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Displayed below are some selected recent viaLibri matches for books published in 1628

        Archontologia cosmica, sive imperiorum, regnorum, principatuum, rerumque publicarum omnium per totum Terrarum Orbem commentarii luculentissimi (..) Opera et studio Jo. Ludovici Gotofredi ...

      Lucas Jennisius, Frankfurt am Main 1628. Small folio. 3 parts in 1 volume (complete). (2)+(40)+690+267+81+(44) pages. Woodcut vignette on titlepage. Woodct initials and decorations at chapter-ends. Titlepage printed in black and red. Contemporary binding of white pigskin with blindtooled ornamentations to boards. Title and year of publication added to spine in later black handwriting. Bookblock slightly browned throughout. Bookplate on front pastedown. A well-preserved copy.. Graesse III,122 mentions a later edition, Frankfurt 1649. The first Latin edition of this important cosmographic work. Johann Ludwig Gottfried (1584-1633) based his work on the French book "Les Estats, empires, et principautez du monde" (1613) by Pierre d'Avity (1573-1635). He edited and added substantially, thus taking ownership on the work himself. The Latin edition was followed by a German version. In 1638, Matthäus Merian used the German text for a richly illustrated edition. Gottfried's Archontologia describes all the world, of course with emphasis on Germany, the Netherlands and France. The book does, however, cover Africa and the New World. The text describes a.o. the climate, culture, history and religion of each country and area

      [Bookseller: Vangsgaards Antikvariat]
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        De republica Venetorum libri quinque.

      Item synopsis reip. Venetæ et alii de eadem discursus politici. Editio secunda auctior. Leyden, Elzeviriana, 1628. 16mo. Engr. title,+ 3-447,+ (1) pp. Minor spotting. Bound together with: (SEGETHUS, Thomas. Ed.) De principatibus Italiæ, tractatus vary. Leyden, Elzeviriana, 1628. 16mo. Engr. title,+ 3-318,+ (15) pp. Contemporary full vellum. Willems 293 & 301. Berghman 1720 & 1726. Contarini's Venice in the second and enlarged Elzevir edition and Segethus' Italy in the first

      [Bookseller: Centralantikvariatet]
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        [Della misura dell'acque correnti]. Traicté de la mesure des eaux courantes... traduit de'italien en françois. Auec un discours de la ionction des mers... Ensemble un traicté du mouuement des eaux d'Euangeliste Torricelli... Traduit du latin en françois [by Pierre Saporta].Castres: F. Barcouda, 1664.

