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         10 Bände

      unbekannt 1865 - - Gute Exemplare - Holländische Völkerkundezeitschrift. Komplett über ein Jahrzehnt Sprache: Deutsch Gewicht in Gramm: 15000 Tjeenk Willink, Haarlem, 1865-1874. zusammen ca. 4000 S. mit zahlr. Textabb. u. Tafeln in Holzschnitt sowie zusammen ca. 500 S. Register., original rotbraune Halbleder-Einbände mit grünem Rückenschild., quart. (Kanten gering berieben/etwas stockfl./StaT.)

      [Bookseller: Celler Versandantiquariat]
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         EXTENSIVE ARCHIVE OF OVER TWO HUNDRED FIFTY LETTERS FROM HATTIE W. TAYLOR TO HER HUSBAND CHARLES DURING THE CIVIL WAR AND HIS SERVICE IN THE 16th CONNECTICUT INFANTRY].

      Bristol, Unionville, West Meriden, Ct. 1860-1865. - 256 letters of varying lengths, most a single sheet, with 213 envelopes. 217 letters housed in two three-ring binders, with remaining letters still folded in envelopes. Previously folded, and an occasional area of staining, but overall fine. A fascinating and comprehensive collection of over two hundred fifty Civil War-era "home front" letters from a Connecticut woman, Hattie W. Taylor, to her husband, Charles, who spent most of the conflict as a part of Company K of the 16th Connecticut Infantry in the Army of the Potomac. Taylor seems to have been well- educated, and her letters are engaging, insightful, and full of interesting information and strong opinion regarding both local and national affairs. The letters begin in June 1860, and a small portion of them relate to the period in which Taylor was engaged to Charles before they got married in the middle of 1862 and he enlisted in the Union army. She eventually resigned herself to her new husband's plans, stating in an August 9 letter that, "I am brave and stronger now. I have placed all my trust in my Heavenly Father and I believe he will care for you. We shall be both be better for the sacrifice made for 'our country.' You are in the right, God is with you - your course is noble, manly, heroic." The 16th Connecticut participated in the Battle of Antietam on September 16- 17, 1862, and suffered heavy losses, with more than 200 men captured. On September 23, Taylor wrote to her husband that she thanked God, "That he was spared-that from out that terrible battle you came unscathed." She also mentioned that she felt, "More encouraged regarding the end of the war. President Lincoln has issued a proclamation that after the first of January all slaves are to be free - so I think we may hope that God will give us success." Another local soldier, a Captain Manross was killed at Antietam and Taylor wrote of his funeral in a September 29 letter: "Mrs. Manross is nearly crazy - God pity and help her. Capt. B. Darrons company came out from Hartford to attend Capt. Manross' funeral-also his class from Amherst & the Free Masons. The flags were hung at half mast & a general feeling of sadness prevailed." While some in the North were opposed to Lincoln's preliminary Emancipation Proclamation and fighting a civil war to free the slaves, Hattie Taylor supported the abolitionist cause. As she wrote in a December 7, 1862, letter to her husband: "God is on the side of right and if we obey him he will deliver us. Sometimes I think we at the north are suffering full measure for all that the poor oppressed black at the south has for years suffered. I believe their day of deliverance is at hand and when that comes peace will come too. You see your little wife hasn't changed her abolition principles." By March 1863, the early optimism concerning the war had given way to pessimism and, in some quarters, anti-war activities, in Connecticut. In a March 1 letter, Taylor wrote that people "are expecting another draft and there are long faces. Patriotism seems to have gone by-people are discouraged. Secession democrats here have had and still hold their secret meetings. I wish every soul of them was down South. It is a downright shame that such things are tolerated." A week later, she was still condemning the copperheads, as well as being critical of the Union Army, writing that, "We can see no immediate prospect of peace, but these miserable 'copperheads' (I wish they were all in rebeldom) are trying their best to help the rebels as you will see by the Press I send you weekly-and our armies are doing nothing (I'm thankful the 16th Reg. are not) at present." Taylor did like Union General Benjamin Butler but had harsh words for Secretary of State Seward. In a May 20, 1863 letter she claimed, "I like such a man as Gen. Butler, when he says a thing, he will do it and he is for having this infernal (big word for me) rebellion put down at all hazards. He knows what he wants to do or what wants doing and that

      [Bookseller: William Reese Company - Americana]
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         Oeuvres complètes

      - Pagnerre, Paris 1865-1873, 14x23cm, 18 volumes reliés. - Nuova edizione della traduzione Fancaise da François-Victor Hugo. Leganti metà dolore marrone cioccolato, torna con cinque nervi set con fili d'oro e ornato con gli ornamenti dorati, le date d'oro code, piatti di carta marmorizzata, guardie e contreplats di carta fatta a mano, le teste dorate, alcuni angoli utilizzati senza gravità, leganti uniformi del tempo. Piacevole Nel complesso, nonostante il fatto che alcune copie hanno versione precedente di approvazioni, splendidamente immerso in un legame divisa contemporanea. - [FRENCH VERSION FOLLOWS] Nouvelle édition de la traduction fançaise établie par François-Victor Hugo.  Reliures en demi chagrin marron chocolat, dos à cinq nerfs sertis de filets dorés et ornés de fleurons dorés, dates dorées en queues, plats de papier marbré, gardes et contreplats de papier à la cuve, têtes dorées, quelques coins émoussés sans gravité, reliures uniformes de l'époque.  Agréable ensemble, malgré le fait que quelques exemplaires comportent des mentions d'éditon, joliment établi dans une reliure uniforme de l'époque.

      [Bookseller: Librairie Feu Follet]
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         [DIARY AND ARMY DOCUMENTS OF ISAAC D. LANDIS, SERGEANT MAJOR IN THE 9th PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER CAVALRY, FOR 1864 AND 1865]

      [Tennessee; Georgia; South Carolina; North Carolina, 1865. [420]pp., plus 23 printed and manuscript forms and reports, with two framed photograph portraits. Narrow 12mo. Original soft leather wrappers, perished and lacking rear wrapper, a.e.g. Spine and stitching perished. Small chips and tears at edges, slightly affecting text. Light soiling and dampstaining. Some entries in pencil somewhat faded. Other documents loose, photographs somewhat dust soiled. Good. A detailed Civil War diary kept by a Sergeant Major in the 9th Pennsylvania Volunteer Cavalry, Isaac D. Landis, from January 1, 1864 through the end of the conflict to December, 1865. Landis was promoted to Sergeant Major on New Year's Day, 1864, when the diary begins, and his writing recorded the movements and action of his unit through Tennessee, Georgia, and the Carolinas. At the commencement of the journal, the unit was encamped at Mossy Creek after a small battle there at the close of the previous year: "In camp, two miles east of Mossy Creek Station in East Tennessee, having driven the enemy from the former place on the memorable 29th day of December 1863. Encamped in line of Battle the 2nd Battalion was on Picket. I have been acting Adjutant since the 16th of Dec. 1863 when the Adjutant went to hospital in Knoxville Tenn.... Fell back to the position at Mossy Creek as the enemy made a movement to outflank our position. Encamped in line of Battle the 9th Penna Cav being on the left of the division which occupied the center of the line.... Four hundred enlisted men of the Regiment reenlisted as veteran volunteers to serve for the year from the 1st day of January 1864." The 9th Pennsylvania Cavalry was engaged in Tennessee for much of 1864, until the fall when it moved into Georgia, and on Election Day the unit was encamped at Marietta: "This being the day that will decide the fate of the Nation the day of the Presidential Election. We all proceed to opening ballot boxes and polls - that all may have have a chance to fight the great Political Battle - which results in Lincoln receiving 403 votes and McClellan 146 votes receiving. 257 votes Majority for Lincoln." Landis' unit then took part in the famed March to the Sea, crossing Georgia between mid-November and mid- December, and culminating in the seizure of Savannah just before Christmas, 1864. At the beginning of 1865, the unit marched from the vicinity of Savannah north to South Carolina and North Carolina, where they spent the remainder of the war involved in various engagements and securing lines of communication and supply, as on February 18, when Landis reported: "Marched at 7 AM 2nd Brig. in advance Regt. on left center. Marched 20 miles to Alston, [South Carolina], for the purpose of getting possession of the R.R. Bridge across Broad River but the enemy who had a force stationed at the bridge for the purpose burned it and the 2nd brigade charged in vain to retake it before the fire had destroyed it. We then went into camp at Stuckville, barricaded our front, reset Co. L on Picket, marched during the day on parallel road with Cheatham's Corps who are endeavoring to get in our front." During the momentous events of April 1865, Landis was camped at Durham, North Carolina, reporting the news as in his entry for April 18: "Genls. Sherman and Johnson [sic] again met and the latter accompanied by the Rebel Sec'y of War Breckenridge who was representing the Confederacy to submit terms of Peace, which was entered into and orders issued for the Cessation of Hostilities which it is supposed will result in the restoration of Peace. We were all pained to receive the intelligence of the assassination of President Lincoln and the attempt on the life of Seward." Accompanying the diary are a number of printed forms and manuscript reports including registers of the commissioned officers of the unit from January 1864 and January 1865, nine casualty reports (including one that gives a history of the regimental casualties from the beginning of the war to March 1865), and a roster of unit soldiers captured during the campaign in Georgia in February and March, 1865. Further documents consist of clothing and camp equipment reports, weekly reports of the unit's eligible force, a muster-out roll from the end of the war, a list of officers below the rank of Colonel who wished to remain in service after the Confederate surrender, a printed Farewell Address from Gen. Thomas J. Jordan, and handwritten farewells from unit officers Col. F.A. Jones and Capt. E.M. Ward. Two framed photographic portraits of Landis also accompany the material. A fascinating collection that provides much detail on Union cavalry movement and activity in the Deep South during the last year and a half of the Civil War.

