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Displayed below are some selected recent viaLibri matches for books published in 1891
2019-08-21 06:47:28
Dr. Albert Leffingwell
1891-1914. Dr. Leffingwell joined the anti-vivisection movement in the 1880s: protesting against the use of live animal (and human) subjects for medical testing. He and his fellow activists worked tirelessly to gain public support: distributing educational pamphlets and submitting articles that called attention to doctors and educators who tried to defend the practice. His collection of anti-vivisection material is the result of his years of activism, and has examples of a wide variety of pamphlets, newspaper articles, and items from a wide variety of anti-vivisection organizations across the country between 1891 and 1914. 1. American Humane Society: sixteen (16) items – Formed in 1877 as the “International Humane Association,” then changed to “American Humane Society” in 1878, the American Humane Society is dedicated to the safety and welfare of animals. One of the larger organizations involved in the animal vivisection debate, the Society published many anti-vivisection pamphlets, leaflets, and books, some of which Dr. Leffingwell himself wrote. This organization exists to this day, under the name “American Humane,” and continues to champion animal rights. -Thirteen (13) different pamphlets and leaflets. Six items are booklets with 12 or more pages, the majority of which are published by Leffingwell himself. Titles include “Scientific Chicanery: Does it Pay?”, “The Starvation of Cattle on the Western Plains, “and “Is Vivisection Painful?”, among others. Pamphlets and leaflets are primarily devoted to educating the reader on the subject of vivisection in school … [Click Below for Full Description]
Bookseller: Eclectibles [US]
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2019-08-20 18:44:28
Richard Bowdler Sharpe & John Gould, William Hart
London, 1891. This stunning hand-colored folio lithograph is from "Monograph of the Paradiseidae, or Birds of Paradise and Ptilonorhynchidae, and Bower-Birds" by Richard Bowdler Sharpe. The work was published in London by Taylor & Francis for Henry Sotheran & Co between 1891 and 1898. The "Birds of Paradise" was the idea of John Gould's but completed after his death by Sharpe. The plates were predominantly drawn by William Matthew Hart, John Gould, and John Gerard Keulemans. It was the first monograph devoted to the remarkable birds of paradise and the "last of the fine bird books" (Fine Bird Books p.107) --- The remarkable-looking Birds of Paradise have captivated western science since Magellan first brought back a skin of such a creature in 1522. The skins, highly prized by East Indian natives, was given by the ruler of Batchian (in the Mollucas) as a gift to the King of Spain. The legs and wings of the bird, however, had been removed when skinned, presumably to better show its impressive plumage. When asked why the bird had no wings or feet, the natives replied that none were needed as the bird simply floated in its heavenly paradise. Thus, the earliest descriptions of the species, and indeed even its scientific naming by Linnaeus in the 18th century as Paradisaea apoda (legless bird of paradise), perpetuated that myth. Due to the remote nature of their rain forest habitat in New Guinea, it was not until the mid-19th century that these remarkable birds were first scientifically observed and accurately described. --- Gould had intended to publish the first monograph devot … [Click Below for Full Description]
Bookseller: Trillium Antique Prints & Rare Books [Franklin, TN, U.S.A.]
2019-08-20 18:44:28
Richard Bowdler Sharpe & John Gould, William Hart
London, 1891. This stunning hand-colored folio lithograph is from "Monograph of the Paradiseidae, or Birds of Paradise and Ptilonorhynchidae, and Bower-Birds" by Richard Bowdler Sharpe. The work was published in London by Taylor & Francis for Henry Sotheran & Co between 1891 and 1898. The "Birds of Paradise" was the idea of John Gould's but completed after his death by Sharpe. The plates were predominantly drawn by William Matthew Hart, John Gould, and John Gerard Keulemans. It was the first monograph devoted to the remarkable birds of paradise and the "last of the fine bird books" (Fine Bird Books p.107) --- The remarkable-looking Birds of Paradise have captivated western science since Magellan first brought back a skin of such a creature in 1522. The skins, highly prized by East Indian natives, was given by the ruler of Batchian (in the Mollucas) as a gift to the King of Spain. The legs and wings of the bird, however, had been removed when skinned, presumably to better show its impressive plumage. When asked why the bird had no wings or feet, the natives replied that none were needed as the bird simply floated in its heavenly paradise. Thus, the earliest descriptions of the species, and indeed even its scientific naming by Linnaeus in the 18th century as Paradisaea apoda (legless bird of paradise), perpetuated that myth. Due to the remote nature of their rain forest habitat in New Guinea, it was not until the mid-19th century that these remarkable birds were first scientifically observed and accurately described. --- Gould had intended to publish the first monograph devot … [Click Below for Full Description]
Bookseller: Trillium Antique Prints & Rare Books [Franklin, TN, U.S.A.]
2019-08-20 18:44:28
Richard Bowdler Sharpe & John Gould, William Hart
London, 1891. This stunning hand-colored folio lithograph is from "Monograph of the Paradiseidae, or Birds of Paradise and Ptilonorhynchidae, and Bower-Birds" by Richard Bowdler Sharpe. The work was published in London by Taylor & Francis for Henry Sotheran & Co between 1891 and 1898. The "Birds of Paradise" was the idea of John Gould's but completed after his death by Sharpe. The plates were predominantly drawn by William Matthew Hart, John Gould, and John Gerard Keulemans. It was the first monograph devoted to the remarkable birds of paradise and the "last of the fine bird books" (Fine Bird Books p.107) --- The remarkable-looking Birds of Paradise have captivated western science since Magellan first brought back a skin of such a creature in 1522. The skins, highly prized by East Indian natives, was given by the ruler of Batchian (in the Mollucas) as a gift to the King of Spain. The legs and wings of the bird, however, had been removed when skinned, presumably to better show its impressive plumage. When asked why the bird had no wings or feet, the natives replied that none were needed as the bird simply floated in its heavenly paradise. Thus, the earliest descriptions of the species, and indeed even its scientific naming by Linnaeus in the 18th century as Paradisaea apoda (legless bird of paradise), perpetuated that myth. Due to the remote nature of their rain forest habitat in New Guinea, it was not until the mid-19th century that these remarkable birds were first scientifically observed and accurately described. --- Gould had intended to publish the first monograph devot … [Click Below for Full Description]
Bookseller: Trillium Antique Prints & Rare Books [Franklin, TN, U.S.A.]
2019-08-20 18:44:28
Richard Bowdler Sharpe & John Gould, William Hart
London, 1891. This stunning hand-colored folio lithograph is from "Monograph of the Paradiseidae, or Birds of Paradise and Ptilonorhynchidae, and Bower-Birds" by Richard Bowdler Sharpe. The work was published in London by Taylor & Francis for Henry Sotheran & Co between 1891 and 1898. The "Birds of Paradise" was the idea of John Gould's but completed after his death by Sharpe. The plates were predominantly drawn by William Matthew Hart, John Gould, and John Gerard Keulemans. It was the first monograph devoted to the remarkable birds of paradise and the "last of the fine bird books" (Fine Bird Books p.107) --- The remarkable-looking Birds of Paradise have captivated western science since Magellan first brought back a skin of such a creature in 1522. The skins, highly prized by East Indian natives, was given by the ruler of Batchian (in the Mollucas) as a gift to the King of Spain. The legs and wings of the bird, however, had been removed when skinned, presumably to better show its impressive plumage. When asked why the bird had no wings or feet, the natives replied that none were needed as the bird simply floated in its heavenly paradise. Thus, the earliest descriptions of the species, and indeed even its scientific naming by Linnaeus in the 18th century as Paradisaea apoda (legless bird of paradise), perpetuated that myth. Due to the remote nature of their rain forest habitat in New Guinea, it was not until the mid-19th century that these remarkable birds were first scientifically observed and accurately described. --- Gould had intended to publish the first monograph devot … [Click Below for Full Description]
Bookseller: Trillium Antique Prints & Rare Books [Franklin, TN, U.S.A.]
2019-08-20 18:44:28
Richard Bowdler Sharpe & John Gould, William Hart
London, 1891. This stunning hand-colored folio lithograph is from "Monograph of the Paradiseidae, or Birds of Paradise and Ptilonorhynchidae, and Bower-Birds" by Richard Bowdler Sharpe. The work was published in London by Taylor & Francis for Henry Sotheran & Co between 1891 and 1898. The "Birds of Paradise" was the idea of John Gould's but completed after his death by Sharpe. The plates were predominantly drawn by William Matthew Hart, John Gould, and John Gerard Keulemans. It was the first monograph devoted to the remarkable birds of paradise and the "last of the fine bird books" (Fine Bird Books p.107) --- The remarkable-looking Birds of Paradise have captivated western science since Magellan first brought back a skin of such a creature in 1522. The skins, highly prized by East Indian natives, was given by the ruler of Batchian (in the Mollucas) as a gift to the King of Spain. The legs and wings of the bird, however, had been removed when skinned, presumably to better show its impressive plumage. When asked why the bird had no wings or feet, the natives replied that none were needed as the bird simply floated in its heavenly paradise. Thus, the earliest descriptions of the species, and indeed even its scientific naming by Linnaeus in the 18th century as Paradisaea apoda (legless bird of paradise), perpetuated that myth. Due to the remote nature of their rain forest habitat in New Guinea, it was not until the mid-19th century that these remarkable birds were first scientifically observed and accurately described. --- Gould had intended to publish the first monograph devot … [Click Below for Full Description]
Bookseller: Trillium Antique Prints & Rare Books [Franklin, TN, U.S.A.]
