viaLibri Requires Cookies CLICK HERE TO HIDE THIS NOTICE

Displayed below are some selected recent viaLibri matches for books published in 1864


         Our Mutual Friend...With Illustrations By Marcus Stone.

      London: Chapman and Hall, Piccadilly, [May, 1864 - November 1865]. 8vo., 20 monthly parts in 19 as issued, 32, [1], [1]-32, [4], [4], [2], 8, [4], [2], [2], [2]; 16, 33-64, 4, [2], [2], [4], [2]; 16, 65-96, [1], [2], [4], 8, [2]; 16, 97-128, 4, [1], [1], [4], [2], [4], [2]; 16, [1], 129-160, [2], [2], [2]; 16, [161]-192, [1], 4, 4, [1], [4], [8], 4, [2], 16, 193-224, [1], [2], [1], [2], [4], [1]; [1], [2], 16, [1], 225-256, 4, 4; [2], 16, 257-288, [2], [4], [4], [2], [1], 8, [4]; 16, 289-320, [xii], [1], 4, 4; 16, [1]-32, [2], 4, [1]; 16, [1], [1], 33-64, 4, [4], [1], [4], 4; 16, 65-96, [2]; 16, 97-128, 4, [2]; 16, 129-160, [2], [2], [4], [2], [4], [2]; 16, [161]-192, 4; 16, 193-224, [2], [4], [8], [2]; 16, [1], 225-256, 4, 4, [2]; 16, 257-309, [3], [viii], [2], [2], 4, [2], [1], [4], [2], 40 wood engraved plates. Original printed green wrappers with trade advertisements to inner sides as well as outside back wrappers, uncut, with a variety of publishers ads and slips on teal, green, pink, yellow, orange, and color-printed paper The individual parts are in very good condition, with the usual chipping to wrappers around edges, and at worst some tears/soiling to numbers 12, 13 and 18 at the fore-edge of the wrappers, internally they are bright and very lightly handled. A complete set missing only a few ads mentioned in Hatton & Cleaver, with no visible signs that ads have been removed. First edition in the original parts. The wood engravings and cover designs were for the first time charged to the skillful hand of Marcus Stone, the orphaned son of an old artist friend who worked in the â€

      [Bookseller: John Windle Antiquarian Bookseller ]
 1.   Check availability:     ABAA     Link/Print  


         Dictionnaire Erotique Moderne par un professue de langue verte

      Imprimerie de la Bibliomaniac Society. Hardcover. Freetown (Bruselles), 1864. 12mo, 319 pp., couverture rigide / hardcover. No. 103 of 300. Grave frontispice de Felicien Rops. La tres rare premiere edition du dictionnaire erotique de Alfred Delvau. Delvau a publie deux dictionnaires, ce qui est le premier et le second etant Dictionnaire de la Langue Verte: argots Parisiens Compare. Il s'agit de la plus rare des deux, avec seulement huit des 300 exemplaires originaux survivants dans les institutions (les sites d'OCLC plusieurs entrees, avec huit participations au total). Une copie tres bien conserve, avec d'excellentes contenu. Relie en bougran rouge plus tard avec lettrage dore. Professionnel de reparation de la bande de charniere a la page de titre. Frontis presente avec une certaine rousseurs marginales. Tres bon etat general. S'il vous plait nous contacter pour des photos ou des informations supplementaires. Etched frontispiece by Felicien Rops. The extremely scarce first edition of Alfred Delvau's erotic dictionary. Delvau published two dictionaries, this being the first and the second being Dictionnaire de la Langue Verte: Argots Parisiens Compares. This is the more scarce of the two, with only eight of the original 300 copies surviving in institutions (OCLC sites multiple entries, with eight total holdings). A very well preserved copy, with excellent contents. Bound in later red buckram with gilt lettering. Professional tape repair to hinge at title page. Frontis present with some marginal foxing. Very good condition overall. Please contact us for additional pictures or information. . Very Good. 1864. First Edition.

      [Bookseller: Auger Down Books]
 2.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  


         Arizona. Original Document Regulating Gambling in the Counties. Signed By Governor John Goodwin and Two Other Major Leaders, November 9, 1864

      Prescott, [AZ], 1864. Slight variations in text from the printed published the next year (1865). Possibly W. Claude Jones copy. The printed version adds: "shall take effect and be in force from and after the passage of this act." Two page document signed by Governor John Goodwin, President of the Legislative Council, Coles Bashford and W. Claude-Jones who was Speaker of the House of Representatives. Page one measures 9 1/2" x 15; Page two measures 10 1/2" x 15". Included is the original bill number (46) signed by James Anderson who was the official clerk of the House. It measures 4" x 5 1/4". This remarkable document is important for several reasons. First, it can be compared for minute differences with the actual printed forms of both the Journals of the First Legislative Assembly as well as the Acts, Memorials and Resolutions which were published the following year (1865). The goal was to both exclude minors (under age 21) from losing their hard earned money as well as helping each county to collect $100 a month for each table at which gambling took place. This helped pay the Sheriff and other officials' salaries. It was not until the 24th Territorial Legislature that Governor Joseph H. Kibbey demanded the abolishment of gambling which was one of two major obstacles in Arizona's quest for statehood (the other was relating to the easy removal of State Supreme Court Justices by a simple vote). Of course, it was not until 1988 when the Federal Indian gambling Regulatory Act became law that gambling then become legal in the state on Indian reservations.

      [Bookseller: Alcuin Books, ABAA-ILAB]
 3.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  


         Our Mutual Friend...With Illustrations By Marcus Stone.

