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        Réflexions Historiques et Critiques sur les différens Théatres de l'Europe. Avec les Pensées sur la déclamation. Paris, de l'Imprimerie de Jacques Guerin, Quay des Augustins, 1738

      J. Guerin, 1738. in-8, pp. (2), VIII, 303, (9), 45, (3), leg. coeva p.pelle con fregi oro ai piatti e al dorso. Marca tipogr. al front., testatine ed iniziali silogr. Prima edizione del saggio, dedicato a Elisabetta Farnese, in cui Riccoboni (Modena 1676-Parigi 1753) realizza il primo lavoro di storia comparata sui teatri europei, ''confermando la tendenza, già sperimentata come capocomico, di ricercare fonti oltre i confini della Francia, dell'Italia e del suo tempo''. L'opera prevede infatti cinque capitoli in cui si analizza la produzione di alcuni paesi europei (Francia, Italia, Spagna, Germania e Olanda), cui fanno seguito una serie di riflessioni su svariati argomenti di critica; concludono lo scritto i ''Pensées sur la déclamation''. Importante e raro. Esemplare in ottimo stato.

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        Genera plantarum . Editio secunda.Paris, M.A. David, 1743. With 2 folding engraved plates, and one folding table.With: (2) BULLIARD, Pierre. Dictionnaire

      - Ad 1: Soulsby 299; Stafleu & Cowan 4714; ad 2: Hunt 432; Stafleu & Cowan 910. Ad 1: Third edition of what is called "the starting-point of modern systematic botany." This edition includes the additions from the Classes Plantarum (1738) and for the first time French names of the different genera. One of the folding engravings is the famous plate after G.D. Ehret, illustrating the sexual system. Ad 2: Fourth edition of a botanical dictionary, the first edited by L.C. Richard. Title-pages with library stamps and owner's entries; binding rubbed and corners and head of spine damaged.

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        Éléments de la Philosophie de Neuton, mis à la portée de tout le monde.

      Amsterdam: Etienne Ledet et Compagnie, 1738. First edition, first issue, extremely rare large and thick paper copy, and in a beautiful contemporary binding, of Voltaire's only scientific work. "Owing to Descartes' great influence and Newton's dispute with Leibnitz, the spread of his [Newton's] thought on the continent took about fifty years. One of his greatest champions in France was Voltaire (1694-1778), whose Éléments de la Philosophie de Neuton, 1738, was widely read" (PMM). Voltaire "presented Newton as the discoverer of the true system of the world and the destroyer of the errors of Cartesianism" (Norman). "Popularisations are normally the most ephemeral of works: having served their purpose they are forgotten, while the masterpieces about which they were written continue to be admired even though they may long have ceased to be read by any but enquiring scholars. Voltaire's Éléments, however, is a rare exception to the general rule, being the popularisation of the work of genius by a man of genius. It is of interest, therefore, not only in itself but for what it tells us of Voltaire in relation to Newton (1643-1727), as an abiding memorial to the central role that Newton played in the development of Voltaire's philosophical thinking. Voltaire's Éléments was one of a small number of published works which contributed significantly to the acceptance and adoption of Newtonian theory in France" (Walters & Barber, p. 3). The work is dedicated to Voltaire's mistress, the Marquise du Châtelet, who provided the first French translation of Newton's Principia. Two issues of this first edition are known, printed for the publishers Etienne Ledet and Jacques Desbordes, of which the Ledet issue is generally accepted to be the first. ABPC/RBH list only two large paper copies in the last 80 years. One of these was the Norman copy (Christie's, 15 June 1998, lot 843, $5520), the second (Desbordes) issue, in a later binding and described as being 'large and thick paper' in the Norman library catalogue, although it only measured 215 x 132 mm, compared to 227x137 mm for the present copy. Voltaire's first committed interest in science in general, and in Newton in particular, dates from his increasingly close relations with the English aristocrat, freethinker, and Jacobite Lord Bolingbroke (1678-1751) and his circle from the end of 1722 onwards. Bolingbroke left London for voluntary exile in France in 1715, where he spent the next ten years. Bolingbroke encouraged Voltaire to become a frequent visitor to La Source, the Englishman's estate near Orléans. Influencing him towards an admiration of the Newtonian system and encouraging him to read Locke, Voltaire's contact with Bolingbroke and his circle ensured that when he crossed the channel in 1726, and began the intellectually most formative period of his life, he had already become oriented towards contemporary English thought, to which the Newtonian system as presented in the Principia and the Opticks had made so decisive a contribution. In London Voltaire met the prominent Newtonian Samuel Clarke (1675-1729), and seems to have regarded himself for a time as Clarke's disciple. He also came into contact with John Conduitt (1688-1737) and his wife Catherine Barton (1679-1729), Newton's niece, as well as the astronomer Samuel Molyneux (1689-1728), who may have introduced Voltaire to his pupil Robert Smith (1689-1768), whose Compleat System of Opticks (1738) Voltaire went to some trouble to obtain. Voltaire's first dated reference to Newton occurs in a letter of 27 May 1727, in which he recommends his life-long friend Nicolas-Claude Thiriot (1697-1772) to translate Henry Pemberton's A View of Sir Isaac Newton's Philosophy (1728). Voltaire was impressed by Pemberton's exposition of Newton's thoughts, which managed to convey a faithful impression of Newton's work in optics and gravitation without going into mathematical detail. Its style and approach were in sharp contrast to the writings of Bernard Le Bovier de Fontenelle (1657-1757) and other French popularisers of science of the day, with their emphasis on elegance and wit, often at the expense of scientific accuracy. The extent of Voltaire's Newtonian education at this time is indicated by his Lettres écrites de Londres sur les Anglois et autres sujets, in which he discussed his views on the institutions, religion, philosophy, and people of England. In letter XIV, 'Sur Descartes et Newton,' while praising the overthrow of Aristotelianism by Descartes the philosopher, Voltaire makes plain his preference for Newton's theory of attraction over the vortex theory of Descartes the physicist. Letter XV, 'Sur le systeme d'attraction,' proves how careful Voltaire's study of this system had been, indeed a comparison of this letter with the relevant parts of the Éléments shows that Newtonian attraction was a topic on which Voltaire thereafter felt little or no need to deepen his understanding. The situation was very different as regards the Opticks, however, on which letter XVI, 'Sur l'optique de M. Newton,' has very little to say. Much hard study of this aspect of Newton's work was needed before Voltaire was in a position to compose the optical chapters of his Éléments. Voltaire spent the first few years after returning to France in 1729 to poetry and playwriting, but in May 1733 he met the brilliant and vivacious Gabrielle Émilie Le Tonnelier de Breteuil, Marquise du Châtelet (1706-49); their relationship was to have a profound influence on the development of Voltaire's scientific ideas. Appreciating Émilie's interest in mathematics and natural philosophy, early in 1734 Voltaire introduced her to Pierre-Louis Moreau de Maupertuis (1698-1759), the most knowledgeable Newtonian in Paris; Maupertuis soon began to give Émilie lessons in science and mathematics. She sought to understand the nascent science of mechanics through the philosophy of Newton, Descartes, Leibniz, and Wolff, and in the process she participated in the debate between Cartesians and Newtonians. When Voltaire's Lettres were published in France in 1735, the book was condemned, torn and burned. Voltaire had to leave Paris hurriedly; Émilie offered him a refuge in her husband's Château de Cirey, located near the border with Champagne and Lorraine, which was an independent province at the time, making it an ideal sanctuary for Voltaire. A few months later, Émilie joined Voltaire at Cirey, where they lived for four years, dedicating much of their effort to studying and debating physical and metaphysical issues. She called Cirey "the land of philosophy and reason." In the autumn of 1735, after much urging from Émilie, young Venetian Newtonian Francesco Algarotti (1712-64) arrived at Cirey for a six-week visit. Algarotti had made his name through the successful repetition of some Newtonian optical experiments at Bologna in 1729. In 1733 he travelled to Florence and Rome, where he met Martin Folkes (1690-1754) who had been vice President of the Royal Society during Newton's presidency, and the Swedish astronomer Anders Celsius (1701-44). In 1734 he accompanied Celsius to Paris where he spent some time working with the mathematical prodigy Alexis-Claude Clairaut (1713-65) and Maupertuis and where, probably through Maupertuis, he met Voltaire and Madame du Châtelet. Algarotti brought with him the manuscript of a popular work he had written on optics entitled Il Newtonianismo per le dame, ovvero Dialoghi sopra la luce, which had been inspired by Fontenelle's treatment of Descartes's astronomy. Algarotti admired the technique of interspersing scientific information with literary allusions and other elegant asides, and decided to use the same approach for a popularisation of Newton's Opticks. During his visit to Cirey Algarotti read his dialogues aloud to his hosts and put the finishing touches to them. Voltaire was soon fired with enthusiasm and set about obtaining some works on optics. On 18 October he is recorded as borrowing Marco Antonio Dominis's De radiis visus et lucis (1611), Franceso Maria Grimaldi's Physico-mathesis de lumine (1665) and Athenasius Kircher's Phonurgia nova (1673) from the Bibliothèque du Roi. Algarotti's work served to remind Voltaire that in France there was no equivalent explanation of Newton's work at this level, and it is easy to see the idea of writing his own popularisation taking shape in Voltaire's mind. After the departure of Algarotti from Cirey at the end of 1735, both Voltaire and Émilie turned to science with renewed energy. Voltaire first mentions his book on Newton in an undated letter that Theodore Besterman (1904-76) assigns to the middle of July 1736. 'Il est vrai que mes occupations me détournent un peu de la poésie. J'étudie la philosophie de Newton sous les yeux d'Émilie qui est à mon gré encore plus admirable de Newton. Je compte meme faire imprimer bientôt un petit ouvrage qui metre tout le monde en état d'entendre cette philosophie, don't le monde parle & qu'on connait encore si peu.' Voltaire ordered a copy of Newton's Traité d'Optique, translated by Pierre Coste, in August 1736, and there seems to have been a copy of Principia at Cirey from late 1736 or early 1737. By October 1736 a substantial amount of progress on the book had been made, and on 19 November he announced to d'Argens that his 'philosophie de Newton' was about to be printed. This was but one more example of Voltaire's perennial optimism. If the optical side was largely finished by this date, the second, gravitational, part probably still remained largely unwritten. At the beginning of December 1736 the outcry over the publication of Voltaire's poem Le Mondain forced him to flee Cirey, taking refuge in Holland. While there he was able to set in motion the printing of the first, optical, part of the book with Etienne Ledet and Jacques Desbordes in Amsterdam while he was hard at work on the remainder. The first sheet of the Éléments was printed at the beginning of February, and the whole was to be finished in two months. But evidently this did not mean that the work itself had been completed; on 4 February Voltaire wrote to Thiriot: 'Mes récréations sont icy de corriger mes ouvrages de belles lettres, et mon occupation sérieuse d'étudier Neuton, et de tâcher de réduire ce géant là à la mesure des mains mes confrères ... J'ay entrepris une besogne bien difficile.' By the beginning of March Voltaire was back at Cirey, where he continued with the preparation of the Éléments. Voltaire sent further material to Ledet but still the gravitational part was incomplete, finishing in the middle of chapter 23. Voltaire thought that his failure to submit his final chapters would delay the Dutch