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Displayed below are some selected recent viaLibri matches for books published in 1864

        THE PARABLES OF OUR LORD AND SAVIOUR JESUS CHRIST

      London: Routledge Warne & Routledge 1864 - First edition, 25 x 19.5cm [4to], in publisher's green hexagon-grain cloth w/gilt & embossed decorations & title to covers & spine, bevelled edges, a.e.g., pale yellow ep.s w/binder's ticket (Bone & Son, Ball 17A) to rear pastedown, [i-xii], 1-48 + [1-48 blank versos] + [1-40, plates] red-ruled cardstock pp. w/20 wood engravings by the Dalziels after Millais, +2pp. publ. adverts to rear. Printed at the Camden Press, London. Binding Very Good (extremities moderately bumped & worn, upper fr. cover gilt sl. rubbed, & fr. ep. gutter sl. stained); contents Very Good (1st & final leaves foxed w/lt. spotting elsewhere)-this is the green cloth binding, much scarcer than the more common red. White 48-49, Reid 6-7 & 71-72 ("of this superb work much has been written, but it is worthy of all the praise ever bestowed upon it"), Fredeman 95.37, Ray 170, de Beaumont 244, Goldman 311. [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Leonard Roberts, Bookseller]
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        CIRCULAR. ADJUTANT AND INSPECTOR GENERAL'S OFFICE, GENERAL ORDERS, No. 32. AN ACT TO INCREASE THE EFFICENCY OF THE ARMY BY THE EMPLOYMENT OF FREE NEGROES AND SLAVES IN CERTAIN CAPACITIES [caption title].

      Richmond. March 11, 1864. - Broadside, 18 x 12 inches. Printed in three columns. Previously folded, with a couple of small separations along old fold lines. Light toning and foxing. About very good. A very scarce and quite interesting broadside circular printing of the act which allowed slaves and free blacks to be used in certain tasks by the Confederate Army during the Civil War, as well as instructions for the conscription and induction of those men into the armed forces. The Confederacy was of course loath to arm any of its slave population, but by 1864 could not spare any further manpower from their infantry to perform menial tasks, and the government therefore passed a law allowing slaves to be used "in certain capacities," such as the construction of fortification, the production of arms, and the transport of materiel. The first coulomb of this broadside comprises a full printing of that law, while the remainder sets forth the rules for the impressment of slaves into military service, for their care while in service, and for the compensation of their owners. A fascinating piece that lays bare the desperation of the Confederacy for labor and supplies in early 1864. Not in Parrish & Willingham.

      [Bookseller: William Reese Company - Americana]
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        CIRCULAR. ADJUTANT AND INSPECTOR GENERAL'S OFFICE, GENERAL ORDERS, No. 32.... AN ACT TO INCREASE THE EFFICENCY OF THE ARMY BY THE EMPLOYMENT OF FREE NEGROES AND SLAVES IN CERTAIN CAPACITIES [caption title]

      Richmond, 1864. Broadside, 18 x 12 inches. Printed in three columns. Previously folded, with a couple of small separations along old fold lines. Light toning and foxing. About very good. A very scarce and quite interesting broadside circular printing of the act which allowed slaves and free blacks to be used in certain tasks by the Confederate Army during the Civil War, as well as instructions for the conscription and induction of those men into the armed forces. The Confederacy was of course loath to arm any of its slave population, but by 1864 could not spare any further manpower from their infantry to perform menial tasks, and the government therefore passed a law allowing slaves to be used "in certain capacities," such as the construction of fortification, the production of arms, and the transport of materiel. The first coulomb of this broadside comprises a full printing of that law, while the remainder sets forth the rules for the impressment of slaves into military service, for their care while in service, and for the compensation of their owners. A fascinating piece that lays bare the desperation of the Confederacy for labor and supplies in early 1864. Not in Parrish & Willingham.

      [Bookseller: William Reese Company - Americana]
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        Traité Elémentaire de Chimie Médicale comprenant quelques notions de toxicologie et les principales applications de la chimie a la physiologie, a la pathologie, a la pharmacie et a l'hygiène par Ad. Wurtz Vol. I: Chimie Inorganique - Vol. II: Chimie Organique

      Victor Masson wt Fils - Parigi 1864-1865, PARIGI - Traité Elémentaire de Chimie Médicale Francese Due volumi della seconda metà dell'800 in buono stato, coperta in mezzapelle, dorso in pelle con elementi decorativi incisi a secco, caratteri dorati in bassorilievo, piatti in cartone rigido goffrato, alcuni segni di sfregamento, tagli puntinati in marrone, pagine in ottimo stato, poca gora. Illustrazioni in b. e n. in testo, nel I volume I tavola, fuori formato, ben piegata, con analisi spettrale di alcuni elementi chimici a colori. I e II volume del Traité Elémentaire di Chimie Médicale. La libreria offre per un periodo limitato uno sconto del 20% su tutti i suoi libri. Il prezzo originale dell'articolo era 999,00 euro.

      [Bookseller: Biblioteca di Babele]
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        The Scottish Metrical Psalter of A. D. 1635

      Maclure & Macdonald, Lithographers to the Queen, Glasgow 1864 - 229, xxxiv p. Reprinted in Full from the Original Work. Illustrated by Disseratations, Notes & Facsimiles. Respined. Some scuffs to covers and edges of original leather. Discreet library marks. Pages bright. The Church of Scotland approved the text of this Psalter for use by the church in 1650. Originally the work of Francis Rous, he complete his text around 1644. Before the text was approved for use in the Scottish church it was subjected to six years of scrutiny and revision by two different groups of leaders of the church. Every word and phrase was carefully weighed for faithfulness to the original Hebrew texts. [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Attic Books (ABAC, ILAB)]
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        A Mission to Gelele, King of Dahome. With notices of the so-called ?Amazons,? the Grand Customs, the Yearly Customs, the Human Sacrifices, the Present State of the Slave Trade, and the Negro's Place in Nature.

      1864 - Second edition. 2 vols. Each with a frontispiece and other plates. 8vo. Original maroon publisher's cloth, gilt; professionally repaired, very good.pp. xvii, 386; vi, 413,London, Tinsley Brothers, Dedicated to his Spanish friends in Fernando Po, Burton describes herein his mission to Dahomey, the aim of which had been to end slave raiding and human sacrifice. Despite the presentation of suitable gifts to King Gelele the mission was not a diplomatic success. [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Maggs Bros. Ltd ABA, ILAB, PBFA, BA]
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        [Civil War Journal]: Visit to the Armies of the James and the Potomac, Oct. 1864

