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Displayed below are some selected recent viaLibri matches for books published in 1933

        Nus [cover title]: La Beaute de la femme

      1933. First Edition . MASCLET, Daniel. Nus. La beauté de la femme. Paris: Daniel Masclet, (1933). Quarto, original cream stiff paper wrappers. $1500.First edition of the influential collection of female nudes assembled by French photographer Masclet to commemorate the landmark 1933 Paris International Salon of Nude Photography, with 96 rich full-page heliogravures, including Man Ray's ""Violon d'Ingres"" and ""Solarisation,"" along with images by Moholy-Nagy, Frantisek Drtikol, Emil Hoppé, Pierre Boucher, Maurice Beck, Jean Moral and others. Scarce in original wrappers.""The depiction of the human being was a central theme of photography during a period of social change"" in the early 1930s (Open Book, 15). Masclet's innovative volume of 96 female nudes highlights the work of figures such as Man Ray, ""the main Surrealist photographer"" (Parr & Badger I:87), seen here in his ""Violon d'Ingres,"" and ""Solarisation,"" the latter featured one year later in Man Ray Photographs 1920-1934. Also included is the artistry of Moholy-Nagy and Pierre Boucher, along with five images by Czech photographer Frantisek Drtikol, whose nude studies ""prefigured and influenced the emerging Bauhaus aesthetic"" (Roth, 64). Additional full-page heliogravures after Vogue's Maurice Beck and Life's Andreas Feininger, Emile Hoppé, Jean Moral, Bruno Schultz and numerous others. Published to commemorate the first International Salon of Nude Photography in Paris,1933, and edited by exhibit curator Daniel Masclet, ""a major figure on the European photographic scene"" (Lenman, 395). First edition, published in wrappers only, with original cord binding; without dust jacket as issued. Images fine, small ink mark to margin of one page without affecting plate; some soiling to original wrappers, loss to spine ends. An extremely good copy of a highly desirable European photobook.

      [Bookseller: Bauman Rare Books]
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        Fünf Leitsätze für die Rechtspraxis.

      2 Blatt. Ohne Einband. Mit Faltspur und leicht stockfleckig. Folded and with some foxing. = Sonderabruck aus "Deutsches Recht". 15. Dezember 1933. Very rare seperately printed leaflet establishing the Nazi juridical system ! Sehr seltener Sonderdruck. Die Streuweite der Schmittschen Gedanken, die präsise an das anschlossen, was Hitler und Frank auf dem LeipzigerJuristentag aufgestellte hatten, war beträchtlich. "Dieser Sonderdruck sollte den Justizstab auf Grundsätze und die Gesetze verpflichten, die sich der nationalsozialistische Staat gegeben hat." siehe "Blasius, Dirk. Carl Schmitt. Preussischer Staatsrat in Hitlers Reich"., Göttingen, Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 2001. and ref. Fijalkowski, Jürgen. Die Wendung zum Führerstaat. Die ideologischen Komponenten in der politischen Philosophie Carl Schmitts. Wiesbaden, Springer, 1958. The change to the Führer state. The ideological components in the political philosophy of Carl Schmitt.siehe auch Werle: Der Führerwille als Rechtsquelle.

      [Bookseller: J.J. Heckenhauer e.K.]
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        CHAMP ROSÉ.

      New Rochelle: Peter Pauper Press, 1933. 4 1/2 x 7 1/2. 29 leaves. Bound by Peter Geraty at his Praxis Bindery in 1988. Red goatskin with green leather onlaid panel. Gold tooled letters G, T (for Tory) and B, R (for Rogers) on this panel are cut out to expose the red leather beneath. The letters are based on Tory's. Lower cover repeats BR's IOU. Fine, in cloth traycase. Printed at The Walpole Printing Office "primarily for presentation at New Year's to a number of B. R.'s friends" with some for sale. Reprints the Roman letters from the Grolier Club edition, without the text. The "poor man's" Champ Fleury, printed entirely in red-- "as in these aforesaid days of hardship & depression much Book-Keeping is being written down in red...perhaps it would be better for Book-Selling too if Printing were done in that cheerful colour..."--BR. A binder and conservator since 1975, Peter Geraty also teaches at the American Academy of Bookbinding in Telluride. Peter is intrigued by the challenge of combining design, structure, and materials to present text or art. This binding was part of the 1989 Guild of Book Workers exhibition.

      [Bookseller: The Veatchs Arts of the Book]
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        Chats et Autres Betes

      , 1933. 1933. First Edition . STEINLEN, Theophile; LECOMTE, Georges. Chats et Autres Bêtes. Paris: Eugène Rey, 1933. Folio (10 by 13 inches), original printed paper self-wrappers, uncut; original glassine. $1800.Limited edition, with 19 mounted full-page plates (two double-page) and dozens of in-text reproductions of Steinlen's wonderful charcoal studies of cats, great cats, and other animals, number 72 of 500 copies on Velin d'Arches.Renowned painter, printmaker and illustrator Théophile Steinlen produced hundreds of illustrations throughout his career, often for magazines like Le Rire and Gil Blas illustré. ""It was his connection with Gil Blas illustré which made him famous. His more than 1000 designs for this weekly, printed in from two to four colors, offer a comprehensive survey of the teeming life of the city… He also showed himself to be a master of the poster, and after his first exhibition in 1894, both his lithographs and his etchings came to be sought after by collectors… Des chats [Some Cats], a folio of 1897, is a splendid tribute to the animals he loved best"" (Ray, The Art of the French Illustrated Book, 440). The present work finely reproduces for the first time a number of studies and drawings of cats (and other animals) that were found among Steinlen's papers after he died in 1923. From a total edition of 595 copies. Text in French. Wear and one small stain to fragile original glassine, rarely present. Book clean and fine. A lovely volume.

      [Bookseller: Bauman Rare Books ]
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        Ein Briefwechsel / Warum Krieg, Völkerbund ( Nummer 1043 von 2000

      Eigenverlag des istitutes, 1933. 61 S.Einband etw. vergilbt u. bestaubt u. lose, letzte S. beschrieben (Bleistift), Buchschnitt bestaubt G1000a Versand D: 6,00 EUR

      [Bookseller: Antiquarische Fundgrube e.U.]
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        THE STORY OF TEMPLE DRAKE - ORIGINAL LOBBY CARD

      [Los Angeles]: Paramount PIctures Distributing Corporation, 1933. Original studio-issued lobby card, offset printed on card stock, measuring 35.5cm x 28cm (14" x 11"). Discreet pinholes to corners, a few very faint stress creases to same, else bright, very Near Fine, and unrestored. Attractive lobby card from Stephen Roberts's 1933 pre-code crime drama, adapted from William Faulkner's 1931 novel Sanctuary. The story centers around Temple Drake, the daughter of a judge in a Southern city, who refuses to marry a steady, reliable lawyer and instead falls in with a group of bootleggers, resulting in rape and murder. This card illustrates the dramatic concluding scene of the film, where Temple confesses in court all that has happened to her, subsequently fainting into the arms of Mr. Steady, Reliable Lawyer, who carries her from the courtroom. Original ephemera from the film is uncommon, particularly well-preserved and in an unrestored state.

      [Bookseller: Captain Ahab's Rare Books]
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        Edward Wadsworth Sandeacutelection chronique de la vie artistique XIII

      

      [Bookseller: Maggs Bros. Ltd.]
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        Green Bough

      1933. First Edition . Signed. FAULKNER, William. A Green Bough. New York: Harrison Smith and Robert Haas, 1933. Octavo, original tan cloth, mounted cover illustrations, uncut and unopened. $3000.Signed limited first edition of FaulknerÂ’s second and last book of poetry, number 248 of 360 copies signed by him, of which only 350 copies were for sale, with two mounted cover illustrations and mounted frontispiece by Lynd Ward.""A Green Bough came out at the end of April [1933] without much fanfare. It was published as a favor to Faulkner by Hal Smith, with illustrations by Lynd Ward. The volume contained 44 poems, most of which were written very early in Faulkner's career and reflect his close reading of Eliot, Housman, Swinburne and Keats. One can hardly imagine that the author of these intensely literary poems is the same man who wrote Sanctuary or Light in August. This was Faulkner's farewell to poetry, and, as such, it warrants a glance. Poetry was the schoolhouse of Faulkner's fictionÂ… A Green Bough remains a fairly accomplished collection that demonstrates a firm grasp on the craft of poetry"" (Parini, 177). Twenty-nine of the 44 poems in this collection were previously unpublished and nearly all were revised prior to the publication of this work. No slipcase or dust jacket issued with this signed limited edition. Brodsky 147. Peterson A15.1a. Light offsetting to front endpapers. An about-fine copy.

      [Bookseller: Bauman Rare Books]
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        Sommerhöhe". Typed poem with autograph dedication, title and watercolour.

      No place, [15. VIII. 1933]. - 2 pp. on double leaf. 8vo. Watercolour ca. 75 x 90 mm. Autograph title "Sommerhöhe" (="height of summer") and dedication "für Adis zum 15. VIII. 33" for his sister Adele Gundert on occasion of her birthday on the first page of the double leaf under the watercolor. the typescript on the first page of the second leaf.

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat INLIBRIS Gilhofer Nfg. GmbH]
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        Fine photo by Jaeger, boldly signed "Edmund" and "Sibylla" and dated by the Prince, (Edmund, 1906-1947, Prince of Sweden, killed in a flying accident) & his wife Sibylla (Calma Marie, 1908-1972, elder daught of Karl Eduard, Duke of Saxe-Coburg & Gotha)

      1933 - also signed in pencil by the photographer, showing the young married couple seated together with their dog, 9½" x 7", no place, From the collection of Lady Patricia Ramsay, daughter of the Duke of Connaught. [Attributes: Signed Copy]

      [Bookseller: Sophie Dupre ABA ILAB PADA]
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        The Tragedy of Hamlet, Prince of Denmark. With engravings by Eric Gill & an introduction by Gilbert Murray

      (High Wycombe: Hague and Gill for the Limited Editions Club, 1933) - Limited edition, no. 910 of 1,500 copies signed by Gill, 8vo, (xvi), 149, (3) pp. Full page fly title engraving, five engravings in the text and one below the colophon. Full pigskin with blind stamped decoration to the covers, some mild rubbing to spine ends otherwise a very good copy in the slipcase, this with some sunning.