edition:  behind the scenes he was working to secure a privilège for a Paris edition, a move that, if successful, would have allowed Voltaire's explanations to carry the imprimatur of the French intellectual establishment. It was essential - if the censors were to believe in Voltaire's good faith - that the Dutch edition should not appear before the French one. The long delay made Ledet restless, and Voltaire tried to placate him at the end of 1737 by allowing him to publish L'Enfant prodigue in return for postponing publication of the Éléments. By then Voltaire already feared that he would not be granted the privilege, and in January 1738 the request was formally denied after the notoriously cautious and narrow-minded Chancellor d'Aguesseau personally read the text (a rare occurrence), and then vetoed the recommendation of two other censors (another rarity) who had both recommended publication. Among the reasons for the refusal, beyond the chancellor's fussiness, were the theological views attributed to Newton in the final chapter; the great age that Voltaire assigned to the earth, in contradiction to orthodox Christian dating; and the overall anti-Cartesian tone of the work. The last in particular was seen as enflaming public debate in a climate that had already become far too contentious. But it is likely that Voltaire's tone and general reputation were the operative criterion in his censure far more than any conviction about Newtonian or Cartesian philosophy. Once he learned that he would not be granted permission for a French edition Voltaire seemed resigned to not publishing the work at all. Ledet, however, had on his hands a work supervised by Voltaire himself, of which over 300 pages had been set and printed, with many engraved illustrations, vignettes and culs-de-lampe. This was a large investment for a publisher; Ledet was not willing to abandon the project. Without consulting Voltaire he commissioned an anonymous mathematician to finish chapter 23 and add two more chapters to complete the description of the solar system which Voltaire had begun but not finished. Finally, in March 1738, at a point when the controversy between the Newtonians and Cartesians had reached its final critical stage, Ledet lost patience and published the Éléments in Holland on his own account. Ever conscious of the importance of a work appearing à propos, Voltaire could hardly have chosen a better occasion for the appearance of the Éléments if he had tried, and were it not for his genuine annoyance over the errors in the parts of the manuscript that had not been printed before Voltaire left Amsterdam, and that seemed to have been compounded by the printers, one might be tempted to suppose that, given the apparent impossibility of a French edition, all the elaborate attempts he later made to dissociate himself from the publication were no more than a smoke-screen to hide his tacit permission for the publication of the work in Holland. Nevertheless, the errors in the published work became a serious source of acrimony between Voltaire and his Dutch publishers, and Voltaire issued a number of 'éclaircissements'. He was also annoyed by his Dutch editor's decision to add "mise à la porté de tout le monde" (put at the level of everyone) to his chosen title. These were not his words, he asserted, and echoing his many statements in his contemporary correspondence, he described his work as something much more substantial than a popularisation. News of the publication of the Amsterdam edition reached Voltaire long before copies of the book itself, which took the best part of two months to arrive at Cirey. Once the Amsterdam edition was on sale Voltaire was anxious for a French edition to appear with the least delay, and since only a permission tacite could be obtained, his Paris publisher Laurent-François Prault simply set out to reproduce the Ledet edition, consulting Voltaire only at the proof stage. He made no attempt either to remove the chapters written by the anonymous mathematician or to make any revisions, apart from cancels, except that the 'éclaircissements' and a chapter on tides were added (these were also sent to Ledet, who added them to the unsold copies of his own edition). The Prault edition reached the market in August 1738; the place of publication is given as 'Londres' and no publisher is named. The Amsterdam edition of the Éléments has 25 chapters, of which the first 14 are concerned with Newtonian optics. In adopting this order, Voltaire was undoubtedly influenced by Algarotti's Newtonianismo per le dame (1737), which is primarily concerned with this aspect of Newton's discoveries, but it amounts to an innovation in that most other Newtonian expositors, including Pemberton, had followed the order of publication of Newton's major works in treating the material of the Opticks (1704) after that of the Principia (1687). The work begins with a chapter on the nature of light and of its propagation which is a historical account of earlier theories, culminating in an attack on those of René Descartes (1596-1650) and Nicolas Malebranche (1638-1715). The next two chapters deal respectively with reflection and refraction. Chapter 4 describes the eye and the role of refraction in vision. Chapter 5 discusses mirrors and the way the eye interprets their reflected images, a topic pursued in chapter 6 to consider the visual assessment of distance; this proved to be one of the most controversial sections of the work. Chapter 7 gives a more detailed analysis of the phenomenon of refraction, including an extended demonstration of Descartes's errors on this subject which was omitted in later editions. Chapter 8 then introduces Newton's major discovery of the refrangibility of solar light to give the colours of the spectrum. There now follow two chapters, 9 and 10, in which Voltaire, going beyond Newton, looks for an explanation of the phenomena just described and advances an ultimately metaphysical hypothesis - that all matter consists of indivisible and impenetrable atomic particles, separated by empty space, subject to the laws of attraction and apparently variable in individual mass. Light consists of streams of such particles, and therefore has weight; of the seven colours of the spectrum, violet, the most refrangible, will be the lightest, red, the least refrangible, the heaviest, and white light will weigh the sum of its parts. Returning to the topic of refrangibility and colour, Voltaire next provides, in chapter 11, an account of the rainbow, followed by a discussion of the reflection of colour by solid surfaces, and the phenomenon of 'Newton's rings'. The treatment of optics concludes with a description of speculations, by Newton and some predecessors, on the existence of a relationship between the seven colours of the spectrum and the seven notes of the musical scale.   Voltaire now turns from the Opticks to the Principia. Chapter 15 and 16 clear the way by demolishing prevailing Cartesian cosmological theories of subtle matter occupying all space and causing the movements of heavenly bodies by its vortices. Chapter 17 then pursues the conceptual problem of empty space from a philosophical standpoint. Chapter 18 presents the discoveries of Galileo and Newton concerning gravitational attraction, a topic expounded in detail in four further chapters, 19-22, covering respectively the general laws of planetary motion, the movements of the earth and the moon and the universality of the operation of gravitational attraction on all matter. Voltaire's clear intention was to proceed from this point to a description of the solar system in accordance with Newtonian principles; but he had sent to his Amsterdam publisher only the first part of his chapter 23, covering the sun and the inner planets, breaking off in the middle of the description of the earth. From this point on, the text was supplied by the anonymous mathematician commissioned by Ledet, who completes the description of the solar system in chapter 23, and then proceeds to add a chapter 24 which discusses the problem of zodiacal light - a non-Newtonian topic which Voltaire would not have included, he tells us - and then considers Newton's views on the nature of comets, and on the effects of gravitational attraction upon the fixed stars. Finally, in chapter 25, he goes into some detail concerning Newton's explanation of certain irregularities in the movements of the moon and other satellites. The dedicatory 'Avant-propos' to Émilie with which Voltaire prefaced the Éléments makes a frank avowal of his debt to her superior knowledge of mathematics and her particularly sound knowledge of Newton's Opticks. During the course of the composition of the Éléments Voltaire also went so far as to write to Frederick of Prussia, 'J'avois esquissé les principes assez faciles de philosophie de Neuton et Madame du Chastelet avoit sa part à l'ouvrage. Minerve dictoit et j'écrivois.' Her encouragement and advice, in spite of increasing disagreement, throughout the period of the composition of the Éléments of 1738 and the revisions from 1741 (by which time she had started work on her translation of the Principia) were clearly of inestimable value to Voltaire. It might even be argued that it would have been more appropriate, or at least more natural, if she had appeared as joint author of a work to which she evidently contributed so much. Nevertheless, even when we discount all the undoubted assistance, advice and encouragement Voltaire received, from Émilie, Maupertuis and others, it remains true that he did acquire a fundamental understanding of Newton, and that for a person of his educational background, with no more than a smattering of mathematics and science, this represented a very considerable achievement. Some idea of the magnitude of this achievement can be gained from the physical effort it cost him: 'J'ai une santé bien faible pur m'apliquer aux mathématiques,' he complained to Henri Pitot (1695-1771) in August 1736, 'je ne peux pas travailler une heure par jour sans soufrir beacoup.' Indeed, had Voltaire been asked to name the greatest intellectual challenge of his life, and the period which had cost him most in unremitting intellectual toil, he would surely have pointed to his mastery of Newton's system, and the composition of the Éléments during the period from the summer of 1736 to the summer of 1737.   It is generally accepted that the issue with Ledet's imprint precedes that with Desbordes's. "There are several variations between the two versions: the title vignette motto of the Desbordes imprint reads "Serere ne dubites" instead of "L'Esperance"; the diagrams on pp. 61 and 63 in the Desbordes version have been re-engraved with heavy lines on the mirror; and there are several minor differences in their collations" (Norman). According to Walters & Barber's definitive variorum edition of the Éléments, "There was in fact a partnership between the two men, as Voltaire's correspondence makes clear, and both were booksellers, although the actual printing and binding were done at Ledet's establishment. Ledet, an émigré Huguenot publisher, had a two-thirds interest in the firm" (p. 63, n. 8). The Éléments went through no fewer than 26 editions between 1738 and 1785. Babson 120; Bengesco, II, 1570; Wallis 155; Norman 2165 (Desbordes issue); cf. Cohen-De Ricci 1037-38, second issue. Voltaire. Éléments de la Philosophie de Neuton. Critical edition by Robert L. Walters and W. H. Barber, 1992 (see pp. 3-97). 8vo (227x137), pp. [ii], [1-3], 4-399, [400] (p. 271 misnumbered 371), with vignettes et culs-de-lampe engraved by Jacob Folkema (1692-1767), François Morellon de La Cave (1696-1768), Bernard Picart (1673-1733) and Jacob Van der Schley (1715-1779), engraved frontispiece by Folkema after Louis-Fabricius Dubourg (1693-1775), engraved portrait of Voltaire by Folkema, numerous engraved geometric figures in the text, six engraved plates and one folding engraved table ("Table des couleurs & des tons de la musique"). The remarkable frontispiece shows a ray of light from God passing through the head of Newton, seated on a cloud, then reflected in a mirror held by Madame du Châtelet who directs the shaft of light towards a man, evidently Voltaire, seated at a desk writing and surrounded by mathematical instruments, books and a globe (the figure at the desk is sometimes said to be Newton, but the figure in the clouds is clearly recognizable from contemporary portraits of Newton by Kneller and Roubiliac, in oil and marble, respectively). Contemporary polished French calf, spine richly gilt with red lettering-piece, all edges gilt, old paper label at foot of spine.