      1864. Very Good. A remarkable 70-page manuscript journal written by William H. Baldwin, a New England businessman, philanthropist, and abolitionist. Baldwin wrote the journal in October 1864, while on a tour of Union military camps and frontline battlefields in the James and Appomattox River valleys near Richmond and Petersburg, Virginia. The journal provides a firsthand account of the activities and conditions of soldiers and of freed African-Americans at City Point, and Baldwin's encounter with both Abraham Lincoln and Ulysses S. Grant, including each of their Signatures which he collected from them on his journey.Born in Brighton, Massachusetts in 1826, Baldwin established a successful import business of woolen goods in 1850 (Baldwin, Baxter and Company). During the Civil War he was a founding and active member of the Ward 11 Boston Soldiers' Relief Commission which was dedicated to providing relief to the families and soldiers of the Army of the Potomac. After retiring from business in 1868, he became president of the Boston Young Men's Christian Union (YMCU) and devoted the rest of his life to philanthropic work for the YMCU and other Boston-based organizations including the Boston School Board, the Children's Mission to the Children of the Destitute, and the American Unitarian Association.The closely written manuscript, title in gilt on the front board, provides a detailed account of all the principal places and points of interest on the James and Appomattox Rivers, and other points in the vicinity, where the two armies fought at the end of the Civil War. These include the headquarters of Generals Grant, Meade, and Hancock, Bermuda Hundreds (Butler's Headquarters), and Butler's Dutch Gap Canal (built primarily by African-American troops), Deep Bottom, and Aiken's Landing (where prisoners were exchanged.) Of the condition and activities of the Union Army, he writes: "Here at City Point as far as the eye can reach you see but one vast array of army tents, for camps and hospitals, while on every side you behold lines of military wagons and ambulances going to and coming from the front continually -- by day and by night."Baldwin gains audience with General Grant at City Point ("with his felt hat, dark suit, without the slightest military rank -- with the ever present cigar") and gives a dramatic firsthand account of the meeting: "In conversation with Gen. Grant one cannot help being struck with his extreme modesty ... With a clear and decided tone he spoke in the highest terms of our Generals in the Field ... He talked hopefully and with full confidence in the future movements of our Armies. He had but a few minutes (before my first conversation with him) received a dispatch from ... Sheridan, and with a voice which showed the emotions of his heart he said -- 'Sheridan tells me that he has not only fed his Army all along his route from rebel supplies but reports to me a balance in hand of 3000 cattle.' It was a glorious dispatch to us, but made much more so by hearing it from him ... The great question with our Patriotic People is -- 'when is Gen. Grant going into Richmond?' Gen. Grant has an object far above the mere fact of 'going into Richmond' as he plainly stated in our interviews with him. I said to him, 'I suppose you do not state when you want to go into Richmond,' to which he replied, 'I want to go into Richmond, but I want to destroy their Army.'"Baldwin also provides a vivid firsthand account of the activities of freed slaves, in which he includes much of their spoken dialect (transcribed to the best of his ability), especially that of preachers at evening meetings: "At City Point and all along our lines are large numbers of Black families, those who have joined our Armies in their marches through Virginia ... The men -- those not in the Army -- are employed either as teamsters, or laborers, are faithful in whatever position they are placed.""We were strongly impressed with their great religious zeal and earnestness by attending at times their evening meetings for exhortation and prayer. The meetings were held in the open air, not far from Gen. Grant's Head-Quarters ... A candle upon a common pine table, and a lantern hanging from the side of a shed near by, gave light to the men, women, and children assembled. Their rough, crude, ideas of God ... [were] plainly shown by their language of which I will attempt to give you an idea. ...""The first speaker I heard was a stout, hearty, Black man, who began by stating -- 'dat Paul says if you can get de attention of de audience much good can be done -- and dat he would take for his subject on dis occasion -- Life and Salvation, Hell and Damnation.'""He then in language of unequaled eloquence, with oft repeated blows upon the desk, and with the full power of his lungs, impressed upon the minds of his eager listeners -- 'de importance of dere being good Brothers, and Sisters, and not to be such wicked people as you are.' -- 'Dere is lots of wickedness here at City Point, one of de wickedest places on de Earth.'""He said -- 'We are told bout Noah and his family, dey were good people and minded God-Almighty. But dere was lots of wicked people dere dat didn't mind God-Almighty. Dey had horseracing, and card-playing, and God-Almighty told um to stop it, but dey would'nt. Den God-Almighty let de water on de Earth -- cause de people were all so awful wicked.''And de water came up to de first story of de houses, and dey kept on card playing, and horse racing.''Den God Almightly make de water come up to de second story -- and dey kept on card playing, and horse racing.''Den God Almighty make de water come up to de attics -- and den God-Almighty lay back in his arm chair, and hoisted de windows of Jerusalem, and took Noah and his family all in ...'"On another evening the speaker was one of those earnest, zealous Black men, whose style, manner, and language conveys power and lasting impressions. He took for his subject one that most of us have often heard discussed -- the subject of Faith. He went strongly to work to prove that his heavens 'must have lots of faith, faith in de Lord, and dat also de Brudders must have faith in de Sisters, and de Sisters in de Brudders.' He then said, 'We are told dat many years ago dere was a man named Amos, and he hand'nt no faith -- Now one day Amos was up on a high tree, hanging way out on a limb, and de Lord was down on de ground under de tree -- And de Lord look up, - and sing out to Amos, 'Let go dat limb' -- but Amos no hab faith, and no let go.''Den de Lord sing out again -- Amos, I tell you let go dat limb, but Amos no let go dis time. And den de Lord sing out de third time...'Other accounts include Baldwin's meetings with Rebel deserters and prisoners, of the conditions and morale of the Union soldiers, and of the fighting: "Before leaving City Point we could plainly hear the reports, and see the bursting of the shells thrown by the rebels into our lines ... the question of our safety was presented for our consideration... Watching with increasing interest the rebel shells constantly being thrown from Petersburg, we cross the Petersburg and Norfolk Rail-Road and the Jerusalem Plank Road. Arriving at Park-Station we left the cars and proceeded to Gen. Meade's Head Quarters."Near the end of the journal, Baldwin gives an account of several Rebel prisoners: "I took special pains to converse freely and to question [them] carefully ... I asked one of the men how recently he had been paid by their government, to which he replied, he hadn't seen any money for nearly a year, but that it didn't make any difference to him, as their money was so poor he couldn't have 'a decent spree on six months pay.' A very smart appearing Black man who had come into our lines from Richmond, told me that 'his master was an officer in the Rebel army, he acting as his servant. That his master died of wounds received in the service. That just before his death he gave him his freedom papers and one hundred dollars in Silver, but very soon after the authorities at Richmond took from him his papers and money, and put him into the army -- where, he added -- I have staid until this morning when I watched my chance and run away and here I am with Gen. Butler.'The journal concludes with a particularly moving account of his meeting with President Lincoln at the White House: "I called upon President Lincoln by whom I was most cordially received ... From an half hour passed in his presence I became fully convinced that Abraham Lincoln is ... a man of great wisdom, deep, far-seeing penetration, and one whose heart and soul are with his country. I believe it to be the solemn duty of every man who desires to see peace upon a basis of everlasting and universal liberty, to use his influence, be it great or small, for the reelection of Abraham Lincoln. Never, from the first, has my faith been shaken in the ultimate results of this unholy rebellion -- and I do solemnly believe that never was this county so strong, never so near perfection, as today."An historically important and compelling journal by a committed abolitionist who was actively involved in aiding the Union during the Civil War, with notable firsthand accounts of Union troops, Rebel prisoners, freed African-Americans, and his meeting with General Grant and President Lincoln.Detailed list:1. [Manuscript Journal]: Visit to the Armies of the James and the Potomac, Oct. 1864. Quarto. Hand-drawn frontispiece map: "Richmond, Petersburg, and Vicinity in Oct. 1864," and 70 manuscript pages (including 13 manuscript sheets laid-in). Bound in quarter leather and cloth over boards with the title stamped in gilt on the front board. The map (sketched in purple, brown, and black ink) depicts the principal places visited by Baldwin upon the James and Appomattox Rivers, and in the vicinity of the two great armies at that time in the history of the Rebellion. The manuscript pages have been further annotated in ink and pencil by Baldwin. The 13 laid-in manuscript sheets are divided into two sets: "Before using the journal" (eight leaves laid-in at the front) and "After reading the journal" (five leaves laid-in at the back). They were presumably written by Baldwin for the many public readings of the journal that he gave as President of the Boston Young Men's Christian Union.2. LINCOLN, Abraham. Autograph Card Signed: "A. Lincoln." Mounted on an octavo sheet of printed Boston YMCU stationary, with a manuscript note by Baldwin: "Written and handed to me Oct. 10, 1864 -- by Abraham Lincoln at his room in the White House. W.H. Baldwin."3. GRANT, Ulysses S. Autograph Card Signed: "U. S. Grant / Lt. Gen. U.S.A." Mounted onto an octavo sheet of printed Boston YMCU stationary, with a manuscript note by Baldwin: "Written by Gen. Grant on his pine table in his Head-Quarters at City Point, Va. Oct. 6th 1864 and then and there handed to me. W.H. Baldwin."

