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Displayed below are some selected recent viaLibri matches for books published in 1863

        Wanderings in West Africa from Liverpool to Fernando Po. By a F.R.G.S.

      London: Tinsley Brothers, 1863. London:: Tinsley Brothers, 1863.. 2 volumes. Small 8vo. viii, [2], 303, [1]; [vi], 295, [1] pp. Half-titles, folding map of

      [Bookseller: Jeff Weber Rare Books ]
 1.   Check availability:     ABAA     Link/Print  


        The Woman In White

      RARE. Used. Very Good Condition.By Wilkie Collins. Harper & Brothers First American Edition, Copyright 1860, 1863 Printing Thus. Blue blindstamped boards. 260 Pages plus adverts. A nice copy. Illustrated by John Mc Lenan.

      [Bookseller: Mary Riversong]
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        A HISTORY OF BRITISH BIRDS Complete in Six Volumes

      Groombridge and Sons, 1863 - 1864. 1st edn. 6 vols. Tall 8vo. Original blind stamped gilt decorated green cloth (some light wear at edges of spines, otherwise a bright VG set) Pp. iv + 364 [&] iv +360 [&] iv + 390 [&] iv + 330 [&] iv + 315 [&] iv +290, illus throughout with hand-coloured plates with tissue-guards (some light spotting on prelims, no inscriptions).

      [Bookseller: Rothwell & Dunworth Ltd]
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        [Husaren mit Pferden].

      Orig.-Federzeichnung. 14 x 10 cm. (Blattgr.). C. Jahn, Das Werk von J. A. Klein, Mchn. 1863, N64 - Vermutlich eine Vorarbeit für die Radierung mit Aquatinta "Der Husar mit den beiden HandpferdenJohann Adam Klein (Nürnberg 1792-1875 München), Schüler v. Ch. v. Bemmel, Ambr. Gabler, G. Ph. Zwinger, studierte an der Akademie d. bild. Künste in Wien. Zu seinen Freunden zählten Füger, G. Mansfeld, Molitor, Bartsch u. a. Vgl. "Die Zeichnungen und Aquarelle des 19. Jahrhunderts in der Graphischen Sammlung der Staatsgalerie Stuttgart. katalog 1976."

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Burgverlag]
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        Two letters from a female Confederate sympathizer in Pennsylvania to her aunt in New York City

      Greenwood, [Pennsylvania], 1863. Unbound. Very good. Two letters (one with 6-pages and one with 4-pages) measure approximately 4.5" x 6.5". Their envelopes are postmarked at Brookeville, Maryland; one is franked with a 3-cent Washington stamp (Scott #65), and the stamp is missing from the other. The letters and envelopes are in nice shape. Exceptional content from a female Confederate sympathizer regarding the New York City draft riots and General Lee's campaign through Maryland and Pennsylvania that culminated with its defeat at Gettysburg. Some of the content includes: "There are no cars now running to Hood Hills. The Confederates have possession of Frederick [Maryland] and have burned one of the railroad bridges, consequently the cars advance to farther than Ellicotts Mills. . . . I was [on] the last train that came as far as our station, we are not entirely cut off from Balto. . . . The excitement in the city was intense, streets barricaded with Logheads of tobacco, flour barrels, etc. anticipating a cavalry raid. Have not the Confeds behaved as true Southerners in Pennsylvania! The contrast is so great between their conduct and that of the federals on Virginia soil. Gen. Lee is near Leesburg threatening Hooker and 'tis said, determined to take Washington. On Sunday there was an incessant roar of cannon. . . . There must have been a severe battle though the papers spoke of it as mere artillery skirmishing, a true sign the Federals gained no advantage. As we sat upon the portico listening to the dreaded sound, I sadly thought of the many poor fellows lying in agony. . . . We anticipate with foreboding . . . the appearance of either army here. . . . A letter just received from Ester . . . the excitement is intense. Madison St. barricaded up to Aunt Glenn's door. The city being rapidly fortified. . . . We are at a loss to know where is a place of safety. The papers think Lee intends marching on Pittsburgh. . . . Through the papers we have terrible accounts of the scenes enacted in your midst this week. . . . Some of these horrors must have been perpetuated almost before your door but we trust none of you have been in anyway injured. Ma desires me to say that while such excitement prevails in [New York City] you and your family had much better pay us a visit. . . . I do not wonder many poor fellows object to the draft, but tis sad to read of the fiendish delight with which vengeance has been wreaked on many innocent. . . . I hope Mr. Gabriel Disosway will not be molested. I see the rioters have undisputed sway on Staten Island. . . . A wagon train gathering up all the Confederates left in their raid through our country, broken down horses and mules, old wagons, harness, etc. passed us on Wednesday. Halted a while before our gates, old contraband drivers, who in loud tones with terrible oaths expressed their detestation of their former mode of life to our servants, had no respect for the white officers with them and seemed to be on perfect equality. How it made my blood boil! The change of position of the armies will I suppose rid us again from such annoyance. . . . I saw in a Baltimore paper the marriage of Lieut. Clem Disosway to Miss Mary Lyber. . . but think during such a fearful times Miss Mattie's could not have been a joyous wedding. . . ." Of course, the armies did not again change position as after Gettysburg as General Lee's forces never marched north again. No doubt, Miss Rebecca was even more distressed when she later learned that Lieutenant Clem Disosway, had been murdered at Fort Magruder, Virginia by a private (perhaps a draftee) who was serving with him in the First New York Mounted Rifles. An exceptionally scarce pair of letters. As of 2017, no similar correspondence from a female Confederate sympathizer living in the North is recorded in OCLC, the Rare Book Hub, ABPC, or for sale in the trade.

      [Bookseller: Read 'Em Again Books, ABAA]
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        Leatherbound Album of Carte de Visite photographs from c1865

      San Francisco, CA. Very Good+. 0. Hardcover. This is a full morocco leather photographic album with raised and tooled decorations and porcelain beads on the front and rear covers and raised and tooled decorations on the spine. This book also includes two brass clasps with decorations and porcelain beads. The binding, the clasps and the interior hinges on this book are all in Very Good or better condition. It's unusual for the clasps, with their raised decorations to be in such nice clean, intact condition. This is an early version of the "Hinged Back" photographic album patented by Altemus & Co. in 1863. "By 1864 Altemus was touting its special photographic album design. "It having the advantage of laying open perfectly flat..." Altemus had the patent for the "hinged back" design. As described by Altemus--" each leaf is attached to a small rod covered with morocco forming a separate hinge of its own, admitting the book to be opened to its full extent without danger of the slightest injury". " The album contains 42 carte de visite photographs from Sacramento, CA and San Francisco, CA . Some of the photos have notations discreetly in the lower margins. Several of the cards have been notated on the reverse - two are of particular interest : Joseph Levison and Mrs. J. Levison. There is a Joseph Levison naturalized 1866 in Northern California and this name also appears in regards to CA historical Landmark 654 : the first Jewish Synagogue owned by a congregation on the Pacific Coast. Joseph Levison was one of the officers of B'nai Israel who purchased the edifice. Both husband and wife were recorded in California's social register in San Francisco from the 1870s through the 1830s. .

      [Bookseller: S. Howlett-West Books (member of ABAA & ]
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        The Scottish Freemasons` magazine, for the year 1863 (bis 1865)

      Edinburgh, Finlay 1863 - 1865.. Jgg. 1 - 3 in 1 Band. 2 Bll., 214 S.; IV, 220 S.; 2 Bll., 216 S. Grüner HLdr. d. Zt. 28 x 22 cm. Watkins/Mórris, International Masonic periodicals 291. - Gelenke tls. etwas angerissen, insgesamt aber sehr gutes Exemplar! - Aus der Charlesworth Masonic Library.

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Turszynski]
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        Die Bauhütte. Zeitung für Freimaurer.

      Leipzig, Findel 1863 - 1883.. Konvolut von 7 Jahrgängen. Dekorative grüne HLdr.-Bde. d. Zt., mit Rückenschild und goldgepr. Freimaurersymbolen am Rücken. 32 x 24,5 cm. Vorhanden: Jgg. 1863, 1864, 1874, 1878, 1879, 1882 und 1883. - Unbeschnitten. - Aus der Charlesworth Masonic Library.

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Turszynski]
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        Report on the Joint Committee on the Conduct of the War. [with] Report of the Joint Committee on the Conduct of the War, Second Session [Gideon Welles' Set in Custom Binding, Eight Volumes]

      1863 - Washington, 1863 - 1865. 8vo, half morocco over marbled paper, 756 + 510 + 659 + 524 + 249 + 401 + 269 + 179 pp. Consists of the following series:Report on the Joint Committee on the Conduct of the War. In Three Parts; Report of the Joint Committee on the Conduct of the War, Second Session, Thirty Eighth Congress. This is Gideon Welles' set, custom bound with his name on heels of spines. A generally quite well preserved set, in very good condition with light shelfwear and excellent contents. Vol. V with a chip to head of spine, though the missing piece is preserved. Material covered in the reports includes the Army of the Potomac, Bull Run, Ball's Bluff, Department of the West, Battle of Petersburg, Red River Expedition, Fort Fisher Expedition, Heavy Ordnance, Sherman-Johnson, Massacre of the Cheyenne Indians, Reports of Generals Sherman and Thomas, etc. Please contact us for additional pictures or information. [Attributes: First Edition]

      [Bookseller: Auger Down Books, ABAA/ILAB]
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        Husaren mit Pferden].