      [Bookseller: William Reese Company - Americana ]
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         [EXTENSIVE ARCHIVE OF OVER TWO HUNDRED FIFTY LETTERS FROM HATTIE W. TAYLOR TO HER HUSBAND CHARLES DURING THE CIVIL WAR AND HIS SERVICE IN THE 16th CONNECTICUT INFANTRY]

      Bristol, Unionville, West Meriden, Ct, 1865. 256 letters of varying lengths, most a single sheet, with 213 envelopes. 217 letters housed in two three-ring binders, with remaining letters still folded in envelopes. Previously folded, and an occasional area of staining, but overall fine. A fascinating and comprehensive collection of over two hundred fifty Civil War-era "home front" letters from a Connecticut woman, Hattie W. Taylor, to her husband, Charles, who spent most of the conflict as a part of Company K of the 16th Connecticut Infantry in the Army of the Potomac. Taylor seems to have been well-educated, and her letters are engaging, insightful, and full of interesting information and strong opinion regarding both local and national affairs. The letters begin in June 1860, and a small portion of them relate to the period in which Taylor was engaged to Charles before they got married in the middle of 1862 and he enlisted in the Union army. She eventually resigned herself to her new husband's plans, stating in an August 9 letter that, "I am brave and stronger now.... I have placed all my trust in my Heavenly Father and I believe he will care for you.... We shall be both be better for the sacrifice made for 'our country.' You are in the right, God is with you - your course is noble, manly, heroic." The 16th Connecticut participated in the Battle of Antietam on September 16-17, 1862, and suffered heavy losses, with more than 200 men captured. On September 23, Taylor wrote to her husband that she thanked God, "That he was spared-that from out that terrible battle you came unscathed." She also mentioned that she felt, "More encouraged regarding the end of the war. President Lincoln has issued a proclamation that after the first of January all slaves are to be free - so I think we may hope that God will give us success." Another local soldier, a Captain Manross was killed at Antietam and Taylor wrote of his funeral in a September 29 letter: "Mrs. Manross is nearly crazy - God pity and help her.... Capt. B. Darrons company came out from Hartford to attend Capt. Manross' funeral-also his class from Amherst & the Free Masons. The flags were hung at half mast & a general feeling of sadness prevailed." While some in the North were opposed to Lincoln's preliminary Emancipation Proclamation and fighting a civil war to free the slaves, Hattie Taylor supported the abolitionist cause. As she wrote in a December 7, 1862, letter to her husband: "God is on the side of right and if we obey him he will deliver us. Sometimes I think we at the north are suffering full measure for all that the poor oppressed black at the south has for years suffered. I believe their day of deliverance is at hand and when that comes peace will come too. You see your little wife hasn't changed her abolition principles." By March 1863, the early optimism concerning the war had given way to pessimism and, in some quarters, anti-war activities, in Connecticut. In a March 1 letter, Taylor wrote that people "are expecting another draft and there are long faces. Patriotism seems to have gone by-people are discouraged. Secession democrats here have had and still hold their secret meetings. I wish every soul of them was down South. It is a downright shame that such things are tolerated." A week later, she was still condemning the copperheads, as well as being critical of the Union Army, writing that, "We can see no immediate prospect of peace, but these miserable 'copperheads' (I wish they were all in rebeldom) are trying their best to help the rebels as you will see by the Press I send you weekly-and our armies are doing nothing (I'm thankful the 16th Reg. are not) at present." Taylor did like Union General Benjamin Butler but had harsh words for Secretary of State Seward. In a May 20, 1863 letter she claimed, "I like such a man as Gen. Butler, when he says a thing, he will do it and he is for having this infernal (big word for me) rebellion put down at all hazards. He knows what he wants to do or what wants doing and that is more than can be said of some. I wish Mr. Seward was in Fort Lafayette or some other place, than where he is now. I guess I will stop for wishing does no good, but if I had the power he would be missing till this war was over and some other ones too." Taylor reported vigorously on local reaction to military news. On July 7, 1863, she relayed the celebration in West Meriden, Connecticut, resulting from the Union victory at Vicksburg. "This afternoon the news of the surrender of Vicksburg was received. And it has been a time of rejoicing. All the bells in town were rung, shop whistles blew, all the flags were flying and people greeted each other with smiling faces. Some swung their hats in the air, and a feeling of hope filled all hearts." Learning that the Union victory of Gettysburg was accompanied by large numbers of casualties, she expressed her views regarding the outcome of the war in a July 12 letter: "Oh! That this cruel war was ended, but the clouds are breaking - already we can see through them the blue sky of peace - yet we know there is much more to be done yet- many hard battles to be fought ere the end comes-but we have great reason to be encouraged. Oh! I do hope our rulers may see and realize that only in justice can peace come to us. When we unconditionally give freedom to every downtrodden son of Africa then I believe the starry banner of our country shall float over a land of peace - and home of the brave." In her next letter, dated July 14, Taylor mentioned the New York draft riots and again expressed her negative opinion of copperheads: "Drafting has commenced and it makes many long faces. In New York it is being resisted by a mob - several lives have been lost, buildings burned-the telegraph poles cut down-rail road torn up - Harlem river bridge burned. A regular copperhead demonstration. It is reported they are fighting there to-night. How dreadful it is, but I hope these traitors at home will be attended to in earnest." Five days later she wrote of an expected draft riot in Meriden, Connecticut, "There is every expectation of it and every night when I retire to rest I know not but before morning I shall be awakened by the cries of a mob in our streets. The loyal citizens have formed themselves into companies for the defense of our town - they drill every morning and evening and have minie' rifles." In the summer of 1864, with General Ulysses Grant's army bogged down in Virginia and suffering heavy casualties, President Lincoln was re-nominated for a second term. Despite the growing number of casualties resulting from Grant's movement against General Lee's army, Taylor felt confident in Grant's abilities, as she stated in a June 21 letter. "I think Grant is the man for whom we have so long been looking to lead the Army of the Potomac, and he will eventually take Richmond but what a sacrifice of life." Nevertheless, she still held General Benjamin Butler in high regard, especially after reading James Parton's 1864 book, General Butler in New Orleans. In an August 2 letter, she wrote that she was, "Reading Parton's 'Life of Butler' - it is very interesting. I had no idea he had done so much - he stands high here than ever in my estimation. Would that we had more like him." By early 1865, Taylor looked forward to the end of the war and the return of her husband. As she indicated in a February 4 letter, she was not favor ending the war with an unjust peace, though she did welcome the passage of the 13th Amendment by the U.S. House of Representatives on January 31: "What do you think of the present 'peace movement'? I do not like the way things are being managed - much as I desire peace, let it come on a right basis - in justice or not at all, and let the traitors suffer the penalty of their crime. But it is glory enough for one week that the amendment of the Constitution is passed and slavery is abolished from our land. Thank God for that." In a February 21 letter, Taylor cheered the retaking of Fort Sumter by Union forces and expressed hopes for severe retribution to Confederates: "The flags are all flying here to-day because our glorious banner again waves over Fort Sumter.... I wish Gen. Sherman would not leave one stone upon another in the city of Charleston - but let it be forever waste - an example to all traitors and traitorous cities." When the Confederate capital Richmond fell on April 3, 1865, Hattie joined other Northerners in celebration. She wrote to her husband on April 4 of her happiness that: "the rebel capital is taken.... So long looking for this and now it has come. I can scarcely realize it.... I saw in last night's paper that 'staid New York merchants hugged each other' and every one was almost wild with joy." A week later she celebrated General Lee's surrender to General Grant at Appomattox. "Only think of it! Richmond ours and Lee with his army surrendered! - such rejoicing was never seen before I'm sure. I was so glad I almost cried for joy - we hung out our flag... we could hear bells and gongs all around." The celebrations in the North were, of course, silenced by the assassination of Lincoln. In an April 18, 1865, letter, Taylor expressed her emotions of sadness mixed with anger: "It seems so sad to think Mr. Lincoln is dead. There is mourning everywhere -any 'copper' that dares express joy is silenced. Traitors have added the last drop to their cup of iniquity and it is running over. I hope they will receive no mercy.... It seems sad to see black crape fluttering from the door knobs all along the street. They rode a man on a rail in Chipping hill for saying he ought to have been shot four years ago." In an April 30 letter Hattie informed her husband that she sought retribution: "I hope all implicated may be brought to justice. Gens. Lee, Johnson, Breckinridge, Jeff Davis and all those leaders ought to be hanged!! They have slain their ten thousands and deluged our land in blood. Justice demands it... there is no mercy pleading for them in my heart-but justice, stern justice to traitors-and copper's too- demands a fit punishment for this treason." She was optimistic about President Andrew Johnson, especially in handling the Southern traitors. On May 9 she wrote that, "I have a great deal of confidence in President Johnson. He has a good deal of the Andrew Jackson spirit that I like to see, when rebels and traitors are concerned. Decision and justice - I hope justice will be measured out to them to the brim." Approximately a month later, Charles had mustered out of his unit and returned to Connecticut. An extensive and exhaustive collection of correspondence that provides tremendous detail of a New England home experience of the Civil War.

