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Displayed below are some selected recent viaLibri matches for books published in 1628

        Plate from 'Academie de l'Espee' [Tab. XVII]

      [Leiden: B. & A. Elzevir: 1628]. Copper engraving by Pieter van Serwouters. Very good condition apart from a few light foxing marks in the bottom margin. 19 x 27 1/4 inches. 21 x 29 3/8 inches. A fine print from the most sumptuous book on fencing ever produced, which combines a strong design sense with beauty and historical importance, executed by one of the greatest engravers of the day. The image illustrates Thibault's theories of successful fencing using movement and mathematical principles. Thibault's work was produced during a period when the Italian rapier (or epee) held sway. "The Italians discovered the effectiveness of the dexterous use of the point rather than the edge of the sword. By the end of the 16th century, their lighter weapon...and simple, nimble, and controlled fencing style, emphasizing skill and speed rather than force, spread throughout Europe. Most of the wrestling tricks [used in earlier disciplines] were abandoned, the lunge was discovered, and fencing became established as an art" (Encyclopaedia Britannica). The present image marks the zenith of the use of the epee in Europe. "In the latter half of the 17th century, the sword and swordsmanship changed dramatically with a change in gentleman's dress. In France the court of Louis XIV set the fashion of silk stockings, breeches, and brocaded coats...As the long trailing rapier was unsuited to this form of dress, fashion decreed the wearing of a light, short court sword. The French style set in throughout Europe as the Italian had done earlier" (op. cit.). Cf. Vigeant p. 125; cf. Willems 302.

      [Bookseller: Donald Heald Rare Books ]
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        Plate from 'Academie de l'Espee' [Tab. XIII]

      [Leiden: B. & A. Elzevir: 1628]. Copper engraving by Johann Gelle. Very good condition apart from a small orange spot in the left side of the image. 18 7/8 x 27 1/8 inches. 21 x 29 5/8 inches. A fine print from the most sumptuous book on fencing ever produced, which combines a strong design sense with beauty and historical importance, executed by one of the greatest engravers of the day. The image illustrates Thibault's theories of successful fencing using movement and mathematical principles. Thibault's work was produced during a period when the Italian rapier (or epee) held sway. "The Italians discovered the effectiveness of the dexterous use of the point rather than the edge of the sword. By the end of the 16th century, their lighter weapon...and simple, nimble, and controlled fencing style, emphasizing skill and speed rather than force, spread throughout Europe. Most of the wrestling tricks [used in earlier disciplines] were abandoned, the lunge was discovered, and fencing became established as an art" (Encyclopaedia Britannica). The present image marks the zenith of the use of the epee in Europe. "In the latter half of the 17th century, the sword and swordsmanship changed dramatically with a change in gentleman's dress. In France the court of Louis XIV set the fashion of silk stockings, breeches, and brocaded coats...As the long trailing rapier was unsuited to this form of dress, fashion decreed the wearing of a light, short court sword. The French style set in throughout Europe as the Italian had done earlier" (op. cit.). Cf. Vigeant p. 125; cf. Willems 302.

      [Bookseller: Donald Heald Rare Books ]
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        Plate from 'Academie de l'Espee' [Tab. XII]

      [Leiden: B. & A. Elzevir: 1628]. Copper engraving by Egbert van Panderen. Very good condition apart from some light soiling in the top left side of the image and margin. 19 x 27 1/2 inches. 20 3/8 x 30 inches. A fine print from the most sumptuous book on fencing ever produced, which combines a strong design sense with beauty and historical importance, executed by one of the greatest engravers of the day. The image illustrates Thibault's theories of successful fencing using movement and mathematical principles. Thibault's work was produced during a period when the Italian rapier (or epee) held sway. "The Italians discovered the effectiveness of the dexterous use of the point rather than the edge of the sword. By the end of the 16th century, their lighter weapon...and simple, nimble, and controlled fencing style, emphasizing skill and speed rather than force, spread throughout Europe. Most of the wrestling tricks [used in earlier disciplines] were abandoned, the lunge was discovered, and fencing became established as an art" (Encyclopaedia Britannica). The present image marks the zenith of the use of the epee in Europe. "In the latter half of the 17th century, the sword and swordsmanship changed dramatically with a change in gentleman's dress. In France the court of Louis XIV set the fashion of silk stockings, breeches, and brocaded coats...As the long trailing rapier was unsuited to this form of dress, fashion decreed the wearing of a light, short court sword. The French style set in throughout Europe as the Italian had done earlier" (op. cit.). Cf. Vigeant p. 125; cf. Willems 302.