      - Orig.-Federzeichnung. 14 x 10 cm. (Blattgr.). C. Jahn, Das Werk von J. A. Klein, Mchn. 1863, N64 - Vermutlich eine Vorarbeit für die Radierung mit Aquatinta "Der Husar mit den beiden HandpferdenJohann Adam Klein (Nürnberg 1792-1875 München), Schüler v. Ch. v. Bemmel, Ambr. Gabler, G. Ph. Zwinger, studierte an der Akademie d. bild. Künste in Wien. Zu seinen Freunden zählten Füger, G. Mansfeld, Molitor, Bartsch u. a. Vgl. "Die Zeichnungen und Aquarelle des 19. Jahrhunderts in der Graphischen Sammlung der Staatsgalerie Stuttgart. katalog 1976." Gewicht in Gramm: 500

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Burgverlag]
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        Le capitaine Fracasse EDITION ORIGINALE

      Paris: Charpentier, 1863. Fine. Charpentier, Paris 1863, 12x18cm, 2 volumes reliés. - First edition, rare and sought-after (Clouzot), especially in a contemporary binding Strictly contemporary half brown shagreen, spine in five compartments heightened with gilt fillets and double gilt compartments A fine copy in particularly desirable condition. - [FRENCH VERSION FOLLOWS] Edition originale rare et recherchée, selon Clouzot, surtout en reliure d'époque Reliures en demi chagrin brun, dos à quatre nerfs rehaussés de filets dorés, ornés de doubles caissons dorés, reliures strictement de l'époque. Très bel exemplaire dans une condition particulièrement désirable.

      [Bookseller: Librairie Le Feu Follet]
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        "An Fräulein Wolter". Eigenh. Gedichtmanuskript. O. O., 19. II. 1863.

      1863. 1 S. 4to. Widmungsgedicht für die gefeierte Schauspielerin, die seit 1862 dem Wiener Hofburgtheater angehörte: "Dem Dichter Heil! Dem Du die Stimme leihst, | Denn Du verkörperst seine Trauergebilde; | Nicht herrlicher schmückt sie sein eig'ner Geist | Mit Hoheit, Glut, u. jungfräulicher Milde [...]".

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Inlibris]
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        Svenska Jägarförbundets Nya Tidskrift 1863-1917.

      Illustrationer i texten samt planscher. 1863-1875 i samtida nött halvskinnband med marmorerade. 1876-1917 i halvklotband med marmorerade snitt. Banden uniforma i respektive svit med snarlik gulddekor på ryggarna. Ur Gunnar Brusewitz bibliotek med hans exlibris i årg. 1863-74 samt hans namnteckning i årg. 1863. 22 x 14 cm. 55 vol. De tidigare årgångarna innehåller färglitografier av Bröderna von Wright. Från och med årgång 46, 1908, är titeln Svenska jägarförbundets tidskrift. Mer utkom.

      [Bookseller: Antiquaria]
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        Nature-Printed British Ferns.Nature-Printed by Henry Bradbury.

      Bradbury and Evans London. 1863. - 2 volumes Roy8vo (6.5 x 10in.) original red blind-stamped and gilt cloth, broken and defective, some sections loose. 2 engraved and nature-printed titles, 122 Nature-Printed coloured plates of ferns. Marginal foxing to a few plates as usual with this work, couple of plates lightly waterstained, a few plates roughly stitched back into the book - images still good - overall the plates are not nearly as bad as it sounds! Nissen BBI 1401. The works by Bradbury "constitute the crowning achievement of nature printing.it is unlikely that the process.will ever again be put to serious scientific use." (Blunt p.142.) [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Nicholas Goodyer ABA ILAB]
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        Ueber Oeffentliche Schulen und Erziehungsanstalten. Nebst einigen Zusätzen zu den Grundsätzen der Erziehung und des Unterrichts für die Besitzer der ersten und zweyten Ausgabe. Halle, the author, Waisenhaus-Buchhandlung, 1799. 8vo. With engraved vignette on title-page. Contemporary boards.

      Lex. der Pädagogik III, 220; cf. Cat. Van Rijn 16; Kat. Sted. Schoolmuz. Antwerpen, p. 10 (abridged Dutch ed. of 1863). First edition of a German plan of education, with the additions for the second and third editions of Grundsätzen der Erziehung und des Unterrichts bound in at the end and the extra title-page for these additions facing the main title-page. The book proposes an overall plan and program for the organisation of public schools in Prussia and in the whole of Germany; not only for general education in primary schools and for professional education in agrarian, technical, industrial, commercial and art schools, in schools for girls, etc., but also for education in military academies, universities and for special education in orphanages, schools for the blind, deaf-mute children, etc. A classic in its field. In good condition, with the large armorial bookplate of the library of the House of Sachsen-Eisenach.

      [Bookseller: Antiquariaat FORUM BV]
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        ONNA DAIGAKU TAKARA BAKO: GREAT TREASURY OF LEARNING FOR WOMEN. Together with:

      [Edo 1863, Naniwa]. Blue covers, stitched, very good, 117 double page b.w. woodcut plates, complete in one volume, Japanese text, hand printed on Washi paper, 18 x 25.5 cm., together with the English translation of London 1914. SCARCE An historically important work on women and women's rights in Japan from the 17th century. Documenting the life, habits, learning and essentials for female social life norms as based on traditional rules. * Each page consists of some form of important lesson & learn- ing for women and girls. Also, by using the Hyakunin Isshu as an example, the text explains the proper attitude and conduct for the women of contemporary Japan. * Beautifully printed on hand-made Washi paper and woodcut illustrated and printed by hand. With one or two illustrat- ions on each page. Handsome illustrated text renders this a valuable original and grand record of women's classic learning. * The Tale of Genji [ie: Genji Monogatari] is also illustrated and cited as examples of proper feminine conduct. The author was the celebrated Kaibara [1630-1714] who was a respected & famous moralist and philosopher. In this work, he extols the Confucian virtues and precepts as they apply to women together with other admonitions of the Samurai class. Women along with men were expected to follow Bushido [The Way of the Samurai] in their conduct, which prescribed ritual Seppuku [aka Harakiri or self-embowelment] for breaches of socially accepted norms of conduct. * This work was the most popular of all his many books and was for two centuries considered an essential part of any bride's trousseau. * INCLUDED WITH THIS JAPANESE WORK, IS THE BELOW REFERENCE IN ENGLISH: See Takaishi below. This reference is the first and only Western language translation of ONNA DAIGAKU and the first of its kind to be done in English. The London 1914 edition of the English translation of ONNA DAIGAKU, with title page reading: WOMEN AND WISDOM OF JAPAN. This keen insight covers the following chapter headings, now translated into English for the first time: [cover has small stain else clean]: - GIRL'S INSTRUCTION DEMARKATION BETWEEN THE SEXES "SEVEN REASONS FOR DIVORCE" THE WIFE'S MISCELLANEOUS DUTIES TREATMENT OF SERVANTS THE INFIRMITIES OF WOMAN -Appendices: A. THE JAPANESE REVOLUTION B. THE LEGAL CONDITIONS FOR A DIVORCE. * A wonderful example of girl's learning for the 17-18th centuries. Profusely illustrated, nicely done Japanese text. * ABOUT KAIBARA: Kaibara Ekken or Ekiken, also known as Atsunobu, [1630-1714] was a Japanese Neo-Confucianist philosopher and botanist during the Edo Period of the 16th century of Japan. * Ekken was destined to introduce two great innovations towards the Tokugawa shogunate. One of such was the systematic study of nature based on Neo-Confucianism, which was the beginning of the empirical science in Japan. Ekken's second innovation was to translate the abstruse and forbidding philosophy of Confucianism and Neo-Confucianism into the language of the ordinary Japanese. * Ekken's science was confined to Biology and focused on the "natural law". Ekken became as famous in Japan as people such as Charles Darwin when it came to Science. Ekken was known for his manuals of behavior, such as changing his Confucian ethical system based on the teachings of Chu Hsi into an easy "self-help" manuals, such as Precepts for Children and Greater Learning for Women. The textbook of Neo-Confucianism was then known as The Great Learning. Ekken's main goal in life was to make sure that that book was known throughout Japan. This project more than any other accomplishment incorporated Neo-Confucianism into the very fiber of Japanese culture * REFERENCES: * Carmen Blacker: THE JAPANESE ENLIGHTENMENT: A Study of the Writings of Fukuzawa Yukichi pp. 11, 79-84. * Shingoro Takaishi : WOMEN AND WISDOM OF JAPAN. This small but excellent resource offers an English translation of title with commentaries about Kaibara Ekiken. Based on Prof. Basil Hall Chamberlain's English translation. * Basil H. Chamberlain: THINGS JAPANESE. See his translation of this title here. * * .