2019-08-20 18:44:28
Richard Bowdler Sharpe & John Gould, William Hart
London, 1891. This stunning hand-colored folio lithograph is from "Monograph of the Paradiseidae, or Birds of Paradise and Ptilonorhynchidae, and Bower-Birds" by Richard Bowdler Sharpe. The work was published in London by Taylor & Francis for Henry Sotheran & Co between 1891 and 1898. The "Birds of Paradise" was the idea of John Gould's but completed after his death by Sharpe. The plates were predominantly drawn by William Matthew Hart, John Gould, and John Gerard Keulemans. It was the first monograph devoted to the remarkable birds of paradise and the "last of the fine bird books" (Fine Bird Books p.107) --- The remarkable-looking Birds of Paradise have captivated western science since Magellan first brought back a skin of such a creature in 1522. The skins, highly prized by East Indian natives, was given by the ruler of Batchian (in the Mollucas) as a gift to the King of Spain. The legs and wings of the bird, however, had been removed when skinned, presumably to better show its impressive plumage. When asked why the bird had no wings or feet, the natives replied that none were needed as the bird simply floated in its heavenly paradise. Thus, the earliest descriptions of the species, and indeed even its scientific naming by Linnaeus in the 18th century as Paradisaea apoda (legless bird of paradise), perpetuated that myth. Due to the remote nature of their rain forest habitat in New Guinea, it was not until the mid-19th century that these remarkable birds were first scientifically observed and accurately described. --- Gould had intended to publish the first monograph devot … [Click Below for Full Description]
Bookseller: Trillium Antique Prints & Rare Books [Franklin, TN, U.S.A.]
2019-08-20 18:44:28
Richard Bowdler Sharpe & John Gould, William Hart
London, 1891. This stunning hand-colored folio lithograph is from "Monograph of the Paradiseidae, or Birds of Paradise and Ptilonorhynchidae, and Bower-Birds" by Richard Bowdler Sharpe. The work was published in London by Taylor & Francis for Henry Sotheran & Co between 1891 and 1898. The "Birds of Paradise" was the idea of John Gould's but completed after his death by Sharpe. The plates were predominantly drawn by William Matthew Hart, John Gould, and John Gerard Keulemans. It was the first monograph devoted to the remarkable birds of paradise and the "last of the fine bird books" (Fine Bird Books p.107) --- The remarkable-looking Birds of Paradise have captivated western science since Magellan first brought back a skin of such a creature in 1522. The skins, highly prized by East Indian natives, was given by the ruler of Batchian (in the Mollucas) as a gift to the King of Spain. The legs and wings of the bird, however, had been removed when skinned, presumably to better show its impressive plumage. When asked why the bird had no wings or feet, the natives replied that none were needed as the bird simply floated in its heavenly paradise. Thus, the earliest descriptions of the species, and indeed even its scientific naming by Linnaeus in the 18th century as Paradisaea apoda (legless bird of paradise), perpetuated that myth. Due to the remote nature of their rain forest habitat in New Guinea, it was not until the mid-19th century that these remarkable birds were first scientifically observed and accurately described. --- Gould had intended to publish the first monograph devot … [Click Below for Full Description]
Bookseller: Trillium Antique Prints & Rare Books [Franklin, TN, U.S.A.]
2019-08-20 18:44:28
Richard Bowdler Sharpe & John Gould, William Hart
London, 1891. This stunning hand-colored folio lithograph is from "Monograph of the Paradiseidae, or Birds of Paradise and Ptilonorhynchidae, and Bower-Birds" by Richard Bowdler Sharpe. The work was published in London by Taylor & Francis for Henry Sotheran & Co between 1891 and 1898. The "Birds of Paradise" was the idea of John Gould's but completed after his death by Sharpe. The plates were predominantly drawn by William Matthew Hart, John Gould, and John Gerard Keulemans. It was the first monograph devoted to the remarkable birds of paradise and the "last of the fine bird books" (Fine Bird Books p.107) --- The remarkable-looking Birds of Paradise have captivated western science since Magellan first brought back a skin of such a creature in 1522. The skins, highly prized by East Indian natives, was given by the ruler of Batchian (in the Mollucas) as a gift to the King of Spain. The legs and wings of the bird, however, had been removed when skinned, presumably to better show its impressive plumage. When asked why the bird had no wings or feet, the natives replied that none were needed as the bird simply floated in its heavenly paradise. Thus, the earliest descriptions of the species, and indeed even its scientific naming by Linnaeus in the 18th century as Paradisaea apoda (legless bird of paradise), perpetuated that myth. Due to the remote nature of their rain forest habitat in New Guinea, it was not until the mid-19th century that these remarkable birds were first scientifically observed and accurately described. --- Gould had intended to publish the first monograph devot … [Click Below for Full Description]
Bookseller: Trillium Antique Prints & Rare Books [Franklin, TN, U.S.A.]
2019-08-20 18:44:28
Richard Bowdler Sharpe & John Gould, William Hart
London, 1891. This stunning hand-colored folio lithograph is from "Monograph of the Paradiseidae, or Birds of Paradise and Ptilonorhynchidae, and Bower-Birds" by Richard Bowdler Sharpe. The work was published in London by Taylor & Francis for Henry Sotheran & Co between 1891 and 1898. The "Birds of Paradise" was the idea of John Gould's but completed after his death by Sharpe. The plates were predominantly drawn by William Matthew Hart, John Gould, and John Gerard Keulemans. It was the first monograph devoted to the remarkable birds of paradise and the "last of the fine bird books" (Fine Bird Books p.107) --- The remarkable-looking Birds of Paradise have captivated western science since Magellan first brought back a skin of such a creature in 1522. The skins, highly prized by East Indian natives, was given by the ruler of Batchian (in the Mollucas) as a gift to the King of Spain. The legs and wings of the bird, however, had been removed when skinned, presumably to better show its impressive plumage. When asked why the bird had no wings or feet, the natives replied that none were needed as the bird simply floated in its heavenly paradise. Thus, the earliest descriptions of the species, and indeed even its scientific naming by Linnaeus in the 18th century as Paradisaea apoda (legless bird of paradise), perpetuated that myth. Due to the remote nature of their rain forest habitat in New Guinea, it was not until the mid-19th century that these remarkable birds were first scientifically observed and accurately described. --- Gould had intended to publish the first monograph devot … [Click Below for Full Description]
Bookseller: Trillium Antique Prints & Rare Books [Franklin, TN, U.S.A.]
2019-08-20 18:44:28
Richard Bowdler Sharpe & John Gould, William Hart
London, 1891. This stunning hand-colored folio lithograph is from "Monograph of the Paradiseidae, or Birds of Paradise and Ptilonorhynchidae, and Bower-Birds" by Richard Bowdler Sharpe. The work was published in London by Taylor & Francis for Henry Sotheran & Co between 1891 and 1898. The "Birds of Paradise" was the idea of John Gould's but completed after his death by Sharpe. The plates were predominantly drawn by William Matthew Hart, John Gould, and John Gerard Keulemans. It was the first monograph devoted to the remarkable birds of paradise and the "last of the fine bird books" (Fine Bird Books p.107) --- The remarkable-looking Birds of Paradise have captivated western science since Magellan first brought back a skin of such a creature in 1522. The skins, highly prized by East Indian natives, was given by the ruler of Batchian (in the Mollucas) as a gift to the King of Spain. The legs and wings of the bird, however, had been removed when skinned, presumably to better show its impressive plumage. When asked why the bird had no wings or feet, the natives replied that none were needed as the bird simply floated in its heavenly paradise. Thus, the earliest descriptions of the species, and indeed even its scientific naming by Linnaeus in the 18th century as Paradisaea apoda (legless bird of paradise), perpetuated that myth. Due to the remote nature of their rain forest habitat in New Guinea, it was not until the mid-19th century that these remarkable birds were first scientifically observed and accurately described. --- Gould had intended to publish the first monograph devot … [Click Below for Full Description]
Bookseller: Trillium Antique Prints & Rare Books [Franklin, TN, U.S.A.]
2019-08-20 18:44:28
Richard Bowdler Sharpe & John Gould, William Hart
London, 1891. This stunning hand-colored folio lithograph is from "Monograph of the Paradiseidae, or Birds of Paradise and Ptilonorhynchidae, and Bower-Birds" by Richard Bowdler Sharpe. The work was published in London by Taylor & Francis for Henry Sotheran & Co between 1891 and 1898. The "Birds of Paradise" was the idea of John Gould's but completed after his death by Sharpe. The plates were predominantly drawn by William Matthew Hart, John Gould, and John Gerard Keulemans. It was the first monograph devoted to the remarkable birds of paradise and the "last of the fine bird books" (Fine Bird Books p.107) --- The remarkable-looking Birds of Paradise have captivated western science since Magellan first brought back a skin of such a creature in 1522. The skins, highly prized by East Indian natives, was given by the ruler of Batchian (in the Mollucas) as a gift to the King of Spain. The legs and wings of the bird, however, had been removed when skinned, presumably to better show its impressive plumage. When asked why the bird had no wings or feet, the natives replied that none were needed as the bird simply floated in its heavenly paradise. Thus, the earliest descriptions of the species, and indeed even its scientific naming by Linnaeus in the 18th century as Paradisaea apoda (legless bird of paradise), perpetuated that myth. Due to the remote nature of their rain forest habitat in New Guinea, it was not until the mid-19th century that these remarkable birds were first scientifically observed and accurately described. --- Gould had intended to publish the first monograph devot … [Click Below for Full Description]
Bookseller: Trillium Antique Prints & Rare Books [Franklin, TN, U.S.A.]