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        La friponnerie laïque des pretendus Esprits-Forts d'Angleterre: ou remarques de Phileleuthere de Leipsick sur le discours de la liberté de penser

      first edition. Title page in red and black.Binding nineteenth later in full morocco red long grain (Russian leather) signed Thouvenin tail. Back with nerves decorated with boxes framing nets. Gilt title and date. Framing nets on the boards with clover in the spandrels. Indoor Friesland. Gilt edges. spine slightly thinned. Friction headdress, joint and corners. Split upper joint closely tailed by 3 cm. Despite some flaws, fine copy, Chez J. Wetstein & G. Smith A Amsterdam 1738 XXXVI, 581pp. (1) relié

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        Éléments de la Philosophie de Neuton, mis à la portée de tout le monde.

      Amsterdam: Etienne Ledet et Compagnie, 1738. First edition, first issue, extremely rare large and thick paper copy, and in a beautiful contemporary binding, of Voltaire's only scientific work. "Owing to Descartes' great influence and Newton's dispute with Leibnitz, the spread of his [Newton's] thought on the continent took about fifty years. One of his greatest champions in France was Voltaire (1694-1778), whose Éléments de la Philosophie de Neuton, 1738, was widely read" (PMM). Voltaire "presented Newton as the discoverer of the true system of the world and the destroyer of the errors of Cartesianism" (Norman). "Popularisations are normally the most ephemeral of works: having served their purpose they are forgotten, while the masterpieces about which they were written continue to be admired even though they may long have ceased to be read by any but enquiring scholars. Voltaire's Éléments, however, is a rare exception to the general rule, being the popularisation of the work of genius by a man of genius. It is of interest, therefore, not only in itself but for what it tells us of Voltaire in relation to Newton (1643-1727), as an abiding memorial to the central role that Newton played in the development of Voltaire's philosophical thinking. Voltaire's Éléments was one of a small number of published works which contributed significantly to the acceptance and adoption of Newtonian theory in France" (Walters & Barber, p. 3). The work is dedicated to Voltaire's mistress, the Marquise du Châtelet, who provided the first French translation of Newton's Principia. Two issues of this first edition are known, printed for the publishers Etienne Ledet and Jacques Desbordes, of which the Ledet issue is generally accepted to be the first. ABPC/RBH list only two large paper copies in the last 80 years. One of these was the Norman copy (Christie's, 15 June 1998, lot 843, $5520), the second (Desbordes) issue, in a later binding and described as being 'large and thick paper' in the Norman library catalogue, although it only measured 215 x 132 mm, compared to 227x137 mm for the present copy. Voltaire's first committed interest in science in general, and in Newton in particular, dates from his increasingly close relations with the English aristocrat, freethinker, and Jacobite Lord Bolingbroke (1678-1751) and his circle from the end of 1722 onwards. Bolingbroke left London for voluntary exile in France in 1715, where he spent the next ten years. Bolingbroke encouraged Voltaire to become a frequent visitor to La Source, the Englishman's estate near Orléans. Influencing him towards an admiration of the Newtonian system and encouraging him to read Locke, Voltaire's contact with Bolingbroke and his circle ensured that when he crossed the channel in 1726, and began the intellectually most formative period of his life, he had already become oriented towards contemporary English thought, to which the Newtonian system as presented in the Principia and the Opticks had made so decisive a contribution. In London Voltaire met the prominent Newtonian Samuel Clarke (1675-1729), and seems to have regarded himself for a time as Clarke's disciple. He also came into contact with John Conduitt (1688-1737) and his wife Catherine Barton (1679-1729), Newton's niece, as well as the astronomer Samuel Molyneux (1689-1728), who may have introduced Voltaire to his pupil Robert Smith (1689-1768), whose Compleat System of Opticks (1738) Voltaire went to some trouble to obtain. Voltaire's first dated reference to Newton occurs in a letter of 27 May 1727, in which he recommends his life-long friend Nicolas-Claude Thiriot (1697-1772) to translate Henry Pemberton's A View of Sir Isaac Newton's Philosophy (1728). Voltaire was impressed by Pemberton's exposition of Newton's thoughts, which managed to convey a faithful impression of Newton's work in optics and gravitation without going into mathematical detail. Its style and approach were in sharp contrast to the writings of Bernard Le Bovier de Fontenelle (1657-1757) and other French popularisers of science of the day, with their emphasis on elegance and wit, often at the expense of scientific accuracy. The extent of Voltaire's Newtonian education at this time is indicated by his Lettres écrites de Londres sur les Anglois et autres sujets, in which he discussed his views on the institutions, religion, philosophy, and people of England. In letter XIV, 'Sur Descartes et Newton,' while praising the overthrow of Aristotelianism by Descartes the philosopher, Voltaire makes plain his preference for Newton's theory of attraction over the vortex theory of Descartes the physicist. Letter XV, 'Sur le systeme d'attraction,' proves how careful Voltaire's study of this system had been, indeed a comparison of this letter with the relevant parts of the Éléments shows that Newtonian attraction was a topic on which Voltaire thereafter felt little or no need to deepen his understanding. The situation was very different as regards the Opticks, however, on which letter XVI, 'Sur l'optique de M. Newton,' has very little to say. Much hard study of this aspect of Newton's work was needed before Voltaire was in a position to compose the optical chapters of his Éléments. Voltaire spent the first few years after returning to France in 1729 to poetry and playwriting, but in May 1733 he met the brilliant and vivacious Gabrielle Émilie Le Tonnelier de Breteuil, Marquise du Châtelet (1706-49); their relationship was to have a profound influence on the development of Voltaire's scientific ideas. Appreciating Émilie's interest in mathematics and natural philosophy, early in 1734 Voltaire introduced her to Pierre-Louis Moreau de Maupertuis (1698-1759), the most knowledgeable Newtonian in Paris; Maupertuis soon began to give Émilie lessons in science and mathematics. She sought to understand the nascent science of mechanics through the philosophy of Newton, Descartes, Leibniz, and Wolff, and in the process she participated in the debate between Cartesians and Newtonians. When Voltaire's Lettres were published in France in 1735, the book was condemned, torn and burned. Voltaire had to leave Paris hurriedly; Émilie offered him a refuge in her husband's Château de Cirey, located near the border with Champagne and Lorraine, which was an independent province at the time, making it an ideal sanctuary for Voltaire. A few months later, Émilie joined Voltaire at Cirey, where they lived for four years, dedicating much of their effort to studying and debating physical and metaphysical issues. She called Cirey "the land of philosophy and reason." In the autumn of 1735, after much urging from Émilie, young Venetian Newtonian Francesco Algarotti (1712-64) arrived at Cirey for a six-week visit. Algarotti had made his name through the successful repetition of some Newtonian optical experiments at Bologna in 1729. In 1733 he travelled to Florence and Rome, where he met Martin Folkes (1690-1754) who had been vice President of the Royal Society during Newton's presidency, and the Swedish astronomer Anders Celsius (1701-44). In 1734 he accompanied Celsius to Paris where he spent some time working with the mathematical prodigy Alexis-Claude Clairaut (1713-65) and Maupertuis and where, probably through Maupertuis, he met Voltaire and Madame du Châtelet. Algarotti brought with him the manuscript of a popular work he had written on optics entitled Il Newtonianismo per le dame, ovvero Dialoghi sopra la luce, which had been inspired by Fontenelle's treatment of Descartes's astronomy. Algarotti admired the technique of interspersing scientific information with literary allusions and other elegant asides, and decided to use the same approach for a popularisation of Newton's Opticks. During his visit to Cirey Algarotti read his dialogues aloud to his hosts and put the finishing touches to them. Voltaire was soon fired with enthusiasm and set about obtaining some works on optics. On 18 October he is recorded as borrowing Marco Antonio Dominis's De radiis visus et lucis (1611), Franceso Maria Grimaldi's Physico-mathesis de lumine (1665) and Athenasius Kircher's Phonurgia nova (1673) from the Bibliothèque du Roi. Algarotti's work served to remind Voltaire that in France there was no equivalent explanation of Newton's work at this level, and it is easy to see the idea of writing his own popularisation taking shape in Voltaire's mind. After the departure of Algarotti from Cirey at the end of 1735, both Voltaire and Émilie turned to science with renewed energy. Voltaire first mentions his book on Newton in an undated letter that Theodore Besterman (1904-76) assigns to the middle of July 1736. 'Il est vrai que mes occupations me détournent un peu de la poésie. J'étudie la philosophie de Newton sous les yeux d'Émilie qui est à mon gré encore plus admirable de Newton. Je compte meme faire imprimer bientôt un petit ouvrage qui metre tout le monde en état d'entendre cette philosophie, don't le monde parle & qu'on connait encore si peu.' Voltaire ordered a copy of Newton's Traité d'Optique, translated by Pierre Coste, in August 1736, and there seems to have been a copy of Principia at Cirey from late 1736 or early 1737. By October 1736 a substantial amount of progress on the book had been made, and on 19 November he announced to d'Argens that his 'philosophie de Newton' was about to be printed. This was but one more example of Voltaire's perennial optimism. If the optical side was largely finished by this date, the second, gravitational, part probably still remained largely unwritten. At the beginning of December 1736 the outcry over the publication of Voltaire's poem Le Mondain forced him to flee Cirey, taking refuge in Holland. While there he was able to set in motion the printing of the first, optical, part of the book with Etienne Ledet and Jacques Desbordes in Amsterdam while he was hard at work on the remainder. The first sheet of the Éléments was printed at the beginning of February, and the whole was to be finished in two months. But evidently this did not mean that the work itself had been completed; on 4 February Voltaire wrote to Thiriot: 'Mes récréations sont icy de corriger mes ouvrages de belles lettres, et mon occupation sérieuse d'étudier Neuton, et de tâcher de réduire ce géant là à la mesure des mains mes confrères ... J'ay entrepris une besogne bien difficile.' By the beginning of March Voltaire was back at Cirey, where he continued with the preparation of the Éléments. Voltaire sent further material to Ledet but still the gravitational part was incomplete, finishing in the middle of chapter 23. Voltaire thought that his failure to submit his final chapters would delay the Dutch edition:  behind the scenes he was working to secure a privilège for a Paris edition, a move that, if successful, would have allowed Voltaire's explanations to carry the imprimatur of the French intellectual establishment. It was essential - if the censors were to believe in Voltaire's good faith - that the Dutch edition should not appear before the French one. The long delay made Ledet restless, and Voltaire tried to placate him at the end of 1737 by allowing him to publish L'Enfant prodigue in return for postponing publication of the Éléments. By then Voltaire already feared that he would not be granted the privilege, and in January 1738 the request was formally denied after the notoriously cautious and narrow-minded Chancellor d'Aguesseau personally read the text (a rare occurrence), and then vetoed the recommendation of two other censors (another rarity) who had both recommended publication. Among the reasons for the refusal, beyond the chancellor's fussiness, were the theological views attributed to Newton in the final chapter; the great age that Voltaire assigned to the earth, in contradiction to orthodox Christian dating; and the overall anti-Cartesian tone of the work. The last in particular was seen as enflaming public debate in a climate that had already become far too contentious. But it is likely that Voltaire's tone and general reputation were the operative criterion in his censure far more than any conviction about Newtonian or Cartesian philosophy. Once he learned that he would not be granted permission for a French edition Voltaire seemed resigned to not publishing the work at all. Ledet, however, had on his hands a work supervised by Voltaire himself, of which over 300 pages had been set and printed, with many engraved illustrations, vignettes and culs-de-lampe. This was a large investment for a publisher; Ledet was not willing to abandon the project. Without consulting Voltaire he commissioned an anonymous mathematician to finish chapter 23 and add two more chapters to complete the description of the solar system which Voltaire had begun but not finished. Finally, in March 1738, at a point when the controversy between the Newtonians and Cartesians had reached its final critical stage, Ledet lost patience and published the Éléments in Holland on his own account. Ever conscious of the importance of a work appearing à propos, Voltaire could hardly have chosen a better occasion for the appearance of the Éléments if he had tried, and were it not for his genuine annoyance over the errors in the parts of the manuscript that had not been printed before Voltaire left Amsterdam, and that seemed to have been compounded by the printers, one might be tempted to suppose that, given the apparent impossibility of a French edition, all the elaborate attempts he later made to dissociate himself from the publication were no more than a smoke-screen to hide his tacit permission for the publication of the work in Holland. Nevertheless, the errors in the published work became a serious source of acrimony between Voltaire and his Dutch publishers, and Voltaire issued a number of 'éclaircissements'. He was also annoyed by his Dutch editor's decision to add "mise à la porté de tout le monde" (put at the level of everyone) to his chosen title. These were not his words, he asserted, and echoing his many statements in his contemporary correspondence, he described his work as something much more substantial than a popularisation. News of the publication of the Amsterdam edition reached Voltaire long before copies of the book itself, which took the best part of two months to arrive at Cirey. Once the Amsterdam edition was on sale Voltaire was anxious for a French edition to appear with the least delay, and since only a permission tacite could be obtained, his Paris publisher Laurent-François Prault simply set out to reproduce the Ledet edition, consulting Voltaire only at the proof stage. He made no attempt either to remove the chapters written by the anonymous mathematician or to make any revisions, apart from cancels, except that the 'éclaircissements' and a chapter on tides were added (these were also sent to Ledet, who added them to the unsold copies of his own edition). The Prault edition reached the market in August 1738; the place of publication is given as 'Londres' and no publisher is named. The Amsterdam edition of the Éléments has 25 chapters, of which the first 14 are concerned with Newtonian optics. In adopting this order, Voltaire was undoubtedly influenced by Algarotti's Newtonianismo per le dame (1737), which is primarily concerned with this aspect of Newton's discoveries, but it amounts to an innovation in that most other Newtonian expositors, including Pemberton, had followed the order of publication of Newton's major works in treating the material of the Opticks (1704) after that of the Principia (1687). The work begins with a chapter on the nature of light and of its propagation which is a historical account of earlier theories, culminating in an attack on those of René Descartes (1596-1650) and Nicolas Malebranche (1638-1715). The next two chapters deal respectively with reflection and refraction. Chapter 4 describes the eye and the role of refraction in vision. Chapter 5 discusses mirrors and the way the eye interprets their reflected images, a topic pursued in chapter 6 to consider the visual assessment of distance; this proved to be one of the most controversial sections of the work. Chapter 7 gives a more detailed analysis of the phenomenon of refraction, including an extended demonstration of Descartes's errors on this subject which was omitted in later editions. Chapter 8 then introduces Newton's major discovery of the refrangibility of solar light to give the colours of the spectrum. There now follow two chapters, 9 and 10, in which Voltaire, going beyond Newton, looks for an explanation of the phenomena just described and advances an ultimately metaphysical hypothesis - that all matter consists of indivisible and impenetrable atomic particles, separated by empty space, subject to the laws of attraction and apparently variable in individual mass. Light consists of streams of such particles, and therefore has weight; of the seven colours of the spectrum, violet, the most refrangible, will be the lightest, red, the least refrangible, the heaviest, and white light will weigh the sum of its parts. Returning to the topic of refrangibility and colour, Voltaire next provides, in chapter 11, an account of the rainbow, followed by a discussion of the reflection of colour by solid surfaces, and the phenomenon of 'Newton's rings'. The treatment of optics concludes with a description of speculations, by Newton and some predecessors, on the existence of a relationship between the seven colours of the spectrum and the seven notes of the musical scale.   Voltaire now turns from the Opticks to the Principia. Chapter 15 and 16 clear the way by demolishing prevailing Cartesian cosmological theories of subtle matter occupying all space and causing the movements of heavenly bodies by its vortices. Chapter 17 then pursues the conceptual problem of empty space from a philosophical standpoint. Chapter 18 presents the discoveries of Galileo and Newton concerning gravitational attraction, a topic expounded in detail in four further chapters, 19-22, covering respectively the general laws of planetary motion, the movements of the earth and the moon and the universality of the operation of gravitational attraction on all matter. Voltaire's clear intention was to proceed from this point to a description of the solar system in accordance with Newtonian principles; but he had sent to his Amsterdam publisher only the first part of his chapter 23, covering the sun and the inner planets, breaking off in the middle of the description of the earth. From this point on, the text was supplied by the anonymous mathematician commissioned by Ledet, who completes the description of the solar system in chapter 23, and then proceeds to add a chapter 24 which discusses the problem of zodiacal light - a non-Newtonian topic which Voltaire would not have included, he tells us - and then considers Newton's views on the nature of comets, and on the effects of gravitational attraction upon the fixed stars. Finally, in chapter 25, he goes into some detail concerning Newton's explanation of certain irregularities in the movements of the moon and other satellites. The dedicatory 'Avant-propos' to Émilie with which Voltaire prefaced the Éléments makes a frank avowal of his debt to her superior knowledge of mathematics and her particularly sound knowledge of Newton's Opticks. During the course of the composition of the Éléments Voltaire also went so far as to write to Frederick of Prussia, 'J'avois esquissé les principes assez faciles de philosophie de Neuton et Madame du Chastelet avoit sa part à l'ouvrage. Minerve dictoit et j'écrivois.' Her encouragement and advice, in spite of increasing disagreement, throughout the period of the composition of the Éléments of 1738 and the revisions from 1741 (by which time she had started work on her translation of the Principia) were clearly of inestimable value to Voltaire. It might even be argued that it would have been more appropriate, or at least more natural, if she had appeared as joint author of a work to which she evidently contributed so much. Nevertheless, even when we discount all the undoubted assistance, advice and encouragement Voltaire received, from Émilie, Maupertuis and others, it remains true that he did acquire a fundamental understanding of Newton, and that for a person of his educational background, with no more than a smattering of mathematics and science, this represented a very considerable achievement. Some idea of the magnitude of this achievement can be gained from the physical effort it cost him: 'J'ai une santé bien faible pur m'apliquer aux mathématiques,' he complained to Henri Pitot (1695-1771) in August 1736, 'je ne peux pas travailler une heure par jour sans soufrir beacoup.' Indeed, had Voltaire been asked to name the greatest intellectual challenge of his life, and the period which had cost him most in unremitting intellectual toil, he would surely have pointed to his mastery of Newton's system, and the composition of the Éléments during the period from the summer of 1736 to the summer of 1737.   It is generally accepted that the issue with Ledet's imprint precedes that with Desbordes's. "There are several variations between the two versions: the title vignette motto of the Desbordes imprint reads "Serere ne dubites" instead of "L'Esperance"; the diagrams on pp. 61 and 63 in the Desbordes version have been re-engraved with heavy lines on the mirror; and there are several minor differences in their collations" (Norman). According to Walters & Barber's definitive variorum edition of the Éléments, "There was in fact a partnership between the two men, as Voltaire's correspondence makes clear, and both were booksellers, although the actual printing and binding were done at Ledet's establishment. Ledet, an émigré Huguenot publisher, had a two-thirds interest in the firm" (p. 63, n. 8). The Éléments went through no fewer than 26 editions between 1738 and 1785. Babson 120; Bengesco, II, 1570; Wallis 155; Norman 2165 (Desbordes issue); cf. Cohen-De Ricci 1037-38, second issue. Voltaire. Éléments de la Philosophie de Neuton. Critical edition by Robert L. Walters and W. H. Barber, 1992 (see pp. 3-97). 8vo (227x137), pp. [ii], [1-3], 4-399, [400] (p. 271 misnumbered 371), with vignettes et culs-de-lampe engraved by Jacob Folkema (1692-1767), François Morellon de La Cave (1696-1768), Bernard Picart (1673-1733) and Jacob Van der Schley (1715-1779), engraved frontispiece by Folkema after Louis-Fabricius Dubourg (1693-1775), engraved portrait of Voltaire by Folkema, numerous engraved geometric figures in the text, six engraved plates and one folding engraved table ("Table des couleurs & des tons de la musique"). The remarkable frontispiece shows a ray of light from God passing through the head of Newton, seated on a cloud, then reflected in a mirror held by Madame du Châtelet who directs the shaft of light towards a man, evidently Voltaire, seated at a desk writing and surrounded by mathematical instruments, books and a globe (the figure at the desk is sometimes said to be Newton, but the figure in the clouds is clearly recognizable from contemporary portraits of Newton by Kneller and Roubiliac, in oil and marble, respectively). Contemporary polished French calf, spine richly gilt with red lettering-piece, all edges gilt, old paper label at foot of spine.