      [Bookseller: Bow Windows Bookshop (ABA, ILAB)]
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        The Tragedy of Hamlet, Prince of Denmark.

      Limited Editions Club, High Wycombe 1933 - Limited Edition, one of 1500 copies signed by the illustrator. Introduction by Gilbert Murray. Engraved title and numerous illustrations by Eric Gill. 149 pages, small 8vo, full brown leather with blind stamped figure stamped on front and rear covers; spine rubbed and dry & slipcase quite worn. High Wycombe: The Limited Editions Club, 1933. Small ownership bookplate otherwise very good (+). [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Argosy Book Store, ABAA, ILAB]
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        The Tragedy of Hamlet, Prince of Denmark With engravings by Eric Gill & an introduction by Gilbert Murray

      (High Wycombe: Hague and Gill for the Limited Editions Club, 1933). Limited edition, no. 910 of 1,500 copies signed by Gill, 8vo, (xvi), 149, (3) pp. Full page fly title engraving, five engravings in the text and one below the colophon. Full pigskin with blind stamped decoration to the covers, some mild rubbing to spine ends otherwise a very good copy in the slipcase, this with some sunning.

      [Bookseller: Bow Windows Bookshop]
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        The Tragedy of Hamlet, Prince of Denmark

      High Wycombe: Limited Editions Club, 1933. hardcover. very good(+). Introduction by Gilbert Murray. Engraved title and numerous illustrations by Eric Gill. 149 pages, small 8vo, full brown leather with blind stamped figure stamped on front and rear covers; spine rubbed and dry & slipcase quite worn. High Wycombe: The Limited Editions Club, 1933. Small ownership bookplate otherwise very good (+). Limited Edition, one of 1500 copies signed by the illustrator.

      [Bookseller: Argosy Book Store]
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        Ein Briefwechsel / Warum Krieg, Völkerbund ( Nummer 1043 von 2000

      Eigenverlag des istitutes, 1933 - 61 S. Einband etw. vergilbt u. bestaubt u. lose, letzte S. beschrieben (Bleistift), Buchschnitt bestaubt G1000a *.* Sprache: Deutsch Gewicht in Gramm: 270

      [Bookseller: Antiquarische Fundgrube e.U.]
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        Die Geschwister.

      252 Seiten mit illustriertem Titel und 9 ganzseitigen Illustrationen von Horst Bartsch. 8, gebundene Ausgabe, Original Ganz-Leineneinband mit Schutzumschlag, dieser mit kleinen fachmännisch hinterlegten Einrissen, die Ecken bestossen, ansonsten sauber und frisch, auf dem Vorsatz persönliche Widmung der Autorin, signiert und datiert (Berlin, 12.7.63). EA Hoeft/Streller 2778. Brigitte Reimann (* 21. Juli 1933 in Burg - + 20. Februar 1973 in Ost-Berlin) war eine bekannte deutsche Schriftstellerin. Sie hatte eine intensive Brieffreundschaft mit Christa Wolf. Signierte Bücher von Brigitte Reimann werden so gut wie nie angeboten!!!

      [Bookseller: Bührnheims Literatursalon GmbH]
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        God Rest You Merry Gentlemen

      1933. First Edition . HEMINGWAY, Ernest. God Rest You Merry Gentlemen. New York: House of Books Ltd., 1933. Small slim octavo, original red cloth, original glassine wrapper. $1500.Limited first edition, number 55 of only 300 copies.This was the first appearance of this story, although it was published with some revisions later the same year in Winner Take Nothing. Hemingway “drew on his remembrances of Kansas City in 1917” in writing this, one of his darkest stories, which “consisted of a conversation between two young ambulance surgeons about the case of a boy who had tried to persuade one of the doctors to castrate him and then mutilated himself with a razor in order to get rid of an ‘awful lustÂ’ which he took to be a ‘sin against purity” (Baker 227). Hanneman A11a. Light wear to edges of glassine. Book near-fine, with only mild toning to extremities. A handsome copy.

      [Bookseller: Bauman Rare Books]
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        Le Corset dans l'Art et les Moeurs du XIIIe au XXe Siècle

      1933. First Edition . LIBRON, Fernand and CLOUZOT, Henri. Le Corset dans lÂ’Art et les Moeurs du XIIIe au XXe Siècle. Paris: F. Libron, 1933. Large, thick folio (11 by 15 inches), original gilt-lettered cream wrappers, uncut and partially unopened. $1500.Limited first edition, number 662 of 880 copies, of this erudite history of “the artifices that women employ in order to support and perfect their fragile beauty,” with fashion plates (12 in color), facsimiles and in-text illustrations on nearly every page.Written some years after the heyday of corsetry by Fernand Libron, president of the Chambre Syndicale des Fabricants de Corsets, and Henri Clouzot, conservateur of the Musee Galliera (better known today as the Musee la Mode et du Costume), this monumental costume book pays special tribute to Ernest LeotyÂ’s very scarce Le Corset a Traverse les Ages (1893), which includes detailed cutting patterns and technical information for the tailor who specializes in making corsets. “A corset is somewhat similar to an umbrella in its construction. When the umbrella is raised, the fabric tautens. The ribs are reinforced with metal tips, to which the fabric of the umbrella is sewn. These tips hold the fabric in a tautened condition while the umbrella is in use. It is the same with a corset” (O.Y. Dalziel). Text in French. Without original slipcase. Hiler, 544. Fine condition.

      [Bookseller: Bauman Rare Books]
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        Knock-Out. A Bulldog Drummond Novel.

      London, Hodder and Stoughton. 1933. Two-fisted adventure. First Edition. 8vo. Near fine in publisher's light blue cloth titled in black to spine and front board, light bumping to spine ends. In a fine dustwrapper, very minor edgewear and marginal wear, outstandingly clean, bright and crisp. internally clean, light spotting to prelims. A splendid copy. Sapper's Drummond was one of the fore-runners to James Bond; [author Ian Fleming] "was certainly influenced by no-nonsense British fictional characters such as Bulldog Drummond" [Gilbert, p.616].

      [Bookseller: Adrian Harrington]
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        Autograph letter signed

      1933. Signed. RACKHAM, Arthur. Autograph letter signed. Surrey, England, July 28, 1933. Single sheet, measuring 4-1/2 by 7 inches folded; pp. 4 (writing on first and last pages). With archive of related material. $2200.Original lengthy autograph letter from Arthur Rackham, entirely written and signed by him, to a Mrs. Lloyd [Berrall] regarding the theft of his illustrations by American artist Edward Trumbull for a mural in New York's Metropolitan Life Building, with original hand-addressed signed envelope.This autograph letter by Arthur Rackham was written in response to a letter from a Julia Smith Berrall (a.k.a. Mrs. James Lloyd Berrall) of Montclair, New Jersey. Berrall had written to Rackham to inform him that the new murals in New York City's Metropolitan Life Building by muralist Edward Trumbull were ""exact copies of the figures in [his] illustrations of Rip Van Winkle and the Legend of Sleeph [sic] Hollow."" She further inquired whether Rackham had given permission to Trumbull to use the images. Less than two weeks later—incredibly quickly for transatlantic mail—Rackham penned an outraged response. The letter, written from Rackham's home in ""Stilegate, Limpsfield, Surrey, England"" and dated ""28.7.33,"" reads: ""Dear Mrs. Lloyd, Many thanks for your letter. You are quite right in assuming that. I know nothing about Mr. Trumbull's theft of my designs—for it is nothing less. I will take steps to find out whether there is anything to be done about it. That whether Mr. Trumbull is on the safe side of the law or not (& one fears he may have taken steps to find out, before embarking) it is a strange mentality that allows one artist to lift the work of another without even the courtesy of an acknowledgement. I am indeed surprised that a man in such a position as Mr. Trumbull appears to be should so demean himself. One would think that any artist would feel it to be an outrage, which it certainly is. Yrs sincerely, Arthur Rackham. PS. The question of International Copyright is one that to my sorrow the United States will not agree with the rest of us about."" Included with the letter to Mrs. Berrall are a copy of an article concerning the murals in the May 1933 issue of Pencil Points that showed pictures of the murals, but made no reference to Rackham; a copy of Berrall's letter to Rackham; a handwritten letter on Montclair Art Museum stationary which appears to be a draft of Berrall's letter to Publisher's Weekly inquiring about the plagiarism issue and inquiring as to whether Pencil Points was aware of Rackham's ownership of the mural images; a letter to Berrall from Publisher's Weekly confirming that Metropolitan Life was aware of the plagiarism and was attempting to come to a settlement with Rackham; a draft of an article by Jesse Mann of The Chatham Bookseller who acquired the Berrall/Rackham material and attempted to find out the ultimate disposition of Rackham's claim against Metropolitan Life; a copy of a letter from The Book Collector to Mann asking for additional information on the Met Life building; and Mann's finished article, published in The Book Collector in 1996.Autograph signed letter and envelope fine. A fascinating and desirable collection of items.