      London: Chapman and Hall, Piccadilly, [May, 1864 - November 1865]. 8vo., 20 monthly parts in 19 as issued, 32, [1]-32, [2], [8], [2], 8, [4], [2], [2], [2], [4]; 16, 33-64, 4, [2], [2], [4], [2]; 16, 65-96, [1], [2], [4], 8, [2]; 16, 97-128, 4, [1], [1], [4], [2], [4]; 16, [1], 129-160, [2], [2], [2]; 16, 161-192, [1], 4, 4, [1], [4], [8], 4, [2]; 16, 193-224, [1], [2], [1], [2], [4], [2]; [2], 16, 257-288, [2], [4], [4], [4], [1], 8, [4]; 16, 289-320, xi, [1], 4, [4]; 16, [1], [1]-32, [2], 4, [1]; [2], 16, [1], [1], 33-64, 4, [4], [2], [2]; 16, 65-96, [2]; 16, 97-128, 4; 16, 129-160, 4, 4; 16, [161]-192, 4, [2]; 16, 193-224, [2], [4], [8], [2]; 16, [1], 225-256, 4, 4, [2]; 16, 257-309, [viii], [2], [2], 4, [2], [1], [2], [2], 40 wood engraved plates. Original printed green wrappers with trade advertisements to inner sides as well as outside back wrappers, uncut, with a variety of publishers ads and slips on teal, green, pink and white paper bound-in. Housed in a half green morocco and green cloth pull-off case with raised bands, gilt titling, and additional green cloth portfolio with flaps. The backstrip of the case has sunned to a sumptuous saddle-brown, and the individual parts are in very good condition, with only slight wear to wrappers and edges, internally they seem almost to have never been read. A complete set missing only a few ads mentioned in Hatton & Cleaver, with no visible signs that ads have been removed, and includes ads not mentioned in Hatton & Cleaver. First edition in the original parts. The wood engravings and cover designs were for the first time charged to the skillful hand of Marcus Stone, the orphaned son of an old artist friend who worked in the “sentimental-realist style of 1860s book illustration” (OxfordDNB). Our Mutual Friend was Dickens’s last completed novel, written slowly due too increased occasions of illness, and a serious railway accident. Similar to Bleak House and Little Dorrit, Our Mutual Friend comprises the usual social satire, elaborate plotting, and sweeping views of contemporary society, differing most notably in the positive outcome of the central love stories. Eckel 96. Hatton and Cleaver 345-370.

      [Bookseller: John Windle Antiquarian Bookseller]
 4.   Check availability:     Direct From Seller     Link/Print  


         Some New Industries for South Australia. Silkworms, Mulberry, Olives, Tobacco, etc., etc

      Adelaide, Rigby, 1864. Octavo, xii (last one blank), 82, [2] (colophon) pages plus 2 lithographs by William Wyatt (a double-page plate of 'Method of training the White Mulberry to a standard' and 'The Reeling Machine'). Original yellow card covers with the plain spine expertly renewed; absolutely trifling surface loss to silverfish; essentially a fine copy with the contemporary blind-stamp of Rigby (as bookseller) on the front flyleaf. Sir Samuel Davenport (1818-1906) was an ardent promoter of agriculture and new industries in South Australia and served as president of both the Royal Agricultural and Horticultural Society and the South Australian branch of the Royal Geographical Society of Australasia (Australian Dictionary of Biography). Other new industries discussed in the book are Verdigris and Flower-Farming. Ferguson 8971 (pagination incorrect, and the plates are not recorded).

      [Bookseller: Michael Treloar Antiquarian Booksellers]
 5.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  


         John Wisden's Cricketers' Almanack for 1864 - 1864 Wisden : Paperback with Facsimile Spine and Covers

      1864. Hi, This is a Wisden from the Adrian Ellis Collection. 1864 : Paperback with facsimile Spine and Covers - 1st Edition! This Wisden was first listed as a rebind, it was from the Auty collection and hence we thought it was a valid listing with the Auty boards, however the binding wasputting pressure on the frist 2 pages and they were starting to tear down the line of the binding which was 1cm into the book and hence we took the book out of the binding and added facimile covers and a spine and touched up the small tear that was appearing. We have kept the Auty page if needed. The covers and spine are very well made and internally the book is nice and clean, there is some rounding to the pages and the last page has a small loss to the top of it as can be seen in the pictures. A small tear was forming thanks to the binding to the first 2 pages, this has been repaired.

      [Bookseller: Wisdenshop.com]
 6.   Check availability:     IOBABooks     Link/Print  


         NORTH CLEAR CREEK GOLD & SILVER MINING CO., GILPIN COUNTY, COLORADO TERRITORY

      [ New York, 1864. 17pp. Original printed wrappers. Old central vertical fold lines, front wrapper nearly detached. Light dampstaining throughout. Good. A promotional pamphlet including descriptions, letters, and affidavits from various persons concerning the potential of the Henderson Mill in the Colorado Territory. Provides favorable notices of the mining prospects on the Ground Hog Lode, upon which the mill stands and solicits new investors. A scarce, relatively early Colorado mining report.

      [Bookseller: William Reese Company - Americana]
 7.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  


         THE PARABLES OF OUR LORD AND SAVIOUR JESUS CHRIST

      London: Routledge Warne & Routledge, 1864. First edition, 25 x 19.5cm [4to], in publisher's green hexagon-grain cloth w/gilt & embossed decorations & title to covers & spine, bevelled edges, a.e.g., pale yellow ep.s w/binder's ticket (Bone & Son, Ball 17A) to rear pastedown, [i-xii], 1-48 + [1-48 blank versos] + [1-40, plates] red-ruled cardstock pp. w/20 wood engravings by the Dalziels after Millais, +2pp. publ. adverts to rear. Printed at the Camden Press, London. Binding Very Good (extremities moderately bumped & worn, upper fr. cover gilt sl. rubbed, & fr. ep. gutter sl. stained); contents Very Good (1st & final leaves foxed w/lt. spotting elsewhere)-this is the green cloth binding, much scarcer than the more common red. White 48-49, Reid 6-7 & 71-72 ("of this superb work much has been written, but it is worthy of all the praise ever bestowed upon it"), Fredeman 95.37, Ray 170, de Beaumont 244, Goldman 311.

      [Bookseller: Leonard Roberts, Bookseller]
 8.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  


         CIRCULAR. ADJUTANT AND INSPECTOR GENERAL'S OFFICE, GENERAL ORDERS, No. 32. AN ACT TO INCREASE THE EFFICENCY OF THE ARMY BY THE EMPLOYMENT OF FREE NEGROES AND SLAVES IN CERTAIN CAPACITIES [caption title].