      [Bookseller: Between the Covers- Rare Books, Inc. ABA]
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        Montreux (Canton de Vaud).

      Imp. Lemercier, Paris, (feuille:) 26, s.d., vers 1864, - 27.5x39. cm., lithographie tirée en 3 couleurs, 1 feuille (38x48) Please notify before visiting to see a book. Prices are excl. VAT/TVA (only Switzerland) & postage.

      [Bookseller: Harteveld Rare Books Ltd.]
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        Civil War

      Dec. 19, 1864. A letter from a Confederate Brigadier General, George T. Anderson dated Dec. 19th, 1864 reads in part, <I>" I . . . at Bagda yesterday and learned from Johnnie that the . . . had reinforced two while Regs on the Island. I believe it reliable they have been making frequent visits to Clarksville but my horses are so poor . . . I sent a request to your office about the 1st of Nov. to send after some deserters that had left my company. Please send it to me with your action on the matter."</I> <br /><br />Anderson was a very respected man of the Confederacy in the Civil War. Before he became the General he had acquired his war experience from the conflict with Mexico, where he served as a captain in 1846. When the 11th Georgia regiment was organized in 1861, he was elected as colonel and went with his regiment to in Virginia. During the Seven Days battles around Richmond, he led a brigade consisting of the First Regulars, Eleventh, Seven, Eighth, and Ninth Georgia regiment. Still upholding the rank of colonel, Anderson led his brigade through the ordeals of Second Manassas and Sharpsburg. During this time he showed such gallantry and showed much skill in handling his troops that in November of 1862, he had received the commission of brigadier-general. <br /><br />At the time of the Battle of Chancellorsville, he was fighting alongside the famous Confederate General, General Longstreet. At this time, the 59th Georgia Volunteer Infantry had replaced the 7th, 8th, 9th, 11th, and 59th Georgia Regiments for the remainder of the war. During The Battle of Gettysburg on July 2, 1863 General Robert E. Lee directed Longstreet to take two divisions of I Corps and march south until they reached the Federal forces and take control of the hill Little Round Top. One of the divisions was Andersons. They had a total force of nearly 20,000 men. The Union army was well prepared for Lee's offensive attack. Six of the seven corps had arrived on the battlefield. Longstreet was the first to attack. After some heavy fighting the Confederacy started gaining ground over the Union. However, the Union had sent for reinforcements, which forced the Confederacy to retire. During the battle each side had lost 9,000 men each. G. T. Anderson was one of the severely wounded Generals

      [Bookseller: University Archives]
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        Relación del Incendio de la Compañía acaecido el 8 de diciembre de 1863

      Imprenta del Ferrocarril, Santiago de Chile 1864 - Precedida de una reseña histórica sobre el mismo templo acompañada de importantes documentos relativos al incendio.Una nómina de los que perecieron en él,los censos oficiales formados hasta la fecha por orden de la intendencia de Santiago.Y una lámina litografiada que representa la iglesia en el acto de incendiarse 135 pp páginas [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Libreria de Antano (ILAB & ABA Members)]
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        (xt) THE JEWISH CHRONICLE. JAN 1, 1864-DEC 29, 1865 [WHOLE NRS. 472-576]. COMPLETE RUN OF 2 YEARS (105 ISSUES)

      London : Abraham Benisch(1864-1865). 1st edition. Originally bound into 2 large volumes; Lacks outer bindings, original period internal sewn binding in tact. Folio, 840 pages (8 pages each issue. Complete for 1866 and first half of 1867. English with occasional Hebrew. The Jewish Chronicle, Founded in 1841, it is the oldest continuously published Jewish newspaper in the world. It was initially under the editorship of D. Meldola and M. Angel. "On Oct 18, 1844, to the editorship of Joseph Mitchell, it took the title of "The Jewish Chronicle (New Series) and Working Man's Friend"; it appeared only fortnightly till July 9, 1847, when it became a weekly; from Aug. 18, 1854, it was edited by M. H. Bresslau, who changed the title to "The Jewish Chronicle and Hebrew Observer. " From Jan. 12, 1855, A. Benisch assumed the editorship, which he retained till April 2, 1869, when Michael Henry took charge of the paper until his death" (JE, 1905) . This run from the final 2 years of the American Civil War, includes numerous ads and announcements from the period, indicating deaths, weddings, and celebrations of all kinds, from across the UK, the British Empire, English Speaking Jewry and, indeed, the entire world. Anniversary dinners and events often list participants, which sometimes read like who's who's of Anglo-jewry of the period, and at other times mention names from the far reaches of the British Empire. Too many various reports, letters, discussions, and ads to describe, SUBJECT(S) : Jews -- Great Britain -- Newspapers. First and final leaves show exposure wear, as expected, with a bit of loss along the outer margin of the first leaf (of issue 472) , and the final leaf (of issue 576) lacking about 1/8 of leaf, with text loss. Issue 550 has mostly come loose, with edgewear just touching the outer letters along the outside margins one one leaf. Mid-19th century paper has held up well, Good solid condition overall. Scarce to come up in the trade. (br-11-3)

      [Bookseller: Dan Wyman Books]
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        Civil War General R.W. Johnson -Large Original Oil Painting, Bible, and his Cane

      - Items include: 1. An original 28" x 34" oil painting by Sarah McKnight. Painting is restored and clean. Framed good with expected wear. 2. Original walking stick. Gifted to general R.W. Johnson during the Civil War. Repairs to wood lower area, but very attractive with lots of patina. This walking stick was gifted from Major E.B. Whitman of the Andersonville Prison in Georgia. 3. Original Family Bible (of Johnson's wife) with family history. 4. An original muster role from Georgia, 1864. 5. 8" x 10" photo black and white copy of a younger R.W. Johnson [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Cross and Crown Rare Books]
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        Beiträge zur Kenntniss der Poesie der Alten Araber.

      Hannover: Carl Rümpler, 1864 - Octavo (240 x 155 mm). Early-20th-century blue cloth, gilt-lettered red morocco label and gilt fleur-de-lys to spine, marbled endpapers, top edge red. Shelf-mark label to spine, ink stamp of the Institut Catholique de Toulouse to the title page and p. 39. Extremities lightly rubbed, spine darkened, faint soiling to covers, marginal browning, the occasional spot or mark. A very good copy. Frequent Arabic types. First edition of this foundational study of early Arabic poetry, from the collection of Louis Desnoyers (1874-1928), noted professor of oriental languages at the Institut Catholique de Toulouse, with his ink-stamp to the title page. Nöldeke worked almost entirely from unpublished manuscripts holdings in the libraries of Berlin, Gotha, and Leiden. His account discusses the Mu'allaqat, the Lamiyat al-'Arab of al-Shanfarah, Ibn Qutaybah's Tabaqat al-Shu'ara', and works by lesser-known figures such as Arabian Jews and Mutammim ibn Nuwayrah, many of which are printed in the original Arabic. Nöldeke (1836-1930) was one of the greatest Semitists of the 19th century. He also wrote a highly influential study of the Qur'an, and numerous grammars. One of his main theses was that much early Arabic poetry was written at a later date. Uncommon: no copies traced at auction. [Attributes: First Edition]

      [Bookseller: Peter Harrington. ABA member]
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        Connecticut Colonel Sketches Jacksonville, Florida Headquarters, Muses on the Fountain of Youth, Supports Freed Slaves Getting Land and Recognizes their Humanity