      [Bookseller: SOPHIA RARE BOOKS]
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        TRAVELS INTO THE INLAND PARTS OF AFRICA: Containing a Description of the Several Nations for the Space of Six Hundred Miles up the River Gambia; To which is added Capt. Stibb's Voyage Up the Gambia in the Year 1723; with an Accurate Map of that River...

      London: printed by Edward Cave, 1738. Unusual pagination: xi, xiii, 305 pages, 86 pages, [iv] pages, 23 pages. Illustrated by a large folding map, eleven plates including one fold-out. The date of publication is neatly handwritten at the bottom of the title page; previous owner's stamp on title page and bookplate (circa 1910) on front pastedown endpaper: Henry Von Wackerbarth. Several pencil notations in the margins. Rebound (circa 1910) but the leather is chipped, rubbed and worn, and would greatly benefit from a rebinding. Octavo, measuring 7.5 inches (190mm) in height. The pages were trimmed when rebound, and a few plates are trimmed quite close to the image, and the fold-out plate suffered some loss to the caption title at the top margin. The complete book title is: TRAVELS INTO THE INLAND PARTS OF AFRICA: Containing a Description of the Several Nations for the Space of Six Hundred Miles up the River Gambia; their Trade, Habits, Customs, Language, Manners, Religion and Government; the Power, Disposition and Characters of some Negro Pringes; with a particular Account of Job Ben Solomon, a Pholey, who was in England in the Year 1733, and known by the name of the African.To Which is Added, Capt. Stibb's Voyage up the Gambia in the Year 1723, to make Discoveries; with an Accurate Map of that River taken on the Spot: and Many Other Copper Plates. Also Extracts from the Nubian's Geography, Leo the African, and other Authors antient and modern, concerning the Niger-Nile, or Gambia, and Observations thereon. By Francis Moore, Factor several Years to the Royal African Company of England.". First Edition. Hardcover. Very good condition. Octavo (8vo).

      [Bookseller: Kurt Gippert Bookseller (ABAA) ]
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        Elémens de la philosophie de Neuton [Newton], mis à la portée de tout le monde.

      Amsterdam, Etienne Ledet, 1738. ____ Première édition. Cet ouvrage par lequel Voltaire a popularisé en France les idées scientifiques et philosophiques de Newton, par l'élégance de ses gravures est l'un des plus attrayants des livres scientifiques du XVIIIème siècle. Il est illustré par 7 planches hors-texte dont une dépliante et 107 vignettes et culs de lampe dans le texte, gravés sur cuivre. Des feuillets un peu brunis, coiffes usées, fente à la charnière.***** First edition. By its illustrations, one of the most attractive scientific books of the eighteenth century. Contemporary calf. In-8. Collation : un portrait, un frontispice, (2), 399, (1) pp. et 7 pl. hors-texte. Veau brun, dos à nerfs orné, tranches rouges. (Reliure de l'époque.).

      [Bookseller: Hugues de Latude]
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        Le mécanisme du fluteur automate, présenté à Messieurs de l'Académie royale des Sciences. Avec la description d'un canard artificiel, mangeant, beuvant, digérant & se vuidant, épluchant ses ailes et ses plumes, imitant en diverses manières un canard vivant. Inventé par la même. Et aussi celle d'une autre figure, également merveilleuse, jouant du tambourin & de la flûte, suivant la relation, qu'il en a donnée depuis son mémoire écrit.

      Paris (Hollande), Jacques Guérin, 1738. ____ Seconde édition, augmentée et la première illlustrée. Le frontispice gravé sur cuivre montre les trois automates exposés à Paris par Vaucanson : le joueur de flute, le célèbre canard artificiel et un joueur de tambourin et de flute mesurant 1mètre 50. On sait que les automates de ce génial inventeur sont aujourd'hui perdus, à l'exception de simples morceaux du canard. "Le hardi Vaucanson, rival de Prométhée, semblait, de la nature imitant les ressorts, prendre le feu des cieux pour animer les corps." (Voltaire) "L'Académie ayant entendu la lecture d'un Mémoire de Monsieur Vaucanson contenant la description d'une statue de bois, copiée sur le faune en marbre de Coysevox, qui joue de la flûte traversière, sur laquelle elle exécute douze airs différents avec une précision qui a mérité l'attention du public, et dont une grande partie de l'Académie a été le témoin, elle a jugé que cette machine était extrêmement ingénieuse, que l'auteur avait dû employer des moyens simples et nouveaux, tant pour donner aux doigts de cette figure les mouvements nécessaires que pour modifier le vent qui entre dans la flûte, en augmentant ou diminuant la vitesse suivant les différents tons, en variant la disposition des lèvres et faisant mouvoir une soupape qui fait les fonctions de la langue; enfin, en imitant par art tout ce que l'homme est obligé de faire, et qu'en outre cela, le Mémoire de Monsieur de Vaucanson avait toute la clarté et la précision dont cette machine est susceptible, ce qui prouve l'intelligence de l'auteur et ses grandes connaissances dans les différentes parties de la mécanique." (Rapport de l'Académie des Sciences). Cette seconde édition est augmentée dune "Lettre de M. Vaucanson à M. l'abbé D. F." dans laquelle il décrit longuement son canard automate, sa création la plus étonnante. D'après la typographie, cette édition semble avoir été imprimée en Hollande. ***** Second edition, enlarged and the first illustrated. Vaucanson's creations were recognized as being revolutionary in their mechanical lifelike sophistication. Illustrated by a engraved frontispice showing three automates, his most famous automata. Vaucanson's most famous creation was undoubtedly "The Duck." This mechanical beast could flap its wings, eat, and digest grain. Each wing contained over four hundred moving parts and even today it remains something of a mystery. The original duck has disappeared. "A rival to Prometheus, [Vaucanson] seemed to steal the heavenly fires in his search to give life." (Voltaire). This second edition is enlarged with at the end a letter of Vaucanson to "l'abbé D. F.", in which he describes at lenght his famous duck. This edition, according to its typography, appears to have been printed in Low-Countries. In-4. [230 x 185 mm] Collation : frontispice, 22, (2) pp. Broché.

      [Bookseller: Hugues de Latude]
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        Lyste van sulke simplicia en composita die in een kleine garnisoen hospitaal moeten gevonden worden, te weeten als het garnisoen minder als drie duisend man is, of daar om de kleinheid der stad en garnisoen het hospitaal in het geheel is aan besteed, om soo voor doctor, apothecar, chirurgyn als hospitaalmeester alles te versorgen, moetende nogtans alle simplicia en composita na de descriptie van de Haagsche apotheek in het jaar 1738 gedrukt, geprepareert worden, en van de beste soort zyn.[The Hague], Raad van State, 16 October 1742. Small folio (33 x 21 cm). 2 bifolia, formerly sewn.

      - Cf. Landwehr & V.d. Krogt, VOC 845-851; not in Knuttel; NCC; STCN; WorldCat. Unrecorded list of simples and compound medicine required for the hospitals of Dutch garrisons with fewer than 3000 men. The medicines could be prepared onsite following the The Hague pharmacopoeia of 1738. These lists were issued by the Dutch government for use by the Dutch East India Company (VOC) and Dutch West India Company (WIC), who had troops stationed abroad.Slightly browned and soiled near the edges, otherwise in good condition and wholy untrimmed.

      [Bookseller: ASHER Rare Books]
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        Schloß Weissenstein, Ansicht der Hofseite, "Prospect des Schloß gegen den Hoff".

      - Kupferstich v. Corvinius n. S. Kleiner, 1738, 24,5 x 40,5 Thieme - B. XX, 452 ff. - Blatt 4 der berühmten Folge. Der Schloßhof belebt durch zahlreiche Reiter.

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Nikolaus Struck]
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        A Complete Collection of Genteel and Ingenious Conversation, according to the most polite mode and method now used at court, and in the best companies of England. In three dialogues. By Simon Wagstaff.

      Printed for B. Motte, and C. Bathurst. 1738 [4], lxxxvi, [2], 215, [1]pp ad., preliminary ad. leaf. 8vo. Endpapers & pastedowns browned & dusted. Contemporary calf, double gilt ruled borders; hinges cracked but firm, spine worn at head & tail, corners sl. worn. A good sound copy.ESTC T200363; Teerink-Scouten, 761. One of a number of variant issues published in 1738, this has the woodcut of a basket of flowers as the headpiece on page i, and the catchword 'as'. It is the scarcest variant, recorded in just 3 copies, (Hon. Society of King's Inn Dublin, Bodleian, and New York Historical Society). The work, arranged in a series of dialogues, is designed to teach by example, and offers the reader a method by which they might improve their own art of conversation. In his preface Swift notes that 'I always kept a large table-book in my pocket; and as soon as I left the company, I immediately entered the choicest expressions that passed during the visit; which, returning home, I transcribed in a fair hand'. These were the phrases not to use, and record the banality and cliché ridden conversation of early 18th century England. The work was dramatized in 1749 as 'Tittle Tattle; or, Taste a-la-Mode. A new farce. Perform'd with universal applause by a select company of belles and beaux, at the Lady Brilliant's withdrawing-room ... by Timothy Fribble, Esq.'.