      [Bookseller: Donald Heald Rare Books ]
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        Plate from 'Academie de l'Espee' [Tab. III]

      [Leiden: B. & A. Elzevir: 1628]. Copper engraving by Nicolas Petri Lastman. Very good condition apart from some mild creasing and a small orange spot in the lower right side of the image near the plate number. 19 x 27 1/4 inches. 21 x 29 1/4 inches. A fine print from the most sumptuous book on fencing ever produced, which combines a strong design sense with beauty and historical importance, executed by one of the greatest engravers of the day. The image illustrates Thibault's theories of successful fencing using movement and mathematical principles. Thibault's work was produced during a period when the Italian rapier (or epee) held sway. "The Italians discovered the effectiveness of the dexterous use of the point rather than the edge of the sword. By the end of the 16th century, their lighter weapon...and simple, nimble, and controlled fencing style, emphasizing skill and speed rather than force, spread throughout Europe. Most of the wrestling tricks [used in earlier disciplines] were abandoned, the lunge was discovered, and fencing became established as an art" (Encyclopaedia Britannica). The present image marks the zenith of the use of the epee in Europe. "In the latter half of the 17th century, the sword and swordsmanship changed dramatically with a change in gentleman's dress. In France the court of Louis XIV set the fashion of silk stockings, breeches, and brocaded coats...As the long trailing rapier was unsuited to this form of dress, fashion decreed the wearing of a light, short court sword. The French style set in throughout Europe as the Italian had done earlier" (op. cit.). Cf. Vigeant p. 125; cf. Willems 302.

      [Bookseller: Donald Heald Rare Books ]
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        Plate from 'Academie de l'Espee' [Tab. XXVIII]

      [Leiden: B. & A. Elzevir: 1628]. Copper engraving Andries Jacobsz Stock. Very good condition. 19 x 27 1/4 inches. 21 x 29 1/2 inches. A fine print from the most sumptuous book on fencing ever produced, which combines a strong design sense with beauty and historical importance, executed by one of the greatest engravers of the day. The image illustrates Thibault's theories of successful fencing using movement and mathematical principles. Thibault's work was produced during a period when the Italian rapier (or epee) held sway. "The Italians discovered the effectiveness of the dexterous use of the point rather than the edge of the sword. By the end of the 16th century, their lighter weapon...and simple, nimble, and controlled fencing style, emphasizing skill and speed rather than force, spread throughout Europe. Most of the wrestling tricks [used in earlier disciplines] were abandoned, the lunge was discovered, and fencing became established as an art" (Encyclopaedia Britannica). The present image marks the zenith of the use of the epee in Europe. "In the latter half of the 17th century, the sword and swordsmanship changed dramatically with a change in gentleman's dress. In France the court of Louis XIV set the fashion of silk stockings, breeches, and brocaded coats...As the long trailing rapier was unsuited to this form of dress, fashion decreed the wearing of a light, short court sword. The French style set in throughout Europe as the Italian had done earlier" (op. cit.). Cf. Vigeant p. 125; cf. Willems 302.

      [Bookseller: Donald Heald Rare Books ]
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        Plate from 'Academie de l'Espee' [Tab. XX]

      [Leiden: B. & A. Elzevir: 1628]. Copper engraving by Schelte Adams Bolswert. Very good condition apart from several skillfully repaired losses and tears in the margins. 19 x 27 inches. 21 1/2 x 29 1/4 inches. A fine print from the most sumptuous book on fencing ever produced, which combines a strong design sense with beauty and historical importance, executed by one of the greatest engravers of the day. The image illustrates Thibault's theories of successful fencing using movement and mathematical principles. Thibault's work was produced during a period when the Italian rapier (or epee) held sway. "The Italians discovered the effectiveness of the dexterous use of the point rather than the edge of the sword. By the end of the 16th century, their lighter weapon...and simple, nimble, and controlled fencing style, emphasizing skill and speed rather than force, spread throughout Europe. Most of the wrestling tricks [used in earlier disciplines] were abandoned, the lunge was discovered, and fencing became established as an art" (Encyclopaedia Britannica). The present image marks the zenith of the use of the epee in Europe. "In the latter half of the 17th century, the sword and swordsmanship changed dramatically with a change in gentleman's dress. In France the court of Louis XIV set the fashion of silk stockings, breeches, and brocaded coats...As the long trailing rapier was unsuited to this form of dress, fashion decreed the wearing of a light, short court sword. The French style set in throughout Europe as the Italian had done earlier" (op. cit.). Cf. Vigeant p. 125; cf. Willems 302.