      [Bookseller: Rare Oriental Book Company, ABAA, ILAB -]
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        [EXTENSIVE ARCHIVE OF LETTERS AND PAPERS OF JOHN FREDERICK PIERSON, PRIMARILY RELATED TO THE MUTINY OF THE 1st NEW YORK VOLUNTEER INFANTRY DURING THE CIVIL WAR]

      [Various places, 1863. Over 145 items, comprised of letters, documents, and later pamphlets. Primarily quarto sheets. Old fold lines, some light wear and soiling scattered throughout. Generally very good. Contained in two binders. The extensive archive of Union colonel John Frederick Pierson, consisting of over 145 items, mostly relating to the arguments and disagreements among the officers of the 1st New York Volunteer Infantry. Pierson served as an officer from when the regiment was mustered in June 1861, serving as colonel until he was shot through the chest at the Battle of Chancellorsville on May 3, 1863. Before that, he quarreled with other regimental officers, which resulted in arrests and courts-martial. Many of these documents deal with the ongoing and disruptive fights between the officers. John Frederick Pierson (1839-1932), the son of a New York steel merchant, was privately educated in New York City. He joined the New York National Guard in 1857 (7th New York Regiment, Co. "K"), but once the Civil War broke out he was attached to the 1st New York Infantry, Co. "H" as a lieutenant. He quickly climbed up the ranks, becoming a captain in May 1861, major in July 1861, lieutenant colonel in September 1861, colonel in October 1862, and breveted a brigadier general on March 13, 1865, as part of the general brevet promotion that occurred that day. He was wounded twice, once at the Battle of Glendale and once more seriously on May 3, 1863 at the Battle of Chancellorsville, where he was shot through the chest or shoulder. The 1st New York mustered out in June, and Pierson joined the New York 37th on his recovery. He was captured at Bristoe Station, Virginia on Oct. 14, 1863 and taken as a prisoner of war to Libby Prison in Richmond until exchanged. After the war he joined his family's business, the Ramapo Iron Works. The 1st New York mustered into the Army of the Potomac for two years in May 1861, the first U.S. regiment to enroll for that length of time. They were first assigned to Fort Monroe, Virginia, then ordered to Big Bethel. From there they went to Newport News. The regiment was active in several battles, including Big Bethel, Glendale, Second Bull Run, and Chancellorsville. Many of the earliest documents in this archive regard the New York National Guard (7th New York Regiment, Co. "K"), to which Pierson belonged. One such document is an 1861 roll of the members of the 7th New York, Co. "K," which includes Pierson, and a list of Co. "K" members killed and wounded during the Civil War. After Pierson joined the New York 1st Infantry, Co. "H" on June 27, 1861, he became involved in "the Recruiting business" for the regiment, even using family members, such as his brother Charley, to help. Several letters are included from J. Frederick to Charley, one pleading: "You must help me....Can I get any men there?" Documents from this period also include invoices of purchases for military equipment, including military weapons; promotions; and more. Also included are various general orders listing the promotions of Pierson; lists of "the Officers Mess of Company H" (June 14, 1861, four days after participating in the Battle of Big Bethel); a military appointment of Pierson to captain in the 1st New York signed by New York governor Edwin D. Morgan (May 27, 1861); a military appointment of Pierson to major signed by Gov. Morgan (July 29, 1861), with a document signed by Adj. Gen. J. Meredith Reed, Jr. Trouble began to surface for the 1st New York in early 1862 as the regiment joined the Peninsula Campaign in southeastern Virginia. In a letter from Col. Garrett Dyckman at Newport News, Virginia, Pierson finds out that many of the men under Dyckman were hostile to them: "I occasionally receive a hint that the clique business is still flourishing in the Regt but it does not show itself to me. It appears as if Cl. Co. Bj. & Sil. cannot come to an understanding in what manner they shall remove those above them or who shall fill the vacancies if removed therefore each appears to work on his own hook. The officers in the Regt who are against both of us are (I may as well write their names) Clancy, Coles, Yeamans (Silva against me), Bjorg, (Shaw against you) Hamilton (against you) Campbell (against me) Melville (against me) Hyde, & Carpenter, those not mentioned are either friends, or men of well balanced minds, who would think cliquing too contemptible a business for them to enter into." Earlier in January 1862, Berry sent a letter to Major Henry W. Breevort (a fair copy is included) suggesting the regiment was dysfunctional and thus should be disbanded: "I have to say that the three field officers of this Regt. are very unfriendly to each other, and since its connection with the Brigade, they have done all they could to render each others places uncomfortable. This fight has of course descended to the line Officers sending one way and many another, and so to the Rank and file, until it came to pass that there was no discipline in the Regiment. I do not mean to say that there are no good Officers, for there are quite a number of good and deserving ones but from the quarrel existing between the field Officers, and from the trouble occasioned by some disorderly officers of Line the Regiment has suffered extremely....Lieut. Col. Pierson is in arrest. Major Jas. Clancy is in arrest also. [Berry then lists the names of eight other officers who have been arrested in connection with the crippling quarrel.] I would recommend that the recommendations of General Birney, General of Division, to break up the Regt. and place the members with the 37th N.Y.V. be carried out or that the whole lot of the officers now under arrest be got rid of." Matters got worse when Major James T. Clancy was placed under arrest on July 17, 1862. Two other officers were dismissed in a directive from President Lincoln and carried out by Special Orders No. 179 (included here) issued by the War Department on Aug. 2, 1862. Then in a letter to War Secretary Edwin Stanton (a fair copy is included), Pierson reports the strange desertion of Col. Garrett Dyckman when ordered to the front lines: "At Yorktown he left the Regiment, and has not reported since." Several others also deserted. In this letter Pierson asks Stanton to dismiss all of them from the army because they "have proved themselves to be worthless officers, if not cowards" (Aug. 24, 1862). Included in this archive are holograph statements dated Sept. 8 and 10, 1862 from two of the accused, Capt. William Coles and Major James Clancy. In their statements they explained their absences from the regiment (Coles cited "Cholic" and Clancy blamed his "horse being lame from a wound"). According to another document Cole was found guilty of being absent without leave and neglect of duty; his punishment was the suspension of rank and pay for one month, along with a public reprimand in general orders. Clancy, who was removed from his appointment, was reinstated later in September (those documents are also included here). Pierson has endorsed each statement by Cole and Clancy with an endorsement arguing that both had intentionally deserted. In a significant letter dated Sept. 15, 1862 to Brig. Gen. David Birney from Annapolis, Maryland, Pierson explains the unfortunate affair. Two copies of this letter are included, one being Pierson's retained copy. After the military trials of Cole and Clancy, Pierson writes his father on Oct. 10, 1862: "I am making a big fight here now, and go around full of impudence and bowie knives....The men are enthusiastic over my return." Likely, Pierson felt better about his prospects because the day before he received his commission as colonel of the 1st New York (signed by Gov. Morgan and included here). In another letter to his father dated Dec. 27, 1862, Pierson reports on the day that Clancy returned to his position in the regiment: "Upon his arrival, I demanded 'What are you doing here sir?' 'I am here by order of the Secy. Of War.' Permit me to see the order Sir? He gave it to me and I quietly whistled Yankee Doodle and unhesitatingly endorsed it thus 'The position previously occupied by Mr. Clancy was regularly filled before the date of this order, and he cannot therefore be restored....' I handed it to him and said 'You will of course leave this camp Sir.'...Mr Clancy backed out....If he prefers to contest the point he can give me much trouble." On Dec. 29, 1862, Gen. Hiram G. Berry, commander of the division, praised Pierson for improving the regiment: "In justice to your endeavors to make the Regm't under your command one of the best in this Division, I beg leave to say that you may have positive proof of the value set upon these exertions. That, since your promotion to your present position your Regiment has improved beyond my expectations, although I knew of your previous worth as an officer. When the First New York joined my Brigade at Fair Oaks, its discipline was very poor. The habits of many of its Officers were such as to demoralize....I am happy to say that through your exertions many worthless officers have been got rid of." Three fair copies of this letter are included. By then, however, a serious quarrel had broken out between Pierson and Clancy. Letters of accusation between the two are included. Pierson's impudence became obvious to his own commanding officer, Brig. Gen. David B. Birney, who got involved, writing a letter from the 1st Division headquarters on June 13, 1863, which reads in full: "The conduct of Colonel Pierson has been very insubordinate and I am told by Gen'l [Hiram G.] Berry has tended greatly to relax discipline in his Brigade. I am confident his release from arrest is because of...statements made to the Sec'y of War by the influential friends of Col. Pierson. I would urge that no decision be made before Major Clancy and Gen'l Berry both are heard." Pierson himself had been placed under arrest the very next day, in October 1863. To his utter embarrassment and chagrin, he "was taken by the Enemy and subsequently thrown into a Richmond Prison. While the disgraceful fact that I was captured while under arrest at the rear of the Army was published in the Papers. As my conscience Sir, and my memory both acquit me of ever having neglected my duty or committed any Military Offence." Many more letters and documents concerning this affair are included. This archive contains many other letters (many of which are fair copies) and documents signed by numerous Union officers, such as requests for leaves of absence; various directives, many issued by Pierson; general orders; "orders for the government of the Police Guard" (Aug. 10, 1861); invoices, such as one from the Depot of Army Clothing and Equipage (April 10, 1862); a list of members of the "First Regmt. Inf. N.Y.U.S.V." killed and wounded in the Civil War; letters of promotion recommendations; a document certifying that Col. Pierson "has been exchanged as a prisoner of war....He will join his Regiment without delay," signed by E.D. Townsend, Assistant Adj. Gen., Oct. 5, 1862; and more. Several post-Civil War items are also included: THE UNION CLUB (1867) containing the constitution, rules, and list of members and officers of the exclusive New York City social club (Pierson is listed as a member); THE SEVENTH REGIMENT GAZETTE (January 1933), with an obituary of Pierson; THE NEW YORK NATIONAL GUARDSMAN (June 1933); and the fiftieth anniversary edition of THE SEVENTH REGIMENT GAZETTE (August 1933) with an article on Pierson. A considerable archive, worthy of further research.