2019-08-20 18:44:28
Richard Bowdler Sharpe & John Gould, William Hart
London, 1891. This stunning hand-colored folio lithograph is from "Monograph of the Paradiseidae, or Birds of Paradise and Ptilonorhynchidae, and Bower-Birds" by Richard Bowdler Sharpe. The work was published in London by Taylor & Francis for Henry Sotheran & Co between 1891 and 1898. The "Birds of Paradise" was the idea of John Gould's but completed after his death by Sharpe. The plates were predominantly drawn by William Matthew Hart, John Gould, and John Gerard Keulemans. It was the first monograph devoted to the remarkable birds of paradise and the "last of the fine bird books" (Fine Bird Books p.107) --- The remarkable-looking Birds of Paradise have captivated western science since Magellan first brought back a skin of such a creature in 1522. The skins, highly prized by East Indian natives, was given by the ruler of Batchian (in the Mollucas) as a gift to the King of Spain. The legs and wings of the bird, however, had been removed when skinned, presumably to better show its impressive plumage. When asked why the bird had no wings or feet, the natives replied that none were needed as the bird simply floated in its heavenly paradise. Thus, the earliest descriptions of the species, and indeed even its scientific naming by Linnaeus in the 18th century as Paradisaea apoda (legless bird of paradise), perpetuated that myth. Due to the remote nature of their rain forest habitat in New Guinea, it was not until the mid-19th century that these remarkable birds were first scientifically observed and accurately described. --- Gould had intended to publish the first monograph devot … [Click Below for Full Description]
Bookseller: Trillium Antique Prints & Rare Books [Franklin, TN, U.S.A.]
2019-08-20 18:44:28
Richard Bowdler Sharpe & John Gould, William Hart
London, 1891. This stunning hand-colored folio lithograph is from "Monograph of the Paradiseidae, or Birds of Paradise and Ptilonorhynchidae, and Bower-Birds" by Richard Bowdler Sharpe. The work was published in London by Taylor & Francis for Henry Sotheran & Co between 1891 and 1898. The "Birds of Paradise" was the idea of John Gould's but completed after his death by Sharpe. The plates were predominantly drawn by William Matthew Hart, John Gould, and John Gerard Keulemans. It was the first monograph devoted to the remarkable birds of paradise and the "last of the fine bird books" (Fine Bird Books p.107) --- The remarkable-looking Birds of Paradise have captivated western science since Magellan first brought back a skin of such a creature in 1522. The skins, highly prized by East Indian natives, was given by the ruler of Batchian (in the Mollucas) as a gift to the King of Spain. The legs and wings of the bird, however, had been removed when skinned, presumably to better show its impressive plumage. When asked why the bird had no wings or feet, the natives replied that none were needed as the bird simply floated in its heavenly paradise. Thus, the earliest descriptions of the species, and indeed even its scientific naming by Linnaeus in the 18th century as Paradisaea apoda (legless bird of paradise), perpetuated that myth. Due to the remote nature of their rain forest habitat in New Guinea, it was not until the mid-19th century that these remarkable birds were first scientifically observed and accurately described. --- Gould had intended to publish the first monograph devot … [Click Below for Full Description]
Bookseller: Trillium Antique Prints & Rare Books [Franklin, TN, U.S.A.]
2019-08-20 18:44:28
Richard Bowdler Sharpe & John Gould, William Hart
London, 1891. This stunning hand-colored folio lithograph is from "Monograph of the Paradiseidae, or Birds of Paradise and Ptilonorhynchidae, and Bower-Birds" by Richard Bowdler Sharpe. The work was published in London by Taylor & Francis for Henry Sotheran & Co between 1891 and 1898. The "Birds of Paradise" was the idea of John Gould's but completed after his death by Sharpe. The plates were predominantly drawn by William Matthew Hart, John Gould, and John Gerard Keulemans. It was the first monograph devoted to the remarkable birds of paradise and the "last of the fine bird books" (Fine Bird Books p.107) --- The remarkable-looking Birds of Paradise have captivated western science since Magellan first brought back a skin of such a creature in 1522. The skins, highly prized by East Indian natives, was given by the ruler of Batchian (in the Mollucas) as a gift to the King of Spain. The legs and wings of the bird, however, had been removed when skinned, presumably to better show its impressive plumage. When asked why the bird had no wings or feet, the natives replied that none were needed as the bird simply floated in its heavenly paradise. Thus, the earliest descriptions of the species, and indeed even its scientific naming by Linnaeus in the 18th century as Paradisaea apoda (legless bird of paradise), perpetuated that myth. Due to the remote nature of their rain forest habitat in New Guinea, it was not until the mid-19th century that these remarkable birds were first scientifically observed and accurately described. --- Gould had intended to publish the first monograph devot … [Click Below for Full Description]
Bookseller: Trillium Antique Prints & Rare Books [Franklin, TN, U.S.A.]
2019-08-20 18:44:28
Richard Bowdler Sharpe & John Gould, William Hart
London, 1891. This stunning hand-colored folio lithograph is from "Monograph of the Paradiseidae, or Birds of Paradise and Ptilonorhynchidae, and Bower-Birds" by Richard Bowdler Sharpe. The work was published in London by Taylor & Francis for Henry Sotheran & Co between 1891 and 1898. The "Birds of Paradise" was the idea of John Gould's but completed after his death by Sharpe. The plates were predominantly drawn by William Matthew Hart, John Gould, and John Gerard Keulemans. It was the first monograph devoted to the remarkable birds of paradise and the "last of the fine bird books" (Fine Bird Books p.107) --- The remarkable-looking Birds of Paradise have captivated western science since Magellan first brought back a skin of such a creature in 1522. The skins, highly prized by East Indian natives, was given by the ruler of Batchian (in the Mollucas) as a gift to the King of Spain. The legs and wings of the bird, however, had been removed when skinned, presumably to better show its impressive plumage. When asked why the bird had no wings or feet, the natives replied that none were needed as the bird simply floated in its heavenly paradise. Thus, the earliest descriptions of the species, and indeed even its scientific naming by Linnaeus in the 18th century as Paradisaea apoda (legless bird of paradise), perpetuated that myth. Due to the remote nature of their rain forest habitat in New Guinea, it was not until the mid-19th century that these remarkable birds were first scientifically observed and accurately described. --- Gould had intended to publish the first monograph devot … [Click Below for Full Description]
Bookseller: Trillium Antique Prints & Rare Books [Franklin, TN, U.S.A.]
2019-08-20 18:44:28
Richard Bowdler Sharpe & John Gould, William Hart
London, 1891. This stunning hand-colored folio lithograph is from "Monograph of the Paradiseidae, or Birds of Paradise and Ptilonorhynchidae, and Bower-Birds" by Richard Bowdler Sharpe. The work was published in London by Taylor & Francis for Henry Sotheran & Co between 1891 and 1898. The "Birds of Paradise" was the idea of John Gould's but completed after his death by Sharpe. The plates were predominantly drawn by William Matthew Hart, John Gould, and John Gerard Keulemans. It was the first monograph devoted to the remarkable birds of paradise and the "last of the fine bird books" (Fine Bird Books p.107) --- The remarkable-looking Birds of Paradise have captivated western science since Magellan first brought back a skin of such a creature in 1522. The skins, highly prized by East Indian natives, was given by the ruler of Batchian (in the Mollucas) as a gift to the King of Spain. The legs and wings of the bird, however, had been removed when skinned, presumably to better show its impressive plumage. When asked why the bird had no wings or feet, the natives replied that none were needed as the bird simply floated in its heavenly paradise. Thus, the earliest descriptions of the species, and indeed even its scientific naming by Linnaeus in the 18th century as Paradisaea apoda (legless bird of paradise), perpetuated that myth. Due to the remote nature of their rain forest habitat in New Guinea, it was not until the mid-19th century that these remarkable birds were first scientifically observed and accurately described. --- Gould had intended to publish the first monograph devot … [Click Below for Full Description]
Bookseller: Trillium Antique Prints & Rare Books [Franklin, TN, U.S.A.]
2019-08-20 18:44:28
Richard Bowdler Sharpe & John Gould, William Hart
London, 1891. This stunning hand-colored folio lithograph is from "Monograph of the Paradiseidae, or Birds of Paradise and Ptilonorhynchidae, and Bower-Birds" by Richard Bowdler Sharpe. The work was published in London by Taylor & Francis for Henry Sotheran & Co between 1891 and 1898. The "Birds of Paradise" was the idea of John Gould's but completed after his death by Sharpe. The plates were predominantly drawn by William Matthew Hart, John Gould, and John Gerard Keulemans. It was the first monograph devoted to the remarkable birds of paradise and the "last of the fine bird books" (Fine Bird Books p.107) --- The remarkable-looking Birds of Paradise have captivated western science since Magellan first brought back a skin of such a creature in 1522. The skins, highly prized by East Indian natives, was given by the ruler of Batchian (in the Mollucas) as a gift to the King of Spain. The legs and wings of the bird, however, had been removed when skinned, presumably to better show its impressive plumage. When asked why the bird had no wings or feet, the natives replied that none were needed as the bird simply floated in its heavenly paradise. Thus, the earliest descriptions of the species, and indeed even its scientific naming by Linnaeus in the 18th century as Paradisaea apoda (legless bird of paradise), perpetuated that myth. Due to the remote nature of their rain forest habitat in New Guinea, it was not until the mid-19th century that these remarkable birds were first scientifically observed and accurately described. --- Gould had intended to publish the first monograph devot … [Click Below for Full Description]
Bookseller: Trillium Antique Prints & Rare Books [Franklin, TN, U.S.A.]