      Very rare first edition in French of two works which founded the modern science of hydraulics, and including <b>an original contribution by Fermat</b> which appears here for the first time. Only one other scientific work of Fermat was published in his lifetime (see below).<br/><br/> The first work is a translation of <i>Demostrazioni geometriche della misura dell'acque correnti</i> (1628). "Castelli's work is considered one of the cornerstones of modern hydraulics, and its importance is such that he is often claimed to have been the founder of the Italian hydraulics school. This treatise on the speed of liquids in channels and on the measurement of that speed is the first to enunciate the well-known theorem in hydraulics known by the author's name. Castelli proposed the first accurate and effective methods for measuring the volume of moving water. This fundamental step in hydraulic mechanics and engineering was accomplished by the geometric method of using the cross-sections of a river to measure the volume. He also discusses the relation of velocity and head-in flow through an orifice. Castelli's work is quoted by almost every major survey of hydraulics..." (Roberts & Trent, p. 66). <br/><br/> The present French translation of Castelli's work has a lengthy preface, 'a messeigneurs les commissaires... pour la jonction des mers,' signed by Saporta, on the great scheme (actually carried out under Louis XIV) to join the Mediterranean to the Atlantic by means of a canal joining the Garonne river to the Etang de Thau in the south, the famous Canal du Midi. It exerted a great influence on the French engineer Pierre-Paul Riquet Caraman (1609-80), the architect of the Canal du Midi, who had read Castelli's work in this first French edition. <br/><br/> The second work is a translation of a set of propositions entitled <i>De motu aquarum</i>, part of Torricelli's work <i>De motu gravium</i>, which was first published in his <i>Opera geometrica</i> (1644). "The treatise [De motu gravium] also refers to the movement of water in a paragraph so important that Ernst Mach proclaimed Torricelli the founder of hydrodynamics. Torricelli's aim was to determine the efflux velocity of a jet of liquid spurting from a small orifice in the bottom of a receptacle. Through experiment he had noted that if the liquid was made to spurt upward, the jet reached a height less than the level of the liquid in the receptacle. He supposed, therefore, that if all the resistances to motion were nil, the jet would reach the level of the liquid. From this hypothesis, equivalent to a conservation principle, he deduced the theorem that bears his name: The velocity of the jet at the point of efflux is equal to that which a single drop of the liquid would have if it could fall freely in a vacuum from the level of the top of the liquid to the orifice of efflux. Torricelli also showed that if the hole is made in the wall of the receptacle, the jet of fluid will be parabolic in form; he ended the paragraph with interesting observations on the breaking of the fluid stream into drops and on the effects of air resistance. Torricelli's skill in hydraulics was so well known to his contemporaries that he was approached for advice on freeing the Val di Chiana from stagnant waters, and he suggested the method of reclamation by filling" (DSB XIII, 437). <br/><br/> The translator, Pierre Saporta (1613-85), a Montpellier lawyer, was a correspondent of Henry Oldenburg. Fermat, normally associated with Toulouse, where he was conseiller du roi, had for many years close links with Castres, a strongly Huguenot town on the banks of the river Agout. In fact, he died and was buried there in 1665. In 1648 a protestant Academy was founded at Castres amongst whose members were Pierre Bayle, Pierre Borel, the physician and writer on alchemy, de Ranchin and Pierre Saporta. It was thus that Fermat and Saporta became acquainted and eventually close friends. The second work has a preface by Saporta addressed to Fermat, whom he terms 'le souverain legislateur de tous les scavans'. Fermat had prompted Saporta to undertake the translation as a sequel to that of Castelli. <br/><br/> The last four pages of the book contain the 'Observation sur Synesius' which in translation begins as follows: "The pages which remain empty in this quire made me think of filling them with the splendid observation which I learned some days ago from the incomparable M. Fermat, who does me the honour of being my friend and of frequently talking with me. It is in the fifteenth letter of Synesius, Bishop of Cyrene, which deals with something not understood by any of his commentators, not even by the learned Father Petau, as he himself avows in his notes on this author. I give this observation even more willingly as it has much in common with the treatises here printed." The ailing Synesius (378-430 AD) wrote in 402 to his friend and teacher Hypatia asking for an instrument he called a hydroscopium or baryllion, and provided detailed instructions as to its construction. When the works of Synesius were published by the Jesuit theologian Denis Petau (1583-1652) in 1640, Petau confessed that he was unable to understand Synesius' letter. Castelli asked Fermat for his opinion, and the latter's response was published as the 'Observation sur Synesius'. Fermat showed that the instrument described by Synesius was a hydrometer, used to measure the specific gravities of liquids, and he gives a detailed description of its construction, with a diagram. The only other scientific work of Fermat to be published in his lifetime was <i>De linearum curvarum</i>, which appeared as an appendix to Antoine de Lalouvere's <i>Veterum geometrica promota</i> (1660). <br/><br/> Three other rare works on hydraulics (none of them in Roberts & Trent) are bound up in the present volume, two of which are incomplete. <br/><br/> [CEREDI, Giuseppe].Tre discorsi sopra il modo d'alzar acque da luoghi bassi. Per adaquar terreni. Per levar l'acque sorgenti, & piovute dalle ca[m]pagne, che non possono naturalmente dare loro il decorso. Per mandare l'acqua da bere alle città, che n'hanno bisogno, & per altri simili usi. Opera non piu stampata. Parma, Seth Viotti, 1567. 4to, pp. [xx], 68, 71-74, 76-77, 79-100 (recte 99), [1], with woodcut printer's device on title, eight woodcuts in text and folding woodcut plate within pagination (numbered 78) (lacking three woodcut plates numbered 69, 70 and 75). <br/><br/> First edition. "[In this work] Ceredi was interested in the construction and use of the Archimedean screw for the irrigation of fields and the draining of swamps. He had found that the devices in use were inefficient, and sought to discover the rules of design by which they might be improved. The results led him to specify a maximum length and optimum dimension for the water-channel, to suggest batteries of screws for lifts higher than the efficient maximum length, and to examine the design of cranks and other devices for turning the screws" (Drake & Drabkin, <i>Mechanics in Sixteenth-Century Italy</i>, pp. 51-2). <br/><br/> D'ACRES, R. (?pseud.). The elements of water-drawing, or a compendious abstract of all sorts and kinds of water-machins or gins, used or practised in the World... London: by Tho. Leach, for Henry Brome, n.d. [?1659/ 1660]. 4to, pp. [8], 41, [1]. Title shaved closely at the head, title-page and last (blank) page lightly dust-soiled; lightly browned throughout. <br/><br/> First edition of "the earliest work exclusively on the subject [of vacuum steam-pumps] by an Englishman" (R.S.Kirby, et al. Engineering in History (1990), p. 155). "R. D'Acres", the signature to the preface, is presumed to be a pseudonym; "ascribed on insufficient evidence to Robert Thornton [1618-79, of Warwickshire]" (ESTC). <br/><br/> VAUGHAN, Rowland. Most approved and long experienced water-workes. Containing, The manner of winter and summer-drowning of medow and pasture, by the advantage of the least, river, brooke, fount, or water-prill adiacent; there-by to make those grounds (especially if they be drye) more fertile ten for one... 4to, pp. [140]. London: by George Eld, 1610. With a 13-page verse "Panegyricke" by his "poore kinsman" John Davies of Hereford, another poem by Davies and others verses by Robert Corbet, John Hoskins, etc. S4v in this copy has a printed certificate by Vaughan dated 1609 (in some copies the page is blank).Lacking the first blank leaf and the two folding plates, side-notes to Davies's' "Panegyricke" shaved. <br/><br/> First edition. Vaughan's idea of regularly flooding water-meadows to boost crops was developed by Sir Richard Weston in the mid-17th-century. <br/><br/> CASTELLI: We have located nine copies of this work worldwide: Two in America (Harvard, Oklahoma), five in France (Albi, Bordeaux, BNF, and two in the Museum of Natural History in Paris), and one each in Germany (Gottingen) and Japan (Keio University). Not in COPAC. Brunet, I, 1625; Riccardi, I, 291; see Pierre Chabbert, "Fermat à Castres", in: Revue d'histoire des sciences et de leurs applications, 1967, vol. 20, n° 20-4, pp. 337-348. The text of 'Observation sur Synesius' was reprinted in the preface of the edition of Diophantus' Arithmetica edited by Fermat's son Samuel (1670), and in Fermat's Oeuvres (Tome I, Appendix). CEREDI: Adams C1280; Hoover Collection 210 (mentioning one plate only); Riccardi I, 339; Wellcome 1411; see Stillman Drake, An Agricultural Economist of the Late Renaissance. in: Humana Civilitas, vol. I, pp. 53-73. D'ACRES: Wing E494. Five copies are recorded (BL (2 copies, one with title mutilated), Cambridge, Bodleian (ex Ashmole; last leaf in facsimile) & Folger). VAUGHAN: STC 24603. Seven copies located in America: Columbia, Harvard (not on HOLLIS), Yale (Beinecke, no plates, & British Art Center, with plates); Folger (2 copies, both lacking plates & one lacking leaf K1), Huntington (ex Bridgewater, with plates handcoloured).. 4to, pp [10], 87, woodcut diagrams in text. Mid-18th-century sprinkled calf, gilt spine, red morocco label, red edges. Provenance: from the Macclesfield library