      Jacksonville, FL 1864 - Autograph Letter Signed, to his wife, [Jacksonville, Fla.], [April?] 8, 1864. 16 pp., 8 x 10 in., on 4 folding sheets stitched together. "Just make up your mind that negro nature & human white nature are very near alike.""Every now & then it is proclaimed with great joy that Mr So & so, some northern nabob or speculator has purchased some rebel plantation & prepares to work the same. . It's of more consequence locally & nationally, thus the negro should buy & toil as he surely will on his acre of land, than that princely men in Illinois should have inserted his loose change in a southern plantation."Connecticut native William H. Noble, writing to his wife, responds to rumors of the fountain of youth, vilifies northerner plantation renters who continued the Southern system as new feudal barons, and calls for the redistribution of plantations to former slaves to ensure national stability. Jacksonville, Florida, was occupied and then abandoned by the Union four times. The result was a broken, skeletal city at the Civil War's conclusion.Noble reflects on how the African Americans' freedom will change Southern and national life, and that regardless of race, he believed human nature was the same. Further, the former slaves needed an interest in and responsibility for their own advancement. Presaging Booker T. Washington, he thinks developing industry more important than carpetbaggers coming south offering education. With a detailed sketch of headquarters in Jacksonville, including tents, stables, and the brigade flagstaff. Excerpts"An artillery officer told me yesterday that there is a spot down the coast somewhere at which people never die. I am going to live down there. I want to see how this country I am helping to save and remake gets along and grows & flourishes in the coming years."The truth is there are but very few men as old as I really am in point of years in the army, and I have no doubt I look old to them. But I am not in point of the elements of youth & age & their manifestations more than half the years. I think very likely however that the change in the Status of the negro will show that race to occupy the place now accorded to the Irish and push up the Irish girls a peg or two. That is just what the Irish did for the American help. When I was young there were no Irish field or house servitors. All were Yankeys. Well the irish are dreadfully down on the negroes. American laborers used to be very hard on the Irish. But God works wonders in spite of mans blindness and I have no doubt in more ways than one he will do so with the Negro. But I see but very few contrabands. My Regiment has never yet penetrated into a virgin Ethiopian place. In fact wherever we have been the yanks have one time & another been before us and culled them out for soldiers or Sambo has taken his chance and gone north. The fact is the quicker Sambo learns to take care of himself and is made so to do the better. But it wont by apprenticeing him to some one who only cares to get the most possible out of him. Forcing him to work for set wages to remain in a fixed place, & to toil for a man who buys of the government his industry is but a mockery of Freedom. Sambo has the same right & must be treated like any other human & not as if his skin hid under its somber hue a different nature, or a soul governed by different impulses passions & motives. Who cares whether the world has cotton princes or not. Let the production run out if need be. Don't bother yourself about obtuse fancies on the negro question & his industry. Take no thought about large Estates going to waste & without culture. Have no anxiety but that human nature & niger nature will work out its own salvation if you give it a chance. Sambo wont work if you feed him a plumb pudding and send down a lot of infatuated people who should make little nigs. fully acquainted with general geography, the distribution of offices, universal History in 24 l. (See website for full description)

      [Bookseller: Seth Kaller Inc.]
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        The Nile Basin. Part I. Showing Tanganyika to be Ptolemy's Western Lake Reservoir. A memoir read before the Royal Geographical Society, November 14, 1864. With prefatory remarks . Part II. Captain Speke's Discovery of the Source of the Nile. A review by James M'Queen .

      London Tinsley Brothers 1864 - First edition. 8vo., 195pp., 4 pages ads at end, 3 maps, original purple-brown cloth gilt, neat repairs to joints and spine, old stamps to verso of title and last leaf, a very good copy. Scarce. Following the death of Speke, on the eve of his proposed debate with Burton concerning the source of the Nile, there was a great increase in sympathy for the unfortunate explorer. Indeed, in Speke's obituary in the Times, he was credited with being the true discoverer of this holy grail of African adventurers. All this was too much for Burton who delivered before the Royal Geographical Society the speech he had intended for his debate with Speke. This lecture is here printed for the first time, along with MacQueen's highly critical remarks on Speke. MacQueen had first confronted Speke in a meeting of the R.G.S. in June 1859, questioning the accuracy of his quoted latitudes relative to vegetation at which Speke was evasive. Burton tried to make out that he bore Speke no ill-will, but contemporary reviews saw the book as a tasteless attack upon a dead man. Penzerp74-75; Casada 49. [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Shapero Rare Books]
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        A Mission to Gelele King of Dahome With notices of the so called Amazons the Grand Customs the Yearly Customs the Human Sacrifices the Present State of the Slave Trade and the Negros Place in Nature

      Second edition. 2 vols. Each with a frontispiece and other plates. 8vo. Original maroon publisher's cloth, gilt; professionally repaired, very good. pp. xvii, 386; vi, 413,London, Tinsley Brothers,

      [Bookseller: Maggs Bros. Ltd.]
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        OUR MUTUAL FRIEND

      Chapman & Hall, London 1864 - 20 parts in 19. Some advert variances (+/-) from that found listed in Hatton & Cleaver; specific collation supplied on request. Illustrated with 40 plates by Marcus Stone. 8vo. 8-3/4" x 5-5/8" Age-toning. 1st two parts, as well as the final, show some wear & edge chipping. Part 12 with largish chip to top of front wrapper, affected "April". Part 15 lacking tip of front wrapper lower corner. Part 18 with tear to rear wrapper fore-edge. Overall condition of Parts: VG - VG+. Case: Some minor wear, with interior lip showing some chafing at top corners [from removal of top portion's tight fit]. Overall, VG+. Original green printed wrappers. Housed in a custom chemise and deep green full morocco pull-apart case, with elaborate gilt decoration to spine 1st edition (Hatton & Cleaver, pp. 345 - 370). [Attributes: Soft Cover]

      [Bookseller: Tavistock Books, ABAA]
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        Our Mutual Friend.

      Chapman & Hall. 1864-65 - FIRST EDITION. With illustrations by Marcus Stone. XX original parts in XIX. Orig. green pictorial wrappers; some sl. chipped at fore-edge, spines cracking in places, the occasional tear; several spines carefully repaired, spine defective Part XVIII. In dark blue cloth fold-over box. Collated with Hatton & Cleaver. A good-plus set, retaining nearly all the original advertisements. With the following omissions: Part XI, lacks slip to follow plates; Part XIV, lacks 4pp Economic Life Assurance ad. to follow plates (often missing); Part XVI, lacks 2pp ad. for Mappin, Webb & Co.; Part XIX/XX, lacks 4pp Economic Life Assurance ad. to follow plates. The De Jongh?s ad. in Part IX is in a different state from that described in H&C; The 4pp ad. for Chapman & Hall in Part VI is bound in upside down. N.B. With the slip for Foreign Bank Notes in Part XIX/XX, ?often found wanting?. [Attributes: First Edition; Soft Cover]

      [Bookseller: Jarndyce, The 19th Century Booksellers]
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        WALK ACROSS AFRICA or Domestic Scenes from My Nile Journal.

      Edinburgh William Blackwood and Sons 1864 - First edition. With the folding map contained in pocket in back cover. 8vo, in fine period three-quarter dark green calf and marbled boards, red morocco lettering label gilt, elaborate gilt tooled panels within compartments of the spine, quite handsome. xviii, 452 pp. A very desirable copy indeed, internally exceptionally clean and fresh, the very handsome binding very well preserved indeed, The RARE first edition of one of the most elusive of the early African exploring books. James Grant accompanied Speke on his journey across Africa to solve the riddle of the source of the Nile. Meant as a companion to Speke&#146;s account of the journey, Grant explores the "ordinary life and pursuits, the habits and feelings of the natives" and the economic potential of the countries they traveled. [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Buddenbrooks, Inc. ABAA]
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        A walk across Africa or domestic scenes from my Nile journal.