2019-08-20 18:44:28
Richard Bowdler Sharpe & John Gould, William Hart
London, 1891. This stunning hand-colored folio lithograph is from "Monograph of the Paradiseidae, or Birds of Paradise and Ptilonorhynchidae, and Bower-Birds" by Richard Bowdler Sharpe. The work was published in London by Taylor & Francis for Henry Sotheran & Co between 1891 and 1898. The "Birds of Paradise" was the idea of John Gould's but completed after his death by Sharpe. The plates were predominantly drawn by William Matthew Hart, John Gould, and John Gerard Keulemans. It was the first monograph devoted to the remarkable birds of paradise and the "last of the fine bird books" (Fine Bird Books p.107) --- The remarkable-looking Birds of Paradise have captivated western science since Magellan first brought back a skin of such a creature in 1522. The skins, highly prized by East Indian natives, was given by the ruler of Batchian (in the Mollucas) as a gift to the King of Spain. The legs and wings of the bird, however, had been removed when skinned, presumably to better show its impressive plumage. When asked why the bird had no wings or feet, the natives replied that none were needed as the bird simply floated in its heavenly paradise. Thus, the earliest descriptions of the species, and indeed even its scientific naming by Linnaeus in the 18th century as Paradisaea apoda (legless bird of paradise), perpetuated that myth. Due to the remote nature of their rain forest habitat in New Guinea, it was not until the mid-19th century that these remarkable birds were first scientifically observed and accurately described. --- Gould had intended to publish the first monograph devot … [Click Below for Full Description]
Bookseller: Trillium Antique Prints & Rare Books [Franklin, TN, U.S.A.]
2019-08-20 18:44:28
Richard Bowdler Sharpe & John Gould, William Hart
London, 1891. This stunning hand-colored folio lithograph is from "Monograph of the Paradiseidae, or Birds of Paradise and Ptilonorhynchidae, and Bower-Birds" by Richard Bowdler Sharpe. The work was published in London by Taylor & Francis for Henry Sotheran & Co between 1891 and 1898. The "Birds of Paradise" was the idea of John Gould's but completed after his death by Sharpe. The plates were predominantly drawn by William Matthew Hart, John Gould, and John Gerard Keulemans. It was the first monograph devoted to the remarkable birds of paradise and the "last of the fine bird books" (Fine Bird Books p.107) --- The remarkable-looking Birds of Paradise have captivated western science since Magellan first brought back a skin of such a creature in 1522. The skins, highly prized by East Indian natives, was given by the ruler of Batchian (in the Mollucas) as a gift to the King of Spain. The legs and wings of the bird, however, had been removed when skinned, presumably to better show its impressive plumage. When asked why the bird had no wings or feet, the natives replied that none were needed as the bird simply floated in its heavenly paradise. Thus, the earliest descriptions of the species, and indeed even its scientific naming by Linnaeus in the 18th century as Paradisaea apoda (legless bird of paradise), perpetuated that myth. Due to the remote nature of their rain forest habitat in New Guinea, it was not until the mid-19th century that these remarkable birds were first scientifically observed and accurately described. --- Gould had intended to publish the first monograph devot … [Click Below for Full Description]
Bookseller: Trillium Antique Prints & Rare Books [Franklin, TN, U.S.A.]
2019-08-20 18:44:28
Richard Bowdler Sharpe & John Gould, William Hart
London, 1891. This stunning hand-colored folio lithograph is from "Monograph of the Paradiseidae, or Birds of Paradise and Ptilonorhynchidae, and Bower-Birds" by Richard Bowdler Sharpe. The work was published in London by Taylor & Francis for Henry Sotheran & Co between 1891 and 1898. The "Birds of Paradise" was the idea of John Gould's but completed after his death by Sharpe. The plates were predominantly drawn by William Matthew Hart, John Gould, and John Gerard Keulemans. It was the first monograph devoted to the remarkable birds of paradise and the "last of the fine bird books" (Fine Bird Books p.107) --- The remarkable-looking Birds of Paradise have captivated western science since Magellan first brought back a skin of such a creature in 1522. The skins, highly prized by East Indian natives, was given by the ruler of Batchian (in the Mollucas) as a gift to the King of Spain. The legs and wings of the bird, however, had been removed when skinned, presumably to better show its impressive plumage. When asked why the bird had no wings or feet, the natives replied that none were needed as the bird simply floated in its heavenly paradise. Thus, the earliest descriptions of the species, and indeed even its scientific naming by Linnaeus in the 18th century as Paradisaea apoda (legless bird of paradise), perpetuated that myth. Due to the remote nature of their rain forest habitat in New Guinea, it was not until the mid-19th century that these remarkable birds were first scientifically observed and accurately described. --- Gould had intended to publish the first monograph devot … [Click Below for Full Description]
Bookseller: Trillium Antique Prints & Rare Books [Franklin, TN, U.S.A.]
2019-08-20 18:44:28
Richard Bowdler Sharpe & John Gould, William Hart
London, 1891. This stunning hand-colored folio lithograph is from "Monograph of the Paradiseidae, or Birds of Paradise and Ptilonorhynchidae, and Bower-Birds" by Richard Bowdler Sharpe. The work was published in London by Taylor & Francis for Henry Sotheran & Co between 1891 and 1898. The "Birds of Paradise" was the idea of John Gould's but completed after his death by Sharpe. The plates were predominantly drawn by William Matthew Hart, John Gould, and John Gerard Keulemans. It was the first monograph devoted to the remarkable birds of paradise and the "last of the fine bird books" (Fine Bird Books p.107) --- The remarkable-looking Birds of Paradise have captivated western science since Magellan first brought back a skin of such a creature in 1522. The skins, highly prized by East Indian natives, was given by the ruler of Batchian (in the Mollucas) as a gift to the King of Spain. The legs and wings of the bird, however, had been removed when skinned, presumably to better show its impressive plumage. When asked why the bird had no wings or feet, the natives replied that none were needed as the bird simply floated in its heavenly paradise. Thus, the earliest descriptions of the species, and indeed even its scientific naming by Linnaeus in the 18th century as Paradisaea apoda (legless bird of paradise), perpetuated that myth. Due to the remote nature of their rain forest habitat in New Guinea, it was not until the mid-19th century that these remarkable birds were first scientifically observed and accurately described. --- Gould had intended to publish the first monograph devot … [Click Below for Full Description]
Bookseller: Trillium Antique Prints & Rare Books [Franklin, TN, U.S.A.]
2019-08-20 18:44:28
Richard Bowdler Sharpe & John Gould, William Hart
London, 1891. This stunning hand-colored folio lithograph is from "Monograph of the Paradiseidae, or Birds of Paradise and Ptilonorhynchidae, and Bower-Birds" by Richard Bowdler Sharpe. The work was published in London by Taylor & Francis for Henry Sotheran & Co between 1891 and 1898. The "Birds of Paradise" was the idea of John Gould's but completed after his death by Sharpe. The plates were predominantly drawn by William Matthew Hart, John Gould, and John Gerard Keulemans. It was the first monograph devoted to the remarkable birds of paradise and the "last of the fine bird books" (Fine Bird Books p.107) --- The remarkable-looking Birds of Paradise have captivated western science since Magellan first brought back a skin of such a creature in 1522. The skins, highly prized by East Indian natives, was given by the ruler of Batchian (in the Mollucas) as a gift to the King of Spain. The legs and wings of the bird, however, had been removed when skinned, presumably to better show its impressive plumage. When asked why the bird had no wings or feet, the natives replied that none were needed as the bird simply floated in its heavenly paradise. Thus, the earliest descriptions of the species, and indeed even its scientific naming by Linnaeus in the 18th century as Paradisaea apoda (legless bird of paradise), perpetuated that myth. Due to the remote nature of their rain forest habitat in New Guinea, it was not until the mid-19th century that these remarkable birds were first scientifically observed and accurately described. --- Gould had intended to publish the first monograph devot … [Click Below for Full Description]
Bookseller: Trillium Antique Prints & Rare Books [Franklin, TN, U.S.A.]
2019-08-20 18:44:27
Richard Bowdler Sharpe & John Gould, William Hart
London, 1891. This stunning hand-colored folio lithograph is from "Monograph of the Paradiseidae, or Birds of Paradise and Ptilonorhynchidae, and Bower-Birds" by Richard Bowdler Sharpe. The work was published in London by Taylor & Francis for Henry Sotheran & Co between 1891 and 1898. The "Birds of Paradise" was the idea of John Gould's but completed after his death by Sharpe. The plates were predominantly drawn by William Matthew Hart, John Gould, and John Gerard Keulemans. It was the first monograph devoted to the remarkable birds of paradise and the "last of the fine bird books" (Fine Bird Books p.107) --- The remarkable-looking Birds of Paradise have captivated western science since Magellan first brought back a skin of such a creature in 1522. The skins, highly prized by East Indian natives, was given by the ruler of Batchian (in the Mollucas) as a gift to the King of Spain. The legs and wings of the bird, however, had been removed when skinned, presumably to better show its impressive plumage. When asked why the bird had no wings or feet, the natives replied that none were needed as the bird simply floated in its heavenly paradise. Thus, the earliest descriptions of the species, and indeed even its scientific naming by Linnaeus in the 18th century as Paradisaea apoda (legless bird of paradise), perpetuated that myth. Due to the remote nature of their rain forest habitat in New Guinea, it was not until the mid-19th century that these remarkable birds were first scientifically observed and accurately described. --- Gould had intended to publish the first monograph devot … [Click Below for Full Description]
Bookseller: Trillium Antique Prints & Rare Books [Franklin, TN, U.S.A.]