      [Bookseller: Bauman Rare Books]
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        Marlborough: His Life and Times

      1933. First Edition . CHURCHILL, Winston. Marlborough: His Life and Times. London: George G. Harrap, (1933-38). Four volumes. Octavo, original plum cloth, top edges gilt. $2000.First trade editions of this important biography, with hundreds of maps and plans (many folding), plates, and document facsimiles.Churchill wrote this history of his famous ancestor to refute earlier criticisms of Marlborough by Macaulay. “Though it was a commissioned work, Churchill would not have invested nearly a million words and ten years had it not had special significance for him. For he wrote about a man who was not only his ancestor, an invincible general, the first of what became the Spencer-Churchill dukes of Marlborough, and a maker of modern Britain, but also a supreme example of heroism in the two vocations which mainly interested Churchill and in which ultimate triumph seemed to have eluded him— politics and war making” (Wiedhorn, 110). “It may be his greatest book. To understand the Churchill of the Second World War, the majestic blending of his commanding English with historical precedent, one has to read Marlborough. Only in its pages can one glean an understanding of the root of the speeches which inspired Britain to stand when she had little to stand with” (Langworth, 164). Issued simultaneously in a signed limited edition. Errata slips present in Volumes I-III, as called for. Without scarce original dust jackets. Cohen A97.1.a. Woods A40a. Interiors fine; light fading to spines of Volumes I-III. About-fine condition. Increasingly scarce.

      [Bookseller: Bauman Rare Books]
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        Nus [cover title]: La Beaute de la femme

      , 1933. 1933. First Edition . MASCLET, Daniel. Nus. La beauté de la femme. Paris: Daniel Masclet, (1933). Quarto, original cream stiff paper wrappers. $1500.First edition of the influential collection of female nudes assembled by French photographer Masclet to commemorate the landmark 1933 Paris International Salon of Nude Photography, with 96 rich full-page heliogravures, including Man Ray's ""Violon d'Ingres"" and ""Solarisation,"" along with images by Moholy-Nagy, Frantisek Drtikol, Emil Hoppé, Pierre Boucher, Maurice Beck, Jean Moral and others. Scarce in original wrappers.""The depiction of the human being was a central theme of photography during a period of social change"" in the early 1930s (Open Book, 15). Masclet's innovative volume of 96 female nudes highlights the work of figures such as Man Ray, ""the main Surrealist photographer"" (Parr & Badger I:87), seen here in his ""Violon d'Ingres,"" and ""Solarisation,"" the latter featured one year later in Man Ray Photographs 1920-1934. Also included is the artistry of Moholy-Nagy and Pierre Boucher, along with five images by Czech photographer Frantisek Drtikol, whose nude studies ""prefigured and influenced the emerging Bauhaus aesthetic"" (Roth, 64). Additional full-page heliogravures after Vogue's Maurice Beck and Life's Andreas Feininger, Emile Hoppé, Jean Moral, Bruno Schultz and numerous others. Published to commemorate the first International Salon of Nude Photography in Paris,1933, and edited by exhibit curator Daniel Masclet, ""a major figure on the European photographic scene"" (Lenman, 395). First edition, published in wrappers only, with original cord binding; without dust jacket as issued. Images fine, small ink mark to margin of one page without affecting plate; some soiling to original wrappers, loss to spine ends. An extremely good copy of a highly desirable European photobook.

      [Bookseller: Bauman Rare Books ]
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        Fine photograph boldly signed (Anne, 1906-2001, pioneering American Aviator, author, and wife of CHARLES, 1902-1974, American Aviator, First to fly solo non-stop across the Atlantic in 1927)

      1933 - showing her full length, wearing jodphurs and a flying helmet, standing on a quay, together with a copy of a signed photo of her and her husband Charles, with a note saying that they were being met on their arrival in Shetland by members of the Shetland Council, 6½" x 4½" in mount 12" x 7½", Shetland, August In August 1933 the Lindberghs were surveying a Northern Trans-Atlantic Route by flying boat from Canada to Denmark via Labrador, Greenland, Iceland, Faroe and Shetland. Cans of petrol and oil had been shipped to Lerwick the month before. On 25th August 1933, the Provost of Lerwick and all the notables went out in the harbour to welcome the Lindberghs as they brought in their red and black machine, Tingmissartoq. The first wheeled aircraft had landed in Shetland only three months before. The Lindberghs were fêted everywhere. They stayed two nights, visiting the Observatory (for weather reports) and archaeological excavations and were much admired for their easy courtesy. [Attributes: Signed Copy]

      [Bookseller: Sophie Dupre ABA ILAB PADA]
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        9 letters and 2 lettercards signed.

      Mårbacka, Sunne, Badesanatoriet Skodsborg, and Karlavägen, 1925 to 1933. - Mostly small 4to. Altogether 34½ pp. on 22 ff. With 8 envelopes. Together with a portrait postcard with 2 autograph but unsigned lines. Mostly dictated. To the prominent Swedish baritone and opera administrator John Forsell, mentioning her novel "Gösta Berling's Saga", which was set to music by Riccardo Zandonai (under the title "I cavalieri di Ekebù") and was staged at the Stockholm Opera in 1928 in connection with her 70th birthday. Moreover, on some economic problems with a Mr. Falke, who wrote a dramatization of "Gösta Berling", and "who has never paid me a Pfening, but has repeatedly sought to capitalize his being in contact with me" (transl. from the Swedish original). - From the estate of John Forsell (1868-1941).

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat INLIBRIS Gilhofer Nfg. GmbH]
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        Unsere Führer im Lichte der Rassenfrage und Charakterologie. Eine rassenmäßige und charakterbiologische Beurteilung von Männern des Dritten Reiches. Mit polizeilicher und parteiamtlicher NSDAP-Genehmigung

      Vollständige Ausgabe im original Verlagseinband (blaues Ganzleinen GLn / OLn / Ln im Format 14 x 22 cm) mit dekoriertem Deckeltitel in Goldprägung, Text: Fraktur. 169 Seiten, mit vielen ganzseitigen Fotoabbildungen auf Kunstdruckpapier (Porträt-Aufnahmen von führenden Nationalsozialisten) sowie einem Foto des Verfassers auf Seite 6. Druck: Hansa-Buchdruckerei Bormann & Co / Leipzig. - Das Buch ist gewidmet "aus tiefer Geistverbundenheit allen schaffenden germanischen Artschwestern und Artbrüdern, die deutsch leben und streben". - Aus dem Vorwort: "Menschenkenntnis ist Macht. Keineswegs fußt die vorliegende Arbeit auf neuen wissenschaftlichen Grundsätzen. Seit dem 17.Jahrhundert bereits finden sich immer wieder Anläufe, Rassenkunde und Menschenkenntnis zu staatlich anerkannten Wissenschaften erheben. Aber die Gegner in Staatsstellen und an Schulen und Universitäten haben es verstanden, das Urwissen unserer Ahnen bis zu dieser Zeit zu unterdrücken. Von den Vorkämpfern für dieses Wissen seien erwähnt: Lavater, Dr.Gall, Dr.Spürzheimer, Prof.Combe, Carus, Hutter, Gerling und Peters. Diese deckt bereits die kühle Erde. Unter uns Lebenden weilen: Lanz von Liebensfels, Ißberner-Haldane, Georg Richter und Burger-Villingen. Lanz von Liebensfels gebührt ein besonderer Ruhmeskranz. Trotz stärkster Knebelung und erbitterter Verfolgung hat er sich voller Idealismus für die Rassenkunde eingesetzt und sie weithin verbreitet. Ißberner-Haldane und Georg Richter kämpfen heldenmütig für den Rassengedanken und lassen sich selbst durch den Verlust von Freundinnen und Freunden nicht beirren. Beide schufen und finanzierten völlig unabhängig voneinander je eine Rassenschule . . . Hinsichtlich der Literatur verweise ich auf die Angaben in meinem Werk "Die urewige Weisheitssprache der Menschenformen". Heil Deutschland! Der Verfasser. Bärenstein (Bez. Dresden), am 20. April 1933". - Aus der Einleitung: "Alle äußeren Formen, gleichviel ob Kopf, Hals, Hand, Gang, Sprache, Gebärde, Ausdruck, Schrift, entsprechen den inneren Kräfte des Menschen. Damit ist die Möglichkeit gegeben, an den Rassenmerkmalen die unterschiedlichen seelischen Anlagen zu erkennen. Rasse ist niemals mit Taufe oder Änderung der Nationalität zu verwischen. Sie besteht vielmehr immer weiter, weil die Rasse durch das unveränderte Blut bestimmt wird. An ihrer Hautfarbe kann man die vier Grund- und Hauptrassen erkennen. Weiße Hautfarbe: arisch-germanische Rasse, braune Hautfarbe: Mediterrane, gelbe Hautfarbe: Mongolen, schwarze Hautfarbe: afrikanische Stämme. Der Jude ist keine bestimmte reine Rasse, sondern eine Mischrasse aus allen vier Grundrassen unter deren Unterarten. Daraus erklärt sich sein unberechenbares, internationales Heimatgefühl. Seine Heimat ist jeweilig dort, wo ein gutes Auskommen findet. Darin unterscheidet er sich grundlegend von den germanischen Völkern, denn diese halten ihrer Heimat die unbedingte Treue. Das gleiche gilt für die schwarzen Völker und auch für die Mongolen. Wenn der Jude eine Rassengemeinschaft eingeht, so tut er das nur aus Not und Berechnung. Selten aber ist diese Gemeinschaft von langer Dauer. Denn infolge seines egoistischen und händlerischen Wesens macht er sich bei jedem Wirtsvolk bald dermaßen unbeliebt, daß er wieder vertrieben wird. Darum muss auch für das deutsche Volk aus Liebe zu seiner Rassenreinheit Rassenscheidung gefordert werden. Jede Rassenmischung ist Sünde!... Seit unserer Volkskanzler die Zügel in die Hand genommen hat, ist gottlob unter dem verjudeten medizinischen Berufsstand aufgeräumt worden. Mit einemal geht von dort eine Welle des Verständnisses aus . . . Gutes Expl. weiter Beschreibung s.Nr.21072! - Deutsches / Drittes Reich, Antisemitismus, Sachsen, Alte Kämpfer als heroische nordisch-germanische Menschen dargestellt, deutsche Menschen um Adolf Hitler, Charakterkunde, menschlicher Charakter, Charakterologie, Phrenologie, Schädellehre, Guido von List, der Frankenführer Julius Streicher und weitere Führungspersönlichkeiten des Nationalsozialismus rassenkundlich betrachtet, nationalsozialistische Führer in menschenkundlicher bzw. charakterologischer Beurteilung, Antisemitismus, Rassenkunde, NS.-Schrifttum aus Sachsen, völkisches / nationalsozialistisches Gedankengut

      [Bookseller: Galerie für gegenständliche Kunst]
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        Eigenh. Brief mit U.