      [Bookseller: Jarndyce Rare Books]
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        A Faithful Account of the Religion and manners of the MahometansandnbspIn which is a particular relation of their pilgrimage to Mecca the place of Mahomets birth and a Description of Medina and of his Tomb there As likewise of Algier and the Country adjacent and of Alexandria Grand Cairo andampc With an account of the Authors being taken captive the Turks Cruelty to him and of his escape

      

      [Bookseller: Maggs Bros. Ltd.]
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        Panegyricus, cum notis integris [Ensemble] Latini Pacati Drepanii panegyricus

      First edition, illustrated with a frontispiece Jongmann and a title tag. Title page in red and black.Copy to big arms stamped on the flat of the city of Amsterdam.Dutch Binding full rigid vellum gold. Back with nerves decorated with the arms of the city of Amsterdam. dishes hit the center of the arms of the cities of Amsterdam, a first frieze frame with the arms of the city of Amsterdam in the corners, a second frieze broader framework. Traces laces. Ors slightly dimmed on the big guns of the dishes. Dos yellowed. Despite the reported defects, very nice copy, rare in this condition. Apud Janssonio Waesbergios & Apud Vduum & filium S. Schouten Amstelaedami (Amsterdam) 1738 - 1753 in-4 (19x25,5cm) (6) xcii, (22) 469pp. (57) relié

      [Bookseller: Librairie Le Feu Follet]
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        A Chart of the entrance into Kanton from the Sea. Humbly Inscribed to the Rt. Honourable Lord Vere Beauclerk.

      No date. [ 1738]. Copper plate engraving, 9 3/8 x 14 1/2 inches on sheet 16 x 10 inches. Narrow left margin with little paper loss just entering the neat line at upper left. Soft undulations to the paper. Map is clean and bright. An attractive early map of the Pearl river delta from Kanton to the sea including Ma-kau (Macau), Lan-tou (Hong Kong's Lantau Island), and islands to the southwest. At left is an inset map "Plan of Quang-Chew Fu commonly called Kanton" showing the divisions of the city: Tartar City, Chinese City and Suburb, with the location of forts. This is a plate from Du Halde's "A description of the empire of China and Chinese-Tartary: together with the kingdoms of Korea, and Tibet: containing the geography and history (natural as well as civil) of those countries" published in London in 1738. Originally published in French in 1735, this was an encyclopedic compendium by Jesuit priest Jean Baptiste Du Halde of the written accounts of some 27 Jesuits in China, documenting the history and customs of the country.

      [Bookseller: oldimprints.com]
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        The Description and Use of the Globes, and the Orrery. To which is prefixed, by way of introduction, a brief Account of the Solar System.

      London: Printed for Thomas Wright, Mathematical Instrument-Maker... And E. Cushee, Globe-Maker, 1738. Octavo, with six engraved folding plates; early ink ownership inscription ("John Wadham, his booke July 12th 1762"), armorial bookplate of Belsfield, and a later owner's embossed stamp; a good, crisp copy in contemporary dark calf, front cover later paper label. A popular handbook on globes which ran to at least ten editions from 1731 (this is the fourth). Harris begins with an introduction to the latest models of globes, celestial and terrestrial. He then demonstrates how to use the globes to solve forty-six problems, including finding latitudes and longitudes for any given place, finding the position of the sun at any given date, discovering on which date the sun will be directly overhead in any given spot in the torrid zone, computing the length of any given day of the year, finding the altitude of a star, and so on (Taylor, The Mathematical Practitioners).Joseph Harris (1702-64) began as a blacksmith in Cornwall with an interest in mathematics. He designed and made mathematical and navigational instruments, and his interest in navigation led him to voyage to Mexico and Jamaica. He also taught mathematics, and in 1748 became Master of the Mint in the Tower of London. These interests are reflected in his publications on coinage and navigation.The two publishers of the book were also practical savants: Thomas Wright was a maker of scientific instruments, who specialised in the orrery, while Richard Cushee (who died in about 1732: the publisher here is probably his son) was a maker of globes and was the engraver of the plates in this book. With two layers of leather showing with some wear near the spine, but the book not rebacked.

      [Bookseller: Hordern House]
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        The History of the Conquest of Mexico by the Spaniards

      London: Printed for T Woodward, 1738. 2 volumes. x+479 pages with foldout frontispiece portrait of Hernan Cortez, four foldout plates and two fold out maps. xii+475+[1 ad] pages with two foldout plates. Octavo (8 1/2" x 5 1/2") bound in original full leather with with gilt fillet borders on covers, the spine in six compartments separated by six raised bands, black morocco gilt lettering piece in one and the rest gilt-ruled (Field 1465, Sabin 86490, Palau: VI 530) First octavo edition.Originally published in Spanish in 1684, the first English edition was published in 1724.In 1661 Antonio de Solis was appointed to succeed Antonio de León Pinelo as chronicler of the Indies. He was a native of Alcalá and had studied classics, philosophy, and laws there and in Salamanca. He served as secretary to the Conde de Oropesa and, after 1654, as Oficial of the first Secretariat of State. His writings prior to his appointment as chronicler were of a literary nature, principally dramatic and poetic. His work as chronicler showed the influence of his literary background. He at first intended to write a continuation of Herrera’s Historia. In preparing himself for this he found a prejudice in the works of foreigners and his own nation that he decided to rewrite the story of the conquest of Mexico, which he found most in need of revision. His work, therefore, was affected by two elements which damaged its historical value: his desire to write a well-balanced literary work and his determination to defend the Spanish national honor. The result of his labors was his Historia de la conquista de México, población y progreso de la Amérique Septentrional conocida con el nombre Nueva España, which appeared in 1684. The actual content of the work does not come up to the indications of the title. Solís was able to complete only the first part, which told the history of the conquest of Mexico, 1519-1521. He was working on the continuation of the work when he died in Madrid in 1686. Solis’ Historia has been called a poem without verse, as it is written in epic style, with a great central hero and with the facts selected according to the needs of the story. It became the first standard literary version of the Conquest until Prescott’s history and other later works. It went through numerous Spanish editions and was translated in the major European tongues.... A lengthy study of Solís and his history, by Luis A. Arocena, saw publication in Buenos Aires in 1963. (Handbook of Middle American Indians, Volume 13 )Condition:Book plate to front paste down, previous owner's name on front end papers, skillfully rebacked, corners bumped with some chipping to some else a very nice set.

      [Bookseller: The Book Collector ]
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         Le méchanisme ou le nouveau traité de l'anatomie du globe de l'oeil avec l'usage de ses différentes parties, & de celles qui lui sont contigües.

      Paris, Michel-Estienne David, 1738, in 8°, de 4ff. VII-413,pp. 1f.., ill. d'un portrait et de 5 planches gravées se dépl., pl. veau moucheté époque, dos orné, tr. rouges, bel exemplaire. Première édition française. de "An account of the mechanism of the globe of the eye" (1730). L'oculiste du Roi George II, John Taylor, un habile chirurgien, apporta une contribution notable à l'ophtalmologie. Il parcourut toute l'Europe, et sa dextérité supposée lui valut un grand renom, qu'il sut adroitement entretenir à grand renfort de publicité. Il finit sa vie à Paris. Toutefois il est resté dans l'histoire pour ses opérations manquées sur les musiciens Bach et Haendel. In fine se trouve une bibliographie des auteurs qui ont écrit sur les maladies de l'oeil. "Taylor possessed considerable skill as an operator... his main claim to priority lies in his views on strabismus. He kept up with the discoveries of the day, made original contributions to the treatment of squint, and was expert at couching for cataract." (Oxford Dict.) ¶ Dezeimeris IV. p.252 - Hirsch V. p.524 - Waller I. 9502 - cat. Bernard Becker Coll. in Ophthalmology n°371.

      [Bookseller: L'intersigne Livres anciens]
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        Version du Nouveau Testament selon la Vulgate, par le Pere Amelote

      New corrected edition.Binders full morocco vintage claret. Back to jansenist nerves. parts of title and volume number in beige leather. Guards in gold leaf. gilt edges. Roll on turns and inner frieze. minimal traces of rubbing. Gilding faded on contreplats. Very nice copy executed in a high quality skin. Chez la veuve Mazieres & J. B. Garnier à Paris 1738 in-12 (9,5x17cm) (94) 645pp. et (2) 509pp. (11) 2 volumes reliés

      [Bookseller: Librairie Le Feu Follet]
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        Das zum Krieg gehörige Augen-Werck, In Ansehung der Vortheile, So man in einer wohl ordinierten Bataille von der Situation des Orts zu erwarten hat... Dresden, Zimmermann seel. Erben u. Gerlach, 1738. 12 Bll. m. gestoch. Vignette, 276 S. Mit 6 mehrf. gefalt. Kupfertafeln. Kl.-4°. Leder d. Zt. m. Rverg. (etw. beschabt und bestoßen, Kap. etw. angeplatzt bzw. restauriert).

       1738 Jähns 1514 f.- Erste Ausgabe.- \'Wird auch durch die von Herrn George Rimpler in seinen Schriften angezeigte vortheilige Disposition der Festungs-Wercke ... erkennet ...\' (Untertitel).- Die Arbeit des in Diensten des Kurfürsten von Sachsen stehenden Capitaines Herlin enthält eine Erläuterung von Darstellungen und Grundsätzen französischer Schriftsteller, welche damals unbestritten die militärische Gedankenwelt beherrschten (Jähns), und eine von J. Chr. Glaser 1736 herausgegebene Zusammenstellung zur Rimplerschen Kontroverse: Antwort-Schreiben auf die vom Herrn Grafen von A. gethane drey Fragen, betreffend I. Das Laster des Ingenieurs, die anderer Leute Wercke vor die ihrigen ausgeben II. Das beruffene Dessein des Herrn Rimplers III. Den Nutzen der Analyse in dem Genie (ab S. 133).- Die Kupfer zeigen Festungsanlagen von Malta und Stralsund, Festungsdetails sowie Schlachtordnungen.- Etwas braunfleckig.

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Schramm]
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        Hydrodynamica; sive, de viribus et motibus fluidorum commentarii.

      Strassburg: Johann Heinrich Decker, 1738. 1st Edition. Hardcover. 4to - over 9¾ - 12" tall. 304 pp., 12 engraved plates, full calf, gilt-lettered backstrip, 5 bands. With engraved title vignette and 12 folding copperplates by I.M. Weis. Royal coat of arms tipped in title page. Minor rubbing to boards; otherwise fine. ---Bibliotheca Mechanica, pages 34-35. Norman 215, PMM 179 (mentioned). - FIRST EDITION of Daniel Bernoulli's most important work, the foundation of modern hydrodynamics (a term first employed in this book), and containing his formulae for calculating the velocity, duration and quantity of liquid issuing from an opening in a container. Other chapters deal with water oscillations, a theory of machinery (including an extensive treatment of the screw of Archimedes) and an important section which introduces his kinetic gas theory. Very Good.

      [Bookseller: Milestones of Science Books]
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        Histoire des rats, pour servir a l'histoire universelle. [Ensemble] Dissertation sur la prééminence des chats dans la société, sur les autres animaux d'Egipte

      Second edition of the history of rats, possibly a reprint of the first published the previous year in 1737 and identical to it.New edition under a different title Moncrif Cats, originally published in 1727 and illustrated in Figures 9 after Charles Antoine Coypel by Caylus.Binding in full mottled calf brown circa 1815. Back to nerves decorated with 5 irons, fat nets and rollers. red calf as an exhibit. frieze framing on the boards, and inner frieze. 3 corners bumped. Traces of friction. Misses the bottom right corner of the first page after the title of the second book. Beautiful copy, well connected. S.n. & chez Jean Daniel Beman à Ratopolis& àRotterdam 1738 - 1741 in-8 (13x21cm) (4) xvj, 140pp. (12) (4bc.) VIII, 204pp. (13) relié

      [Bookseller: Librairie Le Feu Follet]
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        Anglia Judaica: or The History and Antiquities of the Jews in England

      Oxford James Fletcher 1738 First edition. Full leather binding with raised bands, 4to. (8)319 pp. Scuffing to binding and boards. Gilt stamped "London Society for Promoting Christianity Amongst the Jews" on the front board. Roth, Magna Bibliotheca Anglo-Judaica A3:42 (page 28) Anglia Judaica, by the clergyman D'Blossiers Tovey (1692-1745), is the first comprehensive history of the Jews of England, with especially useful information concerning the protracted negotiations between Menaseh ben Israel and Oliver Cromwell over the proposed resettlement of the Jews in England - a crucial period in Anglo-Jewish history.