2019-08-20 18:44:27
Richard Bowdler Sharpe & John Gould, William Hart
London, 1891. This stunning hand-colored folio lithograph is from "Monograph of the Paradiseidae, or Birds of Paradise and Ptilonorhynchidae, and Bower-Birds" by Richard Bowdler Sharpe. The work was published in London by Taylor & Francis for Henry Sotheran & Co between 1891 and 1898. The "Birds of Paradise" was the idea of John Gould's but completed after his death by Sharpe. The plates were predominantly drawn by William Matthew Hart, John Gould, and John Gerard Keulemans. It was the first monograph devoted to the remarkable birds of paradise and the "last of the fine bird books" (Fine Bird Books p.107) --- The remarkable-looking Birds of Paradise have captivated western science since Magellan first brought back a skin of such a creature in 1522. The skins, highly prized by East Indian natives, was given by the ruler of Batchian (in the Mollucas) as a gift to the King of Spain. The legs and wings of the bird, however, had been removed when skinned, presumably to better show its impressive plumage. When asked why the bird had no wings or feet, the natives replied that none were needed as the bird simply floated in its heavenly paradise. Thus, the earliest descriptions of the species, and indeed even its scientific naming by Linnaeus in the 18th century as Paradisaea apoda (legless bird of paradise), perpetuated that myth. Due to the remote nature of their rain forest habitat in New Guinea, it was not until the mid-19th century that these remarkable birds were first scientifically observed and accurately described. --- Gould had intended to publish the first monograph devot … [Click Below for Full Description]
Bookseller: Trillium Antique Prints & Rare Books [Franklin, TN, U.S.A.]
2019-08-20 18:44:27
Richard Bowdler Sharpe & John Gould, William Hart
London, 1891. This stunning hand-colored folio lithograph is from "Monograph of the Paradiseidae, or Birds of Paradise and Ptilonorhynchidae, and Bower-Birds" by Richard Bowdler Sharpe. The work was published in London by Taylor & Francis for Henry Sotheran & Co between 1891 and 1898. The "Birds of Paradise" was the idea of John Gould's but completed after his death by Sharpe. The plates were predominantly drawn by William Matthew Hart, John Gould, and John Gerard Keulemans. It was the first monograph devoted to the remarkable birds of paradise and the "last of the fine bird books" (Fine Bird Books p.107) --- The remarkable-looking Birds of Paradise have captivated western science since Magellan first brought back a skin of such a creature in 1522. The skins, highly prized by East Indian natives, was given by the ruler of Batchian (in the Mollucas) as a gift to the King of Spain. The legs and wings of the bird, however, had been removed when skinned, presumably to better show its impressive plumage. When asked why the bird had no wings or feet, the natives replied that none were needed as the bird simply floated in its heavenly paradise. Thus, the earliest descriptions of the species, and indeed even its scientific naming by Linnaeus in the 18th century as Paradisaea apoda (legless bird of paradise), perpetuated that myth. Due to the remote nature of their rain forest habitat in New Guinea, it was not until the mid-19th century that these remarkable birds were first scientifically observed and accurately described. --- Gould had intended to publish the first monograph devot … [Click Below for Full Description]
Bookseller: Trillium Antique Prints & Rare Books [Franklin, TN, U.S.A.]
2019-08-20 18:44:27
Richard Bowdler Sharpe & John Gould, William Hart
London, 1891. This stunning hand-colored folio lithograph is from "Monograph of the Paradiseidae, or Birds of Paradise and Ptilonorhynchidae, and Bower-Birds" by Richard Bowdler Sharpe. The work was published in London by Taylor & Francis for Henry Sotheran & Co between 1891 and 1898. The "Birds of Paradise" was the idea of John Gould's but completed after his death by Sharpe. The plates were predominantly drawn by William Matthew Hart, John Gould, and John Gerard Keulemans. It was the first monograph devoted to the remarkable birds of paradise and the "last of the fine bird books" (Fine Bird Books p.107) --- The remarkable-looking Birds of Paradise have captivated western science since Magellan first brought back a skin of such a creature in 1522. The skins, highly prized by East Indian natives, was given by the ruler of Batchian (in the Mollucas) as a gift to the King of Spain. The legs and wings of the bird, however, had been removed when skinned, presumably to better show its impressive plumage. When asked why the bird had no wings or feet, the natives replied that none were needed as the bird simply floated in its heavenly paradise. Thus, the earliest descriptions of the species, and indeed even its scientific naming by Linnaeus in the 18th century as Paradisaea apoda (legless bird of paradise), perpetuated that myth. Due to the remote nature of their rain forest habitat in New Guinea, it was not until the mid-19th century that these remarkable birds were first scientifically observed and accurately described. --- Gould had intended to publish the first monograph devot … [Click Below for Full Description]
Bookseller: Trillium Antique Prints & Rare Books [Franklin, TN, U.S.A.]
2019-08-20 18:44:27
Richard Bowdler Sharpe & John Gould, William Hart
London, 1891. This stunning hand-colored folio lithograph is from "Monograph of the Paradiseidae, or Birds of Paradise and Ptilonorhynchidae, and Bower-Birds" by Richard Bowdler Sharpe. The work was published in London by Taylor & Francis for Henry Sotheran & Co between 1891 and 1898. The "Birds of Paradise" was the idea of John Gould's but completed after his death by Sharpe. The plates were predominantly drawn by William Matthew Hart, John Gould, and John Gerard Keulemans. It was the first monograph devoted to the remarkable birds of paradise and the "last of the fine bird books" (Fine Bird Books p.107) --- The remarkable-looking Birds of Paradise have captivated western science since Magellan first brought back a skin of such a creature in 1522. The skins, highly prized by East Indian natives, was given by the ruler of Batchian (in the Mollucas) as a gift to the King of Spain. The legs and wings of the bird, however, had been removed when skinned, presumably to better show its impressive plumage. When asked why the bird had no wings or feet, the natives replied that none were needed as the bird simply floated in its heavenly paradise. Thus, the earliest descriptions of the species, and indeed even its scientific naming by Linnaeus in the 18th century as Paradisaea apoda (legless bird of paradise), perpetuated that myth. Due to the remote nature of their rain forest habitat in New Guinea, it was not until the mid-19th century that these remarkable birds were first scientifically observed and accurately described. --- Gould had intended to publish the first monograph devot … [Click Below for Full Description]
Bookseller: Trillium Antique Prints & Rare Books [Franklin, TN, U.S.A.]
2019-08-20 18:44:27
Richard Bowdler Sharpe & John Gould, William Hart
London, 1891. This stunning hand-colored folio lithograph is from "Monograph of the Paradiseidae, or Birds of Paradise and Ptilonorhynchidae, and Bower-Birds" by Richard Bowdler Sharpe. The work was published in London by Taylor & Francis for Henry Sotheran & Co between 1891 and 1898. The "Birds of Paradise" was the idea of John Gould's but completed after his death by Sharpe. The plates were predominantly drawn by William Matthew Hart, John Gould, and John Gerard Keulemans. It was the first monograph devoted to the remarkable birds of paradise and the "last of the fine bird books" (Fine Bird Books p.107) --- The remarkable-looking Birds of Paradise have captivated western science since Magellan first brought back a skin of such a creature in 1522. The skins, highly prized by East Indian natives, was given by the ruler of Batchian (in the Mollucas) as a gift to the King of Spain. The legs and wings of the bird, however, had been removed when skinned, presumably to better show its impressive plumage. When asked why the bird had no wings or feet, the natives replied that none were needed as the bird simply floated in its heavenly paradise. Thus, the earliest descriptions of the species, and indeed even its scientific naming by Linnaeus in the 18th century as Paradisaea apoda (legless bird of paradise), perpetuated that myth. Due to the remote nature of their rain forest habitat in New Guinea, it was not until the mid-19th century that these remarkable birds were first scientifically observed and accurately described. --- Gould had intended to publish the first monograph devot … [Click Below for Full Description]
Bookseller: Trillium Antique Prints & Rare Books [Franklin, TN, U.S.A.]
2019-08-20 18:44:27
Richard Bowdler Sharpe & John Gould, William Hart
London, 1891. This stunning hand-colored folio lithograph is from "Monograph of the Paradiseidae, or Birds of Paradise and Ptilonorhynchidae, and Bower-Birds" by Richard Bowdler Sharpe. The work was published in London by Taylor & Francis for Henry Sotheran & Co between 1891 and 1898. The "Birds of Paradise" was the idea of John Gould's but completed after his death by Sharpe. The plates were predominantly drawn by William Matthew Hart, John Gould, and John Gerard Keulemans. It was the first monograph devoted to the remarkable birds of paradise and the "last of the fine bird books" (Fine Bird Books p.107) --- The remarkable-looking Birds of Paradise have captivated western science since Magellan first brought back a skin of such a creature in 1522. The skins, highly prized by East Indian natives, was given by the ruler of Batchian (in the Mollucas) as a gift to the King of Spain. The legs and wings of the bird, however, had been removed when skinned, presumably to better show its impressive plumage. When asked why the bird had no wings or feet, the natives replied that none were needed as the bird simply floated in its heavenly paradise. Thus, the earliest descriptions of the species, and indeed even its scientific naming by Linnaeus in the 18th century as Paradisaea apoda (legless bird of paradise), perpetuated that myth. Due to the remote nature of their rain forest habitat in New Guinea, it was not until the mid-19th century that these remarkable birds were first scientifically observed and accurately described. --- Gould had intended to publish the first monograph devot … [Click Below for Full Description]
Bookseller: Trillium Antique Prints & Rare Books [Franklin, TN, U.S.A.]
2019-08-20 18:44:27
Richard Bowdler Sharpe & John Gould, William Hart
London, 1891. This stunning hand-colored folio lithograph is from "Monograph of the Paradiseidae, or Birds of Paradise and Ptilonorhynchidae, and Bower-Birds" by Richard Bowdler Sharpe. The work was published in London by Taylor & Francis for Henry Sotheran & Co between 1891 and 1898. The "Birds of Paradise" was the idea of John Gould's but completed after his death by Sharpe. The plates were predominantly drawn by William Matthew Hart, John Gould, and John Gerard Keulemans. It was the first monograph devoted to the remarkable birds of paradise and the "last of the fine bird books" (Fine Bird Books p.107) --- The remarkable-looking Birds of Paradise have captivated western science since Magellan first brought back a skin of such a creature in 1522. The skins, highly prized by East Indian natives, was given by the ruler of Batchian (in the Mollucas) as a gift to the King of Spain. The legs and wings of the bird, however, had been removed when skinned, presumably to better show its impressive plumage. When asked why the bird had no wings or feet, the natives replied that none were needed as the bird simply floated in its heavenly paradise. Thus, the earliest descriptions of the species, and indeed even its scientific naming by Linnaeus in the 18th century as Paradisaea apoda (legless bird of paradise), perpetuated that myth. Due to the remote nature of their rain forest habitat in New Guinea, it was not until the mid-19th century that these remarkable birds were first scientifically observed and accurately described. --- Gould had intended to publish the first monograph devot … [Click Below for Full Description]
Bookseller: Trillium Antique Prints & Rare Books [Franklin, TN, U.S.A.]