      Konzentrationslager Sonnenburg bei Küstrin, 9. VII. 1933. - 1½ SS. 8vo. In Bleistift. An seine Frau Maud v. Ossietzky, geb. Lichfield-Woods: "Carl von Ossietzky. Polizeigefängnis Sonnenburg 04/6, 9.7.33. Liebste Maudie, vielen Dank für Deine Karte. Du hast also jetzt viel zu tun. Dein Aufenthalt in Schlachtensee geht zu Ende, was bedeutet, dass Du dich jetzt nach einer neuen Unterkunft umsehen musst. Ebenso ist die Sache mit Baby jetzt geregelt. Das sind schwierige und aufreibende Dinge, die auf Dir lasten. Es tut mir leid, dass Du das alles allein erledigen musst, ich fühle Deine Sorgen. Wie gerne möchte ich Dir, möchte ich Euch helfen! Die neue Cigarettensendung habe ich bekommen. Geld ist noch nicht eingelaufen. Sei so freundlich und schicke mir in den nächsten Tagen ein paar Mark, da ich dringend etwas gebrauche. Schreibe bitte zukünftig meine vollständige Adresse, wie umstehend angegeben. Baby habe ich nicht mehr sehen können. Du musst mir schreiben, wie es ihr geht und wie sie sich herausmacht. Meine Liebe ist bei ihr. Ich küsse und umarme Dich, mein Kind, bleibe gesund. Dein Carl".

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat INLIBRIS Gilhofer Nfg. GmbH]
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        Autograph letter signed.

      Grand Pump Room Hotel, Bath, 27. XII. 1933. - 8vo. 1½ pp. on 2 ff. To the Pupils of Deer Lodge School, Mayerthorpe, Alberta. Kipling profusely thanks the pupils for the custom made calendar and place mats they sent him. He also discusses the difficulties the extreme weather conditions and their effect upon the 75 head steers on his property (Bateman's, a 17th-century house located in Burwash, East Sussex, England, where Kipling. lived from 1902 to his death in 1936). Signed "Rudyard Kipling." - From the Collection of Diana Herzog. [Attributes: Signed Copy]

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat INLIBRIS Gilhofer Nfg. GmbH]
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        Liste des Grands Vins Fins (18 Annual Catalogues)

      , 1933. 1933. First Edition . MAISON NICOLAS. Liste des Grands Vins Fins. [Paris]: (Draeger Frères), 1933-1971. Eighteen volumes. Quarto (varying sizes), original flexible paper covers (some spiral-bound). Housed in two custom red clamshell boxes. $4200.First editions of these wonderfully illustrated annual wine lists from Maison Nicolas, with cover designs and illustrations by such leading French painters as Saint-André, Latour and Minaux.

      [Bookseller: Bauman Rare Books ]
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        LOST HORIZON

      London: Macmillan. 1933. First edition, first printing. First edition, first printing. Signed by the author. PublisherÂ’s original green cloth with gilt titles to the spine, in dustwrapper. A lovely near fine copy, the binding clean and square, the contents with a previous ownerÂ’s bookplate and ink name to the front pastedown otherwise clean and bright throughout. Complete with the near fine, very bright, lightly rubbed and nicked dustwrapper. Not price-clipped (7/6 net to the front flap). Housed in a purpose-made cloth folding case with gilt titles to the upper lid and spine. An exceptional example. Inscribed by the author in black ink on the title page, “H. D. Winney / sincerely / James Hilton”. The basis for the budget busting, multi Acadamy Award nominated 1937 Columbia Pictures film directed by Frank Capra, staring Ronald Colman, Jane Wyatt and H. B. Warner. Further details and images for any of the items listed are available on request. Lucius Books welcomes direct contact with our customers.

      [Bookseller: Lucius Books]
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        The Cantos. Some Testimonies by Ernest Hemingway, Ford Maddox Ford, T. S. Eliot, Hugh Walpole, Archibald Macleish, James Joyce and Others.

      New York: Farrar & Rinehart, Inc., 1933 - Octavo. Original white wrappers printed in black. Wrappers lightly rubbed and toned. An excellent copy. First edition, first impression. [Attributes: First Edition]

      [Bookseller: Peter Harrington. ABA member]
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        Typed letter signed. WITH: Engraved silver trophy bowl

      1933. Signed. PATTON, George S. Typed letter signed. WITH: Engraved sterling silver prize bowl trophy . Fort Meyer, Virginia, May 29, 1933. Single sheet of cream letterhead measuring 6 by 7 inches. WITH: Sterling silver price bowl trophy measuring 9 inches in diameter and 4-1/2 inches in height. $12,500.Original 1933 typed letter written by George S. Patton to his sister and childhood best friend Nita and signed by him concerning his travels to compete in horse shows and discussing several of their friends and neighbors, including fellow West Point graduate Col. Toddy George, his uncle, Billy Wills, and his childhood nurse, Mary Scally, accompanied by an engraved sterling silver prize bowl he won in 1934 for riding Wild Ben at the Cherry Blossom Festival Horse Show.The letter, typed on Patton's personal letterhead and dated ""May 29 1933,"" reads: ""Dear Nita: I have been rather bad about writing lately and am sorry I cant plead excess businness for while I am as usual much occupied I have realy nothing important to do. I think I wrote you that we did nothing in the National Capital Horse Show. In the Front Royal Show we did very well and I got a bad fall which should have but did not hurt me. Too old and tough[.] Toddy George and I are leaving Wednesday Morning for two shows at Tuxeado and West Point we will be gone a week I hope he breaks his neck bit he wont. I have finished my boat all except some few jobs of painting and will launch it when I get back from W.O. on the 7th. How is Uncle Billy Wills and Mary Scally also give my love to Mary Post. I am sorry about her loss and would have written a dozen times but simply cant find the words with which to start. If I were there I could talk all right. She and Henry were so particularly nice at the time of Papa's death. Give her my love. We are all well. With lots of love your devoted broth. {signed] GS Patton Jr.""Although he earned a reputation as an avid letter writer, Patton nevertheless had great difficulty with spelling and sentence construction (evident in this letter). He struggled to learn how to read and write as a child and did not attend formal schooling until the age of 11. Historians have postulated that he may have had dyslexia. This letter shows a certain looseness he often displayed in corresponding to family such as his sister Anne ""Nita"" Patton. Nita was quite possibly Patton's closest friend as a child and she was often his playmate for games such as sword-fighting and war. As they grew up, the pair remained close. In fact, Nita became romantically involved with General Pershing, Patton's superior and mentor. Marriage seemed sure to follow. However, Pershing was so changed by the trauma and triumph of World War I that he lost interest in Nita and broke off their relationship. Patton, of course, had an active social life beyond Nita and this letter discusses several of his friends. Here, Patton is seen humorously wishing ill on Colonel Charles Peasley ""Toddy"" George, one of Patton's fellow West Point attendees. The son-in-law of Hoover's Vice President, George was on the 1928 U.S. Olympic Riding Team and undoubtedly showed the notoriously insecure Patton an uncomfortable level of competition. Also mentioned in the letter are Uncle Billy Wills (Patton's uncle by marriage, who held the distinction of patching Patton up when he lit himself on fire after filling a lamp with gasoline instead of kerosene) and Mary Scally (his childhood nurse and a devout Irish-Catholic who lived with Nita for much of her life).The letter broadly concerns Patton's equestrian accomplishments, which were considerable. On April 20, 1934, the Washington Post wrote that, at the Cherry Blossom Festival Horse Show, ""The horsemen's parade was brought to a close by six hunt teams of three horses each, ridden in hunt colors. The Cobbler Hunt, of Delaplane, Va. was represented by Col. George S. Patton, Mrs. Patton, and their daughter, Beatrice—always a familiar little group at the Virginia horse shows and hunter trialsÂ… The excellent hunter of Col. Patton and familyÂ… were foremost among the performers."" Major Patton had been promoted to Lieutenant Colonel on March 1, 1934.The letter is accompanied by an engraved sterling silver trophy prize bowl won by Col. Patton at the 1934 Cherry Blossom Festival Horse How. The impressive 9"" diameter bowl, which weighs over a pound, is engraved ""Cherry Blossom Festival Horse Show, National Capital 1934, Hunter Class 1st prize, Presented by Hotel Powhatan, Won By Wild Ben, Ridden By Colonel Patton."" Recently from the family of George S. Patton, Jr.Letter and signature fine, slight smooth denting and pinpoint tarnish to bright and handsome silver trophy bowl (occurred while in possession of Patton family).

      [Bookseller: Bauman Rare Books]
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        De bekende Landheer van Tjampea c.a. Willem Vincent Helvetius vam Riemsdijk. Zijn Naaste Familije een zijne Afstammelingen. Genealogie samengestelt door P.R. Feith en P.C. Bloys van Treslong Prins.