      Richmond. March 11, 1864. - Broadside, 18 x 12 inches. Printed in three columns. Previously folded, with a couple of small separations along old fold lines. Light toning and foxing. About very good. A very scarce and quite interesting broadside circular printing of the act which allowed slaves and free blacks to be used in certain tasks by the Confederate Army during the Civil War, as well as instructions for the conscription and induction of those men into the armed forces. The Confederacy was of course loath to arm any of its slave population, but by 1864 could not spare any further manpower from their infantry to perform menial tasks, and the government therefore passed a law allowing slaves to be used "in certain capacities," such as the construction of fortification, the production of arms, and the transport of materiel. The first coulomb of this broadside comprises a full printing of that law, while the remainder sets forth the rules for the impressment of slaves into military service, for their care while in service, and for the compensation of their owners. A fascinating piece that lays bare the desperation of the Confederacy for labor and supplies in early 1864. Not in Parrish & Willingham.

      [Bookseller: William Reese Company - Americana]
 9.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  


         CIRCULAR. ADJUTANT AND INSPECTOR GENERAL'S OFFICE, GENERAL ORDERS, No. 32.... AN ACT TO INCREASE THE EFFICENCY OF THE ARMY BY THE EMPLOYMENT OF FREE NEGROES AND SLAVES IN CERTAIN CAPACITIES [caption title]

      Richmond, 1864. Broadside, 18 x 12 inches. Printed in three columns. Previously folded, with a couple of small separations along old fold lines. Light toning and foxing. About very good. A very scarce and quite interesting broadside circular printing of the act which allowed slaves and free blacks to be used in certain tasks by the Confederate Army during the Civil War, as well as instructions for the conscription and induction of those men into the armed forces. The Confederacy was of course loath to arm any of its slave population, but by 1864 could not spare any further manpower from their infantry to perform menial tasks, and the government therefore passed a law allowing slaves to be used "in certain capacities," such as the construction of fortification, the production of arms, and the transport of materiel. The first coulomb of this broadside comprises a full printing of that law, while the remainder sets forth the rules for the impressment of slaves into military service, for their care while in service, and for the compensation of their owners. A fascinating piece that lays bare the desperation of the Confederacy for labor and supplies in early 1864. Not in Parrish & Willingham.

      [Bookseller: William Reese Company - Americana]
 10.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  