2019-08-20 18:44:27
Richard Bowdler Sharpe & John Gould, William Hart
London, 1891. This stunning hand-colored folio lithograph is from "Monograph of the Paradiseidae, or Birds of Paradise and Ptilonorhynchidae, and Bower-Birds" by Richard Bowdler Sharpe. The work was published in London by Taylor & Francis for Henry Sotheran & Co between 1891 and 1898. The "Birds of Paradise" was the idea of John Gould's but completed after his death by Sharpe. The plates were predominantly drawn by William Matthew Hart, John Gould, and John Gerard Keulemans. It was the first monograph devoted to the remarkable birds of paradise and the "last of the fine bird books" (Fine Bird Books p.107) --- The remarkable-looking Birds of Paradise have captivated western science since Magellan first brought back a skin of such a creature in 1522. The skins, highly prized by East Indian natives, was given by the ruler of Batchian (in the Mollucas) as a gift to the King of Spain. The legs and wings of the bird, however, had been removed when skinned, presumably to better show its impressive plumage. When asked why the bird had no wings or feet, the natives replied that none were needed as the bird simply floated in its heavenly paradise. Thus, the earliest descriptions of the species, and indeed even its scientific naming by Linnaeus in the 18th century as Paradisaea apoda (legless bird of paradise), perpetuated that myth. Due to the remote nature of their rain forest habitat in New Guinea, it was not until the mid-19th century that these remarkable birds were first scientifically observed and accurately described. --- Gould had intended to publish the first monograph devot … [Click Below for Full Description]
Bookseller: Trillium Antique Prints & Rare Books [Franklin, TN, U.S.A.]
2019-08-20 18:44:27
Richard Bowdler Sharpe & John Gould, William Hart
London, 1891. This stunning hand-colored folio lithograph is from "Monograph of the Paradiseidae, or Birds of Paradise and Ptilonorhynchidae, and Bower-Birds" by Richard Bowdler Sharpe. The work was published in London by Taylor & Francis for Henry Sotheran & Co between 1891 and 1898. The "Birds of Paradise" was the idea of John Gould's but completed after his death by Sharpe. The plates were predominantly drawn by William Matthew Hart, John Gould, and John Gerard Keulemans. It was the first monograph devoted to the remarkable birds of paradise and the "last of the fine bird books" (Fine Bird Books p.107) --- The remarkable-looking Birds of Paradise have captivated western science since Magellan first brought back a skin of such a creature in 1522. The skins, highly prized by East Indian natives, was given by the ruler of Batchian (in the Mollucas) as a gift to the King of Spain. The legs and wings of the bird, however, had been removed when skinned, presumably to better show its impressive plumage. When asked why the bird had no wings or feet, the natives replied that none were needed as the bird simply floated in its heavenly paradise. Thus, the earliest descriptions of the species, and indeed even its scientific naming by Linnaeus in the 18th century as Paradisaea apoda (legless bird of paradise), perpetuated that myth. Due to the remote nature of their rain forest habitat in New Guinea, it was not until the mid-19th century that these remarkable birds were first scientifically observed and accurately described. --- Gould had intended to publish the first monograph devot … [Click Below for Full Description]
Bookseller: Trillium Antique Prints & Rare Books [Franklin, TN, U.S.A.]
2019-08-20 18:44:27
Richard Bowdler Sharpe & John Gould, William Hart
London, 1891. This stunning hand-colored folio lithograph is from "Monograph of the Paradiseidae, or Birds of Paradise and Ptilonorhynchidae, and Bower-Birds" by Richard Bowdler Sharpe. The work was published in London by Taylor & Francis for Henry Sotheran & Co between 1891 and 1898. The "Birds of Paradise" was the idea of John Gould's but completed after his death by Sharpe. The plates were predominantly drawn by William Matthew Hart, John Gould, and John Gerard Keulemans. It was the first monograph devoted to the remarkable birds of paradise and the "last of the fine bird books" (Fine Bird Books p.107) --- The remarkable-looking Birds of Paradise have captivated western science since Magellan first brought back a skin of such a creature in 1522. The skins, highly prized by East Indian natives, was given by the ruler of Batchian (in the Mollucas) as a gift to the King of Spain. The legs and wings of the bird, however, had been removed when skinned, presumably to better show its impressive plumage. When asked why the bird had no wings or feet, the natives replied that none were needed as the bird simply floated in its heavenly paradise. Thus, the earliest descriptions of the species, and indeed even its scientific naming by Linnaeus in the 18th century as Paradisaea apoda (legless bird of paradise), perpetuated that myth. Due to the remote nature of their rain forest habitat in New Guinea, it was not until the mid-19th century that these remarkable birds were first scientifically observed and accurately described. --- Gould had intended to publish the first monograph devot … [Click Below for Full Description]
Bookseller: Trillium Antique Prints & Rare Books [Franklin, TN, U.S.A.]
2019-08-20 18:44:27
Richard Bowdler Sharpe & John Gould, William Hart
London, 1891. This stunning hand-colored folio lithograph is from "Monograph of the Paradiseidae, or Birds of Paradise and Ptilonorhynchidae, and Bower-Birds" by Richard Bowdler Sharpe. The work was published in London by Taylor & Francis for Henry Sotheran & Co between 1891 and 1898. The "Birds of Paradise" was the idea of John Gould's but completed after his death by Sharpe. The plates were predominantly drawn by William Matthew Hart, John Gould, and John Gerard Keulemans. It was the first monograph devoted to the remarkable birds of paradise and the "last of the fine bird books" (Fine Bird Books p.107) --- The remarkable-looking Birds of Paradise have captivated western science since Magellan first brought back a skin of such a creature in 1522. The skins, highly prized by East Indian natives, was given by the ruler of Batchian (in the Mollucas) as a gift to the King of Spain. The legs and wings of the bird, however, had been removed when skinned, presumably to better show its impressive plumage. When asked why the bird had no wings or feet, the natives replied that none were needed as the bird simply floated in its heavenly paradise. Thus, the earliest descriptions of the species, and indeed even its scientific naming by Linnaeus in the 18th century as Paradisaea apoda (legless bird of paradise), perpetuated that myth. Due to the remote nature of their rain forest habitat in New Guinea, it was not until the mid-19th century that these remarkable birds were first scientifically observed and accurately described. --- Gould had intended to publish the first monograph devot … [Click Below for Full Description]
Bookseller: Trillium Antique Prints & Rare Books [Franklin, TN, U.S.A.]
2019-08-20 18:44:27
Richard Bowdler Sharpe & John Gould, William Hart
London, 1891. This stunning hand-colored folio lithograph is from "Monograph of the Paradiseidae, or Birds of Paradise and Ptilonorhynchidae, and Bower-Birds" by Richard Bowdler Sharpe. The work was published in London by Taylor & Francis for Henry Sotheran & Co between 1891 and 1898. The "Birds of Paradise" was the idea of John Gould's but completed after his death by Sharpe. The plates were predominantly drawn by William Matthew Hart, John Gould, and John Gerard Keulemans. It was the first monograph devoted to the remarkable birds of paradise and the "last of the fine bird books" (Fine Bird Books p.107) --- The remarkable-looking Birds of Paradise have captivated western science since Magellan first brought back a skin of such a creature in 1522. The skins, highly prized by East Indian natives, was given by the ruler of Batchian (in the Mollucas) as a gift to the King of Spain. The legs and wings of the bird, however, had been removed when skinned, presumably to better show its impressive plumage. When asked why the bird had no wings or feet, the natives replied that none were needed as the bird simply floated in its heavenly paradise. Thus, the earliest descriptions of the species, and indeed even its scientific naming by Linnaeus in the 18th century as Paradisaea apoda (legless bird of paradise), perpetuated that myth. Due to the remote nature of their rain forest habitat in New Guinea, it was not until the mid-19th century that these remarkable birds were first scientifically observed and accurately described. --- Gould had intended to publish the first monograph devot … [Click Below for Full Description]
Bookseller: Trillium Antique Prints & Rare Books [Franklin, TN, U.S.A.]
2019-08-20 18:44:27
Richard Bowdler Sharpe & John Gould, William Hart
London, 1891. This stunning hand-colored folio lithograph is from "Monograph of the Paradiseidae, or Birds of Paradise and Ptilonorhynchidae, and Bower-Birds" by Richard Bowdler Sharpe. The work was published in London by Taylor & Francis for Henry Sotheran & Co between 1891 and 1898. The "Birds of Paradise" was the idea of John Gould's but completed after his death by Sharpe. The plates were predominantly drawn by William Matthew Hart, John Gould, and John Gerard Keulemans. It was the first monograph devoted to the remarkable birds of paradise and the "last of the fine bird books" (Fine Bird Books p.107) --- The remarkable-looking Birds of Paradise have captivated western science since Magellan first brought back a skin of such a creature in 1522. The skins, highly prized by East Indian natives, was given by the ruler of Batchian (in the Mollucas) as a gift to the King of Spain. The legs and wings of the bird, however, had been removed when skinned, presumably to better show its impressive plumage. When asked why the bird had no wings or feet, the natives replied that none were needed as the bird simply floated in its heavenly paradise. Thus, the earliest descriptions of the species, and indeed even its scientific naming by Linnaeus in the 18th century as Paradisaea apoda (legless bird of paradise), perpetuated that myth. Due to the remote nature of their rain forest habitat in New Guinea, it was not until the mid-19th century that these remarkable birds were first scientifically observed and accurately described. --- Gould had intended to publish the first monograph devot … [Click Below for Full Description]
Bookseller: Trillium Antique Prints & Rare Books [Franklin, TN, U.S.A.]