      Selbstverlag, Batavia 1933. - gr.8°, Leinwandeinband, XIV und 574 Seiten, s-w-Abb., Tafeln lichtrandig, Einband etwas berieben und fleckig, Besitzervermerk (der Elisabet Löbell, die auf Batavia gelebt hatte), sonst gut. Beiliegend 2 handschr. Brief der Löbell (dat. 1942) in niederländischer Sprache, Auszüge auf Taufregistern für Ariernachweis (es geht meist um Familie van Zwieten), ein handschr. Stammbaum. Die Familie Riemsdijk lebte lange auf Batavia ( Java.

      [Bookseller: Cassiodor Antiquariat]
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        Le Corset dans l'Art et les Moeurs du XIIIe au XXe Siècle

      , 1933. 1933. First Edition . Signed. LIBRON, Fernand and CLOUZOT, Henri. Le Corset dans l

      [Bookseller: Bauman Rare Books ]
 33.   Check availability:     ABAA     Link/Print  


        FLUSH

      London: The Hogarth Press 1933. First edition, first printing. First edition, first printing. Signed by the author. Publisher’s original brown cloth with gilt titles to the spine, in dustwrapper. With four drawings by Vanessa Bell and six other illustrations. A better than very good copy, the binding firm and square with the toning to the cloth so often seen with this title and light rubbing at the extremities. The contents are lightly spotted to the prelims and some page margins with some ghosting of the signature on the half title. Complete with the attractive lightly rubbed and toned original dustwrapper. An excellent example. Signed by the author in black ink on the front endpaper. Scarce thus. Further details and images for any of the items listed are available on request. Lucius Books welcomes direct contact with our customers.

      [Bookseller: Lucius Books]
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        Ah King six stories

      

      [Bookseller: Maggs Bros. Ltd.]
 35.   Check availability:     Direct From Seller     Link/Print  


        Archive relating to Marlborough

      , 1933. 1933. Signed. CHURCHILL, Winston. Archive of material relating to Marlborough: His Life and Times. London and other locations, 1933-38. Twenty-nine typed signed letters on 34 sheets, 2 of which measure 5 by 8 inches and the remaining of which measure 8 by 10 inches. WITH: Galley proof, measuring 10 by 14 inches. WITH: Map leaves, notes, typed carbon contents leaf, secretarially signed letters, and page-proof corrections, most measuring 8 by 10 inches. WITH: 10 telegrams from Churchill of varying dimensions. Housed together in a black binder and a custom clamshell box. $98,500.An exceptional rarity: large archive of material relating to the editing and publishing of Churchill

      [Bookseller: Bauman Rare Books ]
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        Winner Take Nothing

      1933. First Edition . Signed. HEMINGWAY, Ernest. Winner Take Nothing. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1933. Octavo, original black cloth with gold paper labels, original dust jacket. Housed in a custom clamshell box. $45,000.First edition of Hemingway's famed collection of short stories, an especially rare presentation/association copy warmly inscribed by Hemingway in Paris the day after publication, to his close friend, Guy Hickok, bureau chief of the Brooklyn Daily Eagle, ""To Guy with much affection, Ernest, Paris, Oct 28, 1933."" Also with the bookseller ticket of Sylvia Beach's famed Paris bookshop, Shakespeare and Company, where Hemingway saw the first copies of Winner Take Nothing, which had just been shipped over from Scribner's. This extremely rare presentation first edition of Winner Take Nothing possesses an especially memorable association in Hemingway's inscription—dated in Paris the day after publication—to Guy Hickok, ""one of Hemingway's closest friends in Paris"" (Montgomery Review 25:1, 112). The two first met when Hemingway, new to Paris, attended meetings of the Anglo-American Press Club. Hickok, head of the Paris bureau of the Brooklyn Daily Eagle, impressed Hemingway with his knowledge of fine food, sports and French wines. ""Hickok's neat black mustache was impressive too, and during a visit to Germany in the summer of 1922 Hemingway more than matched it"" (Lynn, 122). The two also shared a keen interest ""in boxing, horse racing, human interest stories, and tall tales. Ernest never crossed the Seine without dropping in at the sign of the Eagle in the Boulevard de la Madeleine. Laughter was always skyrocketing through the smoke-filled rooms"" (Baker, 87). In 1927 Hemingway and Hickok set off on a tour of Italy. ""In late March, in Hickok's battered Ford coupe, the two travelers crossed the border into Italy at Ventimiglia, traveling down the Riviera to Genoa… In a village 20 kilometers above La Spezia, a self-assured young Fascist, disdainful of foreigners, commandeered a ride… Hemingway described the young man in sardonic terms in an article, 'Italy, 1927,' first published as a straight journalistic account in The New Republic (May 18, 1927) and five months later as a short story, retitled 'Che Ti Dice la Patria?' [in Men Without Women]."" Hemingway's chilling glimpse into Fascism also highlighted a comic encounter when ""a chummy whore assaulted the uncomfortable Guy Hickok with her obvious charms."" Hickok and Hemingway were also frequent correspondents, with Hemingway writing Hickok of his pride in A Farewell to Arms [1929]—""It's a swell book—I'm damned if it's not,"" and describing Death in the Afternoon (1932) as ""'my bloody book'… It was a good book, he assured Hickok. 'Really maybe the best one yet'… Hickok, who took pride in Hemingway's later success and admired Hemingway's ambition, furthered Hemingway's legend by writing articles about him and his wartime exploits for the Eagle"" (Mellow, 346-7, 377, 414, 174). This exceptional presentation/association copy also contains the distinct bookseller ticket of Sylvia Beach's famed Paris bookshop, Shakespeare and Company. ""For 20 years Hemingway was a prominent player in the history of Shakespeare and Company… To the delight of Sylvia, Hemingway arrived in Paris the evening of 26 October [1933] and came to see her the next morning. 'He and I are good old friends,' she declared in a letter… 'He looks fine and handsome'"" (Fitch, 117, 341). Ernest's brother, Leicester, would recall: ""At Sylvia Beach's bookshop Ernest had a chance to see the first copies of Winner Take Nothing, which had just been shipped over by Scribner's. He liked the jacket, which he had not seen before since he'd had to correct proofs by cable"" (My Brother, 139). Six of this collection's 14 stories made their first appearance here. ""Published October 27, 1933"" (Hanneman A12). Hanneman A12a. Grissom A.12.1.a. As Ernest Hemingway could be both reclusive and notoriously cold to admirers, this wonderful presentation/association first edition is most rare.Text fresh and clean, faintest foxing only to preliminaries, slight soiling, mild edge-wear to cloth; light edge-wear to scarce dust jacket. A very rare near-fine presentation first edition with an important association.

      [Bookseller: Bauman Rare Books]
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        The Lamentations Of Jeremiah.

      Folio. Original dark blue Hermitage calf, titled in blind on spine and upper cover, Gregynog device also in blind on upper cover; 21 wood-engravings and cover design by Blair Hughes-Stanton, 5 of the engravings are full-page, headings and running titles printed in blue; a little springing to boards but a very nice copy. Limited to 250 copies, printed on Japanese vellum, this being one of 125 copies bound in Hermitage calf. One of the highlights of the Gregynog Press.

      [Bookseller: Henry Sotheran Ltd.]
 38.   Check availability:     Direct From Seller     Link/Print  


        Liste des Grands Vins Fins (18 Annual Catalogues)

      1933. First Edition . MAISON NICOLAS. Liste des Grands Vins Fins. [Paris]: (Draeger Frères), 1933-1971. Eighteen volumes. Quarto (varying sizes), original flexible paper covers (some spiral-bound). Housed in two custom red clamshell boxes. $4200.First editions of these wonderfully illustrated annual wine lists from Maison Nicolas, with cover designs and illustrations by such leading French painters as Saint-André, Latour and Minaux.“From 1928 to 1973, Nicolas has recognized the synergy between wine and art by commissioning such great painters as Derain, Van Dongen and Buffet to illustrate its catalogues of fine vintages.” “Now we start getting closer to the basis of Nicolas’ success. Prime vineyard sites, only old vines— 35 years minimum but typically much older— and growers who work in an organic or even biodynamic way… Of course, there is no fining and (unless absolutely necessary) no filtration and even the bottling is done at the wane of the moon” (Burgundy Report). This collection of 18 Maison Nicolas wine catalogues between the years 1933 and 1971, with their commissioned artistic covers and text illustrations, not only records the vinyard’s annual offerings, but represents a contemporary French popular taste in art— Latour, Saint-André, Gischia, Limouse, Caillard, Humblot, Midy, Guiramand, Minaux, Lorjou and Sarthou. Generally fine condition.

      [Bookseller: Bauman Rare Books]
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        AFRICAN FOLK TALES as told to Pauline E. Dinkins.

      Nashville, TN: Sunday School Publishing Board, 1933. 52 pages of text. Maroon hardcover binding with a color illustration affixed to the front cover; protected in custom stiff archival mylar. The binding is heavily rubbed and soiled, with minor staining and/or discoloration, and chipping and fraying to the extremities. Inner hinges are tender and worn. Several pages have small tears and/or creases at the edges, with minor to moderate soiling. The illustrations by Harlem Renaissance author Effie Lee Newsome (1885-1979) a.k.a. Mary Effie Lee are bright and attractive. Previous owner's inscription neatly on the inside front cover.. First Edition. Hardcover. Good condition. Quarto (4to).