         [Civil War Journal]: Visit to the Armies of the James and the Potomac, Oct. 1864

      1864. Very Good. A remarkable 70-page manuscript journal written by William H. Baldwin, a New England businessman, philanthropist, and abolitionist. Baldwin wrote the journal in October 1864, while on a tour of Union military camps and frontline battlefields in the James and Appomattox River valleys near Richmond and Petersburg, Virginia. The journal provides a firsthand account of the activities and conditions of soldiers and of freed African-Americans at City Point, and Baldwin's encounter with both Abraham Lincoln and Ulysses S. Grant, including each of their Signatures which he collected from them on his journey.Born in Brighton, Massachusetts in 1826, Baldwin established a successful import business of woolen goods in 1850 (Baldwin, Baxter and Company). During the Civil War he was a founding and active member of the Ward 11 Boston Soldiers' Relief Commission which was dedicated to providing relief to the families and soldiers of the Army of the Potomac. After retiring from business in 1868, he became president of the Boston Young Men's Christian Union (YMCU) and devoted the rest of his life to philanthropic work for the YMCU and other Boston-based organizations including the Boston School Board, the Children's Mission to the Children of the Destitute, and the American Unitarian Association.The closely written manuscript, title in gilt on the front board, provides a detailed account of all the principal places and points of interest on the James and Appomattox Rivers, and other points in the vicinity, where the two armies fought at the end of the Civil War. These include the headquarters of Generals Grant, Meade, and Hancock, Bermuda Hundreds (Butler's Headquarters), and Butler's Dutch Gap Canal (built primarily by African-American troops), Deep Bottom, and Aiken's Landing (where prisoners were exchanged.) Of the condition and activities of the Union Army, he writes: "Here at City Point as far as the eye can reach you see but one vast array of army tents, for camps and hospitals, while on every side you behold lines of military wagons and ambulances going to and coming from the front continually -- by day and by night."Baldwin gains audience with General Grant at City Point ("with his felt hat, dark suit, without the slightest military rank -- with the ever present cigar") and gives a dramatic firsthand account of the meeting: "In conversation with Gen. Grant one cannot help being struck with his extreme modesty ... With a clear and decided tone he spoke in the highest terms of our Generals in the Field ... He talked hopefully and with full confidence in the future movements of our Armies. He had but a few minutes (before my first conversation with him) received a dispatch from ... Sheridan, and with a voice which showed the emotions of his heart he said -- 'Sheridan tells me that he has not only fed his Army all along his route from rebel supplies but reports to me a balance in hand of 3000 cattle.' It was a glorious dispatch to us, but made much more so by hearing it from him ... The great question with our Patriotic People is -- 'when is Gen. Grant going into Richmond?' Gen. Grant has an object far above the mere fact of 'going into Richmond' as he plainly stated in our interviews with him. I said to him, 'I suppose you do not state when you want to go into Richmond,' to which he replied, 'I want to go into Richmond, but I want to destroy their Army.'"Baldwin also provides a vivid firsthand account of the activities of freed slaves, in which he includes much of their spoken dialect (transcribed to the best of his ability), especially that of preachers at evening meetings: "At City Point and all along our lines are large numbers of Black families, those who have joined our Armies in their marches through Virginia ... The men -- those not in the Army -- are employed either as teamsters, or laborers, are faithful in whatever position they are placed.""We were strongly impressed with their great religious zeal and earnestness by attending at times their evening meetings for exhortation and prayer. The meetings were held in the open air, not far from Gen. Grant's Head-Quarters ... A candle upon a common pine table, and a lantern hanging from the side of a shed near by, gave light to the men, women, and children assembled. Their rough, crude, ideas of God ... [were] plainly shown by their language of which I will attempt to give you an idea. ...""The first speaker I heard was a stout, hearty, Black man, who began by stating -- 'dat Paul says if you can get de attention of de audience much good can be done -- and dat he would take for his subject on dis occasion -- Life and Salvation, Hell and Damnation.'""He then in language of unequaled eloquence, with oft repeated blows upon the desk, and with the full power of his lungs, impressed upon the minds of his eager listeners -- 'de importance of dere being good Brothers, and Sisters, and not to be such wicked people as you are.' -- 'Dere is lots of wickedness here at City Point, one of de wickedest places on de Earth.'""He said -- 'We are told bout Noah and his family, dey were good people and minded God-Almighty. But dere was lots of wicked people dere dat didn't mind God-Almighty. Dey had horseracing, and card-playing, and God-Almighty told um to stop it, but dey would'nt. Den God-Almighty let de water on de Earth -- cause de people were all so awful wicked.''And de water came up to de first story of de houses, and dey kept on card playing, and horse racing.''Den God Almightly make de water come up to de second story -- and dey kept on card playing, and horse racing.''Den God Almighty make de water come up to de attics -- and den God-Almighty lay back in his arm chair, and hoisted de windows of Jerusalem, and took Noah and his family all in ...'"On another evening the speaker was one of those earnest, zealous Black men, whose style, manner, and language conveys power and lasting impressions. He took for his subject one that most of us have often heard discussed -- the subject of Faith. He went strongly to work to prove that his heavens 'must have lots of faith, faith in de Lord, and dat also de Brudders must have faith in de Sisters, and de Sisters in de Brudders.' He then said, 'We are told dat many years ago dere was a man named Amos, and he hand'nt no faith -- Now one day Amos was up on a high tree, hanging way out on a limb, and de Lord was down on de ground under de tree -- And de Lord look up, - and sing out to Amos, 'Let go dat limb' -- but Amos no hab faith, and no let go.''Den de Lord sing out again -- Amos, I tell you let go dat limb, but Amos no let go dis time. And den de Lord sing out de third time...'Other accounts include Baldwin's meetings with Rebel deserters and prisoners, of the conditions and morale of the Union soldiers, and of the fighting: "Before leaving City Point we could plainly hear the reports, and see the bursting of the shells thrown by the rebels into our lines ... the question of our safety was presented for our consideration... Watching with increasing interest the rebel shells constantly being thrown from Petersburg, we cross the Petersburg and Norfolk Rail-Road and the Jerusalem Plank Road. Arriving at Park-Station we left the cars and proceeded to Gen. Meade's Head Quarters."Near the end of the journal, Baldwin gives an account of several Rebel prisoners: "I took special pains to converse freely and to question [them] carefully ... I asked one of the men how recently he had been paid by their government, to which he replied, he hadn't seen any money for nearly a year, but that it didn't make any difference to him, as their money was so poor he couldn't have 'a decent spree on six months pay.' A very smart appearing Black man who had come into our lines from Richmond, told me that 'his master was an officer in the Rebel army, he acting as his servant. That his master died of wounds received in the service. That just before his death he gave him his freedom papers and one hundred dollars in Silver, but very soon after the authorities at Richmond took from him his papers and money, and put him into the army -- where, he added -- I have staid until this morning when I watched my chance and run away and here I am with Gen. Butler.'The journal concludes with a particularly moving account of his meeting with President Lincoln at the White House: "I called upon President Lincoln by whom I was most cordially received ... From an half hour passed in his presence I became fully convinced that Abraham Lincoln is ... a man of great wisdom, deep, far-seeing penetration, and one whose heart and soul are with his country. I believe it to be the solemn duty of every man who desires to see peace upon a basis of everlasting and universal liberty, to use his influence, be it great or small, for the reelection of Abraham Lincoln. Never, from the first, has my faith been shaken in the ultimate results of this unholy rebellion -- and I do solemnly believe that never was this county so strong, never so near perfection, as today."An historically important and compelling journal by a committed abolitionist who was actively involved in aiding the Union during the Civil War, with notable firsthand accounts of Union troops, Rebel prisoners, freed African-Americans, and his meeting with General Grant and President Lincoln.Detailed list:1. [Manuscript Journal]: Visit to the Armies of the James and the Potomac, Oct. 1864. Quarto. Hand-drawn frontispiece map: "Richmond, Petersburg, and Vicinity in Oct. 1864," and 70 manuscript pages (including 13 manuscript sheets laid-in). Bound in quarter leather and cloth over boards with the title stamped in gilt on the front board. The map (sketched in purple, brown, and black ink) depicts the principal places visited by Baldwin upon the James and Appomattox Rivers, and in the vicinity of the two great armies at that time in the history of the Rebellion. The manuscript pages have been further annotated in ink and pencil by Baldwin. The 13 laid-in manuscript sheets are divided into two sets: "Before using the journal" (eight leaves laid-in at the front) and "After reading the journal" (five leaves laid-in at the back). They were presumably written by Baldwin for the many public readings of the journal that he gave as President of the Boston Young Men's Christian Union.2. LINCOLN, Abraham. Autograph Card Signed: "A. Lincoln." Mounted on an octavo sheet of printed Boston YMCU stationary, with a manuscript note by Baldwin: "Written and handed to me Oct. 10, 1864 -- by Abraham Lincoln at his room in the White House. W.H. Baldwin."3. GRANT, Ulysses S. Autograph Card Signed: "U. S. Grant / Lt. Gen. U.S.A." Mounted onto an octavo sheet of printed Boston YMCU stationary, with a manuscript note by Baldwin: "Written by Gen. Grant on his pine table in his Head-Quarters at City Point, Va. Oct. 6th 1864 and then and there handed to me. W.H. Baldwin."

      [Bookseller: Between the Covers- Rare Books, Inc. ABA]
 11.   Check availability:     ABAA     Link/Print  


         Traité Elémentaire de Chimie Médicale comprenant quelques notions de toxicologie et les principales applications de la chimie a la physiologie, a la pathologie, a la pharmacie et a l'hygiène par Ad. Wurtz Vol. I: Chimie Inorganique - Vol. II: Chimie Organique

      Victor Masson wt Fils - Parigi 1864-1865, PARIGI - Traité Elémentaire de Chimie Médicale Francese Due volumi della seconda metà dell'800 in buono stato, coperta in mezzapelle, dorso in pelle con elementi decorativi incisi a secco, caratteri dorati in bassorilievo, piatti in cartone rigido goffrato, alcuni segni di sfregamento, tagli puntinati in marrone, pagine in ottimo stato, poca gora. Illustrazioni in b. e n. in testo, nel I volume I tavola, fuori formato, ben piegata, con analisi spettrale di alcuni elementi chimici a colori. I e II volume del Traité Elémentaire di Chimie Médicale. La libreria offre per un periodo limitato uno sconto del 20% su tutti i suoi libri. Il prezzo originale dell'articolo era 999,00 euro.