2019-08-20 18:44:27
Richard Bowdler Sharpe & John Gould, William Hart
London, 1891. This stunning hand-colored folio lithograph is from "Monograph of the Paradiseidae, or Birds of Paradise and Ptilonorhynchidae, and Bower-Birds" by Richard Bowdler Sharpe. The work was published in London by Taylor & Francis for Henry Sotheran & Co between 1891 and 1898. The "Birds of Paradise" was the idea of John Gould's but completed after his death by Sharpe. The plates were predominantly drawn by William Matthew Hart, John Gould, and John Gerard Keulemans. It was the first monograph devoted to the remarkable birds of paradise and the "last of the fine bird books" (Fine Bird Books p.107) --- The remarkable-looking Birds of Paradise have captivated western science since Magellan first brought back a skin of such a creature in 1522. The skins, highly prized by East Indian natives, was given by the ruler of Batchian (in the Mollucas) as a gift to the King of Spain. The legs and wings of the bird, however, had been removed when skinned, presumably to better show its impressive plumage. When asked why the bird had no wings or feet, the natives replied that none were needed as the bird simply floated in its heavenly paradise. Thus, the earliest descriptions of the species, and indeed even its scientific naming by Linnaeus in the 18th century as Paradisaea apoda (legless bird of paradise), perpetuated that myth. Due to the remote nature of their rain forest habitat in New Guinea, it was not until the mid-19th century that these remarkable birds were first scientifically observed and accurately described. --- Gould had intended to publish the first monograph devot … [Click Below for Full Description]
Bookseller: Trillium Antique Prints & Rare Books [Franklin, TN, U.S.A.]
2019-08-20 18:44:27
Richard Bowdler Sharpe & John Gould, William Hart
London, 1891. This stunning hand-colored folio lithograph is from "Monograph of the Paradiseidae, or Birds of Paradise and Ptilonorhynchidae, and Bower-Birds" by Richard Bowdler Sharpe. The work was published in London by Taylor & Francis for Henry Sotheran & Co between 1891 and 1898. The "Birds of Paradise" was the idea of John Gould's but completed after his death by Sharpe. The plates were predominantly drawn by William Matthew Hart, John Gould, and John Gerard Keulemans. It was the first monograph devoted to the remarkable birds of paradise and the "last of the fine bird books" (Fine Bird Books p.107) --- The remarkable-looking Birds of Paradise have captivated western science since Magellan first brought back a skin of such a creature in 1522. The skins, highly prized by East Indian natives, was given by the ruler of Batchian (in the Mollucas) as a gift to the King of Spain. The legs and wings of the bird, however, had been removed when skinned, presumably to better show its impressive plumage. When asked why the bird had no wings or feet, the natives replied that none were needed as the bird simply floated in its heavenly paradise. Thus, the earliest descriptions of the species, and indeed even its scientific naming by Linnaeus in the 18th century as Paradisaea apoda (legless bird of paradise), perpetuated that myth. Due to the remote nature of their rain forest habitat in New Guinea, it was not until the mid-19th century that these remarkable birds were first scientifically observed and accurately described. --- Gould had intended to publish the first monograph devot … [Click Below for Full Description]
Bookseller: Trillium Antique Prints & Rare Books [Franklin, TN, U.S.A.]
2019-08-20 18:44:27
Richard Bowdler Sharpe & John Gould, William Hart
London, 1891. This stunning hand-colored folio lithograph is from "Monograph of the Paradiseidae, or Birds of Paradise and Ptilonorhynchidae, and Bower-Birds" by Richard Bowdler Sharpe. The work was published in London by Taylor & Francis for Henry Sotheran & Co between 1891 and 1898. The "Birds of Paradise" was the idea of John Gould's but completed after his death by Sharpe. The plates were predominantly drawn by William Matthew Hart, John Gould, and John Gerard Keulemans. It was the first monograph devoted to the remarkable birds of paradise and the "last of the fine bird books" (Fine Bird Books p.107) --- The remarkable-looking Birds of Paradise have captivated western science since Magellan first brought back a skin of such a creature in 1522. The skins, highly prized by East Indian natives, was given by the ruler of Batchian (in the Mollucas) as a gift to the King of Spain. The legs and wings of the bird, however, had been removed when skinned, presumably to better show its impressive plumage. When asked why the bird had no wings or feet, the natives replied that none were needed as the bird simply floated in its heavenly paradise. Thus, the earliest descriptions of the species, and indeed even its scientific naming by Linnaeus in the 18th century as Paradisaea apoda (legless bird of paradise), perpetuated that myth. Due to the remote nature of their rain forest habitat in New Guinea, it was not until the mid-19th century that these remarkable birds were first scientifically observed and accurately described. --- Gould had intended to publish the first monograph devot … [Click Below for Full Description]
Bookseller: Trillium Antique Prints & Rare Books [Franklin, TN, U.S.A.]
2019-08-20 18:44:27
Richard Bowdler Sharpe & John Gould, William Hart
London, 1891. This stunning hand-colored folio lithograph is from "Monograph of the Paradiseidae, or Birds of Paradise and Ptilonorhynchidae, and Bower-Birds" by Richard Bowdler Sharpe. The work was published in London by Taylor & Francis for Henry Sotheran & Co between 1891 and 1898. The "Birds of Paradise" was the idea of John Gould's but completed after his death by Sharpe. The plates were predominantly drawn by William Matthew Hart, John Gould, and John Gerard Keulemans. It was the first monograph devoted to the remarkable birds of paradise and the "last of the fine bird books" (Fine Bird Books p.107) --- The remarkable-looking Birds of Paradise have captivated western science since Magellan first brought back a skin of such a creature in 1522. The skins, highly prized by East Indian natives, was given by the ruler of Batchian (in the Mollucas) as a gift to the King of Spain. The legs and wings of the bird, however, had been removed when skinned, presumably to better show its impressive plumage. When asked why the bird had no wings or feet, the natives replied that none were needed as the bird simply floated in its heavenly paradise. Thus, the earliest descriptions of the species, and indeed even its scientific naming by Linnaeus in the 18th century as Paradisaea apoda (legless bird of paradise), perpetuated that myth. Due to the remote nature of their rain forest habitat in New Guinea, it was not until the mid-19th century that these remarkable birds were first scientifically observed and accurately described. --- Gould had intended to publish the first monograph devot … [Click Below for Full Description]
Bookseller: Trillium Antique Prints & Rare Books [Franklin, TN, U.S.A.]
2019-08-20 18:44:27
Richard Bowdler Sharpe & John Gould, William Hart
London, 1891. This stunning hand-colored folio lithograph is from "Monograph of the Paradiseidae, or Birds of Paradise and Ptilonorhynchidae, and Bower-Birds" by Richard Bowdler Sharpe. The work was published in London by Taylor & Francis for Henry Sotheran & Co between 1891 and 1898. The "Birds of Paradise" was the idea of John Gould's but completed after his death by Sharpe. The plates were predominantly drawn by William Matthew Hart, John Gould, and John Gerard Keulemans. It was the first monograph devoted to the remarkable birds of paradise and the "last of the fine bird books" (Fine Bird Books p.107) --- The remarkable-looking Birds of Paradise have captivated western science since Magellan first brought back a skin of such a creature in 1522. The skins, highly prized by East Indian natives, was given by the ruler of Batchian (in the Mollucas) as a gift to the King of Spain. The legs and wings of the bird, however, had been removed when skinned, presumably to better show its impressive plumage. When asked why the bird had no wings or feet, the natives replied that none were needed as the bird simply floated in its heavenly paradise. Thus, the earliest descriptions of the species, and indeed even its scientific naming by Linnaeus in the 18th century as Paradisaea apoda (legless bird of paradise), perpetuated that myth. Due to the remote nature of their rain forest habitat in New Guinea, it was not until the mid-19th century that these remarkable birds were first scientifically observed and accurately described. --- Gould had intended to publish the first monograph devot … [Click Below for Full Description]
Bookseller: Trillium Antique Prints & Rare Books [Franklin, TN, U.S.A.]
2019-08-20 18:44:27
Richard Bowdler Sharpe & John Gould, William Hart
London, 1891. This stunning hand-colored folio lithograph is from "Monograph of the Paradiseidae, or Birds of Paradise and Ptilonorhynchidae, and Bower-Birds" by Richard Bowdler Sharpe. The work was published in London by Taylor & Francis for Henry Sotheran & Co between 1891 and 1898. The "Birds of Paradise" was the idea of John Gould's but completed after his death by Sharpe. The plates were predominantly drawn by William Matthew Hart, John Gould, and John Gerard Keulemans. It was the first monograph devoted to the remarkable birds of paradise and the "last of the fine bird books" (Fine Bird Books p.107) --- The remarkable-looking Birds of Paradise have captivated western science since Magellan first brought back a skin of such a creature in 1522. The skins, highly prized by East Indian natives, was given by the ruler of Batchian (in the Mollucas) as a gift to the King of Spain. The legs and wings of the bird, however, had been removed when skinned, presumably to better show its impressive plumage. When asked why the bird had no wings or feet, the natives replied that none were needed as the bird simply floated in its heavenly paradise. Thus, the earliest descriptions of the species, and indeed even its scientific naming by Linnaeus in the 18th century as Paradisaea apoda (legless bird of paradise), perpetuated that myth. Due to the remote nature of their rain forest habitat in New Guinea, it was not until the mid-19th century that these remarkable birds were first scientifically observed and accurately described. --- Gould had intended to publish the first monograph devot … [Click Below for Full Description]
Bookseller: Trillium Antique Prints & Rare Books [Franklin, TN, U.S.A.]