      Blackwood Edinburgh and London 1864 - First edition. 8vo., xviii, 452pp., later half calf gilt, red morocco label, an excellent copy. One of the scarcer Nile accounts. "A monumental work of exploration, this represents Grant's experiences travelling with John Hanning Speke from Zanzibar to the source of the Nile at Lake Victoria, naming Ripon Falls, then trekking down river to the Mediterranean Sea. There are numerous descriptions of the terrain and people, with sporting incidents throughout ." - Czech. Czech p66. [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Shapero Rare Books]
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        Regulations in Reference to Four Per Cent. Treasury Department. Confederate States of America

      Richmond, VA 1864 - Single sheet, 8 1/2 by 5 1/4 inches. Lightweight newsprint-style paper. Page is toned, lightly soiled with minor chipping to edges. Light vertical crease. Confederate imprint. Trenholm was Secretary of the Treasury of the Confederate States of America during the last year of the Civil War and was in office starting July 18, 1864. Regulations were in reference to Four Percent Certificates that had been received by Tax Collectors on an informal basis that were not in strict accordance with instructions. Regulations mention the impact of military operations on mail communications. ; 8vo 8" - 9" tall; 1 pp [Attributes: First Edition; Soft Cover]

      [Bookseller: Back of Beyond Books, ABAA]
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        What Led to the Discovery of the Source of the Nile

      Edinburgh and London: William Blackwood and Sons,, 1864. Octavo. Original reddish-brown cloth, titles to spine gilt, blind panels to the boards, green coated endpapers, binder's ticket of Edmonds & Remnants to the rear pastedown. Frontispiece, folding map of the Somali coast and double-page map of Eastern Africa. Complete with the publisher's 32-page catalogue to rear. Spine rolled, mild darkening to cloth in places, more consistent on the spine, a few trivial marks, light spotting to prelims and folding map, nevertheless an excellent copy, internally clean, the gilt spine-decoration notably bright. First edition of Speke's account of his momentous discovery of Lakes Victoria and Tanganyika, undoubtedly less common that his Journal of the Discovery of the Source of the Nile, especially so in collector's condition; this copy in a variant binding with smaller lettering on the spine and "Capt. Speke" with the letter "t" in superscript. Although it was published the year after the Journal, this work documents the first expedition arranged by the Royal Geographical Society, during which his corrosive rift with Burton first developed over Speke's disputed sighting of Victoria. Speke "had the choice in What Led … of escalating the quarrel or letting things stand as they were. In the event, he did not dramatically change the status quo, but neither did he let slip some chances to challenge Burton further, especially in his account of how he happened to go alone to the Victoria Nyanza" (Carnochan, The Sad Story of Burton, Speke, and the Nile, p. 62).

      [Bookseller: Peter Harrington]
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        Journal 'D' of William D. Olmsted & Co. September 1, 1863 through June 29, 1864

      [ Genessee County, New York ]: Not published, 1864. First Edition. Boards. Very Good. First Edition. 360 numbered pages plus notations on endpapers. Folio (9 x 13 3/4 inches). Stamped reverse calf with leather with diced leather reinforcements on the edges and center of spine.Three compartment labels on the spine: "Journal | D | W.D.O. & Co." the middle on red leather, the others on brown. Marbled endpapers. "W. D. Olmsted & Co. Journal D" inked on flyleaf. Entirely manuscript journal/ledger in multiple hands with additional notes on the blank endpapers. Sound, if worn. Boards. Beer's work "Our County and it's people, A Descriptive work on Genessee County, New York", 1890 includes the following biographical note on William D. Olmsted:&#11;&#11;"Olmsted, William D. p. o. Oakfield, N. Y., was born in Le Roy, February 19, 1832, a son of Stephen and Barbara (Parmelee) Olmsted. His father was a native of Vermont and came to Genesee county at an early day, with less than one dollar in money and an axe, and took up land in Le Roy; he died in 1883. W. D. Olmsted was educated at Cary Collegiate Seminary and Old Round House at Le Roy. After finishing his schooling he engaged in the milling business. As an upright, trustworthy citizen Mr. Olmsted has established an undoubted claim, and his interest in the good of his town and its people is worthy of note. His wife was Frances A. Parmelee, who has borne him two sons - Carlos P. and Herbert W."&#11;&#11;The journal records many interesting items. One entry J Lathrop & Co [bankers in Le Roy] draft $1000 Sep 1,, 1863. Another J Lathrop & Co. to cash: "To this amt Pennsylvannia money" for $150.Many transactions with certain kinds and amounts of lumber - we see pine, oak, hemlock, black walnut moulding, etc. Projects include doors, windows, sash, coffin, clapboards, shingles, norway [pine?], bead, moulding, matched, lath bundles, etc. Many mentions of Batavia Yard (lumber yard?). Each transaction with named customer or supplier, amount, and details about what was being sold/purchased. Mention of turning, machine work, sawing, etc. Hundreds of names of customers, private and institutional. Oddities like glazing street lamps, ash for a cider press, ballusters, and the normal like railroad/railway and cartage charges. That's in the first 50 pages or so we scanned through. A quick flip through finds on p166 "To paid for a soldier" $5, use of saw, and 223 feet of culls. Shortly after Bot. Sleigh Shoes.&#11;&#11;A wealth of research possibilities into a type of business not often found.

      [Bookseller: Kuenzig Books, ABAA/ILAB ]
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        Traite Sur Les Vins Du Medoc, et Les Autres Vins Rouges et Blancs Du Departement De La Gironde

      Bordeaux: P. Chaumas, 1864. Cinquieme Edition . Half Morocco. Fine. 55 Vues De Chateaux, Folding Charts And Large Folding Color Map At Rear. 1V, 364 Pp. + Folding Plates Including Large Folding Map In Color. Old But Fine Quarter Morocco, Wine Red Color, Five Bands, Gilt Title And Author, 11 Gilt Fleur De Lys In Each Of Five Other Compartments, Gold Rules At Edges, Original Marbled Endpapers, Matching Marbling On Edges Of Page Block. No Names, No Marks, No Bookplates, Foxing To White Endpapers And Half-Title, A Few Small Very Light Foxing Areas On Title Page, Otherwise Contents Clean, Square, Crisp, A Superior Example.

      [Bookseller: Arroyo Seco Books]
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        An Historical Account of the New Place, Stratford-Upon-Avon, the Last Residence of Shakeseare

      Printed by J. E. Adlard, London 1864 - One of 750 on the large format and on thick paper. Plans, facsimiles, illustrations. vii, 246, [2] pp. 1 vols. Folio. Includes the list of Subscribers to New Place. The only work to give an account of Gastrell the Iconoclyst. (Jaggard) Presented by the author to anyone who contributed over £5 to the Shakespear fund and published at his expense. Jaggard p. 132 Original mauve cloth. Some fraying of head and tail of spine, fading of spine Plans, facsimiles, illustrations. vii, 246, [2] pp. 1 vols. Folio One of 750 on the large format and on thick paper

      [Bookseller: James Cummins Bookseller, ABAA]
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        Sammelband: Gastoffwechsel, Verbrennung - Sammelband mit 9 Sonderdrucken.