      [Bookseller: Kurt Gippert Bookseller (ABAA) ]
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        MEYERS LEXIKON. Siebente Auflage. In vollst

      Leipzig, Bibliographisches Institut 1924 - 1930, 1931, 1933 - Vollst

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat im Schloss]
 41.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  


        Le Corset dans l'Art et les Moeurs du XIIIe au XXe Siècle

      1933. First Edition . Signed. LIBRON, Fernand and CLOUZOT, Henri. Le Corset dans l’Art et les Moeurs du XIIIe au XXe Siècle. Paris: F. Libron, 1933. Large, thick folio (11 by 15 inches), original gilt-lettered cream wrappers, uncut and partially unopened, original glassine wrapper, original faux alligator slipcase. $4000.Limited first edition, number L of only 80 copies not available for sale (from a total edition of 880), of this erudite history of “the artifices that women employ in order to support and perfect their fragile beauty,” with numerous fashion plates (12 in color), facsimiles and in-text illustrations on nearly every page. Inscribed on the half title, “Hommage de l’auteur a Madame C. Capaldi, sa dénoncé collaboratrice, Paris le 20 Mai 1937, F. Libron,” and accompanied by 15 separate plates from the “Album” laid in.Written some years after the heyday of corsetry by Fernand Libron, president of the Chambre Syndicale des Fabricants de Corsets, and Henri Clouzot, conservateur of the Musee Galliera (better known today as the Musee la Mode et du Costume), this monumental costume book pays special tribute to Ernest Leoty’s very scarce Le Corset a Traverse les Ages (1893), which includes detailed cutting paterns and technical information for the tailor who specializes in making corsets. “A corset is somewhat similar to an umbrella in its construction. When the umbrella is raised, the fabric tautens. The ribs are reinforced with metal tips, to which the fabric of the umbrella is sewn. These tips hold the fabric in a tautened condition while the umbrella is in use. It is the same with a corset” (O.Y. Dalziel). Text in French. Accompanied by 15 loose engravings, listed in the index of illustrations under the heading “Album.” Hiler, 544. Book and plates fine, spine panel of original glassine perished, slipcase only slightly rubbed. A fine copy.

      [Bookseller: Bauman Rare Books]
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        Tale of Peter Rabbit

      1933. Signed. POTTER, Beatrix. The Tale of Peter Rabbit. London and New York: Frederick Warne, [circa 1939]. 16mo, original tan paper boards, mounted cover illustration. Housed in a custom clamshell box. $9000.Later edition of Potter’s first book, one of the most popular of all children’s tales, with charming color frontispiece and 26 illustrations, inscribed by her on the recto of the frontispiece, “Elizabeth Anne Byers, Sept. 7th 1939. ‘Many Happy Returns’! Beatrix Potter.”In 1893, young Beatrix Potter, on holiday with her parents in Scotland, composed a letter to cheer Noel, the child of her former governess, who was suffering from rheumatic fever. ""My dear Noel,"" she began, ""I shall tell you a story about four little rabbits, whose names were Flopsy, Mopsy, Cottontail and Peter…"" The Tale of Peter Rabbit was born. Potter published the first two private editions of Peter Rabbit at her own expense, both editions totaling only 450 copies—which immediately sold. Publisher Frederick Warne agreed to print the first trade edition of Peter Rabbit in 1902. The endpapers in this copy indicate this edition cannot predate circa 1918-19, when they were first used in editions of Johnny Town-Mouse and Timmy Tiptoes (Quinby, plate XV). Interior and boards lightly soiled. Expert restoration to spine. An extremely good copy.

      [Bookseller: Bauman Rare Books]
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        Archive relating to Marlborough