      [Bookseller: Sophia Rare Books]
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        Plate from 'Academie de l'Espee' [Tab. XVIII]

      [Leiden: B. & A. Elzevir: 1628]. Copper engraving by Johann Gelle. Very good condition apart from a few light foxing marks in the bottom margin. 18 7/8 x 27 1/8 inches. 21 x 29 1/2 inches. A fine print from the most sumptuous book on fencing ever produced, which combines a strong design sense with beauty and historical importance, executed by one of the greatest engravers of the day. The image illustrates Thibault's theories of successful fencing using movement and mathematical principles. Thibault's work was produced during a period when the Italian rapier (or epee) held sway. "The Italians discovered the effectiveness of the dexterous use of the point rather than the edge of the sword. By the end of the 16th century, their lighter weapon...and simple, nimble, and controlled fencing style, emphasizing skill and speed rather than force, spread throughout Europe. Most of the wrestling tricks [used in earlier disciplines] were abandoned, the lunge was discovered, and fencing became established as an art" (Encyclopaedia Britannica). The present image marks the zenith of the use of the epee in Europe. "In the latter half of the 17th century, the sword and swordsmanship changed dramatically with a change in gentleman's dress. In France the court of Louis XIV set the fashion of silk stockings, breeches, and brocaded coats...As the long trailing rapier was unsuited to this form of dress, fashion decreed the wearing of a light, short court sword. The French style set in throughout Europe as the Italian had done earlier" (op. cit.). Cf. Vigeant p. 125; cf. Willems 302.