      1864-1878, 8, ca. 400 pp., alter Halbleinenband. Eduard Pflüger: Gasstoffwechsel und Verbrennung Sammelband mit 9 Erstdrucken von Eduard Friedrich Wilhelm Pflüger (1829-1910):1.: Beiträge zur Lehre von der Respiration. I. Ueber die physiologische Verbrennung in den lebendigen Organismen (1875). "Untersuchung über den Chemismus der Zelle. Schauplatz der Oxydation ist die Zelle. Identität des tierischen und pflanzlichen Stoffwechsel hinsichtlich dissimilatorischer Prozesse mit O2-Verbrauch. Zusätzliche Assimilation der Pflanze unter O2-Abgabe." Rothschuh Nr. 2232.: Über die Kohlensäure des Blutes (1864).3.: Ueber die Diffusion des Sauerstoffs, den Ort und die Gesetze der Oxydationsprocesse im thierischen Organismu (1872). Pflüger berichtet das die "Druckdifferenz für O2 zwischen Kapillarblut und Gewebe genügt für ausreichende Diffusion". Garrison & Morton No. 627 Rothschuh Nr. 2234.: Bestimmung der Kohlensäure der lebendigen Knochen (1877).5.: Zur Kenntniss der Gase der Organe (1878).6.: Ueber die Ursache der Athembewegungen, sowie der Dyspnoe und Aponoe (1868). "Pflüger investigated the cause of the initiation of respiration in newborn animals". "CO-Vermerhung und O-Mangel wirken anregend auf die Atmung". Garrison & Morton No.940 Rothschuh Nr. 250Ueber Wärmeregulation der Säugethiere. Vorläufige Mittheilung (1876). "Untersuchungen über den Stoffwechsel bei Kälte und Wärme" Rothschuh Nr.640Ueber Wärme und Oxydation der lebendigen Materie (1878). Garrison & Morton No.633Nachtrag zu meinem Aufsatz: Ueber die physiologische Verbrennung in den lebendigen Organismen (1875).Garrison & Morton No. 627, 633, 940 Rotschuh Nr. 223, 250, 640

      [Bookseller: MedicusBooks.Com]
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        Florida Map] Golfe du Mexique Carte de la Partie Septentrionale comprise entre l'entree du Canal de la Floride et les Bouches du Mississippi Dressee d'apres les documents les plus recents. Publiee par Ordre de L'Empereur, Sous le Ministere de Son Excellence Mr.le Mis. de Chasseloup-Laubat, Senateur, Secretaire d'Etat au Dept. de la Marine et des Colonies, au Depot des Cartes et Plans de la Marine. 1864.

      1864 1880 1864 - This large format (26 1/2 x 36 inch) linen-backed map was issued to mariners and amended from 1864 through the present June of 1880 issue. (due in part to the outdating of its predecessors) this may be the only extant copy. Dark spot southeast of Tampa. ; Elephant Folio

      [Bookseller: William Chrisant & Sons FABA, ABAA, ILAB]
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        SEFER MATSREF LA-HOKHMAH

      Odesa; Bi-Defus M. A. Belinson(1864). Later Boards. 12mo. 108 pages. 19 cm. Second edition. In Hebrew. Short work in defense of the Cabala, by Joseph Solomon Delmedigo (1591-1655) , "rabbi, philosopher, mathematician, and astronomer; also known as Joseph Solomon Rofe acronym YashaR) of Candia (Crete) . A writer of extensive Jewish and secular learning and of encyclopedic range, he is the author of works whose number is estimated by some authorities at 30, by others at over 60. ... wrote Mazref la-Hokhmah, in which he allegedly refuted the attack on the Kabbalah made by his distant relative Elijah Delmedigo, in his Behinat ha-Dat. Since, as Delmedigo himself explains, he was commissioned to write such a refutation, it is unclear whether the work reflects his true convictions. He says in this connection: 'Do not presume that you can unravel the author's mind from his book' (ed. Odessa, 1864, p. 85) . Leone Modena understood the Mazref la-Hokhmah as a refutation of kabbalistic ideas, using it in his Ari Nohem ('Roaring Lion') , a systematic anti-kabbalistic treatise. ... In 1629-31, his Ta'alumot Hokhmah, a collection of kabbalistic treatises, was published by his disciple, Samuel Ashkenazi, in Basle, Switzerland. The first section, Mazref la-Hokhmah, appeared in 1629, the second, Novelot Hokhmah ('Fallen Fruit of Wisdom') , in 1631. Except for these two books, the only other material that remains of Delmedigo's colossal output is the full text of his letter to Zerah of Troki, which was published together with a German translation in 1840 by Abraham Geiger in his Melo Chofnajim. " - EJ 2008 Subjects: Cabala. Jewish philosophy. OCLC lists 10 copies. Leaf 21-22 previously repaired with tape. Boards worn, bumped at edges. Light soiling and foxing throughout, overall fresh and clean. Institutional stamp on rear board. Otherwise fresh. Good - condition. (SPEC-40-22)

      [Bookseller: Dan Wyman Books]
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        THE MAINE WOODS

      Ticknor & Fields, Boston 1864 - Original purple Z cloth. BAL 20113: 1650 copies printed though Borst A4.1.a states that 1450 copies were printed. True first printing with list of Thoreau's books priced. Catalogue dated April 1864 with last leaf advertising "The Thirteenth Volume." About THE MAINE WOODS, Dave Foreman, Earth-First eco-warrior/author, has written that it is "Thoreau's finest book, far deeper and more important than WALDEN . on his two trips into the deep Maine wilderness [Thoreau] had the epiphany that enabled him to realize that 'in wildness is the preservation of the world.' MAINE not WALDEN changed American intellectual history." Contents clean. Spine pleasantly sunned, tips a bit frayed, gilt clear. Near Fine and scarce in this condition [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Charles Agvent, est. 1987, ABAA, ILAB]
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        OUR MUTUAL FRIEND

      London: Chapman & Hall, 1864. 1st edition (Hatton & Cleaver, pp. 345 - 370). Original green printed wrappers. Housed in a custom chemise and deep green full morocco pull-apart case, with elaborate gilt decoration to spine. Age-toning. 1st two parts, as well as the final, show some wear & edge chipping. Part 12 with largish chip to top of front wrapper, affected "April". Part 15 lacking tip of front wrapper lower corner. Part 18 with tear to rear wrapper fore-edge. Overall condition of Parts: VG - VG+. Case: Some minor wear, with interior lip showing some chafing at top corners [from removal of top portion's tight fit]. Overall, VG+.. 20 parts in 19. Some advert variances (+/-) from that found listed in Hatton & Cleaver; specific collation supplied on request. Illustrated with 40 plates by Marcus Stone. 8vo. 8-3/4" x 5-5/8"

      [Bookseller: Tavistock Books, ABAA ]
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        Le Rideau Levé ou l'Éducation de Laure. Edition revue sur celle originale de 1786 et ornee de six figures libres, gravees d'apres celles qu'on ajouta aux editions de 1786 et de 1790

      Cythere (Brussels): Anon(1864). 16mo - over 5¾" - 6¾" tall. "retirez-vous, censeurs alrilaires; fuyez, devots, hypocrites ou fous; prudes, guenons, et vous, vielles megeres : nou doux transports ne sont pas faits pour vous." Text in French. This title was condemned for outrages against good morals, and destruction ordered by the Cour d'assises de la Vienne on December 12, 1838 and banned for many years afterward. The first appearance of "Le Rideau Levé" was in 1786. Scarce early edition of this erotic fiction. CONDITION Red Marbled bds with Black Leather spine and cnrs, bright Gilt title (mild wear to bds with piece of marbled paper missing to front) Pink eps, pp 271. Internally tight with very bright and clean text block, not inscribed. This edition not illustrated. Texte en français. Édition tôt rare de cette fiction érotique. CONDITIONNEZ les bds marbrés rouges avec l'épine et le CNRS en cuir noirs, les eps roses lumineux du titre de jeune truie (usage doux aux bds avec le morceau de disparus de papier marbrés à affronter), pp 271. Intérieurement fortement avec le bloc très lumineux et propre des textes, non inscrit. Cette édition non illustrée.. Book Condition: Near Fine. Binding: Half-Leather. Jacket: Not Issued

      [Bookseller: Ariel Books]
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        THE LIFE AND ADVENTURES OF ROBINSON CRUSOE.