      [Bookseller: Biblioteca di Babele]
 12.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  


         The Scottish Metrical Psalter of A. D. 1635

      Maclure & Macdonald, Lithographers to the Queen, Glasgow 1864 - 229, xxxiv p. Reprinted in Full from the Original Work. Illustrated by Disseratations, Notes & Facsimiles. Respined. Some scuffs to covers and edges of original leather. Discreet library marks. Pages bright. The Church of Scotland approved the text of this Psalter for use by the church in 1650. Originally the work of Francis Rous, he complete his text around 1644. Before the text was approved for use in the Scottish church it was subjected to six years of scrutiny and revision by two different groups of leaders of the church. Every word and phrase was carefully weighed for faithfulness to the original Hebrew texts. [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Attic Books (ABAC, ILAB)]
 13.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  


         Civil War Journal]: Visit to the Armies of the James and the Potomac, Oct. 1864

      1864 - A remarkable 70-page manuscript journal written by William H. Baldwin, a New England businessman, philanthropist, and abolitionist. Baldwin wrote the journal in October 1864, while on a tour of Union military camps and frontline battlefields in the James and Appomattox River valleys near Richmond and Petersburg, Virginia. The journal provides a firsthand account of the activities and conditions of soldiers and of freed African-Americans at City Point, and Baldwin's encounter with both Abraham Lincoln and Ulysses S. Grant, including each of their Signatures which he collected from them on his journey.Born in Brighton, Massachusetts in 1826, Baldwin established a successful import business of woolen goods in 1850 (Baldwin, Baxter and Company). During the Civil War he was a founding and active member of the Ward 11 Boston Soldiers' Relief Commission which was dedicated to providing relief to the families and soldiers of the Army of the Potomac. After retiring from business in 1868, he became president of the Boston Young Men's Christian Union (YMCU) and devoted the rest of his life to philanthropic work for the YMCU and other Boston-based organizations including the Boston School Board, the Children's Mission to the Children of the Destitute, and the American Unitarian Association.The closely written manuscript, title in gilt on the front board, provides a detailed account of all the principal places and points of interest on the James and Appomattox Rivers, and other points in the vicinity, where the two armies fought at the end of the Civil War. These include the headquarters of Generals Grant, Meade, and Hancock, Bermuda Hundreds (Butler's Headquarters), and Butler's Dutch Gap Canal (built primarily by African-American troops), Deep Bottom, and Aiken's Landing (where prisoners were exchanged.) Of the condition and activities of the Union Army, he writes: "Here at City Point as far as the eye can reach you see but one vast array of army tents, for camps and hospitals, while on every side you behold lines of military wagons and ambulances going to and coming from the front continually -- by day and by night."Baldwin gains audience with General Grant at City Point ("with his felt hat, dark suit, without the slightest military rank -- with the ever present cigar") and gives a dramatic firsthand account of the meeting: "In conversation with Gen. Grant one cannot help being struck with his extreme modesty . With a clear and decided tone he spoke in the highest terms of our Generals in the Field . He talked hopefully and with full confidence in the future movements of our Armies. He had but a few minutes (before my first conversation with him) received a dispatch from . Sheridan, and with a voice which showed the emotions of his heart he said -- 'Sheridan tells me that he has not only fed his Army all along his route from rebel supplies but reports to me a balance in hand of 3000 cattle.' It was a glorious dispatch to us, but made much more so by hearing it from him . The great question with our Patriotic People is -- 'when is Gen. Grant going into Richmond?' Gen. Grant has an object far above the mere fact of 'going into Richmond' as he plainly stated in our interviews with him. I said to him, 'I suppose you do not state when you want to go into Richmond,' to which he replied, 'I want to go into Richmond, but I want to destroy their Army.'"Baldwin also provides a vivid firsthand account of the activities of freed slaves, in which he includes much of their spoken dialect (transcribed to the best of his ability), especially that of preachers at evening meetings: "At City Point and all along our lines are large numbers of Black families, those who have joined our Armies in their marches through Virginia . The men -- those not in the Army -- are employed either as teamsters, or laborers, are faithful in whatever position they are placed."We were strongly impressed with their great religious zeal and earnestness by attending at times the

      [Bookseller: Between the Covers-Rare Books, Inc. ABAA]
 14.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  


         A Mission to Gelele, King of Dahome. With notices of the so-called ?Amazons,? the Grand Customs, the Yearly Customs, the Human Sacrifices, the Present State of the Slave Trade, and the Negro's Place in Nature.

      1864 - Second edition. 2 vols. Each with a frontispiece and other plates. 8vo. Original maroon publisher's cloth, gilt; professionally repaired, very good.pp. xvii, 386; vi, 413,London, Tinsley Brothers, Dedicated to his Spanish friends in Fernando Po, Burton describes herein his mission to Dahomey, the aim of which had been to end slave raiding and human sacrifice. Despite the presentation of suitable gifts to King Gelele the mission was not a diplomatic success. [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Maggs Bros. Ltd ABA, ILAB, PBFA, BA]
 15.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  