      [Bookseller: Donald Heald Rare Books ]
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        Plate from 'Academie de l'Espee' [Tab. XXVI]

      [Leiden: B. & A. Elzevir: 1628]. Copper engraving by Schelte Adams Bolswert. Very good condition apart from a 3/8" tear in the right margin and a few small orange spots in the lower part of the image. 19 x 27 1/4 inches. 19 7/8 x 29 1/2 inches. A fine print from the most sumptuous book on fencing ever produced, which combines a strong design sense with beauty and historical importance, executed by one of the greatest engravers of the day. The image illustrates Thibault's theories of successful fencing using movement and mathematical principles. Thibault's work was produced during a period when the Italian rapier (or epee) held sway. "The Italians discovered the effectiveness of the dexterous use of the point rather than the edge of the sword. By the end of the 16th century, their lighter weapon...and simple, nimble, and controlled fencing style, emphasizing skill and speed rather than force, spread throughout Europe. Most of the wrestling tricks [used in earlier disciplines] were abandoned, the lunge was discovered, and fencing became established as an art" (Encyclopaedia Britannica). The present image marks the zenith of the use of the epee in Europe. "In the latter half of the 17th century, the sword and swordsmanship changed dramatically with a change in gentleman's dress. In France the court of Louis XIV set the fashion of silk stockings, breeches, and brocaded coats...As the long trailing rapier was unsuited to this form of dress, fashion decreed the wearing of a light, short court sword. The French style set in throughout Europe as the Italian had done earlier" (op. cit.). Cf. Vigeant p. 125; cf. Willems 302.

      [Bookseller: Donald Heald Rare Books ]
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        Plate from 'Academie de l'Espee' [Tab. VI]

      [Leiden: B. & A. Elzevir: 1628]. Copper engraving by Nicolas Petri Lastman. Very good condition apart from a few skillfully repaired losses in the margins and several tears in the top margin. 18 7/8 x 29 1/8 inches. 21 1/2 x 29 1/8 inches. A fine print from the most sumptuous book on fencing ever produced, which combines a strong design sense with beauty and historical importance, executed by one of the greatest engravers of the day. The image illustrates Thibault's theories of successful fencing using movement and mathematical principles. Thibault's work was produced during a period when the Italian rapier (or epee) held sway. "The Italians discovered the effectiveness of the dexterous use of the point rather than the edge of the sword. By the end of the 16th century, their lighter weapon...and simple, nimble, and controlled fencing style, emphasizing skill and speed rather than force, spread throughout Europe. Most of the wrestling tricks [used in earlier disciplines] were abandoned, the lunge was discovered, and fencing became established as an art" (Encyclopaedia Britannica). The present image marks the zenith of the use of the epee in Europe. "In the latter half of the 17th century, the sword and swordsmanship changed dramatically with a change in gentleman's dress. In France the court of Louis XIV set the fashion of silk stockings, breeches, and brocaded coats...As the long trailing rapier was unsuited to this form of dress, fashion decreed the wearing of a light, short court sword. The French style set in throughout Europe as the Italian had done earlier" (op. cit.). Cf. Vigeant p. 125; cf. Willems 302.