      London, Routledge, Warne and Routledge, Farringdon Street, 1864. VICTORIAN PICTORIAL CLOTH BINDING 1864. 8vo, approximately 230 x 170 mm, 9 x 6½ inches, portrait frontispiece and 100 illustrations by J(John) D(Dawson) Watson, (See: Simon Houfe, The Dictionary of 19th Century British Book Illustrators, page 342) engraved by The Brothers Dalziel, pages: xx, 1-498 plus 1 leaf of adverts, bound in publisher's green pictorial cloth with gilt lettering and decoration, sailing ship and two portraits in gilt to both covers, bevelled edges, all edges gilt, original yellow endpapers, book binder's small ticket on rear pastedown, "Bound by Leighton Son and Hodge". Slightest wear and crinkling to head and tail of spine, corners slightly bumped, blank pages at front and rear, portrait and advert leaf plus a few text pages at front and rear have pale foxing, sporadic foxing mostly to margins and occasionally affecting text, long neat inscription on the first free yellow endpaper with a verse underneath, dated 1865. A very good copy. See Ruari McLean, Victorian Publisher's Book-Bindings, page 111 for a full page illustration, though our copy is in variant green not blue. MORE IMAGES ATTACHED TO THIS LISTING, ALL ZOOMABLE, FURTHER IMAGES ON REQUEST. POSTAGE AT COST. A heavy book which will require extra postage.

      [Bookseller: Roger Middleton P.B.F.A.]
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        Lanificio Francesco Rossi: Schio.

      Pre. Lit. di G. Kirchmayr, Venezia. 1864 - Copia nella legatura editoriale in litografia con veduta centrale del castello di Schio. Album in folio oblungo COMPLETO che contiene 15 tavole litografiche con cornice e titolo, disegnate dal veneziano Carlo Matscheg, relative alla inaugurazione del lanificio Rossi di Schio (Vicenza), edificato su progetto del architetto Antonio Caregaro Negrin nel 1864. Di seguito l&#146;elenco delle tavole: 1) Frontespizio (con 10 vedutine: 2 del giardino e le altre delle lavorazioni nel lanificio); 2) Panorama; 3) Cortile interno; 4) Cortile esterno; 5) Tintoria; 6) Filatura A. - Scardassatura; 7) Filatura B. - Mull-Jenny; 8) Telai meccanici; 9) Tessitori Va. Sala - Alla Jacquard; 10) Follatura - Lavatoj; 11) Cardatura. Lavatoj di lane; 12) Tonditura-Apparecchio; 13) Mendatura; 14) Giardino-Prospetto; 15) Giardino-Parte superiore. Tutte le tavole sono protette da veline. COPIA CON LA DEDICA AUTOGRAFA DI ALESSANDRO ROSSI, A CHINA ALLA SGUARDIA, AD IMPORTANTE NOBILE TRENTINO. Confronta riproduzioni in Schio e Alessandro Rossi (vol. I)- Edizioni di Storia e Letteratura, Roma 1986. Formato: [15] c. di tav. protette da veline, 44x31 cm, cartonato editoriale in litografia. Buono, ordinari segni d&apos;uso e del tempo più evidenti alla legatura che presenta qualche macchia di polvere e minime mancanze marginali.

      [Bookseller: Studio Bibliografico Adige]
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        The Alabaster Sarcophagus of Oimenepthah I, King of Egypt

      Longman et al., London 1864 - iii, 45pp + 19 do.page hand drawn plates in blue, illustrations to text. Title continues 'now in Sir John Soane's Museum in Lincoln's Inn Fields. The boards are rubbed to corners with some damage, contents are clean and tight. Will require insurance. 900g Size: 4to - over 9¾" - 12" tall [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Parveen Papers]
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        NÉGOCIATIONS ENTRE LA FRANCE ET LA CHINE, EN 1860. Livre Jaune du baron Gros, ambassadeur extraordinaire et haut commissaire de l'empereur, en Chine, en 1858 et en 1860. Extrait de sa Correspondance et de son Journal, pendant la seconde mission qu'il a remplie dans l'extrême Orient.

      1864 - Paris, J. Dumaine, 1864. Grand in-quarto (228 X 273 mm) demi-chagrin noir à petits coins, dos quatre nerfs plats surlignés de filets dorés, roulette dorée en queue et tête, titre doré (reliure de l'époque) ; (2) ff. de faux-titre et titre, 248 pages. Ex-libris manuscrit «Raoul de Nully » sur le premier feuillet de garde, puis "A. d'Amade" en tête du titre. Frottements au dos de la reliure avec petite épidermure en tête et quelques manques aux ors, rousseurs éparses, plus marquées à quelques feuillets. ÉDITION ORIGINALE de ce témoignage de première main sur l'expédition franco-britannique en Chine de 1860. Le baron Jean-Baptiste-Louis GROS (1793-1870) fut envoyé en Chine au commencement de l'année 1857 comme ambassadeur extraordinaire pour obtenir, de concert avec lord Elgin, l'ouverture de nouveaux ports chinois au commerce européen et une protection efficace pour les missionnaires. En 1860, par suite de la violation du traité de Tien-Tsin, la France, de concert avec l'Angleterre, envoya en Chine une expédition sous les ordres du général Cousin-Montauban. Le baron Gros rejoignit ce général, qui s'empara des forts de Takou, à l'embouchure du Peï-ho le 20 août, battit Sang-Ko-Lin-sin à Palikao, se rendit maître de Pékin le 12 octobre et contraignit les Chinois à ouvrir de nouvelles négociations de paix qui aboutirent au traité de Pékin le 24 octobre 1860. Le baron Gros est célèbre pour s'être opposé en vain aux chefs militaires britanniques, notamment Lord Elgin, qui décidèrent de brûler le Palais d'été pour contraindre les Chinois à négocier. En dépit de ses protestations, le 18 octobre 1860, un détachement britannique incendia le palais, les pagodes, la bibliothèque et les archives. (Numa Broc, 226-228 - Cordier, "Sinica", 2497 - Larousse, "Grand dictionnaire du XIXe siècle", T. VIII, 1549-4). EXEMPLAIRE de Raoul de NULLY, avec son ex-libris manuscrit sur la première garde, qui embarqua de Bordeaux pour l'Asie en 1878, et qui pendant trente années réalisa de nombreuses expéditions en Chine et au Japon. Puis EXEMPLAIRE DU GÉNÉRAL ALBERT D'AMADE (Toulouse, 1856-1941, Fronsac), avec sa signature autographe à l'encre noire en tête du titre. Général français formé à Saint-Cyr, il participe à la campagne de Tunisie en 1881 au sein du 3e régiment de tirailleurs algériens avant de rejoindre le 108e régiment d'infanterie au Tonkin en 1885 en tant qu'officier d'ordonnance du général Munier. Il est ensuite affecté à l'état-major de la 2e brigade de la division d'occupation du Tonkin et de l'Annam. Lors de la campagne du Tonkin, le jeune capitaine se passionne pour les problématiques de l'Extrême-Orient. De cet intérêt découle certainement sa nomination en Chine, en 1887, lorsqu'il rejoint la représentation diplomatique de la France à Tien-Tsin en tant qu'attaché militaire. Cinquième officier à être nommé à ce poste depuis 1870, Albert d'Amade séjourne en Chine pendant quatre années (1887-1891), au cours desquelles il se révèle un talentueux observateur, doublé d'un photographe accompli. Espion officiel au service de la France, Albert d'Amade incarne le parfait gentleman, séduisant par son tact et son intelligence, ses interlocuteurs. Sa connaissance du mandarin s'avère un atout de premier ordre qui participe au succès de ses trois grands voyages d'étude et de reconnaissance en Chine : la région de Pékin et la Mandchourie au cours de l'hiver 1888, les provinces méridionales du Yunnan et du Guangxi entre octobre 1888 et mai 1889, la Corée en 1890. Au retour de ces missions, il expédie de copieux rapports agrémentés de cartes et de photographies de sa main au 2e Bureau de l'État-major, à Paris, qui forceront l'admiration de ses supérieurs : « Grâce à sa connaissance approfondie des moeurs et des coutumes chinoises et aussi de son grand tact, il s'est parfaitement acquitté de cette mission à la suite de laquelle il a rédigé un rapport fort intéressant. C'est un officier supérieur d'un très grand mérite, ayant un jugement très sûr et qui ne m [Attributes: First Edition; Signed Copy]