      [Bookseller: Fishburn Books]
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        Govierno eclesiastico pacifico, y union de los dos cuchillos, pontificio, y regio

      2 Volumes: [51]+812; [11]+732. Folio (12 1/4" x 8 3/4") issued in leather with raised bands and red label with gilt lettering to spine. First published in 1656-7 (Madrid), Domingo Garcia Morras. This is the second edition. Fray Gaspar de Villarroel joined the order of Saint Augustine in 1607 and occupied a chair of Theology at the University of San Marcos, where he published biblical commentaries and sermons. He was bishop of Santiago, Chile, from 1638 to 1652. He wrote his principal work in Chile, the Govierno eclesiastico pacifico, which describes the different functions of Church and State and includes a wealth of historical information concerning the Spanish American world, (including an extensive description of the disastrous earthquake of 1647). When discussing controversial issues such as polygamy and cannibalism among the Araucan Indians, bishop Villarroel examined different points of view and reached surprisingly tolerant conclusions while also displaying a curious cultural relativism. The Govierno eclesiastico and the Politica Indiana by Solorzano Pereira are the two most important books on canon law and jurisprudence in colonial America.Condition:Worming to volume I mainly in the gutter margin of the index, occasionally affecting text. Volume II worming more extensive occasionally affecting text. Leather boards scuffed, spine ends chipped. A good to very good copy of a rare work on colonial America.

      [Bookseller: The Book Collector]
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        Gründlicher Unterricht von Hütte-Werken. . . nebst einem vollständigem Probier-Buch. Two parts in one volume....

      Braunschweig: F.W.Meyer, 1738. 1st Edition. Hardcover. Folio - over 12 - 15" tall. Folio (348 x 213 mm). [20], 612, [68], 198, [26] pp. Engraved frontispiece, engraved headpiece with 2 portraits, 58 (57 folding) engraved plates. Contemporary three-quarter calf, spine with gilt-lettered label (label chipped with loss, spine ends and hinges expertly repaired), red-coloured edges. Text very little age-toned and virtually unspotted, title-page with little finger-soiling at lower corner, plates with little browning and spotting, occasional light dampstaining to corners of plates, last plate repaired at gutter. A fine, wide-margined copy. ----Duveen 534; Darmstaedter 105; Hoover 725; Honeyman 2793; Ferchl 480; Roller-G. II, 408. - FIRST EDITION of the most important mining book of the 18th century. "Schlüter was an official in British pay at Braunschweig and he dedicates his book to George II. He describes not only German mines, but also those of England, Scotland, Scandinavia and South-Eastern Europe". (Duveen). "The Hoovers rated this great folio with its many descriptions and folding plates of metal separation processes as one of the most important in the Agricola, Ercker, Löhneyss tradition. The accounts of separating silver from copper and from gold were considered especially admirable" (Hoover). "Eines der schönsten Werke über Hüttenkunde und Probirkunst" (Darmstaedter). Schlüter beschreibt nicht nur deutsche Bergwerke, sondern auch solche in England, Schottland, Skandinavien und Südost-Europa. Das Frontispiz mit einer Ansicht von Goslar mit allegorischen Figuren, die gefalteten Kupfer zeigen zahlreiche Öfen, Gebäude, Maschinenanlagen, Geräte, technische und mathematische Instrumente u.v.m. Very Good....

      [Bookseller: Milestones of Science Books]
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        La figure de la terre déterminée par les observations de messieurs de Maupertuis, Clairaut, Camus, Le Monnier, de l'Académie Royale des Sciences & de Monsieur l'Abbé Outhier, correspondant de la même Académie. Accompagnés de Monsieur Celsius, professeur d'Astronomie à Upsal, faites par ordre du Roi au Cercle Polaire.

      Paris, Imprimerie royale, 1738. ____ Première édition. Ardent partisan des théories newtoniennes, Maupertuis a conduit une expédition en Laponie de 1736 à 1737 pour mesurer la longueur d'un degré de méridien. Dans le même temps une autre expédition était envoyée au Pérou, sous la direction de La Condamine pour effectuer le même relevé. Ces mesures permirent de vérifier que la Terre était bien aplatie vers les pôles, comme l'avait prédit Newton. Petit accroc à la coiffe, fente sur 3 cm à une charnière, une coupe frottée, mais bon exemplaire dans l'ensemble de cet ouvrage dans sa première édition. ***** First edition. Maupertuis led an expedition in Lapland of 1736 to 1737 to measure the length of a degree of meridian line. In the mean time another expedition was sent to Peru, under the direction of La Condamine to take the same measurement. In-8. [196 x 122 mm] Collation : XXIV, (4),184 pp., 1 carte et 9 planches h.-t. Veau marbré, dos à nerfs orné, tranches rouges. (Reliure de l'époque.).

      [Bookseller: Hugues de Latude]
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        Le mécanisme du fluteur automate, présenté à Messieurs de l'Académie royale des Sciences. Avec la description d'un canard artificiel, mangeant, beuvant, digérant & se vuidant, épluchant ses ailes et ses plumes, imitant en diverses manières un canard vivant. Inventé par la même. Et aussi celle d'une autre figure, également merveilleuse, jouant du tambourin & de la flûte, suivant la relation, qu'il en a donnée depuis son mémoire écrit.

      Paris (Hollande), Jacques Guérin, 1738. ____ Seconde édition, augmentée et la première illlustrée. Le frontispice gravé sur cuivre montre les trois automates exposés à Paris par Vaucanson : le joueur de flute, le célèbre canard artificiel et un joueur de tambourin et de flute mesurant 1mètre 50. On sait que les automates de ce génial inventeur sont aujourd'hui perdus, à l'exception de simples morceaux du canard. "Le hardi Vaucanson, rival de Prométhée, semblait, de la nature imitant les ressorts, prendre le feu des cieux pour animer les corps." (Voltaire) "L'Académie ayant entendu la lecture d'un Mémoire de Monsieur Vaucanson contenant la description d'une statue de bois, copiée sur le faune en marbre de Coysevox, qui joue de la flûte traversière, sur laquelle elle exécute douze airs différents avec une précision qui a mérité l'attention du public, et dont une grande partie de l'Académie a été le témoin, elle a jugé que cette machine était extrêmement ingénieuse, que l'auteur avait dû employer des moyens simples et nouveaux, tant pour donner aux doigts de cette figure les mouvements nécessaires que pour modifier le vent qui entre dans la flûte, en augmentant ou diminuant la vitesse suivant les différents tons, en variant la disposition des lèvres et faisant mouvoir une soupape qui fait les fonctions de la langue; enfin, en imitant par art tout ce que l'homme est obligé de faire, et qu'en outre cela, le Mémoire de Monsieur de Vaucanson avait toute la clarté et la précision dont cette machine est susceptible, ce qui prouve l'intelligence de l'auteur et ses grandes connaissances dans les différentes parties de la mécanique." (Rapport de l'Académie des Sciences). Cette seconde édition est augmentée dune "Lettre de M. Vaucanson à M. l'abbé D. F." dans laquelle il décrit longuement son canard automate, sa création la plus étonnante. D'après la typographie, cette édition semble avoir été imprimée en Hollande. ***** Second edition, enlarged and the first illustrated. Vaucanson's creations were recognized as being revolutionary in their mechanical lifelike sophistication. Illustrated by a engraved frontispice showing three automates, his most famous automata. Vaucanson's most famous creation was undoubtedly "The Duck." This mechanical beast could flap its wings, eat, and digest grain. Each wing contained over four hundred moving parts and even today it remains something of a mystery. The original duck has disappeared. "A rival to Prometheus, [Vaucanson] seemed to steal the heavenly fires in his search to give life." (Voltaire). This second edition is enlarged with at the end a letter of Vaucanson to "l'abbé D. F.", in which he describes at lenght his famous duck. This edition, according to its typography, appears to have been printed in Low-Countries. In-4. [230 x 185 mm] Collation : frontispice, 22, (2) pp. Broché.

      [Bookseller: Hugues de Latude]
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        Histoire de la papesse Jeanne, fidèlement tirée de la dissertation de M. de Spanheim

      Chez Scheurler. New edition, illustrated with 5 figures including the famous folding plate included Pope Joan giving birth to a child in full procession.Binding in full mottled calf contemporary. Back with nerves decorated. Part of title in red leather and black volume number. Mors top of Volume I strongly split along the first well. A dull corner. Good copy. Chez Scheurler A La Haye 1738 in-12 (9,5x17cm) (52) 331pp. et (2) 328pp. (3) 2 volumes reliés

      [Bookseller: Librairie Le Feu Follet]
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        Histoire des guerres d'Italie

      Chez Paul et Isaac Vaillant. New edition. Although other editions have been given in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, it is not only the most beautiful edition of this text, but also the best translation by Favre, reviewed by Gorgeons and others .. Full speckled antique glazed calf. Back tooled raised florets in 4 boxes. Part of title in red morocco. Caps head leveled. Tail headdress of Volume II threadbare. Wormholes and a gallery on the upper flat of Volume I. A flap of skin torn on upper cover of Volume III of 3 cm. Corners bumped. Of the three title pages, two rectangles of paper were pasted ly of both sides, under the title, thus masking a previous owner. History of the wars of Italy begins in 1490 and ends in 1534; Guicciardini worked there for 27 years, and his work, in the opinion of critics of his time is valuable and of great merit, even though it was criticized its violence would greatly praised his impartiality; this work did much to modernize methods in history. Ambassador, writer and politician of Florence, friend Machiavelli, Guicciardini is part of the pantheon of great men of Florence. --- Please note that the translation in english is done automatically, we apologize if the formulas are inaccurate. Contact us for any information! Chez Paul et Isaac Vaillant Londres 1738 3 Vol. in-4 (19,5x26cm) (4) xxvj (16) 620pp. et (4) xi, 604pp. et (10) 476pp; (188) relié

      [Bookseller: Librairie Le Feu Follet]
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        Opera omnia anatomica & physiologica, hactenus variis locis ac formis edita; nunc vero certo ordine digesta, & in unum Volumen redacta. Accessit Index rerum ac verborum locupletissimus, una cum praefatione Bernardi Siegfried Albini. Editio novissima.

      Ludguni Batavorum, apud Johannem van Kerckhem, 1738, In-4to legatura in mezza pelle rifatta (conservato parte del dorso d'epoca, con tassello rosso, fregi e titoli dorati) pp. (48)-452-(22), frontespizio stampato a due colori con marca tipografica figurata inciusa in rame, numerosi capolettera xilografici e diagrammi xilografici nel testo. Stampato su due colonne, con 60 tavole incise in rame, alcune anche ripiegate, in fine. Grande ex-libris di appartenenza "Loris Premuda" applicato all'occhiello,

      [Bookseller: Libreria Piani gia' Naturalistica]
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        Elémens de la philosophie de Neuton [Newton], mis à la portée de tout le monde....

      Amsterdam, Etienne Ledet, 1738. ____ Première édition. Cet ouvrage par lequel Voltaire a popularisé en France les idées scientifiques et philosophiques de Newton, par l'élégance de ses gravures est l'un des plus attrayants des livres scientifiques du XVIIIème siècle. Il est illustré par 7 planches hors-texte dont une dépliante et 107 vignettes et culs de lampe dans le texte, gravés sur cuivre. Très bel exemplaire.***** First edition. By its illustrations, one of the most attractive scientific books of the eighteenth century. Contemporary calf. In-8. Collation : un portrait, un frontispice, (2), 399, (1) pp. et 7 pl. hors, texte. Veau marbré, dos orné, tranches marbrées. (Reliure de l'époque.)....

      [Bookseller: Hugues de Latude]
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        Recueil des lettres de Madame la marquise de Sévigné a Madame la Comtesse de Grignan, sa fille

      Chez Rollin. Second edition reprint of the first great first edition of the Letters published in 1734 for the first 4 volumes; Editor Rollin had then edited volumes 5 and 6 in 1737 who came to add the first 4 volumes 1734; A year later he published the entire edition. Adorned with a portrait frontispiece. Title pages in red and black. Full Sheepskin contemporary. Back tooled raised. Part of title in red morocco. Caps restored tail of Volumes I and II, 3 caps head frayed, 3 caps tail ditto; a snag with the first Caussin lack; various accidents; gilding faded some boxes. All still significant this rare series. This edition, according to the first original high importance published between 1734 and 1737, contains 614 letter (Edition 2 volumes in 1726 are included in 134); this edition will be especially the first authorized, Pauline Simiane granddaughter Marquise entrust handwritten letters to an editor from Aix en Provence; the letters were not addressed to the Countess of Grignan were discarded. --- Please note that the translation in english is done automatically, we apologize if the formulas are inaccurate. Contact us for any information! Chez Rollin à Paris 1738 in 12 (9,5x16,5cm) six tomes reliés en six volumes

      [Bookseller: Librairie Le Feu Follet]
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        A Complete Collection of the Historical, Political, and Miscellaneous Works of John Milton. Correctly printed from the Original Editions. With an Historical and Critical Account of the Life and Writings of the Author; containing several Original Papers of his, never before published.