      [Bookseller: William Reese Company - Americana]
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        THE DOLDENHORN AND WEISSE FRAU, Ascended for the First Time

      Coblenz, Karl Baedeker, 1863.. FIRST EDITION 1863 with BOOK-PLATE OF HERMANN WOOLEY, (see below for details about Wooley). Slim 8vo, approximately 250 x 170 mm, 10 x 6½ inches, 13 plates of which there are 11 colour lithographs, 1 double page, 2 black and white full page woodcuts, 2 woodcuts in the text and a folding colour lithograph map, 82 pages plus contents page, bound in plain dark green cloth, gilt lettering to spine, red speckled edges. Cloth faded, slight wear to head and tail of spine, 6 pages have very small stain to tip of lower corners, some pale offsetting to text from plates, pale age browning and light foxing to endpapers, half-title and title page, contents leaf has small light stain, otherwise a very good copy. See Jill Neate, Mountaineering Literature, revised edition 1986, page 137, R77. Neate makes a mistake in calling for 13 colour plates instead of 13 plates. This finely illustrated book includes accounts of earlier attempts. HERMANN WOOLEY, was a President of the Alpine Club from 1908-11 and made the first ascent with John Norman Collie of Mount Athabasca in the Canadian Rockies. MORE IMAGES ATTACHED TO THIS LISTING, ALL ZOOMABLE. FURTHER IMAGES ON REQUEST. POSTAGE AT COST.

      [Bookseller: Roger Middleton]
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        [Original watercolour sketches of French landscapes]

      [France], no place, no publisher, ca. 1863-1890. 13 oblong sheets (22.3 x 29.2 cm), all with fine watercolour paintings, either full-sized, or smaller, in a drawn rectangular frame. And one drawing on slightly smaller paper, more sketchy, in pencil.l Count Roger de Bouillé (1819-1906) was a French mountaineer (one would say "pyreneeist" rather than alpinist, as he climbed solely in the Pyrenees mountains), but also a draftsman, illustrator, watercolourist and author, under the pseudonym "JAM", of several books on his ascents and explorations. In 1865, he settled in the town of Pau and from there he explored the western Pyrenees. In his works he described not only the itineraries, mountains, and landscapes, but also the local flora, fauna, and history. The present suite, however, consists mostly of drawings made during a voyage to the French-Mediterranean coast (Côte d'Azur), in 1890. One is dated much earlier. Present are: 1. "Valentin / 28 juillet 1863" [waterfall]; 2. "Ruines de l'amphitéatre de Cimie's / Nice (14 septembre 1890)" [ruins]; 3. "Jaorge / 5 aout 1890" [view of a distant mountain village]; 4. "16 sept. 90 St. Sylvestre / Nice" [view of the area]; 5. "Route de Levens / 5 sept. 1890" [mountain road along river]; 6. "Frontiere Italienne" [landscape]; 7. "Campement du 161me au sommet du chateau / Nice 20 sept. 1890" [town view, horizontal, with soldiers]; 8. no caption [mountain view; the artist and his party (?) situated in the fore ground]; 9. no caption [unidentified fortress in mountainous surroundings, a person sitting in front]; 10. no caption [mountain scene, not completed]; 11. "Apres les Arcs 10", "Gonfaron 11", [no caption] "12", "Lion de Terre et Lion de Mer 13" [Four framed views, numbered 10-13]; 12. "Rognac" [view in drawn frame]; 13. "Berre" [view in drawn frame]; 14. [no caption, pencil sketch on slightly smaller paper, probably depicting Roman ruins near Nice]. All rich and lovely views, well-painted. All 14 leaves in a very good condition; no trace of foxing or discolouring. Left side a bit irregular, as the leaves were removed from a sketchbook, the illustrations bright and clean.

      [Bookseller: Antiquariaat Schierenberg]
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        Die krankhaften Geschwülste

      Berlin: Hirschwald, 1863-67. In the Extremely Rare Original WrappersVirchow, Rudolf (1821-1902). Die krankhaften Geschwülste. 3 vols. in 4 [all published]. Erster Band: xii, 543, [1]pp. plus 33-page publisher's catalogue; 1 plate. II. Band, 1. Hälfte: [2], 288pp. II. Band, 2. Hälfte: x, 289-756pp. III. Band, 1. Hälfte: [2], 496pp.; 1 plate. Text illustrations. Berlin: August Hirschwald, 1863-67. 245 x 170 mm. (uncut and partially unopened). Original printed wrappers, minor wear and chipping, spine of last volume partly split; preserved in cloth slipcase with chemises. Minor dampstaining, uncut edges a little frayed, a few signatures loose, pp. 106-7 in Vol. I with some offsetting from laid-in sheet of manuscript notes (see below). Very good set. From the library of Dutch surgeons Jan van der Hoeven (1834-1900) and his son Jan (1863-1941), with their signatures, dated 1863 and 1900 respectively, on the front wrapper of Vol. I; van der Hoeven bookplate in last volume; densely written sheet of manuscript notes in the hand of the first van der Hoeven laid in.First Edition, in the extremely rare original wrappers, of Virchow's highly influential work on morbid tumors-his "most ambitious literary undertaking" (Ackerknecht, Rudolph Virchow). "Tumors were perhaps Virchow's greatest interest, and in 1863 he began publication of what was to be a comprehensive treatise on the subject. It was never completed, for Virchow stopped when he reached the point where carcinoma was to be discussed, probably because of the vigorous attack which Remak and others were making on his conception of the histogenesis of epithelioma. Nevertheless this work remains one of the great source-books on cancer" (Haagensen, An Exhibit of Important Books Illustrating the Evolution of the Knowledge of Cancer, p. 80)."[Virchow's] works in the field of oncology have been of the most far-reaching importance. Although he himself did not deal with cancer in his famous work 'The morbid tumors,' which was left incomplete, we can nevertheless find in it his general opinions of tumors. . . . [H]e designated as homologous tumors the type whose tissue elements are those which form in places that normally contain the same kind of tissue; the heterologous tumors are those which form in a place where the typical tissue elements of the tumors normally do not occur. Thus, 'deviation from the type of the mother tissue' represented to Virchow the characteristic feature of malignant neoplasm. Virchow presented this anatomical and histological characteristic as the principal criterion for the classification of tumors. . . ."On the basis of these views Virchow, for the first time, and in a systematic manner, separated sarcomatous tumors from carcinomas. Sarcomas deviate little, structurally, from the typical structure of the different kinds of connective tissue, and distinguish themselves only by their great 'number of cells' and not by the 'form.' With this theory Virchow sought to eliminate the classification into benign and malignant tumors, which, though rather unscientific, had been commonly used by practitioners until that time" (Wolff, The Science of Cancerous Disease from Earliest Times to the Present, p. 185). Virchow's Die krankhaften Geschwülste, based on a series of lectures, is normally found bound in three volumes; it is extremely rare in the original four parts with their printed wrappers. This copy was once owned by the Jan van der Hoevens, father and son, both of whom practiced as surgeons in Leiden. Garrison-Morton 2617. Lindeboom, Dutch Medical Biography (for the van der Hoevens).

      [Bookseller: Jeremy Norman's Historyofscience.com]
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        Salammbô.

      Paris, Michel Lévy Frères 1863 - ÉDITION ORIGINALE comprenant les fautes : "effraya" page 5 et "les Scissites" page 251. Paris, Michel Lévy Frères - 1863 - 474 pages. (Contrôlé) Reliure demi chagrin brun de l'époque. Dos à nerfs aux titre, auteur et pointillés dorés. Rousseurs uniquement sur les 3 premiers feuillets. Bon état. Format in-8°(22x15). 1ère Edition [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Livres et Collections]
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        A History of the Birds of Europe, not observed in the British Isles. 4 Bände (komplett).