      [Bookseller: William Reese Company - Americana]
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         The Army & Navy Official Gazette Containing Reports of Battles; also Important Orders of the War Department, Record of Courts Martial, etc Volume II 1864-1865

      Office of F. & J. Rives, 1865, Hardcover, Book Condition: Fair Condition. 832 pages. Large book. The text block is sound but the covers are detached and worn; the spine is heavily worn. The pages are discolored; a few stained; some foxing. Includes 52 issues from July 5, 1864-June 27, 1865. Fascinating publication full of reports. the April 9, 1865 issue has a small report of the surrender by General Lee; the April 18, 1865 issue has Stanton's announcement of the assassination of President Lincoln. Includes 3 folding maps: Fort Buchanan; Fort Fisher; Sherman's March. Quantity Available: 1. Shipped Weight: 4+ Pounds/Larger. Category: Military; Inventory No: 154687.

      [Bookseller: Easy Chair Books]
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         La Divina Commedia

      MILANO: FRANCESCO PAGNONI, 1865. Rilegato. DISCRETO. 25 34,5. 1, 2, 3 USATO

      [Bookseller: Biblioteca di Babele]
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         Traité des propriétés projectives des figures. Ouvrage utile à ceux qui s'occupent de la géométrie descriptive et d'opérations géométriques sur le terrain

      Gauthier-Villars, Paris 1865 - Demi chagrin vert de l'époque, plats en percaline verte. Médaillon doré au centre des plats du Collège de Cognac Deux volumes in quarto (268 x213 mm), xxxii-428 pages et 12 planches / viii-452 pages et 6 planches Reliures frottées, coiffes supérieures abîmées/ Petite déchirure à une planche Seconde édition largement augmentée d'un volume par Poncelet du premier ouvrage entièrement consacré à la géométrie projective. (DSB) DSB [XI, p. 79/80 : "the 'Traité des propriétés projectives des figures' (.) was the first book wholly devoted to projective geometry, a new discipline that was to experience wide success during the nineteenth century. In this domain Poncelet considered himself the successor to Desargues, Blaise Pascal and Maclaurin and the continuator of the work of Monge and his disciples. (.) . The distinction Poncelet made between projective and metric properties prefigures the appearance of the modern concept of structure. Among the many original results presented in the ' Traité ' are those stating that in complex projective space two non-degenerate conics are of the same nature and have four common points (a finding that led to the discovery of cyclic points, imaginary points at infinity common to all the circles of a plane), and that all quadrics possess (real or imaginary) systems of generatrices. The decisive influence that ' Traité des propriétés projectives des figures ' exercised on the development of projective geometry - an influence underestimated by Chasles, Poncelet's direct rival - is brought to light by most commentators, particularly by E. Kotter, who made the most complete analysis of it, but also by A. Schoenflies and A. Tresse, J.L. Coolidge, C.B. Boyer, N. Bourbaki and others (.). Poncelet's geometric work marks the first major step toward the elaboration of the fundamental theories of modern geometry"] ___________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________ENGLISH_DESCRIPTION______________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________ Contemporary quarter green chagreen, gilt centerpiece. Two 4to (268 x213), xxxii-428 pages and 12 plates / viii-452 pages and 6 plates Binding rubbed, caps chipped . Second enlarged edition of "the first book wholly devoted to projective geometry," (DSB) DSB [XI, p. 79/80 : "the 'Traité des propriétés projectives des figures' (.) was the first book wholly devoted to projective geometry, a new discipline that was to experience wide success during the nineteenth century. In this domain Poncelet considered himself the successor to Desargues, Blaise Pascal and Maclaurin and the continuator of the work of Monge and his disciples. (.) . The distinction Poncelet made between projective and metric properties prefigures the appearance of the modern concept of structure. Among the many original results presented in the ' Traité ' are those stating that in complex projective space two non-degenerate conics are of the same nature and have four common points (a finding that led to the discovery of cyclic points, imaginary points at infinity common to all the circles of a plane), and that all quadrics possess (real or imaginary) systems of generatrices. The decisive influence that ' Traité des propriétés projectives des figures ' exercised on the development of projective geometry - an influence underestimated by Chasles, Poncelet's direct rival - is brought to light by most commentators, particularly by E. Kotter, who made the most complete analysis of it, but also by A. Schoenflies and A. Tresse, J.L. Coolidge, C.B. Boyer, N. Bourbaki and others (.). Poncelet's geometric work marks the first major step toward the elaboration of the fundamental theories of modern geometry"] In 8 / 8vo 2800g. [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Eric Zink Livres anciens]
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         HEAD QUARTERS, DIST. OF TEXAS, NEW MEXICO AND ARIZONA. GENERAL ORDERS, No. 6.

      [Houston. Feb. 23, 1865]. - Broadside, 8 x 4 3/4 inches. Small, closed tear in upper margin. Minor foxing. Small institutional stamp ("withdrawn") on verso. Good. A scarce Confederate imprint, reporting the details of the attempted desertion of Private Antone Richers of Degé's Light Battery. Richers deserted on December 10, 1864 at Galveston, Texas, but his boat capsized in trying to navigate the channel, and when he was rescued he was charged with desertion and found guilty. Richers was sentenced "to be shot to death with musketry." If only he had waited it out a few more months. PARRISH & WILLINGHAM 1431.

      [Bookseller: William Reese Company - Americana]
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         SÄCHSISCHE SCHWEIZ. -, 70 mahlerische An- und Aussichten der Umgegend von Dresden in einem Kreise von sechs bis acht Meilen aufgenommen, gezeichnet und radirt von C. A. Richter, Professor, und A. Louis Richter.