      London: Printed for A. Millar, 1738. 2 volumes; Folio. Large paper with wide margins. Sumptuous contemporary gilt and blind tooled panelled calf boards, elaborately gilt and blank tooled spines with gilt titles; blind and gilt dentelles with grey end papers; all edges gilt. Expert repair to joints. Fine. Engraved frontispiece to vol.I. Very minimal and occasional browning and/or spotting. A superb and impressive set. 'A few copies printed' says Lowndes (Rev. Ed. 1864, p.1564). Coleridge 74.

      [Bookseller: Adrian Harrington]
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        Hydrodynamica, sive De Viribus et Motibus Fluidorum Commentarii. Opus Academicum.

      Strasbourg: Johann Reinhold Dulsseker, 1738. First edition of Bernoulli's epochal work on fluid dynamics and the kinetic theory of gases, containing the famous 'Bernoulli equation' for fluid flow. "Besides introducing the first hydraulic theory of fluid flow, this book is the most remarkable general work in theoretical and applied mechanics written in the pre-Lagrangian period of the 18th century, based on a deep physical understanding of mechanical phenomena and presenting many new ideas ... Bernoulli's treatise was to influence the entire development of mechanics and, especially, of applied mechanics, for at least a century" (Landmark Writings, pp. 131-2). "In 1738 Bernoulli published Hydrodynamica. In this treatise, which was far in advance of his time in many ways, is his famous equation governing the flow of fluids in terms of speed, pressure, and potential energy, upon which much modern technology is based, especially aerodynamics" (DSB). "In this book Bernoulli presented the earliest adequate theory of motion of an incompressible fluid in tubes (vessels) and fluid outflow through orifices, introducing the notion of hydrodynamic pressure. However, the treatise is not restricted to theoretical hydraulics. In the subsequent sections, he opens up new branches of physics and mechanics. He develops the first model of the kinetic theory of gases, approaches the principle of conservation of energy, establishes a foundation for the analysis of efficiency of machines, and develops a theory of hydroreactive (water-jet) ship propulsion, including a solution of the first problem of motion of a variable-mass system. "Hydrodynamica contains many profound remarks on the physical background of a wide range of mechanical effects, and its study remains most edifying also to the modern reader ... However, many of his advanced ideas were far ahead of his time and met an adequate understanding only later. In the 19th century, J.-V. Poncelet called Bernoulli's treatise 'the immortal Hydrodynamica' in 1845, and Paul Du Bois-Reymond referred to 'the enormous wealth of ideas which assures this work one of the first places in the literature of Mathematical Physics of all ages' in 1859. "Hydrodynamica is founded mainly on the principle of conservation of 'living forces' (that is, kinetic energy). Bernoulli preferred to use this principle not in its traditional form, received with hostility by Newtonians, but in Christiaan Huygens's formulation that Bernoulli named the principle of equality between the actual descent and potential ascent: 'If any number of weights begin to move in any way by the force of their own gravity, the velocities of the individual weights will be everywhere such that the products of the squares of these velocities multiplied by the appropriate masses, gathered together, are proportional to the vertical height through which the centre of gravity of the composite of the bodies descends, multiplied by the masses of all of them'. "As to hydraulics proper, Bernoulli's considers only quasi-one-dimensional fluid motion, reducing any flow to this case by means of the hypothesis of plane sections: he does not distinguish between tubes and vessels. The principle of conservation of living forces was used for studying fluid flow by Bernoulli and also by Leonhard Euler. Coincidence of their results presented independently in the Petersburg Academy of Sciences in 1727 forced Euler to change his scientific plans and to leave this field for his elder colleague. When Bernoulli developed his work, besides studying many special cases of flow, he achieved two new fundamental results. He succeeded in explaining the nature and determining the value of the hydrodynamic pressure of moving fluids on the wall of tubes and he discovered the principal role of losses of living forces in the fluid flow, especially at sudden changes of the flow cross-sections. The former gave an instrument to engineers for calculation of tube strength and the latter served, in addition, a step to the general principle of conservation of energy. Bernoulli concluded also the sharp discussion of many years on the impact and reaction of emitting jets, giving the final solution of the problem" (Landmark Writings, pp. 132-3). Bernoulli composed the first version of this work at St. Petersburg in the early 1730s; its forthcoming publication was announced in the September 1734 issue of the journal Mercure Suisse. The following December Bernoulli, now in Basel, wrote to Euler: 'My Hydrodynamica is now really being printed by Mr. Dulsecker, and he gives me, besides 30 copies, even 100 thalers of royalty'. However, the actual printing of the book seems to have begun only in 1737, and it finally appeared at the end of April or the beginning of May 1738. In May, Bernoulli sent the first copies of his treatise to St. Petersburg and asked Euler for his comments, but the parcel was lost on the way and it was not until spring 1739 that Euler saw a copy of the book and warmly congratulated its author: "I have read through your incomparable Treatise with full attention and have drawn immense gain from it. I congratulate you, Sir, from all my heart on the felicitous execution of such a difficult and obscure topic, as well as on the immortal fame thus gained. The entire execution of the project deserves all conceivable attention, and all the more so as it is not accessible to rigorous mathematics, but demands the help of several important physical principles, which you have known to employ to indescribable advantage." In contrast to Euler's appreciation, Hydrodynamica became the focus of a bitter dispute between Daniel and his father Johann I. Although the details are disputed, it seems that Johann saw a copy of Daniel's book and used it to compose his own work on the subject, Hydraulica, keeping this secret from his son. Johann published Hydraulica at the beginning of 1743 in his Opera Omnia, adding the subtitle now for the first time disclosed and directly shown from purely mathematical foundations, 1732. Daniel was incensed by Johann's pretence that his Hydraulica had been composed some six years before his own work had been published, and the resulting rift between father and son was never completely healed. "Daniel Bernoulli (1700-1782) was the second son of Johann Bernoulli, who first taught him mathematics. After studying philosophy, logic, and medicine at the universities of Heidelberg, Strasbourg, and Basel, he received an M.D. degree (1721). In 1723-24 he wrote Exercitationes quaedam Mathematicae on differential equations and the physics of flowing water, which won him a position at the influential Academy of Sciences in St. Petersburg, Russia. Bernoulli lectured there until 1732 in medicine, mechanics, and physics, and he researched the properties of vibrating and rotating bodies and contributed to probability theory. In that same year he returned to the University of Basel to accept the post in anatomy and botany. By then he was widely esteemed by scholars and also admired by the public throughout Europe. "Between 1725 and 1749 Daniel won 10 prizes from the Paris Academy of Sciences for work on astronomy, gravity, tides, magnetism, ocean currents, and the behaviour of ships at sea. He also made substantial contributions in probability. He shared the 1735 prize for work on planetary orbits with his father, who, it is said, threw him out of the house for thus obtaining a prize he felt should be his alone. Daniel's prizewinning papers reflected his success on the research frontiers of science and his ability to set forth clearly before an interested public the scientific problems of the day. In 1732 he accepted a post in botany and anatomy at Basel; in 1743, one in physiology; and in 1750, one in physics" (Britannica) Barchas 175; Norman 215; Parkinson pp. 155-6; Roberts and Trent pp. 34-5. Mikhailov, 'Daniel Bernoulli, Hydrodynamica (1738),' Chapter 9 in Landmark Writings in Western Mathematics 1640-1940, Grattan-Guinness (ed.), 2005. For a detailed analysis of the work, see Truesdell, 'Rational fluid mechanics, 1687-1765,' in Euler Opera Omnia, Ser. 2, Vol. 12 (1954), pp. vii-cxxv (especially pp. xxiii-xxxviii). 4to (255 x 202 mm), pp [viii] 304, title in red and black, with engraved vignette and 12 folding engraved plates by Johann Martin Weiss, contemporary Dutch vellum, bookplate of Pierre Philippe Constant Lammens (1762-1836), the first librarian of the University of Ghent. Outer margin of title page with some fraying, slightly dust soiled and mild browning to some leaves, otherwise clean and crisp.

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        Dictamen en Justicia sobre la Jurisdiccion de los Senores Reyes de Castilla y su Supremo Consejo de la Camara, para el conocimiento de todos los Negocios pertenecientes al Real patronato de la Corona

      Madrid, Diego Miguel de Peralta, 1738. - in-folio. 4ff. 92pp. Veau brun, dos à nerfs orné (Reliure de l’époque). Edition Originale de cet ouvrage écrit par ordre du roy d’Espagne Philippe V, sur les biens de la couronne et certains impôts. On y trouve des références aux possessions espagnoles d’Amérique. Pedro Hontalba y Arze était avocat et membre du "Consejo de Hacienda (de Felipe V) y Fiscal en la Junta General del Comercio de Espana". Il exerça à Toledo et à Madrid. Une autre édition de cet ouvrage parut à Medrid en 1763. Mouillures marginales. Assez bon exemplaire en reliure de l’époque. Palau, 116006. [Attributes: First Edition]

      [Bookseller: Librería Comellas]
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        Document, signed]. Mémoire pour retraitte.

      - Application in manuscript for a pension for Captain Jean Antoine Rostaing (b. 20 October 1738). Rostaing had served the army for more than 40 years. In the first column the military career of this captain is listed, from Lieutenant to Captain, serving at campaigns of 1759-1762. Signed by François-Joseph Lefebvre (1755- 1820), General during the French Revolution, Marshal of the first French Empire and Duke of Danzig. Lefebvre stood at the side of Napoleon during his 1799 coup d'état as a governor of Paris. After the battle of Eylau he was in charge of the siege of Danzig, and after he had taken the city he became the Duke of Danzig.

      [Bookseller: ASHER Rare Books]
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        Voyage fait par ordre du Roi en 1768 et 1769, à différentes parties du monde, pour éprouver en mer les horloges marines inventées par M. Ferdinand Berthoud. Première[-seconde] partie, . Paris, Imprimerie Royale, 1773. 2 volumes. Large 4to (27 x 20.5 cm). With 5 numbered folding engraved plates in volume 1 (4 maps of the Atlantic Ocean, the Canaries, the Azores, etc., and 1 plate with topographic diagrams), 1 folding engraved plate with geometrical figures illustrating the determination of latitude[!], and 5 folding letterpress tables in volume 2. Contemporary gold-tooled mottled calf.

      - Bibl. horlogère de Monsieur R.P. 196; Chadenat 2617; Gould, p. 96 note; Tardy, p. 99. First edition of an account by Charles Pierre Claret, Count Fleurieu (1738-1810), of the first voyage made to test the chronometers invented by his mentor, Ferdinand Berthoud (1727-1807). They were developed to keep accurate time at sea in order to solve the problem of the determination of longitude, to make it possible for ships to easily determine their position. Berthoud closely followed the work of Harrison in England, who had already proven the efficacy of his chronometer no. 4 in 1761, but refused to allow Berthoud and others to examine it. During the voyages described in the present work, Fleurieu tested Berthoud's chronometers as well as his own instruments on board the ship Isis, travelling to Cadiz, the Canaries, the Antilles, Santo Domingo, the Atlantic Ocean, Madera, and several other places. The results showed their success even beyond his own expectations. The present work is complete with the appendix.With an owner's inscription on both title-pages. With only some minor, mostly marginal water stains at the beginning of volume 2. Folios e2 and e3 misbound at the end between 4I1 and 4I2. In very good condition.

      [Bookseller: ASHER Rare Books]
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        Biblia, dat is De gantsche H. Schrifture vervattende alle de canonijcke boecken des Ouden en des Nieuwen Testaments.Dordrecht, Jacob and Pieter Keur; Amsterdam, Pieter Rotterdam and Pieter Rotterdam the younger (colophon: printed by Jacob and Pieter Keur, Dordrecht), 1714 (New Testament without Pieter Rotterdam the younger, 1713). 3 parts in 2 volumes. Large folio (42.5×27.5 cm). With engraved general title-page, series of 6 engraved double-page folding maps by Daniël Stoopendaal (his larger set), a complete set of 184 full-page and 28 double-page engraved illustration plates by various artists, including A. de Blois, J. van Vianen and J. Mulder, after G. Hoet, B. Picart, A. Houbraken and others. Gold-tooled sprinkled calf (1738?).