      London, Groombridge and Sons, Paternoster Row, 1859-1863. - Groß-8°. 24,5 cm. IV, 203 Seiten, 60 Blatt, IV, 203 Seiten, 60 Blatt, IV, 247 Seiten, 59 Blatt und XV, 248 (3) Seiten, 59 Blatt. Ockerfarbene Halblederbände der Zeit mit goldgeprägtem Rückentitel. 1. Auflage. Ausgabe. Komplett mit 238 farbigen lithografierten Tafeln (180 Vogel- und 58 Eiertafeln). Im 3. Band ist der aufgeführte "Alpine Serin Finch" nicht vorhanden. Im 4. Band sind die gelisteten "Pallas' Pratincole", "Asiatic Plover", "Red-breasted Dotterel", "Charadrius Longipes" und "Least European Sparrow Owl" nicht vorhanden, dafür sind vom "Levant Sparrow-Hawk" 2 Tafeln (Adulte und Young Male and Female) vorhanden sowie der nicht gelistete "Strix-Pusilla" (Identsch mit dem Exemplar der Smithsonian Library). Band 4 mit dem oft fehlenden Vorwort. Exlibris auf Innendeckel. Einbandecken bestoßen, Namenseintrag auf Schmutzblatt. Gute, innen gute bis sehr gute Exemplare, Tafeln tadellos. [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Lenzen GbR]
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        History of the Birds of Europe, not observed in the British Isles.

      London: Groombridge and Sons. 1860-1863. - 4 Bände. 25,8x16 cm. IV, 206 S.; IV, 203 S., 1 Bl.; IV, 247 S.; VI, 250 S. Mit 180 handkolorierten gestochenen Vogeltafeln und 58 chromolithographierten Eiertafeln. Ziegelrote Originalleinwandbände der Zeit mit Gold- und Blindprägung. Nissen, Vögel, 136. - Erste Ausgabe, erschien in 60 Lieferungen von 1859-1863. - Komplett mit 180 Vogel- und 58 Eiertafeln. - Die Eiertafel zum «Dusky Ixos» sowie ein dazugehöriges Textblatt (doppelt paginiert 203*) ist am Schluss von Band 2 anstatt Band 1 eingebunden. - Im 3. Band ist der gelistete "Alpine Serin Finch" nicht vorhanden, dafür ist der nicht gelistete "P. Graeca, Var." vorhanden (identisch mit dem Exemplar in der Smithsonian Library). Im 4. Band sind die gelisteten "Pallas' Pratincole", "Asiatic Plover", "Red-breasted Dotterel", "Charadrius Longipes" und "Least European Sparrow Owl" nicht vorhanden, dafur sind vom "Levant Sparrow-Hawk" 2 Tafeln (Adulte Male and Female und Young Male and Female) vorhanden sowie der nicht gelistete "Strix-Pusilla" (identsch mit dem Exemplar in der Smithsonian Library). - Ohne das Vorwort, datiert 1863. - Eingebunden in Band 1 ein unpaginiertes Blatt mit einem Text, der in einer 2. Druckversion identisch mit dem 2. Abschnitt auf Seite 6 ist. - Rücken verblasst und bei 2 Bänden mit kleinen Einrissen im Gelenk. Einbände etwas berieben und angestaubt. Textseiten mit schmalen Wasserrand, die meisten Tafeln mit schwachem schmalen Wasserrand, viele mit keinem und wenige mit stärkerem Wasserrand. 1 Bogen lose in Band 4.

      [Bookseller: Daniel Thierstein]
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        Die Preussische Expedition nach China, Japan und Siam in den Jahren 1860, 1861 und 1862.

      F.A. Brockhaus, 1863 - 8vo. 2 vols. xvi, 303, x, 312pp. 2 Frontispieces. 4 plates. 1 color folding map. Half cloth, marbled boards, slightly worn, heavy spotted on frontispeces, each. Cordier 557 [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: The Isseido Booksellers, ABAJ, ILAB]
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        Rosecrans' Campaign with the Fourteenth Army Corps, or the Army of the Cumberland: A Narrative of Personal Observations, with an appendix, consisting of official reports of the Battle of Stone River.

      Moore, wilstach, Keys & Co. 1863 - Association copy. Inscribed by author, William Dennison Bickham to his sister, Mrs Eliza Bickham Lair. First edition. First issue with preface dated March 20, 1863. 476 pages, map ; 19 cm. Bound in modern blue leather. Gilt spine. Fine binding and cover. Edges stained red. Clean, unmarked pages. Marbled end pages. When the Civil War broke out, William spent two years as a war correspondent on the front, sending his dispatches back to the Cincinnati Commercial. He was first assigned to General William Rosecrans? army, where he was a volunteer aide-de-camp with the rank of captain. He also spent several months with General George McClellan?s army, before being transferred back to Rosecrans. He was present at the Battle of Stones River, and Rosecrans? praise for his actions there earned him the rank of major. Howes B-422 [Attributes: First Edition; Signed Copy; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Sequitur Books]
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        [TWO OUTSTANDING EARLY CIVIL WAR DIARIES BELONGING TO UNION ORDERLY SERGEANT FRANK E. NEVINS, COMPANY A, WESTERN SHARPSHOOTERS, 14th MISSOURI VOLUNTEERS]

      Centralia, Mo.; Sturgeon, Mo.; Fort Donelson, Tn.; Schofield Barracks, Mo.; Corinth, Ms.; Camp Davies, Ms.; Danville, Ms, 1863. [50],[88]; [85],[3]pp. First diary disbound, with minor toning. Second diary bound in full calf. Minor wear, some rubbing, short tear to rear cover. Overall good to very good. A compelling pair of Civil War diaries from the early years of the war, kept by Frank E. Nevins, orderly sergeant of the "Western Sharpshooters." Nevins spent late-1861 and early-1862 on the western side of the Mississippi River. Nevins' diaries are replete with detailed descriptions of camp life, troop and officer movements, skirmishes (such as his brief recounting of his unit's involvement in the Battle of Fort Donelson), his musings on life and death, and also contain multi- page accounts of both the Battle of Mount Zion Church and the Battle of Corinth. He also celebrates two birthdays during the time covered in these journals. Nevins served under Colonel John Ward Birge, a St. Louis eye doctor who was appointed by General John C. Fremont to head a specialized unit of marksmen intended to be a western counterpoint to Berdan's Sharpshooters. The Western Sharpshooters were organized just a month before Nevins entered service. The unit left Benton Barracks in St. Louis on Dec. 12, 1861, headed for Centralia to fight bands of Confederate guerillas who were attacking the vital North Missouri Rail Road. We pick up the action in Nevins' first diary just five days later. The first diary opens with an account of Nevins in a snowy, wintery camp at Centralia, Mo. He recounts an incident where his unit was searching for a "secesh" spy. Once they located the spy inside a house, they surrounded the building and "the firing of revolvers was kept up for some time." The group fights patches of Confederate troublemakers for several days, finding themselves about fifteen miles south of "a town called Rennick [Renick] on the N.M.R.R." on Christmas Day, where Nevins' unit enjoys a bright and beautiful day" and "pass the morning in thinking of home and its dear ones." A couple of days later, the unit proceeds to Sturgeon, Mo. where they link up with other units under Brigadier General Benjamin Prentiss, the commanding officer during the Battle of Mount Zion Church on December 28. Nevins' entry for January 1, 1862 recounts his participation in that critical battle, an important Union victory that resulted in the end of Confederate recruiting in Missouri for over two years. Nevins writes: "The fire on both sides was terrific and the balls of the enemy fell like hale around our brave boys. Many were wounded, and three of the cavalry were killed. After a hard fight of about thirty minutes the enemy began their retreat. Our men followed and did all the execution in their power. Two of the sharpshooters were mortally and some fifty more were slightly wounded. The enemy were severely punished and fled. We killed, as nearly as could be ascertained, some fifteen or twenty of the enemy, wounded about one hundred more, took 27 prisoners, 100 guns, and sixty horses and mules. The enemy's camp was situated upon a hill, difficult to approach, and surrounded by woods and brush, which the enemy took advantage of to the utmost extent. The fights occurred about 18 miles from Sturgeon, the place of our encampment, and after the battle we performed the pedestrian feat of marching back. We arrived back about ten o'clock, feet sore and weary, with scarcely strength to masticate our scant supper. Thus ended the fight of the 28th, which will long be remembered by those engaged in it as a warm and bloody one." Not long after the Battle of Mount Zion Church, and after moving somewhat east, in early March 1862 Nevins records a few details about his unit's involvement in the Battle of Fort Donelson in Tennessee in mid-February. He writes: "We remained in camp until the morning of the 12th, when we started for Fort Donelson. We arrived in the vacinity of that place the same day and camped in the woods close proximity of the enemy's breastworks. On the following morning we commenced our bloody work. We fought for three days as is recorded in the history of the battle - the memorable 13th 14th and 15th of Feb. On Sunday morning the Fort surrendered." After a bout of typhoid fever took him out of action for a few months, including the Battle of Shiloh, Nevins rejoins his unit in Corinth, Mississippi in July 1862. Nevins writes of camp life, efforts to take furloughs "for the purpose of recruiting a company of three-years men," military drills, movements to protect rail lines around Mississippi from "guerillas," and other related activities near Corinth. Like so many other soldiers on both sides of the fight throughout the Civil War, he writes of his expectations that the war will soon come to an end: "I truly and confidently expect this naughty rebellion will be completely played out in the next six months, and I have an opportunity to eat a Christmas turkey at home. We soldiers are anxiously watching the progress of events before Richmond. We expect the most successful issue." Most of the time in Corinth, Nevins and his unit lead "a secure, quiet, unprofitable life." On October 2, Nevins writes that "there is some expectation of another battle in this vicinity before long." By the next day, Nevins and his unit are involved in the Battle of Corinth, which Nevins writes about over the course of the next six pages. Nevins describes the battlefield of Corinth as a "scene of carnage and death." He reports that his regiment was ordered for picket duty until they were "deployed as skirmishers in order to fell the enemy." He describes the scene: "We were unsupported when suddenly the whole woods seemed alive with the enemy. They advanced in heavy columns opening up...a tremendous fire of musketry upon us.... The rebels advanced rapidly upon our temporary breast works in the face of a tremendous cannonade and a shower of [?] shots. They seemed perfectly oblivious to the existence of danger and were mowed down like sheep." Nevins and the 14th Missouri Sharpshooters served the next several months in Corinth or Rienzi, Ms. (a location Nevins mentions several times), helping to establish Camp Davies, just south of Corinth. After the Battle of Corinth, the Western Sharpshooters were part of an effort to stabilize Mississippi for the Union Army, and Camp Davies was part of that strategy. By Christmas Day, 1862, Nevins is stationed at Camp Davies, "seven miles south of Corinth and about a mile west of the Mobile and Ohio Railroad." Nevins describes Camp Davies as "of sufficient elevation to command the surrounding country with artillery for a considerable distance...." On December 28, Nevins mentions the anniversary of the Battle of Mount Zion Church, in which his regiment served just a year earlier. The next action Nevins sees occurs in Danville, near Rienzi, Ms. on February 8. The skirmish was mild. According to Nevins, "a squadron of Secesh cavalry consisting of seventeen men were drawn up in the bottom just on the brink of the Tuscumbia river on the opposite bank. Our boys prest [sic] a number of times on them when they skedaddled, not however, until they had given us a shot or two from their shot guns (which by the way I do not consider a very dangerous weapon). We crossed the river and gained a log house just outside the line of timber in time to see the scamps making the raise of the hill just this side of Danville, and distant from us nearly three-fourths of a mile. We gave them a few shots with our long range rifles but without effect." On March 26, Nevins notes that an officer who had been a rebel prisoner since Murfreesboro arrived at Camp Davies that day from Atlanta, "having traveled nearly five hundred miles through the enemys country to make his escape." On April 2, Nevins gives a brief account of the skirmish of his regiment at Booneville. A little less than two weeks later, Nevins reports on the skirmish at Glendale, near the Memphis & Ohio Railroad. And Nevins' final entry mentions a small incident his regiment encountered at Jumpertown, where his group was "fired upon by the guerillas but a charge sent them flying." In addition to Nevin's diary entries, there are numerous pages listing soldiers, equipment, schedules, a "sick list", "Guard Duty," a letter register, and other lists, presumably from Nevins' work as orderly sergeant. A truly captivating pair of journals from a Union sharpshooter, serving in some of the most important areas of the south and west in the first two years of the Civil War. Worthy of much detailed research for a variety of scholarly pursuits related to the Civil War.