      18,5 x 23 cm. Mit 70 radierten Ansichten-Tafeln, mit je 1 Textblatt mit den Bildtiteln in Deutsch und Französisch. Pp. d. Zt. mit mont. Titelblatt. Hoff-Budde 30-99 Rümann (19. Jh.) 1865 Thieme-Becker Bd. XXVIII, S. 298-300. - Erste Ausgabe, noch ohne die fortlaufende Tafelnumerierung im unteren Plattenrand. - Eine Jugendarbeit Ludwig Richters (1803 - 1884), zusammen mit seinem Vater durchgeführt. Nach Hoff-Budde stammen etwa zwei Drittel der Blätter von Ludwig Richter. Die feinen Tafeln zeigen Gesamt- und Teilansichten von Pillnitz, Schloß Lohmen, Wehlen, Rathen, Hohnstein, Schandau, Hirniskretschen, Tetschen, Pirna, Königstein, Teplitz, Aussig, Dohna, Wesenstein, Potschappel, Tharandt, Schloß Augustusburg, Chemnitz, Freiberg, Nossen, Altzelle, Kriebstein, Kohren, Waldheim, Gnandstein, Meissen, die Schlösser Siebeneichen, Hirschstein und Moritzburg, Hermsdorf, Schmeckwitz, Bautzen, Herrnhut, Zittau, Oybin und Stolpen, ferner Landschaften, Höhlen, Wasserfälle, Felsformationen und Burgruinen. Alle Blätter sind mit Spaziergängern, Jägern, Reitern, Tieren, Treidelschiffen, Fuhrwerken und des öfteren auch einem Zeichner staffagiert. - Einband berieben und bestoßen, Rücken und Ecken in Leder erneuert. Die breitrandigen Tafeln zumeist etwas gebräunt und stockfleckig, die zugleich als Deckblätter dienenden Textblätter in kleinerem Format stärker gebräunt. Das Titelblatt, das sich gedruckt nur auf dem Originalumschlag befand, hier auf dem Vorderdeckel montiert. Sachsen und Sachsen-Anhalt

      [Bookseller: Buch- und Kunstantiquariat]
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         Eigenh. Brief mit U. O. O., 18. VI. 1865.

      1865. ½ S. auf Doppelblatt. Gr.-8vo. An einen Regierungsrat: "Heute Sonntag Abend um 7 Uhr kommen Große und Bodenstedt zu mir [...] Kann ich auch von Ihnen die Ehre haben? [...]". - Ludwig Nohl war einer der meistgelesenen Musikschriftsteller seiner Zeit, trat publizistisch zeitlebens für Wagner ein und erwarb sich vor allem als Beethoven-Forscher bleibende Verdienste.

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Inlibris]
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         Archive of 65 documents

      1865 - City of London Truss Society. Archive of 65 documents, including autograph letters signed (mostly to John Colley Taunton [d. 1858]), printed reports and other ephemera. 1822-65. Some documents soiled or dampstained, a few with tears, but overall good to very good. Calendar of the archive included. The City of London Truss Society, a highly successful British charitable organization, began operating in 1807 and continued well into the twentieth century (Sir Geoffrey Keynes, the well-known surgeon and bibliographer, served on the Society's medical staff in the 1930s). A notice published in the Philosophical Magazine in 1813 describes the genesis of the Society: "From the great number of persons among the laboring poor who were afflicted with hernia, and for whose relief no adequate provision existed, on the 14th of October 1807 Dr. Squire, Dr. Herdman, John Taunton, the Rev. H. G. Watkins, James Horton, Michael Bartlett, Joseph Atkinson, John Middleton, John Gardner and John Whitford, met at the City Dispensary, and formed themselves into a Society 'for the relief of the ruptured poor throughout the Kingdom, the City of London Truss Society'" (Philosophical Magazine 43 [1813]: 316). John Taunton (1769-1821), surgeon to London's city dispensary, was appointed the Truss Society's first surgeon; after his death, his son John Colley Taunton took over the post, remaining there until his own death in 1858. By 1813 the Society was treating nearly 2000 patients annually; by Taunton's death in 1821 this number had increased to over 3500; and by the end of the nineteenth century the Society was employing three surgeons and seeing over 10,000 patients per year. The archive we are offering contains 65 documents, of which all but seven are handwritten. Of the 58 handwritten documents, the majority are letters to (and a few from) John Colley Taunton. The most notable correspondent represented here is physiologist and surgeon Benjamin Collins Brodie (1783-1862), whose letter to Taunton advises him on a urinary tract infection in a patient. Four of the letters are from surgeon William Kingdon (1789-1863); two of these recommend poor patients to the Society's care. 31 letters are from Samuel Cartwright (1789-1864), a dentist and one of the vice-presidents of the Truss Society; nearly all of his letters have to do with donations to the Society, and several include the exact amounts given. Another group of letters is from Mary Tanner, presumably a patient; two of these letters include prescription notes in what is presumably J. C. Taunton's hand. Also included in this archive are three of the Society's annual reports, for the years 1862-1864; a printed subscription card; and two printed invitations from the Society addressed to Walter K. Taunton. A complete calendar of the archive is included. Royal College of Surgeons, Plarr's Lives of the Fellows Online. [Attributes: Signed Copy; Soft Cover]

      [Bookseller: Jeremy Norman's historyofscience]
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         Our Mutual Friend

      London: Chapman and Hall, 1865. First Edition. With the half-titles & Postscript. First issue misspelling of "principal" on p. 115, vol. 2. the plates & text are entirely free from foxing Bound in two volumes - contemporary binding - lovely examples

      [Bookseller: John Atkinson Books]
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         Miss Mackenzie

      Chapman and Hall, London 1865 - First Edition, with half-titles. vi, 312 ; vi, 313 pp. 2 vols. 8vo. Sadleir 20 Bound in three quarters blue morocco and matching clloth sides, t.e.g. Bookplate of Joseph Spencer Graydon. Spines slightly sunned, else fine vi, 312 ; vi, 313 pp. 2 vols. 8vo [Attributes: First Edition]

      [Bookseller: James Cummins Bookseller, ABAA]
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         Plates 1 - 6 from "The Kings Quair".

      1865 1865 - Etching Plates 317 x 265 mm Annotated working proofs for The Kings Quair a mural that illustrates a poem written in the 1420s by James I of Scotland whilst he was a prisoner at Windsor Castle. The Mural circles around the spiral staircase at Penkil Castle in Ayrshire which was the home to Scott's mistress Alice Boyd and her Brother Spencer. The captive glimpses his beloved , Lady Jane Beaufort, in the garden, and in a dream is transported to the courts of Venus and Minerva. Portraits of friends appear throughout: Spencer Boyd, posthumously, as one of the castle guards, Christina Rossetti as Lady Jane; Swinburne and W.M. Rossetti as courtiers of Venus, together with Scott himself and allegedly Holman Hunt. I. Vignette Title [For Lady Jane]. II. Old Windsor - Early Morning. III. Lady Jane Listening to the Nightingale. IV. The Garden of the Court of Lovers. V. Lady Jane sending off the Dove. VI. King James Receives the Dove.

      [Bookseller: Sanders of Oxford ltd]
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         Camps and Prisons: Twenty Months in the Department of the Gulf

      New York: J. P. Robens, 1865. _. Hard Cover. Good to Very Good. 12mo. Third edition. Complete: 424 pages; 6 plates; 6-page advertising section in rear. Sound binding with intact hinges. Clean pages. Small owner's label inside front cover. Minor cover wear, heaviest at the head of the spine. "The best account of prison life in Texas during the Civil War" (Basic Texas Books 47B.) (An earlier edition is also listed in Sabin, 21152.) Duganne was a poet, playwright, and dime-novel author who fought in the Gulf region with the Union Army as officer in the New York 176th Volunteer Infantry Regiment and was captured at Brashsear City. About 1/3 of the book discusses service with the regiment and 2/3s discusses life as a prisoner. Quite scarce.