      - Darlow & Moule 3337; for the maps: Poortman & Augusteijn, pp. 196-203; for the prints: Poortman, Bijbel en prent II, pp. 140-145. Beautifully illustrated large folio Dutch States Bible (Statenbijbel) with 6 six maps, including a world map, and a complete set of the striking illustrations drawn and engraved by Bernard Picart and others. The maps belong to the larger of two series by Daniël Stoopendaal and were explicitly made for the Keur Bibles with, for example, Bible scenes (rather than figures from classical mythology) decorating the world map. With the armorial bookplate of Hendrik Gerardsz. van Couwenhoven (1711-1792) and a short handwritten genealogy of Couwenhoven's family, from Couwenhoven's marriage in 1738 to the birth of this last child in 1766. The binding appears to date from the middle quarters of the 18th century, so it may have been bound and presented for the occasion of the 1738 wedding. In very good condition. The binding is slightly worn at the joints, the headcap of volume 1 is damaged and there are a few other minor surface imperfections, but it remains generally in very good condition.

      [Bookseller: ASHER Rare Books]
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        Recherches sur ce qu'il faut entendre par les Démoniaques dont il est parlé dans le Nouveau Testament (.). Traduites de l'anglois, sur la seconde édition [suivi de: TWELLS (Leonard) - Réponse aux recherches sur ce qu'il faut entendre par les Démoniaques (.). En forme de lettre à l'auteur (.)]

      - Leide, Boudouin Van Der Aa, Pierre Van Der Aa, 1738. In-12, plein veau marbré de l'époque, dos à nerfs orné de compartiments fleuronnés et cloisonnés, pièce de titre de maroquin havane, tranches jaspées, (24), 232 p. Edition originale rare de la traduction, par Charles Chais, de ‘Enquiry into the Meaning of Demoniacks (.)’ (Londres 1737) de A. A. Sykes (1683-1756) et de "An Answer to the Enquiry (.)" de L. Twells. "Très intéressante controverse sur les Démons et les Démoniaques, ou Possédés" (selon Guaita 2037). Dans son enquête documentée sur les sources historiques, religieuses et "cliniques" des phénomènes de possession, A. A. Sykes, recteur de l’université de Rayleigh, rejette la réalité de l’existence des démons. Il cherche à prouver que les dits possédés ne sont que des malades mentaux "fous et épileptiques", contre ses adversaires, dont L. Twells, qui défend la thèse de possession littérale par le diable ou des esprits malfaisants. La thèse rationaliste de Sykes, qui trouva l’appui des déistes Francis Hutcheson and Thomas Woolston, souleva une intense polémique à travers toute l’Europe sur la démonologie et les phénomènes de possession. Le traducteur Charles Chais était un protestant libéral. Ami de Barbeyrac, de La Chapelle et de Formey, il s'efforça de concilier la pensée scientifique et l'orthodoxie protestante. (Yves-Plessis, 'Sorcellerie', 609. Caillet 10890. Manque à Dorbon). Seulement 2 ex. recensés dans les bibliothèques françaises: Strasbourg BNU et B. Ecole de Médecine. Manque à la BnF. Infime défaut aux coins. Bel exemplaire, bien relié à l'époque. [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Librairie HATCHUEL]
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        S efêr tehill im. Psalterium. Edendvm Curavit Gotth. Avg. Franckivs; Halae Magdebvrgicae: Impensis Orphanotrophei, 1738.

      Halle 1738 - Kl.-8°, eingebunden in Gr.-8°. (194); (194) S. Pappband der Zeit. Hebräische Ausgabe der Psalmen, mit einem lateinischen Vorwort, eingebunden in eine größere Kladde und handschriftlicher Übersetzung mit teils ausführlichen Kommentaren. - Gotthilf August Francke (* 1. April 1696 in Glaucha; † 2. September 1769 in Halle (Saale)) war ein deutscher Theologe und Pädagoge, Sohn des Gründers der Halle'schen Stiftungen August Hermann Francke, und dessen Nachfolger als Direktor der Stiftung. - Einband stärker beschabt und bestoßen; ansonsten sehr sauberes Exemplar. [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Mattheis]
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        La Sagrada Biblia

      - traducida al español de la Vulgata latina y anotada conforme al sentido de los Santos Padres y espositores catolicos por . Felipe Scio de San Miguel . del orden de las Escuelas Pias. Scío de San Miguel, Felipe (Sch. P.) (1738-1796),trad. y anot. Barcelona : A. Pons y Cª, libreros y editores, 1843-1845. 6 v. : lám. ; 27x18 cm. Incluye: Tablas cronólogicas; Índice de cosas notables; Diccionario Geográfico de la Biblia Enc. pasta española, algo deteriorada, con hierros dorados en el lomo. Cuerpo de los tomos robusto. Algunas páginas con manchas de óxido (muy habitual en los libros del XIX). Lomos con cajo. Cortes decorados con bandas verticales azules. Páginas de guarda iniciales y finales de papel de aguas. Contiene grab. xil., entre otros, de Ollivier, Emile Edmond 1800-1864, Adrien Feart 1813-1880, Peyre, Antoine Franc ois 1739-1823. Las láminas interiores son grabados xilográficos de copias de otros artistas como Rembrandt etc., todas están convenientemente mencionadas, como en los grabados anteriores al siglo XIX y en algunas de este siglo, mediante el término sculpsit, incipit o fecit -en abreviatura, sc. o Sculp., inc. y f., fec.o ft. respectivamente-. Este término se colocaba después del nombre responsable del grabado. El lugar destinado a la mención de grabador es el ángulo inferior derecho justo debajo de la imagen, mientras que el del modelo original en el que se basaba, pintura o escultura la esquina inferior izquierda. Vol. I (LVIII, 642 p., [11] h de lám., 1 mapa) -- Vol. II (859 p., [8] h. de lám.) -- Vol. III ( 751 p.) -- Vol. IV (897 p., [3] h. de lám.) -- Vol. V (440 p., [15] h. de lám.) -- Vol. VI (415, XCI, 96, 10 p., [1] h. de lám., 1 mapa) Texto paralelo a dos columnas latín-castellano. Signaturizado. El padre Scío también fue responsable de esta edición Biblia Vulgata al español, que conoció 51 ediciones sólo entre 1790 y 1851, además de muchas otras en otras desde entonces hasta hoy. Su traducción al español fue la que se utilizó para la Biblia sacra polyglotta, que Samuel Lee publicó en 1831. [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: LLIBRERIA TECNICA]
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        Elémens de la Philosophie de Neuton, Mis à la portée de tout le monde.

      chez Etienne Ledet & Compagnie, A Amsterdam 1738 - In-8 de (2)-399-(1) pp., veau brun, dos orné à nerfs, pièce de titre en maroquin rouge (reliure de l'époque) Edition originale. Un frontispice gravé où figure Mme Du Châtelet tenant en main un miroir qui éclaire le visage de Newton ; un portrait de Voltaire gravé par J. Folkema, dessiné par J. Dubourg, 25 culs-de-lampe par Dubourg, Folkema, Konder, Decave, B. Picart et Schley, fleuron de titre gravé par Duflos. 7 figures gravées sur cuivre dont une planche repliée. Voltaire commença la composition de son principal ouvrage scientifique pendant l'été de 1736, inspiré par les études mathémathiques et scientifiques de la marquise Du Châtelet et l'exemple de Francesco Algarotti. Il propose de convertir les Français au newtonianisme ; rejetant le dialogue, employé par Fontenelle, Algarotti et d'autres, et afin de mettre la science à la portée du public, il adopte un ton sérieux, des illustrations géométriques et des calculs. L'ouvrage parut avant que Voltaire eût envoyé la fin du 23e chapitre et le 24e ; malgré sa réticence, l'éditeur hollandais fit achever cette édition par un mathématicien anonyme et ajouta au titre mis à la portée de tout le monde. Voltaire fit publier une nouvelle édition à Paris chez Prault, à laquelle il ajouta quelques cartons changeant très peu le texte de l'édition originale. Bon exemplaire ; une coiffe restaurée ; 2 feuillets déplacés. Bengesco I, 1570 ; L'Oeuvre imprimé de Voltaire à la B.N., 3744 ; Cohen-De Ricci, 1037. [Attributes: First Edition]

      [Bookseller: Bonnefoi Livres Anciens]
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        LA FIGURE DE LA TERRE, DÉTÉRMINÉE PAR LES OBSERVATIONS DE MESSIEURS DE MAUPERTUIS, CLAIRAUT, CAMUS, LE MONNIER, DE L' ACCADÉMIE ROYALE DES SCIENCES. FAITES PAR ORDRE DU ROY AU CERCLE POLAIRE

      Imprimerie Royale, Paris 1738 - LA FIGURE DE LA TERRE, DÉTÉRMINÉE PAR LES OBSERVATIONS DE MESSIEURS DE MAUPERTUIS, CLAIRAUT, CAMUS, LE MONNIER, DE L' ACCADÉMIE ROYALE DES SCIENCES. FAITES PAR ORDRE DU ROY AU CERCLE POLAIRE. Maupertuis, Pierre-Louis Moreau de (1698-1759). Paris, Imprimerie Royale, 1738. IN- 8°, PIENA PELLE COEVA. XXIV, (4), 184 PP. CON 9 TAVOLE ED UNA CARTA GEOGRAFICA INCISE IN RAME RIPIEGATE F.T. ESEMPLARE BEN CONSERVATO DELLA RARA EDIZIONE ORIGINALE. IL MAPERTUIS, GEOFISICO FRANCESE, ESEGUÌ LA MISURA DI UN ARCO DI CIRCA 1° VICINO AL CIRCOLO POLARE ARTICO E DETERMINÒ LA MISURA DELLA TERRA. "ON Y TROUVE LA PREMIÉRE PREUVE DE L' APLATTISEMENT DE LA TERRE PAR LES OBSERVATIONS. CEST AUSSI DANS CE LIVRE QUE SE TROUVENT LES PREMIÈRES OBSERVATIONS DE PIERRE-CHARLES LE MONNIER, CÉLÈBRE EN ASTRONOMIE." (LALANDE, BIBLIOGRAPHIE ASTRONOMIQUE, P. 406). "IN 1733 LA CONDAMINE HAD PROPOSED AN EXPEDITION TO MEASURE A DEGREE OF ARC AT THE EQUATOR. NO SOONER WAS THE EXPEDITION TO THE EQUATOR READY TO DEPART IN 1735 THAN MAUPERTUIS PROPOSED AN EXPEDITION TO THE ARCTIC CIRCLE. THAT SUCH MEASUREMENTS WOULD SUPPLEMENT AND SERVE AS A CHECK ON THE MEASUREMENTS AT THE EQUATOR WAS A VERY COMPELLING ARGUMENT, AND ONCE AGAIN A ROYAL AUTHORIZATION WAS FORTHCOMING.AT LAST THE QUESTION OF THE FIGURE OF THE EARTH WAS GOING TO BE THROUGHLY INVESTIGATED. IF THERE WAS A DIFFERENCE BETWEEN THE LENGTH OF A DEGREE OF LATITUDE AT THE EQUATOR AND ONE AT THE POLE, THE FACT WOULD FINALLY KNOWN." (JONES, THE FIGURE OF THE EARTH, PP. 59-62). POGGENDORFF, II, 84-85. D.S.B., IX, PP. 186-87. HONEYMAN, V, 2174. TODHUNTER, THEORIES OF ATTRACTION AND THE FIGURE OF THE EARTH, PP. 72-73. LA MISURA DEL GRADO POLARE. [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Libreria Brighenti]
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        THE MODERN THEORY AND PRACTICE OF PHYSIC. Wherein the Antecedent Causes of Diseases; The Rise of the most Usual Symptoms incident to them; And the True Methods of Cure; Are Explaind according to the Established Laws of Nature, and Those of the Animal Oeconomy.

      London: A. Bettsworth & C. Hitch, 1738. Leather. Very Good+. 8vo (8 in. tall); lix, [1], 371, [1 advert] pp. "Together with A Chemical Analysis of the Urine, and a Statical Examination of the Blood, in every Stage of each Distemper where Blood could be drawn with safety. By Browne Langrish, Of the College of Physicians, London; and Fellow of the Royal Society. The Second Edition with Additions. London: printed for A. Bettesworth, and C. Hitch, at the Red-Lion in Pater-noster-Row." Rebound in full leather with gilt titling and blind-stamped decorations to spine. Fine exterior. Text block with slight wave, light chafing to upper and lower edge, pale staining, light creases, faded marginalia. A surgeon turned physician, Langrish displayed considerable originality in clinical research with this publication. ESTC N525; DNB.

      [Bookseller: EXCELSA SCRIPTA Rare & Collectible Books]
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        Discours sur l histoire universelle, pour expliquer la suite de la religion et les changements des empires.

      Artist: ; issued in: Amsterdam; date: 1738 - - technic: Copper print; colorit: original colored; condition: Very good; size in cm : 16 x 13 - description: Atlas showing the history about religion and the changes of empires

      [Bookseller: Antique Sommer& Sapunaru KG]
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