      [Bookseller: Donald Heald Rare Books ]
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        Plate from 'Academie de l'Espee' [Tab. VII]

      [Leiden: B. & A. Elzevir: 1628]. Copper engraving by Andries Jacobsz Stock. Very good condition apart from a few light foxing marks in the top margin. 18 x 27 1/4 inches. 21 x 29 1/2 inches. A fine print from the most sumptuous book on fencing ever produced, which combines a strong design sense with beauty and historical importance, executed by one of the greatest engravers of the day. The image illustrates Thibault's theories of successful fencing using movement and mathematical principles. Thibault's work was produced during a period when the Italian rapier (or epee) held sway. "The Italians discovered the effectiveness of the dexterous use of the point rather than the edge of the sword. By the end of the 16th century, their lighter weapon...and simple, nimble, and controlled fencing style, emphasizing skill and speed rather than force, spread throughout Europe. Most of the wrestling tricks [used in earlier disciplines] were abandoned, the lunge was discovered, and fencing became established as an art" (Encyclopaedia Britannica). The present image marks the zenith of the use of the epee in Europe. "In the latter half of the 17th century, the sword and swordsmanship changed dramatically with a change in gentleman's dress. In France the court of Louis XIV set the fashion of silk stockings, breeches, and brocaded coats...As the long trailing rapier was unsuited to this form of dress, fashion decreed the wearing of a light, short court sword. The French style set in throughout Europe as the Italian had done earlier" (op. cit.). Cf. Vigeant p. 125; cf. Willems 302.

      [Bookseller: Donald Heald Rare Books ]
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        Plate from 'Academie de l'Espee' [Tab. XI]

      [Leiden: B. & A. Elzevir: 1628]. Copper engraving by Peter Isselburg. Very good condition apart from a few several skillfully repaired losses in the top margin, several small tears at the extreme edges of the margins, and an orange spot in the center of the image. 19 x 27 inches. 21 3/4 x 29 5/8 inches. A fine print from the most sumptuous book on fencing ever produced, which combines a strong design sense with beauty and historical importance, executed by one of the greatest engravers of the day. The image illustrates Thibault's theories of successful fencing using movement and mathematical principles. Thibault's work was produced during a period when the Italian rapier (or epee) held sway. "The Italians discovered the effectiveness of the dexterous use of the point rather than the edge of the sword. By the end of the 16th century, their lighter weapon...and simple, nimble, and controlled fencing style, emphasizing skill and speed rather than force, spread throughout Europe. Most of the wrestling tricks [used in earlier disciplines] were abandoned, the lunge was discovered, and fencing became established as an art" (Encyclopaedia Britannica). The present image marks the zenith of the use of the epee in Europe. "In the latter half of the 17th century, the sword and swordsmanship changed dramatically with a change in gentleman's dress. In France the court of Louis XIV set the fashion of silk stockings, breeches, and brocaded coats...As the long trailing rapier was unsuited to this form of dress, fashion decreed the wearing of a light, short court sword. The French style set in throughout Europe as the Italian had done earlier" (op. cit.). Cf. Vigeant p. 125; cf. Willems 302.

      [Bookseller: Donald Heald Rare Books ]
 8.   Check availability:     ABAA     Link/Print  


        Plate from 'Academie de l'Espee' [Tab. XXXIII]

      [Leiden: B. & A. Elzevir: 1628]. Copper engraving by Johann Gelle. Very good condition apart from several skillfully repaired losses in the margins. 19 x 27 1/4 inches. 21 x 29 5/8 inches. A fine print from the most sumptuous book on fencing ever produced, which combines a strong design sense with beauty and historical importance, executed by one of the greatest engravers of the day. The image illustrates Thibault's theories of successful fencing using movement and mathematical principles. Thibault's work was produced during a period when the Italian rapier (or epee) held sway. "The Italians discovered the effectiveness of the dexterous use of the point rather than the edge of the sword. By the end of the 16th century, their lighter weapon...and simple, nimble, and controlled fencing style, emphasizing skill and speed rather than force, spread throughout Europe. Most of the wrestling tricks [used in earlier disciplines] were abandoned, the lunge was discovered, and fencing became established as an art" (Encyclopaedia Britannica). The present image marks the zenith of the use of the epee in Europe. "In the latter half of the 17th century, the sword and swordsmanship changed dramatically with a change in gentleman's dress. In France the court of Louis XIV set the fashion of silk stockings, breeches, and brocaded coats...As the long trailing rapier was unsuited to this form of dress, fashion decreed the wearing of a light, short court sword. The French style set in throughout Europe as the Italian had done earlier" (op. cit.). Cf. Vigeant p. 125; cf. Willems 302.