      [Bookseller: Read 'Em Again Books, ABAA ]
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         Photographs from Sketches by Augustus Welby N. Pugin [2 volumes]

      Published by S. Ayling, London 1865 - , 500 black and white photographs of drawings by Pugin and carvings, mounted two per page with 250 in each book. Each book has a decorated title page with gilt lettering and an index to all the photos which are numbered (105/106 are incorrectly numbered 103/104 in volume I) First Edition , respined with original boards, scuffing to edges and corners, library book plate to front pastedowns, library stamps to pages, good condition , quarter black morocco with stippled green cloth boards, five raised bands to spines with gilt titles, gilt monogram to front boards , 29 cm x 21 cm Hardback ISBN: [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Keoghs Books]
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         Poems Relating to the American Revolution

      New York: Widdleton, 1865 - Attractively bound in full red morocco with gilt decoration; top edge gilt; fine. [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Peter L. Stern & Co., Inc., A.B.A.A.]
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         Dotty Dimple

      Lee and Shepard, Boston - 1865. First edition. 12mo brown cloth stamped in blind and with a gilt title vignette on the spine. Inserted frontispiece and one full-page inserted illustration. Binding slightly cocked; light wear to the spine tips. Light foxing, especially to the title page and the tissue that guards the frontispiece, else a sound, bright, near-fine copy of a rare and fragile book. Laid in is a card signed, "Rebecca S. Clark - "Sophie May" - Norridgewock, Me." PPP page 23. [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: The Literary Lion, ABAA]
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         Narrative of a Year's Journey Through Central and Eastern Arabia.

      1865 - First edition. With an engraved portrait frontispiece vignette, a coloured folding map and 4 folding plans. Two volumes. 8vo. Contemporary half calf with marbled paper-covered boards, green morocco labels to spines, gilt; boards slightly rubbed. A very good copy. xiii, 466; iii, 398 pp. London, Macmillan and Co., Disguising himself as a Syrian doctor Palgrave visited the Rashidi capital Hayil and Riyadh, capital of the Saudis. Thence on to the shores of the Persian Gulf where he visited Bahrain and importantly gives us probably the best nineteenth century description of Qatar. Palgrave was well read in Arabic literature and was conversant with Arab customs, as well as being a shrewd observer and an accomplished writer. Macro, 1731. [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Maggs Bros. Ltd ABA, ILAB, PBFA, BA]
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         Narrative of a year's journey through Central and Eastern Arabia (1862-63).

      London Macmillan 1865 - First edition. 2 volumes, 8vo, xii, [ii], 466 pp., [ii pp. adverts]; vi, 398pp., [ii pp. adverts], folding map (repairs to folds), 5 plates, original pictorial green cloth gilt,a little rubbed, generally a very good copy. William Palgrave (1826-1828) was drawn to the Arab world by early impressions from reading the Arab romance Antar. For some years he was a successful missionary, and became so accustomed to Arab society that he could pass as a native of the Middle East without difficulty. In the employ of the French, his first mission was to sound Halim Pasha about becoming viceroy of Egypt under French suzerainty; although that project failed, Palgrave used the opportunity to prepare plans for a French invasion of Syria from Egypt. His next mission was to report on the Arabian kingdoms of Ha'il and Riyadh. For many years Arabia had remained closed to Europeans. Ha'il had been penetrated by Europeans only once; Riyadh, never. Disguised as a Syrian Christian physician named Selim Abu Mahmoud al-'Eis, Palgrave now undertook an adventurous journey across central Arabia, which he accomplished in 1862 and 1863, thereby becoming the first westerner to cross Arabia by an approximately diagonal route (from the north-west to the south-east). Travelling among the Wahabbis, he was in considerable danger, should he be detected as a European. Once, at Ha'il, he was recognized as having been seen at Damascus, and at Riyadh he was suspected and accused of being an English spy, but his skill at disguise, coupled with his presence of mind and good fortune, secured his safety. Palgrave returned to Europe in late 1863 and wrote the present book, a classic of Arabian travel literature. (From ODNB). [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Shapero Rare Books]
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         Elucidario das palavras, termos e frases que em Portugal antigamente se usaram e que hoje regularmente se ingoram: obra indispensavel para entender sem erro os documentos mais raros e preciosos que entre nós se conservam. Segunda ediçao. Revista, correcta, e copiosamente addicionada de novos vocabulos, observaçoes e notas criticas, com um indice remissivo

      A.J. Fernandes Lopes, Lisboa, 1865 - 2 tomos en un volumen en folio, [12]+343+[2] p+5 láminas +306+[6]+XXIV p, holandesa piel levemente rozada, nervios, tejuelo. Algunos pasajes subrayados con lápiz de color, papel algo tostado, taladro en margen inferior, sin afectar, hasta p. 20. Láminas con tipos de letra, signos, medallas, etc.; ilustraciones en el texto. 2ª edición, después de la de 1798

      [Bookseller: MIQUELEIZ ANTIGUEDADES]
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         Soldier's Letters, from Camp, Batle-Field and Prison (UNION GENERAL W.B. FRANKLIN'S PERSONAL COPY WITH HIS OWNERSHIP SIGNATURE AND DATED JULY, 1865)

      Bunce & Huntington, New York 1865 - First edition. 472 pps. with engraved first title page.Union blue cloth with spine lettering gilt, vintage but presumed not contemporary with the book. Published in the closing days of the Civil War, this collection of extracts from letters and diaries of soldiers, officers and leaders, gleaned mostly from manuscript material not previously published. The book was produced on behalf, and for the benefit, of the U.S. Sanitary Commission. General Franklin's personal copy with his signature and inscription in ink on the second blank, "W.B. Franklin/ July 1865/ York/ Penna.". There is a further notation in pencil on the front free endpaper, "George Small Franklin/ Gen'l Franklin's library/ 1903-". There are also two sections where pencil annotations appear though it is unclear as to whether these are in General Franklin's hand or that of his ancestor. A folded 1862 newspaper clipping (about a Revolutionary War figure) is affixed to the third front blank. A tight copy, with a narrow crescent-shaped stain to the upper outer top corners of the first several leaves in including the titles, gradually diminishing to about p. 90. William Buel Franklin (1823-1903), a native of York, Pa., rose to the rank of Major General and served in command positions in several key engagements. He was wounded in action and also taken prisoner in July, 1864 but escaped the following day. His injuries effectively ended his active military career; after the war he served in a senior management role in the Colt Firearms company and later a U.S. Commissioner- General for the Paris Exposition of 1888. [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Old Book Shop of Bordentown (ABAA, ILAB)]
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         The Book of Perfumes.

      London: Chapman and Hall,, 1865. With above 250 illustrations by Bourdelin, Thomas, etc. Quarto. Original green pebble grain cloth over bevelled boards, gilt decoration to spine, gilt titles, Rimmel's armorial crest and panelling to covers, white silk moiré endpapers, decoratively gilt-gauffered edges. Text printed within floral frame on scented pink paper. Frontispiece and 12 wood-engraved plates, 1 in colour, and numerous illustrations in the text. Slight wear to extremities, occasional light foxing; an excellent copy. First edition of this historical survey of perfumes and cosmetics by the perfumer Eugène Rimmel, printed on scented rose-tinted paper, "elegantly bound and deliciously perfumed" (The Chemical News and Journal of Industrial Science, 1865, p. 250). This work includes a short summary of the methods of extracting aromas from plants, flowers, and animal products, as well as the principal ingredients in the manufacture of perfume. Rimmel known for his innovation in the field, creating the first "factory-made, non-toxic mascara" and inventing "the 'perfume vaporiser', which he exhibited at the 1862 International Exhibition in South Kensington: a piece of apparatus for diffusing the fragrance of flowers and purifying the atmosphere, it was used on Queen Victoria's yacht as well as at public banquets and in ballrooms, theatres, and sickrooms" (ODNB). "Agreeing with Rousseau that the sense of smell is the sense of imagination, Rimmell claimed that pleasant perfumes exercise a cheering influence on the mind, and refresh the memory, recalling scenes from past life" (ibid.). A work that "not only furnishes food for the mind, but gratifies the eyes and olfactory senses by its beauty and fragrance. Seldom have sense and scents been so happily blended" (The Sporting Review, 1865, p. 471).

      [Bookseller: Peter Harrington]
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         The Cutter Yacht "Volante" Winning the Royal Thames Yacht Club First Ocean Match at Harwich June 4th 1864.

      London 1865 - Original hand-coloured lithograph of this magnificent yacht in full sail. Small patch of sun streaking, otherwise in excellent condition. Dimensions: 430 by 640mm. (17 by 25 inches).