2019-08-20 18:44:27
Richard Bowdler Sharpe & John Gould, William Hart
London, 1891. This stunning hand-colored folio lithograph is from "Monograph of the Paradiseidae, or Birds of Paradise and Ptilonorhynchidae, and Bower-Birds" by Richard Bowdler Sharpe. The work was published in London by Taylor & Francis for Henry Sotheran & Co between 1891 and 1898. The "Birds of Paradise" was the idea of John Gould's but completed after his death by Sharpe. The plates were predominantly drawn by William Matthew Hart, John Gould, and John Gerard Keulemans. It was the first monograph devoted to the remarkable birds of paradise and the "last of the fine bird books" (Fine Bird Books p.107) --- The remarkable-looking Birds of Paradise have captivated western science since Magellan first brought back a skin of such a creature in 1522. The skins, highly prized by East Indian natives, was given by the ruler of Batchian (in the Mollucas) as a gift to the King of Spain. The legs and wings of the bird, however, had been removed when skinned, presumably to better show its impressive plumage. When asked why the bird had no wings or feet, the natives replied that none were needed as the bird simply floated in its heavenly paradise. Thus, the earliest descriptions of the species, and indeed even its scientific naming by Linnaeus in the 18th century as Paradisaea apoda (legless bird of paradise), perpetuated that myth. Due to the remote nature of their rain forest habitat in New Guinea, it was not until the mid-19th century that these remarkable birds were first scientifically observed and accurately described. --- Gould had intended to publish the first monograph devot … [Click Below for Full Description]
Bookseller: Trillium Antique Prints & Rare Books [Franklin, TN, U.S.A.]
2019-08-20 14:11:48
Diverse
Frauenfeld Druck und Verlag 1891 (1897). Kurzbeschreibung: Die Zeitschrift für die Schweizerische Artillerie & Genie in den Jahrgängen 1891-18977. Zustand: HALBLEDER-Einband, Einband mit stärkeren Gebrauchsspuren, Einband mit stärkerer Bräunung, Seiten leicht gebräunt, Einband leicht beschädigt, ansonsten GUTER Zustand. Stichworte: Nach Themen Technikgeschichte, Technikgeschichte, Halbledereinband 3319 Seiten Deutsch 5770g Gr. 8° (22,5-25 cm), Hardcover, Halbleder-Einband [Attributes: Hard Cover]
Bookseller: INFINIBU Das Buchuniversum [Düsseldorf, Germany]
2019-08-20 13:51:09
Dr. Albert Leffingwell
1891-1914. Dr. Leffingwell joined the anti-vivisection movement in the 1880s: protesting against the use of live animal (and human) subjects for medical testing. He and his fellow activists worked tirelessly to gain public support: distributing educational pamphlets and submitting articles that called attention to doctors and educators who tried to defend the practice. His collection of anti-vivisection material is the result of his years of activism, and has examples of a wide variety of pamphlets, newspaper articles, and items from a wide variety of anti-vivisection organizations across the country between 1891 and 1914. 1. American Humane Society: sixteen (16) items – Formed in 1877 as the "International Humane Association," then changed to "American Humane Society" in 1878, the American Humane Society is dedicated to the safety and welfare of animals. One of the larger organizations involved in the animal vivisection debate, the Society published many anti-vivisection pamphlets, leaflets, and books, some of which Dr. Leffingwell himself wrote. This organization exists to this day, under the name "American Humane," and continues to champion animal rights. -Thirteen (13) different pamphlets and leaflets. Six items are booklets with 12 or more pages, the majority of which are published by Leffingwell himself. Titles include "Scientific Chicanery: Does it Pay?", "The Starvation of Cattle on the Western Plains, "and "Is Vivisection Painful?", among others. Pamphlets and leaflets are primarily devoted to educating the reader on the subject of vivisection in school, how painfu … [Click Below for Full Description]
Bookseller: Eclectibles, ABAA [Tolland, CT, U.S.A.]
2019-08-20 05:11:23
1891. The top left corner has been "chewed" or rubbed - see scan. This damage does not effect the text. The board cover is warped, but there's no evidence of water damage - so this must have been caused by storage conditions? Pages have yellowed over time - normal for age. Other than the corner, this book is in very good condition for its age. Excerpt From Item: "Twenty-five years have rolled away, with their sunshine and shadow, since we were mustered out of service. Our first reunion was held at Worthington, Indiana, in September, 1888, and our second at Spencer, Indiana. At our first reunion it was determined that a history of the regiment shold be written, which duty was courteously assigned to me. I then felt, and still feel, that the history will fall short of your expectations. But, feeling it to be the duty of a soldier to obey orders, at your command I have written this history." "Aden G. Cavins, Lieutenant Colonel and afterwards Colonel of the regiment, is an old resident of Greene County, Indiana. Had resided in Bloomfield quite a number of years before the war. Was Captain of Co. E, of the 59th Regiment and in the field, and had been about one year when he was appointed Major of the 97th Indiana. He met the regiment at Cairo as it was on its way to Memphis, in November, 1862. He made a most excellent officer and was always found where duty called. Was in command of the regiment in some of the most important and hardest battles in which the regiment was engaged, notably Kenesaw Mountain, Atlanta and Jonesboro. At Jaenson, Miss., his horse was killed with a cannon … [Click Below for Full Description]
Bookseller: gappanapolis [King, Wisconsin, US]
2019-08-19 18:55:16
Gautier, Leon; Translated by Henry Frith
London: George Routledge & Sons, 1891. RARE First Edition in English, finely bound by Bayntun of Bath in half crimson morocco over marbled boards, spine with five harp decorations with gilt borders, marbled end pages, all edges gilt. xii, 499 pp., with fifty-seven wood engraved illustrations (including frontispiece and 23 plates). Near Fine, spine sunned, light rubbing to marbled boards, internally clean and bright. Gautier's classic work on chivalry, in which he set out the "Ten Commandments of Chivalry", of course hundreds of years after the time of medieval chivalry. "Thou shalt be everywhere and always the champion of the Right and the Good against Injustice and Evil". . First Edition. Half Morocco. Near Fine/No Jacket, As Issued. 8vo - over 7¾" - 9¾" tall.
Bookseller: Dale Steffey Books, MWABA [Bloomington, IN, U.S.A.]
2019-08-19 07:33:11
Richard Bowdler Sharpe & John Gould, William Hart
London, 1891. This stunning hand-colored folio lithograph is from "Monograph of the Paradiseidae, or Birds of Paradise and Ptilonorhynchidae, and Bower-Birds" by Richard Bowdler Sharpe. The work was published in London by Taylor & Francis for Henry Sotheran & Co between 1891 and 1898. The "Birds of Paradise" was the idea of John Gould's but completed after his death by Sharpe. The plates were predominantly drawn by William Matthew Hart, John Gould, and John Gerard Keulemans. It was the first monograph devoted to the remarkable birds of paradise and the "last of the fine bird books" (Fine Bird Books p.107) --- The remarkable-looking Birds of Paradise have captivated western science since Magellan first brought back a skin of such a creature in 1522. The skins, highly prized by East Indian natives, was given by the ruler of Batchian (in the Mollucas) as a gift to the King of Spain. The legs and wings of the bird, however, had been removed when skinned, presumably to better show its impressive plumage. When asked why the bird had no wings or feet, the natives replied that none were needed as the bird simply floated in its heavenly paradise. Thus, the earliest descriptions of the species, and indeed even its scientific naming by Linnaeus in the 18th century as Paradisaea apoda (legless bird of paradise), perpetuated that myth. Due to the remote nature of their rain forest habitat in New Guinea, it was not until the mid-19th century that these remarkable birds were first scientifically observed and accurately described. --- Gould had intended to publish the first monograph devot … [Click Below for Full Description]
Bookseller: Trillium Antique Prints & Rare Books [Franklin, TN, U.S.A.]
2019-08-19 07:33:10
Richard Bowdler Sharpe & John Gould, William Hart
London, 1891. This stunning hand-colored folio lithograph is from "Monograph of the Paradiseidae, or Birds of Paradise and Ptilonorhynchidae, and Bower-Birds" by Richard Bowdler Sharpe. The work was published in London by Taylor & Francis for Henry Sotheran & Co between 1891 and 1898. The "Birds of Paradise" was the idea of John Gould's but completed after his death by Sharpe. The plates were predominantly drawn by William Matthew Hart, John Gould, and John Gerard Keulemans. It was the first monograph devoted to the remarkable birds of paradise and the "last of the fine bird books" (Fine Bird Books p.107) --- The remarkable-looking Birds of Paradise have captivated western science since Magellan first brought back a skin of such a creature in 1522. The skins, highly prized by East Indian natives, was given by the ruler of Batchian (in the Mollucas) as a gift to the King of Spain. The legs and wings of the bird, however, had been removed when skinned, presumably to better show its impressive plumage. When asked why the bird had no wings or feet, the natives replied that none were needed as the bird simply floated in its heavenly paradise. Thus, the earliest descriptions of the species, and indeed even its scientific naming by Linnaeus in the 18th century as Paradisaea apoda (legless bird of paradise), perpetuated that myth. Due to the remote nature of their rain forest habitat in New Guinea, it was not until the mid-19th century that these remarkable birds were first scientifically observed and accurately described. --- Gould had intended to publish the first monograph devot … [Click Below for Full Description]
Bookseller: Trillium Antique Prints & Rare Books [Franklin, TN, U.S.A.]
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