      [Bookseller: Donald Heald Rare Books ]
 9.   Check availability:     ABAA     Link/Print  


        Plate from 'Academie de l'Espee' [Tab. X]

      [Leiden: B. & A. Elzevir: 1628]. Copper engraving by 'Rob. beaudoux'. Very good condition apart from some mild rippling. 18 7/8 x 27 inches. 21 x 29 1/4 inches. A fine print from the most sumptuous book on fencing ever produced, which combines a strong design sense with beauty and historical importance, executed by one of the greatest engravers of the day. The image illustrates Thibault's theories of successful fencing using movement and mathematical principles. Thibault's work was produced during a period when the Italian rapier (or epee) held sway. "The Italians discovered the effectiveness of the dexterous use of the point rather than the edge of the sword. By the end of the 16th century, their lighter weapon...and simple, nimble, and controlled fencing style, emphasizing skill and speed rather than force, spread throughout Europe. Most of the wrestling tricks [used in earlier disciplines] were abandoned, the lunge was discovered, and fencing became established as an art" (Encyclopaedia Britannica). The present image marks the zenith of the use of the epee in Europe. "In the latter half of the 17th century, the sword and swordsmanship changed dramatically with a change in gentleman's dress. In France the court of Louis XIV set the fashion of silk stockings, breeches, and brocaded coats...As the long trailing rapier was unsuited to this form of dress, fashion decreed the wearing of a light, short court sword. The French style set in throughout Europe as the Italian had done earlier" (op. cit.). Cf. Vigeant p. 125; cf. Willems 302.

      [Bookseller: Donald Heald Rare Books ]
 10.   Check availability:     ABAA     Link/Print  


        Plate from 'Academie de l'Espee' [Tab. V]

      [Leiden: B. & A. Elzevir: 1628]. Copper engraving by Johann Gelle. Very good condition. 19 x 27 1/8 inches. 21 x 29 1/2 inches. A fine print from the most sumptuous book on fencing ever produced, which combines a strong design sense with beauty and historical importance, executed by one of the greatest engravers of the day. The image illustrates Thibault's theories of successful fencing using movement and mathematical principles. Thibault's work was produced during a period when the Italian rapier (or epee) held sway. "The Italians discovered the effectiveness of the dexterous use of the point rather than the edge of the sword. By the end of the 16th century, their lighter weapon...and simple, nimble, and controlled fencing style, emphasizing skill and speed rather than force, spread throughout Europe. Most of the wrestling tricks [used in earlier disciplines] were abandoned, the lunge was discovered, and fencing became established as an art" (Encyclopaedia Britannica). The present image marks the zenith of the use of the epee in Europe. "In the latter half of the 17th century, the sword and swordsmanship changed dramatically with a change in gentleman's dress. In France the court of Louis XIV set the fashion of silk stockings, breeches, and brocaded coats...As the long trailing rapier was unsuited to this form of dress, fashion decreed the wearing of a light, short court sword. The French style set in throughout Europe as the Italian had done earlier" (op. cit.). Cf. Vigeant p. 125; cf. Willems 302.

      [Bookseller: Donald Heald Rare Books ]
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        The First Part of the Institutes of the Lawes of England. Or, a Commentarie upon Littleton, Not the Name of a Lawyer onely, but of the Law it selfe [etc.]. S.T.C. 15784. Folio

      First edition of Coke's most single famous work and one of the five greatest books of English law, glossing Littleton's 'Tenures', one of the remaining four, and forming the first part (of four) of his monumental Institutes of English Law. Modern calf, gilt, one leaf in facsimile, without the portraits and table of consanguinity, some browning and staining, early notations; a working copy. Printed for the Society of Stationers, London, 1628.

      [Bookseller:  Meyer Boswell Books, Inc.]
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