      [Bookseller: Donald Heald Rare Books ]
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        Plate from 'Academie de l'Espee' [Tab. XVII]

      [Leiden: B. & A. Elzevir: 1628]. Copper engraving by Pieter van Serwouters. Very good condition apart from a few light foxing marks in the bottom margin. 19 x 27 1/4 inches. 21 x 29 3/8 inches. A fine print from the most sumptuous book on fencing ever produced, which combines a strong design sense with beauty and historical importance, executed by one of the greatest engravers of the day. The image illustrates Thibault's theories of successful fencing using movement and mathematical principles. Thibault's work was produced during a period when the Italian rapier (or epee) held sway. "The Italians discovered the effectiveness of the dexterous use of the point rather than the edge of the sword. By the end of the 16th century, their lighter weapon...and simple, nimble, and controlled fencing style, emphasizing skill and speed rather than force, spread throughout Europe. Most of the wrestling tricks [used in earlier disciplines] were abandoned, the lunge was discovered, and fencing became established as an art" (Encyclopaedia Britannica). The present image marks the zenith of the use of the epee in Europe. "In the latter half of the 17th century, the sword and swordsmanship changed dramatically with a change in gentleman's dress. In France the court of Louis XIV set the fashion of silk stockings, breeches, and brocaded coats...As the long trailing rapier was unsuited to this form of dress, fashion decreed the wearing of a light, short court sword. The French style set in throughout Europe as the Italian had done earlier" (op. cit.). Cf. Vigeant p. 125; cf. Willems 302.

      [Bookseller: Donald Heald Rare Books ]
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        Plate from 'Academie de l'Espee' [Tab. XIII]

      [Leiden: B. & A. Elzevir: 1628]. Copper engraving by Johann Gelle. Very good condition apart from a small orange spot in the left side of the image. 18 7/8 x 27 1/8 inches. 21 x 29 5/8 inches. A fine print from the most sumptuous book on fencing ever produced, which combines a strong design sense with beauty and historical importance, executed by one of the greatest engravers of the day. The image illustrates Thibault's theories of successful fencing using movement and mathematical principles. Thibault's work was produced during a period when the Italian rapier (or epee) held sway. "The Italians discovered the effectiveness of the dexterous use of the point rather than the edge of the sword. By the end of the 16th century, their lighter weapon...and simple, nimble, and controlled fencing style, emphasizing skill and speed rather than force, spread throughout Europe. Most of the wrestling tricks [used in earlier disciplines] were abandoned, the lunge was discovered, and fencing became established as an art" (Encyclopaedia Britannica). The present image marks the zenith of the use of the epee in Europe. "In the latter half of the 17th century, the sword and swordsmanship changed dramatically with a change in gentleman's dress. In France the court of Louis XIV set the fashion of silk stockings, breeches, and brocaded coats...As the long trailing rapier was unsuited to this form of dress, fashion decreed the wearing of a light, short court sword. The French style set in throughout Europe as the Italian had done earlier" (op. cit.). Cf. Vigeant p. 125; cf. Willems 302.

      [Bookseller: Donald Heald Rare Books ]
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        Plate from 'Academie de l'Espee' [Tab. XII]

      [Leiden: B. & A. Elzevir: 1628]. Copper engraving by Egbert van Panderen. Very good condition apart from some light soiling in the top left side of the image and margin. 19 x 27 1/2 inches. 20 3/8 x 30 inches. A fine print from the most sumptuous book on fencing ever produced, which combines a strong design sense with beauty and historical importance, executed by one of the greatest engravers of the day. The image illustrates Thibault's theories of successful fencing using movement and mathematical principles. Thibault's work was produced during a period when the Italian rapier (or epee) held sway. "The Italians discovered the effectiveness of the dexterous use of the point rather than the edge of the sword. By the end of the 16th century, their lighter weapon...and simple, nimble, and controlled fencing style, emphasizing skill and speed rather than force, spread throughout Europe. Most of the wrestling tricks [used in earlier disciplines] were abandoned, the lunge was discovered, and fencing became established as an art" (Encyclopaedia Britannica). The present image marks the zenith of the use of the epee in Europe. "In the latter half of the 17th century, the sword and swordsmanship changed dramatically with a change in gentleman's dress. In France the court of Louis XIV set the fashion of silk stockings, breeches, and brocaded coats...As the long trailing rapier was unsuited to this form of dress, fashion decreed the wearing of a light, short court sword. The French style set in throughout Europe as the Italian had done earlier" (op. cit.). Cf. Vigeant p. 125; cf. Willems 302.