      [Bookseller: William Reese Company - Americana ]
 26.   Check availability:     ABAA     Link/Print  


        TWO OUTSTANDING EARLY CIVIL WAR DIARIES BELONGING TO UNION ORDERLY SERGEANT FRANK E. NEVINS, COMPANY A, WESTERN SHARPSHOOTERS, 14th MISSOURI VOLUNTEERS].

      Centralia, Mo.; Sturgeon, Mo.; Fort Donelson, Tn.; Schofield Barracks, Mo.; Corinth, Ms.; Camp Davies, Ms.; Danville, Ms. Dec. 17, 1861 - Aug. 4, 1862; Aug. 26, 1862 - May 13, 1863. - [50],[88]; [85],[3]pp. First diary disbound, with minor toning. Second diary bound in full calf. Minor wear, some rubbing, short tear to rear cover. Overall good to very good. A compelling pair of Civil War diaries from the early years of the war, kept by Frank E. Nevins, orderly sergeant of the "Western Sharpshooters." Nevins spent late-1861 and early-1862 on the western side of the Mississippi River. Nevins' diaries are replete with detailed descriptions of camp life, troop and officer movements, skirmishes (such as his brief recounting of his unit's involvement in the Battle of Fort Donelson), his musings on life and death, and also contain multi- page accounts of both the Battle of Mount Zion Church and the Battle of Corinth. He also celebrates two birthdays during the time covered in these journals. Nevins served under Colonel John Ward Birge, a St. Louis eye doctor who was appointed by General John C. Fremont to head a specialized unit of marksmen intended to be a western counterpoint to Berdan's Sharpshooters. The Western Sharpshooters were organized just a month before Nevins entered service. The unit left Benton Barracks in St. Louis on Dec. 12, 1861, headed for Centralia to fight bands of Confederate guerillas who were attacking the vital North Missouri Rail Road. We pick up the action in Nevins' first diary just five days later. The first diary opens with an account of Nevins in a snowy, wintery camp at Centralia, Mo. He recounts an incident where his unit was searching for a "secesh" spy. Once they located the spy inside a house, they surrounded the building and "the firing of revolvers was kept up for some time." The group fights patches of Confederate troublemakers for several days, finding themselves about fifteen miles south of "a town called Rennick [Renick] on the N.M.R.R." on Christmas Day, where Nevins' unit enjoys a bright and beautiful day" and "pass the morning in thinking of home and its dear ones." A couple of days later, the unit proceeds to Sturgeon, Mo. where they link up with other units under Brigadier General Benjamin Prentiss, the commanding officer during the Battle of Mount Zion Church on December 28. Nevins' entry for January 1, 1862 recounts his participation in that critical battle, an important Union victory that resulted in the end of Confederate recruiting in Missouri for over two years. Nevins writes: "The fire on both sides was terrific and the balls of the enemy fell like hale around our brave boys. Many were wounded, and three of the cavalry were killed. After a hard fight of about thirty minutes the enemy began their retreat. Our men followed and did all the execution in their power. Two of the sharpshooters were mortally and some fifty more were slightly wounded. The enemy were severely punished and fled. We killed, as nearly as could be ascertained, some fifteen or twenty of the enemy, wounded about one hundred more, took 27 prisoners, 100 guns, and sixty horses and mules. The enemy's camp was situated upon a hill, difficult to approach, and surrounded by woods and brush, which the enemy took advantage of to the utmost extent. The fights occurred about 18 miles from Sturgeon, the place of our encampment, and after the battle we performed the pedestrian feat of marching back. We arrived back about ten o'clock, feet sore and weary, with scarcely strength to masticate our scant supper. Thus ended the fight of the 28th, which will long be remembered by those engaged in it as a warm and bloody one." Not long after the Battle of Mount Zion Church, and after moving somewhat east, in early March 1862 Nevins records a few details about his unit's involvement in the Battle of Fort Donelson in Tennessee in mid-February. He writes: "We remained in camp until the morning of the 12th, when we started for Fort Donelson. We arrived in the vacinity of that place the same day and camped in the woods close proximity of the enemy's breastworks. On the following morning we commenced our bloody work. W

      [Bookseller: William Reese Company - Americana]
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        [TWO OUTSTANDING EARLY CIVIL WAR DIARIES BELONGING TO UNION ORDERLY SERGEANT FRANK E. NEVINS, COMPANY A, WESTERN SHARPSHOOTERS, 14th MISSOURI VOLUNTEERS]