      [Bookseller: LIBRAIRIE ERIC CASTERAN]
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        Letter from an Illinois soldier written after the Battle of Resaca and in the midst of the fight at Dallas during Sherman's Atlanta Campaign

      Dallas, Georgia, 1864. Unbound. Very good. This four-page letter is written on partially printed lettersheet featuring a poem that begins, "I'm thinking, fondly thinking". The letter is from a member of the 111th Illinois Volunteer Infantry Regiment. The letter is is nice shape with a little soiling. While the writing is dark, clear, and mostly legible, this is one of the most difficult-to -read Civil War letters I have encountered because the spelling and grammar is incredibly poor. A transcript of the letter as written and as modified to make it intelligible will be provided. I've used the intelligible translation in the quotations below. Wardlew wrote this letter to his wife following the Battle of Resaca while the 111th Illinois was still fighting during the follow-on engagement in Dallas. "We have been hard on the march until we got here and we was stayin' by 80 thousand Rebels, and you better think that there has been some heavy fighting done since we came here, but we held our own. The Rebs made 8 charges last night on the 10th Corps on the right and the left, but they was repulsed both times and every time with heavy loss. We have lost a good many men but nothing like the Rebs has for they say the canon and musketry thundered all night last night but they are still tonight. Killed: Bill McClane, John Durrell, Sergeant Copland. . . . Charley Meliney is wounded very bad shot in the jaw the bullet coming out of at the mouth while eating. There is terrific more wounded but I have not got time to tell you as I am driving a Division team. . . . I have seen sights and wonders since I have been on the march, such sights I never want to see again. The wagons and ambulances is going night and day. They have been fighting here 6 days. We have not gained easy ground. . . . I think the Rebs is trying to cut their way through get away but we don't intend to let them come through if we can help it." Although the Union suffered between 7,500 casualties in the the two engagements, the Confederate Army was unable to thwart the Union advance toward Atlanta as Sherman's manuevering forced the Southerners to retreat and establish defensive positions at Marietta. Wardlew's estimate of "80 thousand Rebels" isn't far from the actual number as over 60,000 Confederate soldiers fought at Resaca. His description of the fighting is accurate as well. Although the 111th had been on active service since it organized in the summer of 1862, it had never engaged in combat until Resaca when it charged and turned back an attack of advancing Rebels. At Dallas, it helped repulse repeated probes and a full attack by General Joseph Johnston's Army of Tennessee. A poignant and event filled letter by a semi-literate Union soldier in the midst of his first combat.

      [Bookseller: Read 'Em Again Books, ABAA]
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        THE LIFE AND ADVENTURES OF ROBINSON CRUSOE

      VICTORIAN PICTORIAL CLOTH BINDING 1864. 8vo, approximately 230 x 170 mm, 9 x 6½ inches, portrait frontispiece and 100 illustrations by J(John) D(Dawson) Watson, (See: Simon Houfe, The Dictionary of 19th Century British Book Illustrators, page 342) engraved by The Brothers Dalziel, pages: xx, 1-498 plus 1 leaf of adverts, bound in publisher's green pictorial cloth with gilt lettering and decoration, sailing ship and two portraits in gilt to both covers, bevelled edges, all edges gilt, original yellow endpapers, book binder's small ticket on rear pastedown, "Bound by Leighton Son and Hodge". Slightest wear and crinkling to head and tail of spine, corners slightly bumped, blank pages at front and rear, portrait and advert leaf plus a few text pages at front and rear have pale foxing, sporadic foxing mostly to margins and occasionally affecting text, long neat inscription on the first free yellow endpaper with a verse underneath, dated 1865. A very good copy. See Ruari McLean, Victorian Publisher's Book-Bindings, page 111 for a full page illustration, though our copy is in variant green not blue. MORE IMAGES ATTACHED TO THIS LISTING, ALL ZOOMABLE, FURTHER IMAGES ON REQUEST. POSTAGE AT COST. A heavy book which will require extra postage.

      [Bookseller: Roger Middleton]
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        Brown's kleurvisioenen met een woord ter aanwijzing en verklaring. Leeuwarden, Hugo Suringar, [1866]. 4to. With 16 numbered lithographed plates (13 hand-coloured) lithographed by Morriën & Amand, Amsterdam. Original illustrated green cloth-backed boards, flyleaves with publishers advertisements.

      Landwehr, Plezier met papier 315; cf. NCC (5 copies of 2nd edition). Rare first edition of the Dutch translation of J.H. Brown's Spectropia, or surprising spectral illusions (1864), using the 19th-century knowledge of optics to explain how people see ghosts. A second edition was published ca. 1870.As described in the (original) introduction: " To see the spectres, it is only necessary to look steadily at the dot, or asterisk, which is to be found on each of the plates, for about a quarter of a minute,.. Then turning the eyes to the ceiling… of a darkened room (not totally dark), and looking rather steadily at any one point, the spectre will soon being to make its appearance, increasing in intensity, and then gradually vanishing, to reappear and vanish again."Some occasional spots, book block nearly detached and wrappers slightly soiled and rubbed. Good copy.

      [Bookseller: Antiquariaat FORUM BV]
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        THE LIFE AND ADVENTURES OF ROBINSON CRUSOE.

      London Routledge Warne and Routledge Farringdon Street 1864 - VICTORIAN PICTORIAL CLOTH BINDING 1864. 8vo, approximately 230 x 170 mm, 9 x 6½ inches, portrait frontispiece and 100 illustrations by J(John) D(Dawson) Watson, (See: Simon Houfe, The Dictionary of 19th Century British Book Illustrators, page 342) engraved by The Brothers Dalziel, pages: xx, 1-498 plus 1 leaf of adverts, bound in publisher's green pictorial cloth with gilt lettering and decoration, sailing ship and two portraits in gilt to both covers, bevelled edges, all edges gilt, original yellow endpaper, book binder's small ticket on rear pastedown, "Bound by Leighton Son and Hodge". Slightest wear and crinkling to head and tail of spine, corners slightly bumped, blank pages at front and rear, portrait and advert leaf plus a few text pages at front and rear have pale foxing, sporadic foxing mostly to margins and occasionally affecting text. A very good copy. See Ruari McLean, Victorian Publisher's Book-Bindings, page 111 for a full page illustration, though our copy is in variant green not blue. MORE IMAGES ATTACHED TO THIS LISTING, ALL ZOOMABLE, FURTHER IMAGES ON REQUEST. POSTAGE AT COST. A heavy book which will require extra postage. [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Roger Middleton P.B.F.A.]
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        Le règne végétal.

      - 9 Text- u. 8 Tafel-Bände. Guérin, Paris 1864-1871. Zus. ca. 4800 S. Text. und 410 (v. 411) meist kolorierten gestoch. Tafeln mit über 3000 Einzeldarst. u. 4 gestoch. gefalt. Karten. 4°. Rote Halblederbände mit Rückenvergoldung u. Kopfgoldschnitt. Etwas berieben u. bestoßen. Stellenweise leicht finger- oder stockfleckig. Die Einbände teilw. berieben u. bestoßen. 2 Rücken leicht verfärbt. Insgesamt gutes Exemplar. &#150;Gegliedert in Abteilungen: Traité de botanique générale (4 Bde.). Flore médicale (6 Bde.). Horticulture: Jardin potagier/ fruitier (2 Bde.). Horticulture: Végétaux d&#146;ornement (2 Bde.). Plantes agricoles et forestières(2 Bde.). Précis de l&#146;histoire de la botanique (1 Bd.). &#150; Nissen 568; Pritzel 2545. &#150; Prachtvolle fein kolorierte, teils eiweißgehöhte, Tafeln. [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Engel & Co GmbH]
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