      [Bookseller: Shapero Rare Books]
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         Deutschland. Nebst theilen der Angrenzenden Länder bis Strassburg, Luxemburg, Kopenhagen, Krakau, Lemberg, Ofen-Pesth, Pola, Fiume. Zweiter Theil: Mittel und Nord Deutschland.

      Karl Baedeker Leipzig 1865 - Twelfth edition, viii, 288pp, 28 maps and plans, heavy pencilling on preliminary pages, restored preserving most of the publisher's red cloth gilt, good firm copy. This series was published from 1851-1887 and town plans include Danzig, Berlin and Dresden. Endpapers dated "Juli 1865". Hinrichsen D103 [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Shapero Rare Books]
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         Il Governo rappresentativo.

      Turin: Tipografia della Rivista dei Comuni Italiani,, 1865. Traduzione fatta sull'ultima edizione Inglese da F. P. Fenili. First edition in Italian of Mill's Considerations on Representative Government. 'In his major work on political institutions, Considerations on Representative Government, the decline of individuality and the growing power of mass opinions are major reasons for Mill's advocacy of a number of reforms to protect minorities and to ensure that the influence exerted by educated minds on government is greater than that to which their numerical strength entitles them. But it is a wide-ranging book, and its interest lies as much in the discussion of general principles as in the particular recommendations regarding the ballot, proportional representation, and plural voting, not to mention the treatment of local government, federalism, and nationality' (IESS).

      [Bookseller: Peter Harrington]
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         Pitture murali a fresco e suppellettili etrusche in bronzo e in terra cotta scoperte in una necropoli presso Orvieto nel 1863 da Domenico Golini. Illustrazione congiunta a XVIII tavole in rame pubblicata per commissione e a spese del R. Ministerio della publica istruzione d'Italia.

      Florence, Mariano Cellini 1865 - un vol. in-4 de texte ; un vol. in-folio oblong d'atlas, 206 pp. [volume de texte] ; [2] ff. n. ch. (titre et table des planches), avec 18 planches gravées par B. Bartoccini et montées sur onglets [volume d'atlas], demi-veau blond, dos à nerfs orné de filets et lions dorés, pièces de titre bouteille, tranches mouchetées (J. Weber). Bon exemplaire. Très rare complet de l'atlas. Le Pérugin Gian Carlo Conestàbile della Staffa (1824-1877) fut l'un des étruscologues italiens les plus en vue, disciple de Vermiglioli et son successeur dans la chaire d'archéologie de l'Université de Pérouse. C'est à lui que remonte la découverte de la célèbre tombe des Volumni, mais dans cet ouvrage il se penche sur le matériel des Tombes Golini (ou à l'origine "tomba delle due bighe" et "tomba dei Velii"), mises au jour en 1863, datées de la seconde moitié du IVe siècle avant notre ère et entièrement ornées de peintures à fresques.

      [Bookseller: Librairie Historique F. Teissèdre]
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         THE AMERICAN ANNUAL CYCLOPAEDIA AND REGISTER OF IMPORTANT EVENTS 1861-1866 (6 VOLUMES)

      New York: D. Appleton & Company, 1865. Half Leather. Very Good binding. The first six years of this Cyclopaedia, covering the entirety of the Civil War and, of course, many other events. Handsomely bound in tan half-calf over marbled boards with raised bands, decorations in gold, and morocco labels. The New York Times reviewed the Cyclopaedia in 1864, noting that "whatever the occurence sought for--it at all likely to interest futurity, or have any bearing upon the great social and political interests that govern--[Appleton's Annual Cyclopaedia] will be found to furnish an account of it, under the year in which it happened, sufficiently full and minute for all general purposes" [New York Times, August 15, 1864]. A handsome set. Very Good binding.

      [Bookseller: Black Swan Books, Inc.]
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         French Military Marching Band Giberne with French Music Sheets

      Germany, France, circa 1865-1870. Nineteenth century musician's leather pouch (French giberne) containing an albumen cabinet card photograph of the younger Gebrüder Müller (Müller Brothers) string quartet, and some printed music sheets. This is an eclectic mini archive of comprising the following items: One original albumen cabinet card photograph of the younger Gebrüder Müller (Müller Brothers) string quartet, taken by photographer F. Lanitzky in Berlin. Photographer's name and address printed in in gilt to front. Card measures approximately 10,5 x 17,5 cm. Photograph measures approximately 10 x 13,5 cm. Very rare. The group formed in 1855 and performed until 1873. The brothers were Karl Müller-Berghaus (1829- 1907) on the 1st violin, also a conductor and composer; Hugo Müller (1832-1886) on the 2nd violin; Bernhard Müller (1825-1895) on the viola; and Wilhelm Müller (1834-1897) on the cello. The four musicians of the younger Müller Brothers were all sons of Karl Friedrich Müller, who was a member of the senior quartet of the same name, which was active from. Their father was first violin in the senior quartet and was also concertmaster to the Duke of Brunswick, Ägidius Christoph Müller (1765-1841) for whom they performed under an agreement of strict exclusivity until 1830 before performing publicly. Eight printed music sheets for works of French composers, each sheet providing the notes for a specific instrument, including the clarinet, the bugle, and the tenor saxophone. Some of the musical pieces are for "Souvenir d'Haydn" by J. B. Maillochaud, "Le Val Joyeux" by J. Egal, and "Marche Francaise, Le Pere La Victoire" by Louis Ganne." Six music sheets are single leafs printed recto only; two are mounted recto and verso to a cardstock. These musical documents measure approximately 17 x 12 cm, with one being larger. One original French giberne (a leather shoulder bag used in the French military) made prior to the Great War. This case, with its pouch adorned with fine brass motifs of musical instruments, was issued to an Officer of the French military marching band. Made of black leather, with adjustable shoulder strap, brass embellishments, a wrap-around leather closure at the bottom, it was cleverly designed for durability with wooden reinforcement to the interior. Gold ornamentation on a giberne was reserved for officers, while silver was used for the sub-officers. The bag measures approximately 22 x 15 x 4,5 cm.

      [Bookseller: Voyager Press Rare Books & Manuscripts]
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         La Mode Illustree : Journal de la Famille 1865

      Paris: A la Librairie de Firmin Didot Freres, Fils et Cie. 1865. Complete year for 1865. 52 weekly issues bound in one. Quarter maroon morocco over red boards. Gilt lettering to spine. Small gilt owner's name to front board. Marbled endpapers. Board edges very rubbed and boards marked. With 52 full-page hand-coloured plates. All plates complete. Numerous b&w illustrations throughout. A few sections loose. Lower half of first page of issue of 12th February excised. Hinges split but binding firm. Text in French language. . Very Good. 1/4 Morocco. 1865. Folio.

      [Bookseller: Fosters' Bookshop]
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         Miss Mackenzie

      London: Chapman and Hall, 1865. First Edition, with half-titles. vi, 312 ; vi, 313 pp. 2 vols. 8vo. Bound in three quarters blue morocco and matching clloth sides, t.e.g. Bookplate of Joseph Spencer Graydon. Spines slightly sunned, else fine. First Edition, with half-titles. vi, 312 ; vi, 313 pp. 2 vols. 8vo. Sadleir 20

      [Bookseller: James Cummins Bookseller]
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         Documents attesting to the service of the Maryland slave, Algy Stanley, in the 7th United States Colored Infantry