      Centralia, Mo.; Sturgeon, Mo.; Fort Donelson, Tn.; Schofield Barracks, Mo.; Corinth, Ms.; Camp Davies, Ms.; Danville, Ms, 1863. [50],[88]; [85],[3]pp. First diary disbound, with minor toning. Second diary bound in full calf. Minor wear, some rubbing, short tear to rear cover. Overall good to very good. A compelling pair of Civil War diaries from the early years of the war, kept by Frank E. Nevins, orderly sergeant of the "Western Sharpshooters." Nevins spent late-1861 and early-1862 on the western side of the Mississippi River. Nevins' diaries are replete with detailed descriptions of camp life, troop and officer movements, skirmishes (such as his brief recounting of his unit's involvement in the Battle of Fort Donelson), his musings on life and death, and also contain multi- page accounts of both the Battle of Mount Zion Church and the Battle of Corinth. He also celebrates two birthdays during the time covered in these journals. Nevins served under Colonel John Ward Birge, a St. Louis eye doctor who was appointed by General John C. Fremont to head a specialized unit of marksmen intended to be a western counterpoint to Berdan's Sharpshooters. The Western Sharpshooters were organized just a month before Nevins entered service. The unit left Benton Barracks in St. Louis on Dec. 12, 1861, headed for Centralia to fight bands of Confederate guerillas who were attacking the vital North Missouri Rail Road. We pick up the action in Nevins' first diary just five days later. The first diary opens with an account of Nevins in a snowy, wintery camp at Centralia, Mo. He recounts an incident where his unit was searching for a "secesh" spy. Once they located the spy inside a house, they surrounded the building and "the firing of revolvers was kept up for some time." The group fights patches of Confederate troublemakers for several days, finding themselves about fifteen miles south of "a town called Rennick [Renick] on the N.M.R.R." on Christmas Day, where Nevins' unit enjoys a bright and beautiful day" and "pass the morning in thinking of home and its dear ones." A couple of days later, the unit proceeds to Sturgeon, Mo. where they link up with other units under Brigadier General Benjamin Prentiss, the commanding officer during the Battle of Mount Zion Church on December 28. Nevins' entry for January 1, 1862 recounts his participation in that critical battle, an important Union victory that resulted in the end of Confederate recruiting in Missouri for over two years. Nevins writes: "The fire on both sides was terrific and the balls of the enemy fell like hale around our brave boys. Many were wounded, and three of the cavalry were killed. After a hard fight of about thirty minutes the enemy began their retreat. Our men followed and did all the execution in their power. Two of the sharpshooters were mortally and some fifty more were slightly wounded. The enemy were severely punished and fled. We killed, as nearly as could be ascertained, some fifteen or twenty of the enemy, wounded about one hundred more, took 27 prisoners, 100 guns, and sixty horses and mules. The enemy's camp was situated upon a hill, difficult to approach, and surrounded by woods and brush, which the enemy took advantage of to the utmost extent. The fights occurred about 18 miles from Sturgeon, the place of our encampment, and after the battle we performed the pedestrian feat of marching back. We arrived back about ten o'clock, feet sore and weary, with scarcely strength to masticate our scant supper. Thus ended the fight of the 28th, which will long be remembered by those engaged in it as a warm and bloody one." Not long after the Battle of Mount Zion Church, and after moving somewhat east, in early March 1862 Nevins records a few details about his unit's involvement in the Battle of Fort Donelson in Tennessee in mid-February. He writes: "We remained in camp until the morning of the 12th, when we started for Fort Donelson. We arrived in the vacinity of that place the same day and camped in the woods close proximity of the enemy's breastworks. On the following morning we commenced our bloody work. We fought for three days as is recorded in the history of the battle - the memorable 13th 14th and 15th of Feb. On Sunday morning the Fort surrendered." After a bout of typhoid fever took him out of action for a few months, including the Battle of Shiloh, Nevins rejoins his unit in Corinth, Mississippi in July 1862. Nevins writes of camp life, efforts to take furloughs "for the purpose of recruiting a company of three-years men," military drills, movements to protect rail lines around Mississippi from "guerillas," and other related activities near Corinth. Like so many other soldiers on both sides of the fight throughout the Civil War, he writes of his expectations that the war will soon come to an end: "I truly and confidently expect this naughty rebellion will be completely played out in the next six months, and I have an opportunity to eat a Christmas turkey at home. We soldiers are anxiously watching the progress of events before Richmond. We expect the most successful issue." Most of the time in Corinth, Nevins and his unit lead "a secure, quiet, unprofitable life." On October 2, Nevins writes that "there is some expectation of another battle in this vicinity before long." By the next day, Nevins and his unit are involved in the Battle of Corinth, which Nevins writes about over the course of the next six pages. Nevins describes the battlefield of Corinth as a "scene of carnage and death." He reports that his regiment was ordered for picket duty until they were "deployed as skirmishers in order to fell the enemy." He describes the scene: "We were unsupported when suddenly the whole woods seemed alive with the enemy. They advanced in heavy columns opening up...a tremendous fire of musketry upon us.... The rebels advanced rapidly upon our temporary breast works in the face of a tremendous cannonade and a shower of [?] shots. They seemed perfectly oblivious to the existence of danger and were mowed down like sheep." Nevins and the 14th Missouri Sharpshooters served the next several months in Corinth or Rienzi, Ms. (a location Nevins mentions several times), helping to establish Camp Davies, just south of Corinth. After the Battle of Corinth, the Western Sharpshooters were part of an effort to stabilize Mississippi for the Union Army, and Camp Davies was part of that strategy. By Christmas Day, 1862, Nevins is stationed at Camp Davies, "seven miles south of Corinth and about a mile west of the Mobile and Ohio Railroad." Nevins describes Camp Davies as "of sufficient elevation to command the surrounding country with artillery for a considerable distance...." On December 28, Nevins mentions the anniversary of the Battle of Mount Zion Church, in which his regiment served just a year earlier. The next action Nevins sees occurs in Danville, near Rienzi, Ms. on February 8. The skirmish was mild. According to Nevins, "a squadron of Secesh cavalry consisting of seventeen men were drawn up in the bottom just on the brink of the Tuscumbia river on the opposite bank. Our boys prest [sic] a number of times on them when they skedaddled, not however, until they had given us a shot or two from their shot guns (which by the way I do not consider a very dangerous weapon). We crossed the river and gained a log house just outside the line of timber in time to see the scamps making the raise of the hill just this side of Danville, and distant from us nearly three-fourths of a mile. We gave them a few shots with our long range rifles but without effect." On March 26, Nevins notes that an officer who had been a rebel prisoner since Murfreesboro arrived at Camp Davies that day from Atlanta, "having traveled nearly five hundred miles through the enemys country to make his escape." On April 2, Nevins gives a brief account of the skirmish of his regiment at Booneville. A little less than two weeks later, Nevins reports on the skirmish at Glendale, near the Memphis & Ohio Railroad. And Nevins' final entry mentions a small incident his regiment encountered at Jumpertown, where his group was "fired upon by the guerillas but a charge sent them flying." In addition to Nevin's diary entries, there are numerous pages listing soldiers, equipment, schedules, a "sick list", "Guard Duty," a letter register, and other lists, presumably from Nevins' work as orderly sergeant. A truly captivating pair of journals from a Union sharpshooter, serving in some of the most important areas of the south and west in the first two years of the Civil War. Worthy of much detailed research for a variety of scholarly pursuits related to the Civil War.

      [Bookseller: William Reese Company - Americana]
 28.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  


        Original watercolour sketches of French landscapes]

      - [France], no place, no publisher, ca. 1863-1890. 13 oblong sheets (22.3 x 29.2 cm), all with fine watercolour paintings, either full-sized, or smaller, in a drawn rectangular frame. And one drawing on slightly smaller paper, more sketchy, in pencil.l Count Roger de Bouillé (1819-1906) was a French mountaineer (one would say "pyreneeist" rather than alpinist, as he climbed solely in the Pyrenees mountains), but also a draftsman, illustrator, watercolourist and author, under the pseudonym "JAM", of several books on his ascents and explorations. In 1865, he settled in the town of Pau and from there he explored the western Pyrenees. In his works he described not only the itineraries, mountains, and landscapes, but also the local flora, fauna, and history. The present suite, however, consists mostly of drawings made during a voyage to the French-Mediterranean coast (Côte d'Azur), in 1890. One is dated much earlier. Present are: 1. "Valentin / 28 juillet 1863" [waterfall]; 2. "Ruines de l'amphitéatre de Cimie's / Nice (14 septembre 1890)" [ruins]; 3. "Jaorge / 5 aout 1890" [view of a distant mountain village]; 4. "16 sept. 90 St. Sylvestre / Nice" [view of the area]; 5. "Route de Levens / 5 sept. 1890" [mountain road along river]; 6. "Frontiere Italienne" [landscape]; 7. "Campement du 161me au sommet du chateau / Nice 20 sept. 1890" [town view, horizontal, with soldiers]; 8. no caption [mountain view; the artist and his party (?) situated in the fore ground]; 9. no caption [unidentified fortress in mountainous surroundings, a person sitting in front]; 10. no caption [mountain scene, not completed]; 11. "Apres les Arcs 10", "Gonfaron 11", [no caption] "12", "Lion de Terre et Lion de Mer 13" [Four framed views, numbered 10-13]; 12. "Rognac" [view in drawn frame]; 13. "Berre" [view in drawn frame]; 14. [no caption, pencil sketch on slightly smaller paper, probably depicting Roman ruins near Nice]. All rich and lovely views, well-painted. All 14 leaves in a very good condition; no trace of foxing or discolouring. Left side a bit irregular, as the leaves were removed from a sketchbook, the illustrations bright and clean.

      [Bookseller: Antiquariaat Schierenberg]
 29.   Check availability:     ZVAB     Link/Print  


        Our Home and Foreign Policy

      [Mobile, Alabama]: Printed at the Office of the Daily Register and Advertiser. 1863. First. First edition. Removed. Printed self-wrappers. 23pp. Faint embossed library stamp and equally faint released stamp on the front wrap, small chips and dogears at the edges, else very good. Statement of future foreign policy for the Confederate nation by a military officer and journalist. Howes S39 ("aa"); Parrish & Willingham 5832. .

      [Bookseller: Between the Covers- Rare Books, Inc. ABA]
 30.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  


        The travels of Ludovico di Varthema in Egypt, Syria, Arabia, Deserta, Persia, India, and Ethiopia, A.D. 1503-1508. Translated from the Original Italian of 1510..