         [Civil War Journal]: Visit to the Armies of the James and the Potomac, Oct. 1864

      1864. Very Good. A remarkable 70-page manuscript journal written by William H. Baldwin, a New England businessman, philanthropist, and abolitionist. Baldwin wrote the journal in October 1864, while on a tour of Union military camps and frontline battlefields in the James and Appomattox River valleys near Richmond and Petersburg, Virginia. The journal provides a firsthand account of the activities and conditions of soldiers and of freed African-Americans at City Point, and Baldwin's encounter with both Abraham Lincoln and Ulysses S. Grant, including each of their Signatures which he collected from them on his journey.Born in Brighton, Massachusetts in 1826, Baldwin established a successful import business of woolen goods in 1850 (Baldwin, Baxter and Company). During the Civil War he was a founding and active member of the Ward 11 Boston Soldiers' Relief Commission which was dedicated to providing relief to the families and soldiers of the Army of the Potomac. After retiring from business in 1868, he became president of the Boston Young Men's Christian Union (YMCU) and devoted the rest of his life to philanthropic work for the YMCU and other Boston-based organizations including the Boston School Board, the Children's Mission to the Children of the Destitute, and the American Unitarian Association.The closely written manuscript, title in gilt on the front board, provides a detailed account of all the principal places and points of interest on the James and Appomattox Rivers, and other points in the vicinity, where the two armies fought at the end of the Civil War. These include the headquarters of Generals Grant, Meade, and Hancock, Bermuda Hundreds (Butler's Headquarters), and Butler's Dutch Gap Canal (built primarily by African-American troops), Deep Bottom, and Aiken's Landing (where prisoners were exchanged.) Of the condition and activities of the Union Army, he writes: "Here at City Point as far as the eye can reach you see but one vast array of army tents, for camps and hospitals, while on every side you behold lines of military wagons and ambulances going to and coming from the front continually -- by day and by night."Baldwin gains audience with General Grant at City Point ("with his felt hat, dark suit, without the slightest military rank -- with the ever present cigar") and gives a dramatic firsthand account of the meeting: "In conversation with Gen. Grant one cannot help being struck with his extreme modesty ... With a clear and decided tone he spoke in the highest terms of our Generals in the Field ... He talked hopefully and with full confidence in the future movements of our Armies. He had but a few minutes (before my first conversation with him) received a dispatch from ... Sheridan, and with a voice which showed the emotions of his heart he said -- 'Sheridan tells me that he has not only fed his Army all along his route from rebel supplies but reports to me a balance in hand of 3000 cattle.' It was a glorious dispatch to us, but made much more so by hearing it from him ... The great question with our Patriotic People is -- 'when is Gen. Grant going into Richmond?' Gen. Grant has an object far above the mere fact of 'going into Richmond' as he plainly stated in our interviews with him. I said to him, 'I suppose you do not state when you want to go into Richmond,' to which he replied, 'I want to go into Richmond, but I want to destroy their Army.'"Baldwin also provides a vivid firsthand account of the activities of freed slaves, in which he includes much of their spoken dialect (transcribed to the best of his ability), especially that of preachers at evening meetings: "At City Point and all along our lines are large numbers of Black families, those who have joined our Armies in their marches through Virginia ... The men -- those not in the Army -- are employed either as teamsters, or laborers, are faithful in whatever position they are placed.""We were strongly impressed with their great religious zeal and earnestness by attending at times their evening meetings for exhortation and prayer. The meetings were held in the open air, not far from Gen. Grant's Head-Quarters ... A candle upon a common pine table, and a lantern hanging from the side of a shed near by, gave light to the men, women, and children assembled. Their rough, crude, ideas of God ... [were] plainly shown by their language of which I will attempt to give you an idea. ...""The first speaker I heard was a stout, hearty, Black man, who began by stating -- 'dat Paul says if you can get de attention of de audience much good can be done -- and dat he would take for his subject on dis occasion -- Life and Salvation, Hell and Damnation.'""He then in language of unequaled eloquence, with oft repeated blows upon the desk, and with the full power of his lungs, impressed upon the minds of his eager listeners -- 'de importance of dere being good Brothers, and Sisters, and not to be such wicked people as you are.' -- 'Dere is lots of wickedness here at City Point, one of de wickedest places on de Earth.'""He said -- 'We are told bout Noah and his family, dey were good people and minded God-Almighty. But dere was lots of wicked people dere dat didn't mind God-Almighty. Dey had horseracing, and card-playing, and God-Almighty told um to stop it, but dey would'nt. Den God-Almighty let de water on de Earth -- cause de people were all so awful wicked.''And de water came up to de first story of de houses, and dey kept on card playing, and horse racing.''Den God Almightly make de water come up to de second story -- and dey kept on card playing, and horse racing.''Den God Almighty make de water come up to de attics -- and den God-Almighty lay back in his arm chair, and hoisted de windows of Jerusalem, and took Noah and his family all in ...'"On another evening the speaker was one of those earnest, zealous Black men, whose style, manner, and language conveys power and lasting impressions. He took for his subject one that most of us have often heard discussed -- the subject of Faith. He went strongly to work to prove that his heavens 'must have lots of faith, faith in de Lord, and dat also de Brudders must have faith in de Sisters, and de Sisters in de Brudders.' He then said, 'We are told dat many years ago dere was a man named Amos, and he hand'nt no faith -- Now one day Amos was up on a high tree, hanging way out on a limb, and de Lord was down on de ground under de tree -- And de Lord look up, - and sing out to Amos, 'Let go dat limb' -- but Amos no hab faith, and no let go.''Den de Lord sing out again -- Amos, I tell you let go dat limb, but Amos no let go dis time. And den de Lord sing out de third time...'Other accounts include Baldwin's meetings with Rebel deserters and prisoners, of the conditions and morale of the Union soldiers, and of the fighting: "Before leaving City Point we could plainly hear the reports, and see the bursting of the shells thrown by the rebels into our lines ... the question of our safety was presented for our consideration... Watching with increasing interest the rebel shells constantly being thrown from Petersburg, we cross the Petersburg and Norfolk Rail-Road and the Jerusalem Plank Road. Arriving at Park-Station we left the cars and proceeded to Gen. Meade's Head Quarters."Near the end of the journal, Baldwin gives an account of several Rebel prisoners: "I took special pains to converse freely and to question [them] carefully ... I asked one of the men how recently he had been paid by their government, to which he replied, he hadn't seen any money for nearly a year, but that it didn't make any difference to him, as their money was so poor he couldn't have 'a decent spree on six months pay.' A very smart appearing Black man who had come into our lines from Richmond, told me that 'his master was an officer in the Rebel army, he acting as his servant. That his master died of wounds received in the service. That just before his death he gave him his freedom papers and one hundred dollars in Silver, but very soon after the authorities at Richmond took from him his papers and money, and put him into the army -- where, he added -- I have staid until this morning when I watched my chance and run away and here I am with Gen. Butler.'The journal concludes with a particularly moving account of his meeting with President Lincoln at the White House: "I called upon President Lincoln by whom I was most cordially received ... From an half hour passed in his presence I became fully convinced that Abraham Lincoln is ... a man of great wisdom, deep, far-seeing penetration, and one whose heart and soul are with his country. I believe it to be the solemn duty of every man who desires to see peace upon a basis of everlasting and universal liberty, to use his influence, be it great or small, for the reelection of Abraham Lincoln. Never, from the first, has my faith been shaken in the ultimate results of this unholy rebellion -- and I do solemnly believe that never was this county so strong, never so near perfection, as today."An historically important and compelling journal by a committed abolitionist who was actively involved in aiding the Union during the Civil War, with notable firsthand accounts of Union troops, Rebel prisoners, freed African-Americans, and his meeting with General Grant and President Lincoln.Detailed list:1. [Manuscript Journal]: Visit to the Armies of the James and the Potomac, Oct. 1864. Quarto. Hand-drawn frontispiece map: "Richmond, Petersburg, and Vicinity in Oct. 1864," and 70 manuscript pages (including 13 manuscript sheets laid-in). Bound in quarter leather and cloth over boards with the title stamped in gilt on the front board. The map (sketched in purple, brown, and black ink) depicts the principal places visited by Baldwin upon the James and Appomattox Rivers, and in the vicinity of the two great armies at that time in the history of the Rebellion. The manuscript pages have been further annotated in ink and pencil by Baldwin. The 13 laid-in manuscript sheets are divided into two sets: "Before using the journal" (eight leaves laid-in at the front) and "After reading the journal" (five leaves laid-in at the back). They were presumably written by Baldwin for the many public readings of the journal that he gave as President of the Boston Young Men's Christian Union.2. LINCOLN, Abraham. Autograph Card Signed: "A. Lincoln." Mounted on an octavo sheet of printed Boston YMCU stationary, with a manuscript note by Baldwin: "Written and handed to me Oct. 10, 1864 -- by Abraham Lincoln at his room in the White House. W.H. Baldwin."3. GRANT, Ulysses S. Autograph Card Signed: "U. S. Grant / Lt. Gen. U.S.A." Mounted onto an octavo sheet of printed Boston YMCU stationary, with a manuscript note by Baldwin: "Written by Gen. Grant on his pine table in his Head-Quarters at City Point, Va. Oct. 6th 1864 and then and there handed to me. W.H. Baldwin."