      Maryland and Virginia, 1865. Very good. This document group include Private Stanley's discharge from Company F, 7th Regiment, U. S. Colored Troops Volunteers, a power of attorney with which Stanley appointed a lawyer to act on his behalf to secure his enlistment and discharge bounties, and the receipt for the payment of those bounties. One of the documets is franked with a 2-cent orange Internal Revene stamp (Scot #R15), and another is franked with a pair of 25-cent orange Power of Attorney revenue stamps (Scott #R48). The documents are in good shape; worn at the edges. The upper left hand corner of all three have been glued together. Although Maryland was a slave state, it never seceeded from the Union, so its slaves were not freed with the Emancipation Proclamation. The could instead, however, earn their freedom by enlisting in the Army with or without their masters consent. In September of 1863, the War Department authorized Colonel William Birney to raise an an infantry regiment, the 7th Regiment of United States Colored Troops, from the slaves an free blacks of Maryland. Men who enlisted were to receive a bounty of $50 for signing up, and if they completed their tour sucessfully, they were to receive an additional discharge bonus of $50. To make the loss of a slave more palatable, slave owner's who could prove their ownership of an enlistee were also entitle to a $100 bounty. Stanley was the property of Thomas J. Lecompte when he enlisted on 27 September 1863. Initially the regiment was sent to Florida and South Carolina where its daily routine of garrison, guard, and labor duties was occassional interupted with a skirmish or two. in Florida and South Carolina. However in August of 1864, the 7th moved into central Virginia and served in the seige operations against Petersburg and Richmond. Stanley was wounded on August 25th during this campaign and subsequently hospitalized at Fortress Monroe where he mostly remained until discharged in 1865. In addition to the the three original documents in the grouping, I've included photostat excerpts from Stanley's official Army record as well as Lecompte's Evidence of Title and ownership statement documenting that Stanley was his property at the time of enlistement. Colored Troops discharges are relatively uncommon, however they turn up regulary at auction. Almost all, however are for African-Americans who were free men before the war began or who were freed as the result of the Emancipation Proclamation. Documents for actual slaves who enlisted from the slave states that remained in the Union (Maryland, Kentucky, and Missouri) are very scarce. As of 2017, there are none for sale in the trade and no auction records at OCLC or the Rare Book Hub. Although there are no similar institutional records per OCLC, OCLC does identify "one certificate . . . freeing a slave and his family as a reward for his service in the Confederate army.," which is located at the New York Historical Society.

      [Bookseller: Read 'Em Again Books, ABAA]
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         Portal of Dolmabahce Palace, Istanbul.

      c. 1865 - Collection of three albumen prints. Credit, title and number in negative, pasted on original thin card. Dimensions: from 220 x 27 cm to 6.5 x 34.5 cm.

      [Bookseller: Shapero Rare Books]
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         Our Mutual Friend

      Chapman and Hall, London 1865 - 320 & 309 PAGES. 22.5 X 15 CM. 40 engraved plates, illustrated by Marcus Stone. The title to the book was selected four years before the issue, but Dickens' effort to keep "All The Year Round" afloat, and his illnesses compelled him to write at a diminished speed. It became clear that Dickens was moving gradually downward. The astonishing fact remained that he did so well with some of the characterizations." [see: ECKEL p.94]. HATTON & CLEAVER pp. 345-370. Bound by Baynton, raised bands, spine panels richly gilt in floral motifs, triple gilt cover fillets, inner dentelles, marbled endpapers, front cover rehinged. Full brown morocco, three dark brown gilt lettered spine labels. Near fine in near fine custom beige cloth slipcase. 2 Vols. in one [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Royoung Bookseller, Inc. ABAA]
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         Chronica da Companhia de Jesu do Estado do Brasil e do que obraram seus filhos n'esta parte do Novo Mundo. Em que se trata da entrada da Companhia de Jesu nas partes do Brasil, dos fundamentos que n'ellas lançaram e continuaram seus religiosos, e algumas noticias antecedentes, curiosas e necessarias das cousas d'aquelle Estado . Segunda Edição [sic] Correcta e augmentada.

      Lisbon, Em Casa do Editor A.J. Fernandes Lopes, 1865. - 2 volumes. 8°, uniform modern half calf over marbled boards, smooth spines with two maroon lettering pieces (author on first, title and volume on second). Scattered light foxing. Uncut and unopened. Overall in very good to fine condition. clvi, 200 pp.; 339 pp., (2 ll.). *** Third edition of this "fundamental book concerning the history of Brazil" (Borba de Moraes), covering the years 1549 to 1570. This edition was published by Innocêncio da Silva because the first edition (Lisbon, 1663) was extremely rare and virtually unobtainable, and because he considered the Chronica to be one of the most notable and esteemed works of its genre. Innocêncio's edition includes the "Poema em louvor da Virgem" by Anchieta (which had also appeared in the first edition), an appendix with seven letters by Nobrega that are reproduced from the Revista do Instituto Historico e Geografico Brasileiro, and a 20-page index. A second edition of the Chronica, edited by Joaquim Caetano Fernandes Pinheiro and published in Rio de Janeiro, 1864, did not include Anchieta's poem.Vasconcellos (1597-1671), a native of Porto, grew up in Brazil and entered the Jesuit order at Bahia in 1616. He accompanied Antonio Vieira to Lisbon in 1641 and served as Jesuit Provincial in Brazil, which gave him access to a great deal of primary material. He died in Rio de Janeiro.*** Borba de Moraes (1983) II, 890. Innocêncio XIX, 234. Berger, Bibliografia do Rio de Janeiro (1980) p. 451. Leite IX, 176. Rodrigues 2459. Welsh 3721. Porbase locates copies at the Biblioteca Nacional de Portugal (seven copies), Biblioteca João Paulo II-Universidade Católica Portuguesa (five copies), and Arquivo Nacional Torre do Tombo (one copy). Copac locates a copy each at Oxford University, King's College London, Cambridge University and Liverpool University. [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Richard C. Ramer Old and Rare Books]
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         Eigenh. Brief m. Unterschrift („J. Stefan").

      Wien, 25. I. 1865. - [An den österr. Chemiker u. Mineralogen Anton Schrötter von Kristelli (1802-1875)]. - „Josef Stefan studierte seit 1853 in Wien und habilitierte sich dort 1858 für mathematische Physik. 1859 übernahm er zunächst eine Lehrerstelle an einer Oberrealschule in Wien. 1863 wurde er Professor der Physik an der Universität Wien und dem erkrankten Direktor des Physikalischen Instituts Andreas von Ettingshausen als Vizedirektor zur Seite gestellt, sowie 1866 Nachfolger und Direktor des physikalischen Instituts. Von 1875 bis 1885 war er Sekretär der mathematisch-naturwissenschaftlichen Klasse der Akademie der Wissenschaften in Wien, 1883 Präsident der internationalen wissenschaftlichen Kommission der elektrischen Ausstellung und 1885 Präsident der internationalen Stimmtonkonferenz, die den Normalton ‚a‘ mit 435 Hertz festlegte. 1876/77 war er Rektor der Universität Wien. Er beschäftigte sich mit der Ausbreitung des Schalls, der Polarisation, Interferenz und Doppelbrechung des Lichts, der Diffusion und Wärmeleitung von Gasen, der Abhängigkeit der Wärmestrahlung von der Temperatur sowie mit elektrodynamischen Erscheinungen und der Induktion. Die berühmteste Leistung Stefans ist die Aufstellung des nach ihm und Boltzmann benannten Strahlungsgesetzes, des Stefan-Boltzmann-Gesetzes, das den Zusammenhang zwischen der ausgestrahlten Energie und der Temperatur eines rein thermisch strahlenden Körpers beschreibt. Er fand bei Prüfung aller vorliegenden Strahlungsmessungen hocherhitzter Körper, dass die ausgestrahlte Energiemenge der 4. Potenz der absoluten Temperatur des Strahlers proportional ist. Bald darauf konnte sein ältester Student Ludwig Boltzmann eine theoretische Begründung dieses empirisch gefundenen Gesetzes geben. Nach beiden benannt ist auch die Stefan-Boltzmann-Konstante. Stefan hat als erster damit die Temperatur der Sonne ermittelt. Er erhielt als erster im Jahr 1865 den Lieben-Preis" (Wikipedia). --- Der in Olmütz geborene Anton Schrötter, Sohn eines Apothekers, studierte ab 1822 zunächst auf Wunsch seines Vaters in Wien Medizin, wechselte dann aber unter dem Einfluss von Friedrich Mohs zu den naturwissenschaftlichen Fächern, speziell der Mineralogie. 1827 erhielt er eine Assistentenstelle für Physik und Mathematik an der Universität Wien. 1830 wurde er Professor für Physik und Chemie am Technischen Institut Joanneum in Graz. Während eines halbjährigen Urlaubs im Jahre 1838 besuchte er chemische Institute in Göttingen, Heidelberg, Frankfurt und Paris. In Gießen machte er sich bei Justus von Liebig mit der organischen Elementaranalyse vertraut. Ab 1843 arbeitete er als Professor für technische Chemie am Polytechnischen Institut der Universität Wien und übernahm dort 1845 die Professur für allgemeine Chemie. Schrötter war neben Baumgartner, Ettingshausen und Haidinger einer der Begründer der Kaiserlichen Akademie der Wissenschaften in Wien und wurde 1850 ihr Generalsekretär. Die Deutsche Akademie der Naturforscher Leopoldina wählte Schrötter 1856 zu ihrem Mitglied. Ab 1868 leitete er das österreichische Hauptmünzamt und wurde gleichzeitig zum Ministerialrat ernannt. Er wurde 1874 in den Ruhestand versetzt und eröffnete in seiner Wohnung ein Privatlaboratorium, in dem er Studien über Edelmetalle betrieb. 1875 starb er in Wien. Schrötter hat in seinem Leben ca. 60 wissenschaftliche Publikationen verfasst. Ab 1845 beschäftigte Schrötter sich intensiv mit Phosphor. 1848 gelang ihm der Nachweis der schon von Berzelius geäußerten Vermutung, dass roter Phosphor eine allotrope Modifikation des weißen Phosphors, nicht aber eine Phosphorverbindung ist. Schrötter wandelte weißen Phosphor durch Erhitzen in roten um, den man zeitweise Schrötterschen Phosphor nannte. Sein Verfahren zur Darstellung desselben revolutionierte die Streichholzindustrie, wo roter Phosphor schon bald als Bestandteil der Reibflächen genutzt wurde. Er war ein Organisator in Industrie und Wissenschaft sowie Berater bei den Vorbereitungen zur Novara-Expedition und zur Öste [Attributes: Signed Copy]