      1933. Signed. CHURCHILL, Winston. Archive of material relating to Marlborough: His Life and Times. London and other locations, 1933-38. Twenty-nine typed signed letters on 34 sheets, 2 of which measure 5 by 8 inches and the remaining of which measure 8 by 10 inches. WITH: Galley proof, measuring 10 by 14 inches. WITH: Map leaves, notes, typed carbon contents leaf, secretarially signed letters, and page-proof corrections, most measuring 8 by 10 inches. WITH: 10 telegrams from Churchill of varying dimensions. Housed together in a black binder and a custom clamshell box. $98,500.An exceptional rarity: large archive of material relating to the editing and publishing of Churchill’s Marlborough: His Life and Times, comprising 29 typed letters signed from Churchill, nearly all to his notorious proofreader, C.C. Wood, together with a galley proof page with corrections in Churchill’s hand and other materials. John Churchill, the first Duke of Marlborough, started his court service as a page during the reign of Charles II and ended it as Master-General of the Ordnance of the English army under George I. He served under five sovereigns, distinguished himself on the battlefield and as a diplomat, and was once even imprisoned in the Tower of London for treason. Handsome and charming— Lord Chesterfield described him as ""irresistible to either man or woman""— Marlborough's military strategy led the Duke of Wellington to say that he could ""conceive nothing greater than Marlborough at the head of an English army."" Future prime minister Winston Churchill, who was named after Marlborough's father and was the nephew of the Eighth Duke of Marlborough, wrote this history of his famous ancestor to refute earlier criticisms of Marlborough by the historian Thomas Babington Macaulay. ""Though it was a commissioned work, Churchill would not have invested nearly a million words and ten years had it not had special significance for him. For he wrote about a man who was not only his ancestor, an invincible general, the first of what became the Spencer-Churchill dukes of Marlborough, and a maker of modern Britain, but also a supreme example of heroism in the two vocations which mainly interested Churchill and in which ultimate triumph seemed to have eluded him— politics and war making"" (Wiedhorn, 110). ""It may be his greatest book. To understand the Churchill of the Second World War, the majestic blending of his commanding English with historical precedent, one has to read Marlborough. Only in its pages can one glean an understanding of the root of the speeches which inspired Britain to stand when she had little to stand with"" (Langworth, 164). ""The scholarship seems formidable, as in no other of his works. Picking his way through conflicting testimony and evaluations, Churchill, while leaning on William Coxe's 1818 biography of the duke, carefully weighs each writer's reliability. Yet the tone is not as detached as might be expected from an academic historian… Marlborough, with his broad European view and his apparent sense of Britain's imperial destiny, is the fulcrum, and all the other characters, parties, and issues take their places accordingly… the literati hostile to Marlborough— Pope, Swift, Thackeray, Macaulay— are harshly expelled from the witness stand"" (Wiedhorn, 113-114). This archive of correspondence highlights both Churchill's meticulousness as a writer and editor and his relationship with his editor Charles Wood. Although Charles Wood first worked with Churchill on his book Marlborough in the 1930's, he was hired full-time in 1948 to proofread Churchill's massive multi-volume work-in-progress, The Second World War, joining Churchill's literary staff of secretaries (who typed on silent typewriters as Churchill dictated), research assistants, and advisors. Wood became ""an essential member of the team and no error escaped his eye"" (Gilbert VIII: 344). ""The main addition to Churchill's literary entourage in 1948 was Charles Wood— a retired proofreader who had worked on Marlborough in the 1930s. Slight and small, Wood was the same age as Churchill but did not smoke or drink. His main virtue… was 'a ruthless eye for misprints and inconsistencies.…. A meticulous proofreader, Wood was pedantic and opinionated. This, as much as Churchill's habitual parsimony, probably explains the reluctance to bring him on board. Even then, Churchill issued firm instructions about reducing, not increasing, the number of commas, identifying inconsistencies without arguing their merits, and certainly not going through original documents. But Wood was soon exceeding his brief in typically abrasive style….. [Churchill once called] Wood 'indefatigable, interminable, intolerable— but he was determined not to repeat the errors in The Gathering Storm. So… [Wood] became a fixed if fractious member of Churchill's team… [The work was] subjected to the green pen of Mr. Wood— a process that became known as 'Wooding"" (Reynolds, In Command of History: Churchill Fighting and Writing the Second World War, 149-150, 153). Typed letters signed from Churchill to C. C. Wood, chief copy editor at George G. Harrap & Co. Ltd. relating to the publication of his monumental biography Marlborough: His Life and Times. Most letters addressed ""Dear Mr. Wood"" in Churchill's hand and all letters signed by Churchill in his hand unless otherwise noted. 1. April 18th, 1933, one page: ""I have sent you by Mr. Ashley the three last chapters for reprint. There will now come in quick succession all the chapters for final galley proof. I shall want twelve copies of all the reprints and you had better order any extra ones you may require yourselves. I am also send you the key to the new chaperisation—two copies so that you may send one to the printers."" Several corrections in Woods' hand. ""Dear Sir"" and ""Yours sincerely/ WS Churchill"" in Churchill's hand. Two ink spots, pencil markings and underlinings. 2. April 30th, 1933, one page: ""I am most carefully considering of course the question of modernising the old letters and documents. Up to the present I am modernising Marlborough's letters and those of the Duchess where quoted, but I am not modernising old documents which are cited in the text for the purpose of creating atmosphere. It may be that a further revision will be necessary later on."" With diagonal line across page in ink. ""Yours very sincerely/ WS Churchill"" in Churchill's hand. 3. May 9th, 1933, one page: ""What do you advise about the old style and new style printing? Our plan is to print in old style events clearly English in their preponderance, and in new style those that are clearly Continental. When a date affects both England and the Continent we print both styles i.e. 4—14, 8—18. How should this be printed? Should it be a 4 with a diagonal line, or 4 on top of the 14 like a fraction, or 4 with 14 in brackets as you have done in certain dual dates. The complications of the year also comes in. It is very tiresome to the reader and should be minimized. Pray state what typography you advise."" Churchill has made two corrections in the text and inserted ""sometimes"" towards the end. In the left margin, in ink, he has shown three forms of the date. With diagonal line across page in ink. ""Yours very sincerely/ Winston S. Churchill"" in Churchill's hand. 4. May 13th, 1933, one page (small sheet): ""Thank you for your letter. I am having the book carefully read by Mr. Marsh for his orthography, and will send him your instructions at the same time."" With diagonal line across page in ink. ""Dear Sir"" and ""Yours W S Churchill"" in Churchill's hand. 5. July 13th, 1933, one and ½ page: ""I send you herewith (1) a list of illustrations, (2) those photographs not already send you yesterday. From these two sets you can make up a complete series according to my table. The arrangement is provisional and the captions which require further study will be supplied later. In all there are 38 illustrations. As you mentioned 32, I have therefore marked 6 with red crosses which can if desired be omitted. Pray let me know promptly. I send you also 6 facsimiles, only one of which, the Camaret Bay Letter cannot be printed with the text. This letter requires special treatment. It never works to have a fold both ways i.e. with an angle in it. I have therefore been forced to cut the sheet so as to make two pages of equal length. This can be printed as simple fold-outs on the lines I have folded them which will be quite convenient to the reader and not get crumpled. A note will explain that the actual size of the document has thus been affected. This letter is vital to the text. The numerals which are provisional as regards order will be convenient for reference in our correspondence. You might decide on technical grounds whether N. 8 the Deed of Annuity and No. 25 Marlborough's letter to William of Orange should not be interleaved instead of being printed in the text. On the whole I should prefer them interleaved. In addition to all these there are 13 maps and plans 3 of which fold out, 2 of them in two colours. All the rest make up in the text."" Two ink diagonal green lines across first page indicate it has been read. Light foxing and paper clip stain to left margin. ""Dear Mr. Harrup"" and ""Yours sincerely/ Winston S. Churchill"" in Churchill's hand. 6. July 18th, 1933, one page: ""Marlborough illustrations. Do not for the present proceed with (5) Arabella, (19) Prince George of Denmark or (26) William III. I have found better pictures which I will send to you shortly. Do not proceed also with (4) Winston and Arabella, (16) Dartmouth, (22) Sunderland, (23) Rochester. Nos. 32, 33 and 34, Fenwick, Ailesbury and Shrewsbury could be reproduced as vignettes on one page. I am awaiting your letter about the illustrations."" Diagonal thin green line across page indicating it had been read. ""Dear Sir"" and ""Yours sincerely/ WS Churchill"" in Churchill's hand. 7. August 21st, 1934, one page: ""I send you herewith Volume I with the corrigenda dealt with. You will see from the enclosed letters that there are one or two extra points which have been brought to my notice. I accept all the corrections which are found in this volume and I am very much surprised to find how few errors there are—nearly all of which are trivial. Kindly note the dedication, page 7, also pages 53, 130, 132 and 358. I have dealt with Professor Trevelyan's complaint. Do you not think there should be a short prefatory note to the new edition? If so I attach a draft."" Some spotting and browning to lower edge. ""Dear Mr. Wood,"" ""month Index"" and ""Yours sincerely/ WS Churchill"" in Churchill's hand. 8. January 9, 1935, one page: ""I am not expecting to publish Volume III of Marlborough till the spring of 1936, as there is so much political distraction at the present time."" ""Dear Mr. Wood"" and ""Yours sincerely/ Winston S. Churchill"" in Churchill's hand. 9. May 21, 1935, one page: ""Please see the enclosed letter from Colonel Pakenham-Walsh and the sketches illustrating Ramillies. You said that if instead of going to Swaines I would come to you, you could save me much expense for the drawings of Volume III. Could you let me know what you can do about them. These sketches of course are only in the rough, and I have to put my own comments upon them. Therefore kindly send them back after using them to explain to the draftsman the kind of work he would be expected to do…"" With date correction in Churchill's hand. ""Dear Mr. Wood"" and ""21st"" and ""Yours WS Churchill"" in Churchill's hand. 10. May 28, 1935, one page: ""Would there be any objection to my seeing if I can get a competitive offer from Swaine? He might be ready to come down in price himself, and it would be convenient to work with him as he knows my methods. If he is not prepared to come near to the new level, I shall certainly put myself in your hands."" ""Dear Mr. Wood"" and ""Yours very truly/ WS Churchill"" in Churchill's hand. 11. August 6, 1935, one page: ""I send you herewith chapters V and VI which have been completely reconstituted and a new chapter, VIII. For your convenience I append a list of the chapters; VII 'The Year of Triumph' is nearly done. It may be possible to cut down the correspondence later. I also send you chapters I, II and III for second revise, leaving only 'The Battle of Ramillies' which I will send in a few days. Pray let me have six copies of all these as they come through. I will send you very shortly a number of maps and I shall be glad if your man would draw them out and let me have them in draft. Please therefore make the arrangement you proposed with him. I will not worry about Swain's."" With ""for revise"" in Churchill's hand. [Together with one page of typed list of chapters]. ""Dear Mr. Wood"" and ""Yours sincerely/ Winston S. Churchill"" in Churchill's hand. 12. October 10, 1935, one and ½ pages: ""Many thanks for your letter. The aid I want is not researching but checking and verifying facts which have already been ascertained. I will dictate a section of a chapter from the many works of reference I have read. I will then mark the various points which require to be more precisely verified, for instance the actual words of a quotation, the exact reference in the footnotes, dates, names, chronology, etc. This is very similar to the work which your readers already do when they read the proofs only it would be rather more extended. At the same time as I send the section for checking I will mention the books where the references occur and give the closest indication I have as to where they can be found. This will enable me to get on a good deal more quickly. Let us anyhow make the experiment and see what trouble is involved for your staff."" With notes ""abouts in the books"" and ""Also I will send some of the books you may not have. W."" in Churchill's hand. ""Dear Mr. Wood"" and ""With many thanks/ Yours sincerely/ W S Churchill"" in Churchill's hand. Rust stain from paper clip at upper left corner. 