      [Bookseller: Donald Heald Rare Books ]
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        Plate from 'Academie de l'Espee' [Tab. III]

      [Leiden: B. & A. Elzevir: 1628]. Copper engraving by Nicolas Petri Lastman. Very good condition apart from some mild creasing and a small orange spot in the lower right side of the image near the plate number. 19 x 27 1/4 inches. 21 x 29 1/4 inches. A fine print from the most sumptuous book on fencing ever produced, which combines a strong design sense with beauty and historical importance, executed by one of the greatest engravers of the day. The image illustrates Thibault's theories of successful fencing using movement and mathematical principles. Thibault's work was produced during a period when the Italian rapier (or epee) held sway. "The Italians discovered the effectiveness of the dexterous use of the point rather than the edge of the sword. By the end of the 16th century, their lighter weapon...and simple, nimble, and controlled fencing style, emphasizing skill and speed rather than force, spread throughout Europe. Most of the wrestling tricks [used in earlier disciplines] were abandoned, the lunge was discovered, and fencing became established as an art" (Encyclopaedia Britannica). The present image marks the zenith of the use of the epee in Europe. "In the latter half of the 17th century, the sword and swordsmanship changed dramatically with a change in gentleman's dress. In France the court of Louis XIV set the fashion of silk stockings, breeches, and brocaded coats...As the long trailing rapier was unsuited to this form of dress, fashion decreed the wearing of a light, short court sword. The French style set in throughout Europe as the Italian had done earlier" (op. cit.). Cf. Vigeant p. 125; cf. Willems 302.

      [Bookseller: Donald Heald Rare Books ]
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        Plate from 'Academie de l'Espee' [Tab. XXVIII]

      [Leiden: B. & A. Elzevir: 1628]. Copper engraving Andries Jacobsz Stock. Very good condition. 19 x 27 1/4 inches. 21 x 29 1/2 inches. A fine print from the most sumptuous book on fencing ever produced, which combines a strong design sense with beauty and historical importance, executed by one of the greatest engravers of the day. The image illustrates Thibault's theories of successful fencing using movement and mathematical principles. Thibault's work was produced during a period when the Italian rapier (or epee) held sway. "The Italians discovered the effectiveness of the dexterous use of the point rather than the edge of the sword. By the end of the 16th century, their lighter weapon...and simple, nimble, and controlled fencing style, emphasizing skill and speed rather than force, spread throughout Europe. Most of the wrestling tricks [used in earlier disciplines] were abandoned, the lunge was discovered, and fencing became established as an art" (Encyclopaedia Britannica). The present image marks the zenith of the use of the epee in Europe. "In the latter half of the 17th century, the sword and swordsmanship changed dramatically with a change in gentleman's dress. In France the court of Louis XIV set the fashion of silk stockings, breeches, and brocaded coats...As the long trailing rapier was unsuited to this form of dress, fashion decreed the wearing of a light, short court sword. The French style set in throughout Europe as the Italian had done earlier" (op. cit.). Cf. Vigeant p. 125; cf. Willems 302.

      [Bookseller: Donald Heald Rare Books ]
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        Plate from 'Academie de l'Espee' [Tab. XX]

      [Leiden: B. & A. Elzevir: 1628]. Copper engraving by Schelte Adams Bolswert. Very good condition apart from several skillfully repaired losses and tears in the margins. 19 x 27 inches. 21 1/2 x 29 1/4 inches. A fine print from the most sumptuous book on fencing ever produced, which combines a strong design sense with beauty and historical importance, executed by one of the greatest engravers of the day. The image illustrates Thibault's theories of successful fencing using movement and mathematical principles. Thibault's work was produced during a period when the Italian rapier (or epee) held sway. "The Italians discovered the effectiveness of the dexterous use of the point rather than the edge of the sword. By the end of the 16th century, their lighter weapon...and simple, nimble, and controlled fencing style, emphasizing skill and speed rather than force, spread throughout Europe. Most of the wrestling tricks [used in earlier disciplines] were abandoned, the lunge was discovered, and fencing became established as an art" (Encyclopaedia Britannica). The present image marks the zenith of the use of the epee in Europe. "In the latter half of the 17th century, the sword and swordsmanship changed dramatically with a change in gentleman's dress. In France the court of Louis XIV set the fashion of silk stockings, breeches, and brocaded coats...As the long trailing rapier was unsuited to this form of dress, fashion decreed the wearing of a light, short court sword. The French style set in throughout Europe as the Italian had done earlier" (op. cit.). Cf. Vigeant p. 125; cf. Willems 302.