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Wolfgang Friebes]
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         Folge von 12 erotischen Radierungen [= alles] zu "Le diable au corps".

      [Um 1865]. - 10 x 6,7 cm (Grösse der Radierungen). 12 feine Blätter mit Orig.-Radierungen, gedruckt im grossen Format auf China (Blattgrösse 23,5 x 18 cm). Mod. Pappmappe. Diese eindeutig erotische Folge schuf Rops für die Poulet-Malassis Ausgabe von "Le Diable au corps" 1865. Offenbar wurde diese Folge von Radierungen aber nicht zusammen mit dieser Ausgabe verkauft, sondern konnte nur separat dazu erworden werden. Der Verleger Vital Puissant brachte 1872 eine weitere Ausgabe von Nerciats "Le Diable au corps" heraus. Die komplette Folge gehört zu den rarsten Werken von Rops. Hier im grossen Format auf China. Ränder der Tafeln mit Läsuren. Teils blass braunfleckig. Rouir, Rops, Catalogue raisonné, T. 3, p. 698. Dutel A274 ("Il existe qqs. ex. sur Chine"). Pia 318. Vgl. Simonson, Rops 1990, 25. Galitzin 496 "Edition très rare"). Nicht bei Oberlé, Poulet-Malassis. ------------- English description available on request. Traduction française sur demande.

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Ars Amandi]
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         La Divina Commedia

      FRANCESCO PAGNONI, 1865. ITALIANO 6,5 La Commedia di Dante Allighieri con ragionamenti e note di Niccolo Tommaséo è una ristampa dell' opera, in tre volumi rilegati in pelle con titoli ai dorsi, tagli decorati con motivi floreali a colori, e riccamente illustrata con stampe, protette da velina, con ritratto di Dante Alighieri eseguito sopra Giotto, Nello Fiorentino e Pietro Lombardo dal distinto Faruffini Federico; presenti segni del tempo e di usura soprattutto nelle copertine consumate ai margini e molto consumate ai dorsi, fioritura sparsa e veline molto imbrunite, il testo è ben leggibile USATO

      [Bookseller: Biblioteca di Babele]
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         La Russie, historique, monumentale et pittoresque; 2 Volumes

      Paris: Librarie Nationale Illustree, 1865. Hardbound. VG-, some significant foxing spots to random pages. 3/4 red cloth with brown marbled paper-covered board covers, printed cloth spines. Vol 1: 392, vii pp list of engravings. Vol. 2: 376 pp., vii list of engravings. A very tight, firm set with hundreds of bw line and other engravings. Text is entirely in French. A later edition of this title, but no bibliographic information can be found relating to the year of publication from normal sources like Worldcat (which relate an 1862 and 1885 edition). This set bears a gift inscription to Col. H. A. du Pont De Nemours, who was a Senator from Delaware and resided at Winterthur, now a famous museum. The inscription was written by "Fte. de Pelleport" who, in actuality, is the author of these two volumes, Piotre Artamof. The Fite de Pelleport and Du Pont families had a long alliance. The inscription, written in French on the ffep of Vol. 1, and dated 1906, reads (in translation), "To Colonel H.A. du Pont de Nemours. In hommage to you from the author in remembrance of the alliance between our two families." Chambr'ier (?), 3 Sept. 1906.

      [Bookseller: Mullen Books, Inc. ABAA / ILAB ]
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         3 eigenh. Briefe m. Unterschrift.

      Purkersdorf u.a., 1865-71. - Die Trauzeugin und Freundin von Königin Victoria heiratete 1845 den Diplomaten Baron John Bloomfield, der 1861 britischer Botschafter in Österreich wurde und mit dem sie von 1861-1871 in Purkersdorf bei Wien lebte. - Lady Bloomfield veröffentlichte u.a. das zweibändige Werk „Reminiscences of Court and Diplomatic Life" (London, 1883), in dem sie ihr Leben als Hofdame und Frau eines hochrangigen Diplomaten schildert. - Der Empfänger der auf Französisch abgefassten Briefe ist Jacques (Jacob) Mislin (1807-1878). Der aus ärmlichen Verhältnissen stammende Mislin konnte dank seines Onkels an der berühmten Lehranstalt von Porrentruy im Schweizer Kanton Bern studieren, wo er nicht viel später auch selbst unterrichten sollte. Der 1830 zum Priester geweihte kath. Theologe wurde 1836 auf Vermittlung des Grafen von Bombelle an den Wiener Hof berufen, wo er einer der Lehrer der Söhne von Erzherzog Franz Karl und Erzherzogin Sophie wurde und damit sowohl den zukünftigen Kaiser Franz Joseph wie auch Erzherzog Ferdinand Maximilian (später Kaiser Max von Mexiko) unterrichtete (u.a. auch in Erdkunde). Vor der Revolution von 1848 unternahm Mislin eine Pilgerreise von Wien über Budapest und Konstantinopel nach Jersusalem. Der danach erschienene Reisebericht wurde in mehrere Sprachen übersetzt und mehrfach nachgedruckt. In den folgenden Jahren leitete er die Bibliothek am Hof der Herzogin von Parma, Erzherzogin Marie Louise, wurde zum Abt von St. Maria von Deg (Ungarn), geheimer Kämmerer u. Hausprälat Papst Pius' XI., Apostolischer Pronotar, Kanoniker der Kathedrale von Großwardein, Träger zahlr. Orden (u.a. von Spanien, Parma u. des Ritterordens vom Heiligen Grab zu Jerusalem) sowie Mitglied zahlr. Akademien. Der Verfasser zahlr. Publikationen und Vertraute des belgischen Königs und des Grafen von Chambord blieb nach der Rückkehr von seiner Pilgerreise in Wien, wo er weiterhin in persönlichem Kontakt mit dem Kaiserhaus stand. - In einem numerierten, von Mislin eigenh. beschrifteten Papierumschlag. - Sprache: Französisch Gewicht in Gramm: 500 Zus. 6 S. auf Briefpapier mit dem blindgepr. gekrönten Monogramm, Kl.-8°. [Attributes: Signed Copy]

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Wolfgang Friebes]
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        Gesamtansicht ('Osnabrück').

      - gouachierte u. eiweißgehöhte Lithographie v. Gustav Frank b. H. Arnold in Leipzig, um 1865, 33,5 x 60,5 Gustav Frank (1819 Stralsund - 1886 Dessau) war Landschaftsmaler, Zeichner u. Lithograph. - Er lebte in Dessau. Von ihm sind über 90 lithographierte großformatige Ansichten bekannt die er zwischen 1852-1880 fertigte. - Mitte der 60er Jahre erfolgte eine Zusammenarbeit mit dem aus Dessau stammenden Zeichner u. Lithographen Carl Frühsorge (1840 - 1906).

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Norbert Haas]
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More rare books found from 1865


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