13. October 14, 1935, one page: ""I send you another chapter [in pencil in another hand, ""Chapter XI, 'Harley'""]. There are a good many queries in my mind about it, but it is maturing sufficiently to be printed straight away. I will then read it over and mark the points which require special attention. I am afraid there will now be a break in Marlborough of at least six weeks. But I hope you will have Oudenards before Christmas. The back is then broken."" ""Dear Mr. Wood"" and Yours v(ery) t(ruly)/ WS Churchill"" in Churchill's hand. 14. March 2, 1936, one page: ""I now send you Chapter XVII (re-numbered) 'The Winter Struggle' All the chapters after XI or XII require renumbering, as a new one has come in. I should be glad to have this chapter back in priority after the first and before the main block of reprints. Six reprints will be required in all cases. I see no advantage in spelling Wynendaele 'Wynendale.' Marlborough always uses the shorter version, but we can discuss this later when the general question of names is considered. Meanwhile stet 'dale.' I think the principle to adopt about modernising the letters is to print the new ones which first see the light in their old style and modernise the rest. At any rate do not worry about these changes at this stage in the work."" Pen and ink notations in another hand. ""Dear Mr. Wood"" and ""Yours sincerely/ WSC"" in Churchill's hand. 15. April 28th,1936, one page: ""I send you herewith two chapters and also a number of documents which you have already printed. These documents should be inserted in the proofs where I have marked them. I presume they are still in type so will not have to be set up again. I have not modernised them at this stage as they have never yet been published. We shall have to consider later on whether these letters should go into an appendix. It will be easy to lift them from the text as they are in sold blocks. Of course I should very much like to have these chapters back again by Saturday afternoon. I fear however this will not be possible."" Pencil and ink notations in another hand. ""Dear Mr. Wood"" and ""Yours v(ery) t(ruly)/ Winston S. Churchill"" in Churchill's hand. 16. June 5th, 1936, one page: ""Yours of June 3: Will you kindly ask your brother for a list of all the plans on which he is working which have not been made into zinco blocks, and what state they are in and what is holding them up. I will then deal with each point."" Diagonal green ink line across page.""Dear Mr. Wood"" and ""Yours v(ery) t(ruly)/ WS Churchill"" in Churchill's hand. 17. June 16th, 1936, one page: ""I have now reached a series of chapters beginning with The Seventh Campaign which have been so recently revised that they do not require immediate reprint. Before I send them in I am anxious to have the maps especially of Oudenarde and Lille. The Brigadier has sent me a list of maps in chronological order of which I send you a copy ticked showing their condition. Perhaps you would mark on this the ones already included in the proofs. Could you accelerate as much as possible the completion of the others which are passed finally in ink."" ""Yours sincerely/ WS Churchill"" in Churchill's hand. Rust stain from paper clip to upper left corner. 18. June 22nd, 1936, one page (small sheet): ""Please note where I have said a new slip is to be taken, these pages have to be interleaved in several various chapters."" ""Dear Mr. Wood"" and ""Yours sincerely WSC"" in Churchill's hand. 19. July 8th, 1936, one page: With regard to the letters quoted in the text, I will finally decide about any cuts in these when the final slip-proofs leave me. As I am having one more re-print, I do not alter them now, neither do I deal with all your queries, 'spelling, capitals and punctuation'. I think the original letters now published for the first time had better be printed in their original form subject only to an occasional adjustment to make them read intelligently. All the other letters already published by various authors should be modernised upon a regular principle. Perhaps in sending me back this new re-print you will ask your readers to carry this out in pencil throughout."" Lengthy notes in red ink by a copy editor in blank left margin and underlinings to text. ""Yours very truly/ WS Churchill"" in Churchill's hand. 20. July 17th, 1936, one page: ""Sketch 46. This does not give a good idea, as La Motte is obviously going to reach Wynendale before the convoy gets within miles of it. Actually La Motte should be further back where I have shown in red, and the convoy further forward. Sketch 42. Berwick ought to be in the same type as Vendome as he is a foe and not a friend. Can these alterations be made without redrawing and re-engraving? How long will it take, and how much will it cost?"" [signed in secretarial hand]. Together with two printed maps, each 7.5 by 10 inches, with wide margins, one map bearing corrections in red ink by Churchill of troop movements of the French commander La Motte. Included is a photocopy of the map, captioned ""Situation, Morning September 28"" from Chapter XXVI ""Wynendael,"" showing Churchill's red ink corrections specified in the letter. The other map, corrected as per Churchill's instructions, is in Chapter XXV ""The Siege of Lille,"" captioned ""August 27—September 5, 1708."" Signed in secretarial hand. 21. July 18th, 1936, one page: ""I send you herewith a note for the 'blurb' about which one of your colleagues wrote to me. You see I have wavered between the present and past tense. Pray take this as a contribution and let me see what you propose to write upon it."" Pencil notations in another hand. ""Dear Mr. Wood,"" ""Also 3 more pictures"" and ""Yours very truly/ WS Churchill"" in Churchill's hand. 22. August 1, 1936, one page: ""You send me a new copy of the enclosed map. It is already in the text, and I commented on it on the proofs 'Where is Villeroy?' Also Ghent and Bruges should (I think) be black as they were in Marlborough's hands. I am sending a duplicate of this letter to the Brigadier. It is of the utmost importance now to know where the remaining maps are. I will get on with the preface as soon as I have completed the chapters. I agree with what you said about the spelling of Wynendael. By all means continue the spelling as 'dale.'"" Attached on the upper left is a small printed map captioned in another hand ""Flanders: July 1706/ Sketch 14 (slip 199)."" Two green ink lines on page. ""Dear Mr. Wood"" and ""Yours sincerely/ Winston S. Churchill"" in Churchill's hand. 23. August 1st, 1936, one page: ""I have altered the Ramillies text so as not to be dependent on the old map, which I cannot find. I must ask the Brigadier to make a folder of the Ramillies as well as the one of Oudenarde now under construction. There will have to be a general map of the Low Countries, but that can be repeated with a few more places in it from Volume II, also a general map of Europe and the theatres which can likewise be repeated. The Ramillies playing card was photographed by the King's librarian. It is very old, small and well-worn, and I doubt if any new photograph would be any better. There is no reason why you should not make a print of it slightly larger, and let us see how it looks. I return it to you herewith meanwhile. You have everything now, so far as illustrations and facsimiles are concerned. I shall keep you well supplied day by day with chapters."" Green ink lines and underlinings, rust stain from paper clip on top of page. Signed ""WSC"" and with a few words in his hand (""with a few more places in it""). 24. August 3, 1936, two pages: ""I send you now everything except the last chapters. Mr. Deakin will be with you tomorrow. There are a number of points for him from the 'Jacobite Raid' chapter onwards, nor are Mr. Marsh's corrections in from that point. Some of these chapters are a good deal pulled about, and if you think fit you had better put them into slip again, keeping enough of the earlier chapters to go on continuously with the page proofing. Chapter 19 about Ghent and Bruges is split in two, altering the numbers thereafter. I do not feel like a lengthy preface, nor is it worth your while to await it. I will, however, do it next before I finish the last chapter, if you wish. What maps are still outstanding? Please discuss all these points with Mr. Deakin. Would you mind asking your proof readers to put down quite clearly their rule about hyphen words. I do not like Mr. Marsh's very full use of hyphens, but what rule do you follow? Macaulay frequently runs the words together with a hyphen, e. g. 'panicstricken.' The great thing is to have a principle and stick to it. With regard to modernization of letters, here is the rule. All letters which have been printed before, unless specially marked by me, should be modernised as you have proposed. All original letters or letters inserted because of their archaic character should only be corrected here and there as I have done for punctuation and to make sense. Contrary to what is said in the preliminary note, all starred documents will have in addition a footnote, Blenheim mss or other source. All spellings of places must agree with the maps unless the maps are definitely wrong. With regard to numbers, I think the following will work: viz. When there is a computation of armies in battalions, squadrons, etc. numerals should be used. Where there are broken numbers, e. g. 7,500 ditto. When numerals are used in some old quoted letter "". Otherwise it is better to spell. In sending these proofs to the printers, please enforce this system. I find we are in practise spelling almost everything and I must say it runs better except as mentioned."" Included are twelve edits in Churchill's hand including five words. Titles of seven chapters from Vol. III are penciled at top of first page in another hand. ""I do not like the high punctuation… Yours very truly/ Winston S. Churchill,"" ""Dear Mr. Wood"" and 12 ink edits including five words in Churchill's hand. 25. November 28th, 1937, two pages: ""Illustrations. Kindly send me a list of the sixteen photographs and two prints which I sent you. With regard to your observations: 1. I never thought that Malplaquet and Bouchain should go on one page. On the contrary I contemplated a flap-out for Bouchain one. 2. I agree with you about Wolf; it must be cancelled. 3. Cancel also Godolphin, Shrewsbury, Burnet, Marlborough 11 and Marlborough 13. I must try to find another Marlborough for the frontispiece. Perhaps I can find a miniature. 4. Cancel also Nos. 14 and 16, Cadogan and George I are already used. 5. We must try to find better ones of Blenheim for 17 and 18. These two prints are cancelled. Out of the 16 photographs eight are rejected. This leaves us with eight. I now send you: (a) Lord Orrery (b) Duke of Argyll (c) Jonathan Swift (d) Craggs (the younger) (e) The Old Pretender (or alternatively 9e) 2, whichever is thought the better (f) Townshend (g) Cowper (h) Ormonde (i) Vanbrugh. These have been procured from the National Gallery by Mr. Deakin, and he has been asked to supply the captions for them. Thus I send you the nine, which with the other eight, makes a total of seventeen. It is increasingly difficult to find illustrations which have not been used in the previous volumes. I shall be very glad of any suggestions which you, or your proof readers, feel able to make. Good progress is being made with the maps. I fear we shall not be able to get the book finished by the end of the year; but I hope to have it finally off my hands by the end of February."" Together with a sheet in another hand with more information about the portraits. Two words and ""Yours very truly/ Winston S. Churchill"" in Churchill's hand. 26. December 14th, 1937, one page: ""This is an addition to the chapter called The New Regime. You could make the slips 200 A, B, C etc. I do not think it necessary to reprint Chapters XX to XXV at present, as their condition has very nearly reached its final form. I send you the latest Contents Table whch will enable you to keep track of the various changes which impose themselves at this stage. The five chapters following those you now have, namely XX to XXIV inclusive, do not require reprint at this stage, as there are not structural changes, and the minor revisions can be effected on the current proof."" Accompanied by two carbon typed pages of the contents of Vol. IV. ""Sincerely WSC"" in Churchill's hand. Some foxing. 27. January 1st, 1938, one page: ""I am very much obliged to you for the extraordinary expedition with which the whole of the eight chapters have been returned. I send you the enclosed letter to Mr. Harrap, which kindly read and deliver to him. Perhaps you will inform me upon the points mentioned. In my absence please keep in touch with Mr. Deakin. All letters to Chartwell will be forwarded to me."" ""My dear Mr. Wood"" and ""Yours v(er)y t(ruly)/ Winston S. Churchill"" in Churchill's hand. Rust stain from paper clip to top of page. 28. January 4th, 1938, two pages: ""I send you herewith three chapters in which I have made heavy cuts, in order to see how the changes will look. We waste space in having a great many extracts of only five or six lines in small print; there are the short heads, there are the dates and the white lines attaching to each of them. It is much better in these small extracts to use the large type in inverted commas, and run straight through the paragraph with dots representing omissions where necessary. I have also run several letters together, separated by dots to make one continuous paragraph, although retained in small print. In this case there will be no quotation marks the necessary phrases such as 'Marlborough wrote to so-and-so' or 'so-and-so reported to Marlborough' should either go in a square bracket as you have sometimes done or merely protected by commas. You will see specimens of both these methods applied in the abridged text. I think there is more to be said for the square brackets but let me know your view. Please send two copies only of each of these chapters to me in three separate envelopes at the Chateau de l'Horizon, Cannes, as soon as possible. Have any of the diagrams to be inserted in the text yet been put on the stone? I have passed at least twenty. Please get in touch with the Brigadier and with your brother and have all I have passed put on the stone and struck off. There will be others still to come but let us get as many as we can. Will you write to me also about reducing the index to twenty pages. I hope you got the blurb all right. It was intended for a guide and you are at liberty to make additions to it as the responsibility for it rests with the firm. It would be well, however, to send me a proof if time permits. Pray write to me fully on these various points."" Titles of the three chapters from Vol. IV are penciled at top of the first page in another hand, on letterhead of the British Embassy, Paris. ""Yours very truly/ Winston S. Churchill"" in Churchill's hand. 29. October 29th, 1938, one page (small sheet): ""I am aware of no correction which I desire to make, and I have not noticed any serious mistakes pointed out by the reviewers."" On smaller sheet, with handwritten note by Churchill: ""I enclose you a letter wh has reached me. Yours truly, W. S. Churchill."" ""Dear Mr. Wood"" and ""Yours very truly/ WS Churchill"" in Churchill's hand. 30. Together with: One large page of a gallery proof entitled ""Marlborough—II Slip 241D,"" 10 by 14 inches. Tear at mid-horizontal fold in blank margin, not near writing, expertly repaired on verso. Edits in red and blue pencil with 22 words in Churchill's hand: ""in the history of the Fall of the House of Stuart has bequeathed us a monumental work"" and ""Imperial commander Prince Louis of Badin"" along with cross-outs and other editorial marks. 31. May 30th, 1933 from Churchill to Wood with Churchill's signature clipped.32. 12 letters dated between July 1933 and April 1938 with excellent content concerning the book, with copious annotations (some possibly in Churchill's hand), signed secretarially for Churchill.33. 14 pages of proof corrections, copiously annotated in multiple hands (some possibly by Churchill).34. 2 proof maps, one showing Minorca, the other Piedmond and Lombardy, giving troop positions and showing the positions of opposing armies and lines of circumvallation. 35. 10 telegrams sent from Churchill to Wood, as well as several other miscellaneous notes. Occasional marginal marks from paper clips to some pages. Rare and important.

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