      London: Hakluyt Society, 1863. FIRST EDITION OF THIS TRANSLATION. Complete with 2 maps (1 folding). Blue cloth, gilt spine, gilt vignette on front board, both covers blind-stamped, corners slightly bumped and exterior somewhat rubbed; text is clean and bright. An excellent copy with the bookplate and withdrawn stamp from Exeter City Library on the front paste-down. First edition of this translation of the incredibly popular original Italian edition of 1510 detailing Ludovico di Varthema's extensive travels to Egypt, Syria, Arabia, Persia, India, and Ethiopia. Varthema is most well known for his escapades, among which he became the first European, non-Muslim to enter Mecca disguised as a pilgrim (a heinous crime at the time), which he details in the work. A raging success, this particular work exposed westerners to Eastern culture, religion, landscape, and customs and was the definitive work on the East for many years.Jones (1805-1881), a British librarian, translator, and editor, manages to capture the humor, simplicity and occasional exaggeration of Varthema. In addition to his work as an editor and translator for the Hakluyt Society, Jones served as the principal librarian of the British Museum from 1866-1873 and was the first president of the United Kingdom's Library Association in 1877.

      [Bookseller: B & L Rootenberg Rare Books & Manuscript]
 31.   Check availability:     ABAA     Link/Print  


        Bericht über ein fast vollständiges Skelet von Palapteryx ingens. Über dessen Restauration und die davon angefertigsten Gypsabgrüsse; mit einigen Bemerkungen über die Aufstellung der Vogelsskelete Überhaupt.

      Wien, Wilhelm Braumüller, 1863. Folio (32.5 x 24.7 cm). Title page, 12 pp., two large, mounted albumen photos (26.3 x 19.3 cm), tissue-guarded. Original printed wrappers; protective translucent sleeve.l A very rare paper, with very early photographs, on the North Island Giant Moa, a New Zealand bird that may have been the largest bird ever. It stood 12 feet tall and became extinct in the 1300s or sligthly later. Gustav Eberhard Jäger (1832-1917) was a German medical doctor and zoologist. He is perhaps best known for his invention and promotion of Jäger clothing. Jäger used a name introduced by Richard Owen in 1844, but the bird is now known as Dinornis novaezealandiae, a name introduced by Owen in 1843. The use of photography in descriptive zoology and palaeontology was, at the time, a novelty. A very good, clean copy. Not in Nissen IVB and ZBI.

      [Bookseller: Antiquariaat Schierenberg]
 32.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  


        Catalogue des mollusques de l'Ile de la Réunion (Bourbon).

      - Paris, Dentu, 1863. 8vo (23.7 x 15.3 cm). Half title, title page with engraved vignette, 148 [4, 144] pp., 14 lithographed plates [numbered XXVII-XLI], all but one hand-coloured (as intended). Contemporary green embossed cloth with gilt title on the spine. Mint endpapers, speckled edges.l Very uncommon (Junk cat. 278: "scarce") work published as part of L. Maillard's "Notes sur l'Ile de la Réunion" (hence the odd plate numbering), and usually found as "Extrait", as is this copy. Gérard Paul Deshayes (1796-1875) was one of the foremost French malacologists and many of his works are beautifully illustrated. This catalogue has the fine plates engraved by E. Levasseur, arguably one of the best engravers from this period. Many species described here were new. Some very light spotting; the plates in this copy are the cleanest we have ever seen. Nissen ZBI, 2652 (under Maillard); Ryckebusch 5445-5446. [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Antiquariaat Schierenberg]
 33.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  


        Boussolle du Docteur Hamel perdue au grand plateau, à la catastrophe du 15 aout 1820, retrouvée au pied ou glacier des Bossons, le 17 juin 1863

      1863 - Original albumen photomontage, 21.6 x 10 cm. Very good. The earliest, and certainly the most infamous of disasters to befall climbers on Mont Blanc was the 1820 expedition of Dr. Joseph Hamel, a Russian naturalist and Counselor of State to the Czar, climbing after a heavy snowfall against the advice of his guides. Setting out from the village of Chamonix, the expedition consisted of four climbers and twelve local guides, three for each of the principals. Nearing the summit via the known route, between the Grand Plateau and the Rochers Rouges, the snow gave way and Hamel was engulfed in the snow. When he was able to extract himself, he witnessed an avalanche pouring down upon the others. The party was swept down 1200 feet, and three of the guides were buried in a crevasse under an insurmountable pile of snow.In August of 1861, Abroise Simond, a Chamonix guide, discovered portions of clothing and human remains near the lower end of the Glacier des Bossons, In the middle of June, 1863, more remains were discovered. There had long been speculations as to the amount of movement of the glaciers, and the discovery of the three guides some 6 miles from the point of their demise, settled the question - roughly 2 feet per day.This image of the scene of the Hamel's disaster, the recovery and the compass is certainly one of the earliest examples of photomontage - it emphatically brings together the three separate events into a complete visual statement of fact. Although photomontage was employed as a tool as early as 1857 by Oscar J. Rejlander, who combined some thirty separate negative to make his masterpiece, "The Two Ways of Life", Rejlander's picture tricks the viewer to believe that the event was seamless whole and captured in real time. There were several photographers active on Mont Blanc in the early 1860s: Auguste-Rosalie and Louis-Auguste Bisson, Aime Civale, Claude-Marie Ferrier, Adolphe Braun, Joseph-Eugène Savioz, and Joseph Tairraz. This photograph contains no signature nor mark of the maker. Joseph Tairraz - a member of his family was one of the guides lost on the Hamel expedition - did photograph the scene where the bodies were discovered in 1863; however, this does not appear to be his work. Stylistically, this closely resembles the work of the Bisson Frères.

      [Bookseller: Andrew Cahan: Bookseller, Ltd., ABAA]
 34.   Check availability:     IberLibro     Link/Print  


        Report on the construction of a military road from Fort Walla Walla to Fort Benton

      Washington: G.P.O., 1863. Large 8vo, pp. 363, [3]; 10 lithograph plates (most with hand coloring), plus 4 large folding maps; recent utilitarian library cloth, gilt-lettered direct on gilt-paneled spine; text block bound tight; clean inside. Early ownership signature of Mr. Thomson Mason, Baltimore, Nov. 1, 1863.markings. See Howes M-884 showing this to be another issue of the Senate Exec. Doc. 43. Wagner-Camp 393.

      [Bookseller: Rulon-Miller Books]
 35.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  


        Koranen. Handskrift från 1863

      Brev, dokument, handskrift. 1863. Över 600 handskrivna sidor i guld, rött och svart, inbundna i ett nött skinnband. Det illuminerade eftersättsbladet skadat (se bild). Handmålade dekorationer i guld och rött. Sidorna börjar med en Sora från Koranen, Sorat "Al-Nas". Detta följs sedan av Doaa, dvs vädjan till Allah. Andra sidan avslutas med namnet till personen "Yousef Al-Shaen" som skrev texten och även hade varit elev hos en "Ali Al-Bahdjah". Den arabiska texten är skriven år 1284 h (jämfört med 1437 h nu), enligt västerländsk tideräkning alltså 1863.

      [Bookseller: Antikvariat Asken]
 36.   Check availability:     Bokbörsen     Link/Print  


        Eigenh. Brief mit U. Weimar, 3. III. 1863.

      1863. 1 S. auf gefalt. Doppelblatt. 8vo. "Ich erlaube mir dir die Tochter des Hofrath Bossler in Berlin, ein Mädchen mit einer schönen Altstimme, aufs Beste zu empfehlen. Sie ist hier als Orsino mit Beifall aufgetreten, und wünscht in Hannover ein Engagement zu finden. Kannst du ihr dazu behülflich sein, so wirst du mich sehr verbinden. Du findest in ihr ein fein gebildetes talentvolles Mädchen [...]". - Der von Goethe geförderte Genast hatte als Siebzehnjähriger sein Debüt in Weimar mit dem Osmin in Mozarts Entführung aus dem Serail. 1817 nahm er ein Engagement in Dresden an und wechselte im folgenden Jahr nach Leipzig. 1828 wurde er Theaterdirektor in Magdeburg, ging jedoch bald nach Weimar zurück, wo ihm eine Anstellung auf Lebenszeit versprochen worden war. Genast, der auch als Opern- und Liederkomponist tätig war, trat seit 1852 nur noch in Schauspielen auf und wurde 1860 pensioniert.

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Inlibris]
 37.   Check availability:     maremagnum.com     Link/Print  


        Difesa Nazionale Napoletana

      1863 - CAVA Tommaso. Difesa Nazionale Napoletana di Tommaso Cava Capitano dello Stato Maggiore dell'esercito delle Due Sicilie Capo dello Stato Maggiore della piazza di Capua durante l'assedio del 1860. Napoli, 1863. Tre parti in un volume in 8vo; pp.XXVII con la prefazione; 25; 114; 25; 14. Parte prima: Le vertenze dell'autore col Ministro della Rovere. Parte seconda: Difesa militare. Parte terza: Difesa civile. In appendice la vita militare dell'autore. Mezza pelle coeva, titolo e fregi in oro al dorso. Raro. [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: CASELLA STUDIO BIBLIOGRAFICO ALAI-ILAB]
 38.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  

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