      [Bookseller: Between the Covers- Rare Books, Inc. ABA]
 16.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  


         Montreux (Canton de Vaud).

      Imp. Lemercier, Paris, (feuille:) 26, s.d., vers 1864, - 27.5x39. cm., lithographie tirée en 3 couleurs, 1 feuille (38x48) Please notify before visiting to see a book. Prices are excl. VAT/TVA (only Switzerland) & postage.

      [Bookseller: Harteveld Rare Books Ltd.]
 17.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  


         Civil War

      Dec. 19, 1864. A letter from a Confederate Brigadier General, George T. Anderson dated Dec. 19th, 1864 reads in part, " I . . . at Bagda yesterday and learned from Johnnie that the . . . had reinforced two while Regs on the Island. I believe it reliable they have been making frequent visits to Clarksville but my horses are so poor . . . I sent a request to your office about the 1st of Nov. to send after some deserters that had left my company. Please send it to me with your action on the matter."

Anderson was a very respected man of the Confederacy in the Civil War. Before he became the General he had acquired his war experience from the conflict with Mexico, where he served as a captain in 1846. When the 11th Georgia regiment was organized in 1861, he was elected as colonel and went with his regiment to in Virginia. During the Seven Days battles around Richmond, he led a brigade consisting of the First Regulars, Eleventh, Seven, Eighth, and Ninth Georgia regiment. Still upholding the rank of colonel, Anderson led his brigade through the ordeals of Second Manassas and Sharpsburg. During this time he showed such gallantry and showed much skill in handling his troops that in November of 1862, he had received the commission of brigadier-general.

At the time of the Battle of Chancellorsville, he was fighting alongside the famous Confederate General, General Longstreet. At this time, the 59th Georgia Volunteer Infantry had replaced the 7th, 8th, 9th, 11th, and 59th Georgia Regiments for the remainder of the war. During The Battle of Gettysburg on July 2, 1863 General Robert E. Lee directed Longstreet to take two divisions of I Corps and march south until they reached the Federal forces and take control of the hill Little Round Top. One of the divisions was Andersons. They had a total force of nearly 20,000 men. The Union army was well prepared for Lee's offensive attack. Six of the seven corps had arrived on the battlefield. Longstreet was the first to attack. After some heavy fighting the Confederacy started gaining ground over the Union. However, the Union had sent for reinforcements, which forced the Confederacy to retire. During the battle each side had lost 9,000 men each. G. T. Anderson was one of the severely wounded Generals


      [Bookseller: University Archives]
 18.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  


         (xt) THE JEWISH CHRONICLE. JAN 1, 1864-DEC 29, 1865 [WHOLE NRS. 472-576]. COMPLETE RUN OF 2 YEARS (105 ISSUES)

      London : Abraham Benisch(1864-1865). 1st edition. Originally bound into 2 large volumes; Lacks outer bindings, original period internal sewn binding in tact. Folio, 840 pages (8 pages each issue. Complete for 1866 and first half of 1867. English with occasional Hebrew. The Jewish Chronicle, Founded in 1841, it is the oldest continuously published Jewish newspaper in the world. It was initially under the editorship of D. Meldola and M. Angel. "On Oct 18, 1844, to the editorship of Joseph Mitchell, it took the title of "The Jewish Chronicle (New Series) and Working Man's Friend"; it appeared only fortnightly till July 9, 1847, when it became a weekly; from Aug. 18, 1854, it was edited by M. H. Bresslau, who changed the title to "The Jewish Chronicle and Hebrew Observer. " From Jan. 12, 1855, A. Benisch assumed the editorship, which he retained till April 2, 1869, when Michael Henry took charge of the paper until his death" (JE, 1905) . This run from the final 2 years of the American Civil War, includes numerous ads and announcements from the period, indicating deaths, weddings, and celebrations of all kinds, from across the UK, the British Empire, English Speaking Jewry and, indeed, the entire world. Anniversary dinners and events often list participants, which sometimes read like who's who's of Anglo-jewry of the period, and at other times mention names from the far reaches of the British Empire. Too many various reports, letters, discussions, and ads to describe, SUBJECT(S) : Jews -- Great Britain -- Newspapers. First and final leaves show exposure wear, as expected, with a bit of loss along the outer margin of the first leaf (of issue 472) , and the final leaf (of issue 576) lacking about 1/8 of leaf, with text loss. Issue 550 has mostly come loose, with edgewear just touching the outer letters along the outside margins one one leaf. Mid-19th century paper has held up well, Good solid condition overall. Scarce to come up in the trade. (br-11-3)