      [Bookseller: Donald Heald Rare Books ]
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        Plate from 'Academie de l'Espee' [Tab. VII]

      [Leiden: B. & A. Elzevir: 1628]. Copper engraving by Andries Jacobsz Stock. Very good condition apart from a few light foxing marks in the top margin. 18 x 27 1/4 inches. 21 x 29 1/2 inches. A fine print from the most sumptuous book on fencing ever produced, which combines a strong design sense with beauty and historical importance, executed by one of the greatest engravers of the day. The image illustrates Thibault's theories of successful fencing using movement and mathematical principles. Thibault's work was produced during a period when the Italian rapier (or epee) held sway. "The Italians discovered the effectiveness of the dexterous use of the point rather than the edge of the sword. By the end of the 16th century, their lighter weapon...and simple, nimble, and controlled fencing style, emphasizing skill and speed rather than force, spread throughout Europe. Most of the wrestling tricks [used in earlier disciplines] were abandoned, the lunge was discovered, and fencing became established as an art" (Encyclopaedia Britannica). The present image marks the zenith of the use of the epee in Europe. "In the latter half of the 17th century, the sword and swordsmanship changed dramatically with a change in gentleman's dress. In France the court of Louis XIV set the fashion of silk stockings, breeches, and brocaded coats...As the long trailing rapier was unsuited to this form of dress, fashion decreed the wearing of a light, short court sword. The French style set in throughout Europe as the Italian had done earlier" (op. cit.). Cf. Vigeant p. 125; cf. Willems 302.

      [Bookseller: Donald Heald Rare Books ]
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        Plate from 'Academie de l'Espee' [Tab. XI]

      [Leiden: B. & A. Elzevir: 1628]. Copper engraving by Peter Isselburg. Very good condition apart from a few several skillfully repaired losses in the top margin, several small tears at the extreme edges of the margins, and an orange spot in the center of the image. 19 x 27 inches. 21 3/4 x 29 5/8 inches. A fine print from the most sumptuous book on fencing ever produced, which combines a strong design sense with beauty and historical importance, executed by one of the greatest engravers of the day. The image illustrates Thibault's theories of successful fencing using movement and mathematical principles. Thibault's work was produced during a period when the Italian rapier (or epee) held sway. "The Italians discovered the effectiveness of the dexterous use of the point rather than the edge of the sword. By the end of the 16th century, their lighter weapon...and simple, nimble, and controlled fencing style, emphasizing skill and speed rather than force, spread throughout Europe. Most of the wrestling tricks [used in earlier disciplines] were abandoned, the lunge was discovered, and fencing became established as an art" (Encyclopaedia Britannica). The present image marks the zenith of the use of the epee in Europe. "In the latter half of the 17th century, the sword and swordsmanship changed dramatically with a change in gentleman's dress. In France the court of Louis XIV set the fashion of silk stockings, breeches, and brocaded coats...As the long trailing rapier was unsuited to this form of dress, fashion decreed the wearing of a light, short court sword. The French style set in throughout Europe as the Italian had done earlier" (op. cit.). Cf. Vigeant p. 125; cf. Willems 302.

      [Bookseller: Donald Heald Rare Books ]
 14.   Check availability:     ABAA     Link/Print  


        Plate from 'Academie de l'Espee' [Tab. XXXIII]

      [Leiden: B. & A. Elzevir: 1628]. Copper engraving by Johann Gelle. Very good condition apart from several skillfully repaired losses in the margins. 19 x 27 1/4 inches. 21 x 29 5/8 inches. A fine print from the most sumptuous book on fencing ever produced, which combines a strong design sense with beauty and historical importance, executed by one of the greatest engravers of the day. The image illustrates Thibault's theories of successful fencing using movement and mathematical principles. Thibault's work was produced during a period when the Italian rapier (or epee) held sway. "The Italians discovered the effectiveness of the dexterous use of the point rather than the edge of the sword. By the end of the 16th century, their lighter weapon...and simple, nimble, and controlled fencing style, emphasizing skill and speed rather than force, spread throughout Europe. Most of the wrestling tricks [used in earlier disciplines] were abandoned, the lunge was discovered, and fencing became established as an art" (Encyclopaedia Britannica). The present image marks the zenith of the use of the epee in Europe. "In the latter half of the 17th century, the sword and swordsmanship changed dramatically with a change in gentleman's dress. In France the court of Louis XIV set the fashion of silk stockings, breeches, and brocaded coats...As the long trailing rapier was unsuited to this form of dress, fashion decreed the wearing of a light, short court sword. The French style set in throughout Europe as the Italian had done earlier" (op. cit.). Cf. Vigeant p. 125; cf. Willems 302.

      [Bookseller: Donald Heald Rare Books ]
 15.   Check availability:     ABAA     Link/Print  


        Plate from 'Academie de l'Espee' [Tab. X]

      [Leiden: B. & A. Elzevir: 1628]. Copper engraving by 'Rob. beaudoux'. Very good condition apart from some mild rippling. 18 7/8 x 27 inches. 21 x 29 1/4 inches. A fine print from the most sumptuous book on fencing ever produced, which combines a strong design sense with beauty and historical importance, executed by one of the greatest engravers of the day. The image illustrates Thibault's theories of successful fencing using movement and mathematical principles. Thibault's work was produced during a period when the Italian rapier (or epee) held sway. "The Italians discovered the effectiveness of the dexterous use of the point rather than the edge of the sword. By the end of the 16th century, their lighter weapon...and simple, nimble, and controlled fencing style, emphasizing skill and speed rather than force, spread throughout Europe. Most of the wrestling tricks [used in earlier disciplines] were abandoned, the lunge was discovered, and fencing became established as an art" (Encyclopaedia Britannica). The present image marks the zenith of the use of the epee in Europe. "In the latter half of the 17th century, the sword and swordsmanship changed dramatically with a change in gentleman's dress. In France the court of Louis XIV set the fashion of silk stockings, breeches, and brocaded coats...As the long trailing rapier was unsuited to this form of dress, fashion decreed the wearing of a light, short court sword. The French style set in throughout Europe as the Italian had done earlier" (op. cit.). Cf. Vigeant p. 125; cf. Willems 302.

      [Bookseller: Donald Heald Rare Books ]
 16.   Check availability:     ABAA     Link/Print  


        Plate from 'Academie de l'Espee' [Tab. V]

      [Leiden: B. & A. Elzevir: 1628]. Copper engraving by Johann Gelle. Very good condition. 19 x 27 1/8 inches. 21 x 29 1/2 inches. A fine print from the most sumptuous book on fencing ever produced, which combines a strong design sense with beauty and historical importance, executed by one of the greatest engravers of the day. The image illustrates Thibault's theories of successful fencing using movement and mathematical principles. Thibault's work was produced during a period when the Italian rapier (or epee) held sway. "The Italians discovered the effectiveness of the dexterous use of the point rather than the edge of the sword. By the end of the 16th century, their lighter weapon...and simple, nimble, and controlled fencing style, emphasizing skill and speed rather than force, spread throughout Europe. Most of the wrestling tricks [used in earlier disciplines] were abandoned, the lunge was discovered, and fencing became established as an art" (Encyclopaedia Britannica). The present image marks the zenith of the use of the epee in Europe. "In the latter half of the 17th century, the sword and swordsmanship changed dramatically with a change in gentleman's dress. In France the court of Louis XIV set the fashion of silk stockings, breeches, and brocaded coats...As the long trailing rapier was unsuited to this form of dress, fashion decreed the wearing of a light, short court sword. The French style set in throughout Europe as the Italian had done earlier" (op. cit.). Cf. Vigeant p. 125; cf. Willems 302.

      [Bookseller: Donald Heald Rare Books ]
 17.   Check availability:     ABAA     Link/Print  


        The First Part of the Institutes of the Lawes of England. Or, a Commentarie upon Littleton, Not the Name of a Lawyer onely, but of the Law it selfe [etc.]. S.T.C. 15784. Folio

      First edition of Coke's most single famous work and one of the five greatest books of English law, glossing Littleton's 'Tenures', one of the remaining four, and forming the first part (of four) of his monumental Institutes of English Law. Modern calf, gilt, one leaf in facsimile, without the portraits and table of consanguinity, some browning and staining, early notations; a working copy. Printed for the Society of Stationers, London, 1628.

      [Bookseller:  Meyer Boswell Books, Inc.]
 18.   Check availability:     Direct From Bookseller     Link/Print  

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