      [Bookseller: Dan Wyman Books]
 19.   Check availability:     Bibliophile     Link/Print  


         Civil War General R.W. Johnson -Large Original Oil Painting, Bible, and his Cane

      - Items include: 1. An original 28" x 34" oil painting by Sarah McKnight. Painting is restored and clean. Framed good with expected wear. 2. Original walking stick. Gifted to general R.W. Johnson during the Civil War. Repairs to wood lower area, but very attractive with lots of patina. This walking stick was gifted from Major E.B. Whitman of the Andersonville Prison in Georgia. 3. Original Family Bible (of Johnson's wife) with family history. 4. An original muster role from Georgia, 1864. 5. 8" x 10" photo black and white copy of a younger R.W. Johnson [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Cross and Crown Rare Books]
 20.   Check availability:     IberLibro     Link/Print  


         On The Origin Of Species By Means Of Natural Selection or the Preservation Of Favoured Races In The Struggle For Life

      D. Appleton, New York 1864 - An exceptionally nice example of this title. 1864 New York - "A New Edition, Revised And Augmented By The Author". There is a closed 1/8 inch split in the cloth at the top and the bottom of the spine. Else the book is very clean, bright and tightly bound with fine, unworn and unbumped edges. In the original dark green cloth. The only faults in the book are that the gilt lettering on the spine is dull (the spine is not sunfaded - the same green shade as the covers). Also the previous owner has his small inked inscription on the top of the inner cover. The endpapers are immaculate yellow with the pages being still stiff and very crisp. No foxing. 2 endpapers, Half-Title, Title Page, xi, 440 pages, 2 pages catalogs (numbered 3 and 4) and 2 endpapers. There are plain paper endpapers facing the yellow endpapers. The pull-out chart is between pages 108 and 109. Size: 8vo - over 7¾" - 9¾" tall [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Antiquarian Books of Boston]
 21.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  


         Beiträge zur Kenntniss der Poesie der Alten Araber.

      Hannover: Carl Rümpler, 1864 - Octavo (240 x 155 mm). Early-20th-century blue cloth, gilt-lettered red morocco label and gilt fleur-de-lys to spine, marbled endpapers, top edge red. Shelf-mark label to spine, ink stamp of the Institut Catholique de Toulouse to the title page and p. 39. Extremities lightly rubbed, spine darkened, faint soiling to covers, marginal browning, the occasional spot or mark. A very good copy. Frequent Arabic types. First edition of this foundational study of early Arabic poetry, from the collection of Louis Desnoyers (1874-1928), noted professor of oriental languages at the Institut Catholique de Toulouse, with his ink-stamp to the title page. Nöldeke worked almost entirely from unpublished manuscripts holdings in the libraries of Berlin, Gotha, and Leiden. His account discusses the Mu'allaqat, the Lamiyat al-'Arab of al-Shanfarah, Ibn Qutaybah's Tabaqat al-Shu'ara', and works by lesser-known figures such as Arabian Jews and Mutammim ibn Nuwayrah, many of which are printed in the original Arabic. Nöldeke (1836-1930) was one of the greatest Semitists of the 19th century. He also wrote a highly influential study of the Qur'an, and numerous grammars. One of his main theses was that much early Arabic poetry was written at a later date. Uncommon: no copies traced at auction. [Attributes: First Edition]

      [Bookseller: Peter Harrington. ABA member]
 22.   Check availability:     ZVAB     Link/Print  


         Connecticut Colonel Sketches Jacksonville, Florida Headquarters, Muses on the Fountain of Youth, Supports Freed Slaves Getting Land and Recognizes their Humanity

      Jacksonville, FL 1864 - Autograph Letter Signed, to his wife, [Jacksonville, Fla.], [April?] 8, 1864. 16 pp., 8 x 10 in., on 4 folding sheets stitched together. "Just make up your mind that negro nature & human white nature are very near alike.""Every now & then it is proclaimed with great joy that Mr So & so, some northern nabob or speculator has purchased some rebel plantation & prepares to work the same. . It's of more consequence locally & nationally, thus the negro should buy & toil as he surely will on his acre of land, than that princely men in Illinois should have inserted his loose change in a southern plantation."Connecticut native William H. Noble, writing to his wife, responds to rumors of the fountain of youth, vilifies northerner plantation renters who continued the Southern system as new feudal barons, and calls for the redistribution of plantations to former slaves to ensure national stability. Jacksonville, Florida, was occupied and then abandoned by the Union four times. The result was a broken, skeletal city at the Civil War's conclusion.Noble reflects on how the African Americans' freedom will change Southern and national life, and that regardless of race, he believed human nature was the same. Further, the former slaves needed an interest in and responsibility for their own advancement. Presaging Booker T. Washington, he thinks developing industry more important than carpetbaggers coming south offering education. With a detailed sketch of headquarters in Jacksonville, including tents, stables, and the brigade flagstaff. Excerpts"An artillery officer told me yesterday that there is a spot down the coast somewhere at which people never die. I am going to live down there. I want to see how this country I am helping to save and remake gets along and grows & flourishes in the coming years."The truth is there are but very few men as old as I really am in point of years in the army, and I have no doubt I look old to them. But I am not in point of the elements of youth & age & their manifestations more than half the years. I think very likely however that the change in the Status of the negro will show that race to occupy the place now accorded to the Irish and push up the Irish girls a peg or two. That is just what the Irish did for the American help. When I was young there were no Irish field or house servitors. All were Yankeys. Well the irish are dreadfully down on the negroes. American laborers used to be very hard on the Irish. But God works wonders in spite of mans blindness and I have no doubt in more ways than one he will do so with the Negro. But I see but very few contrabands. My Regiment has never yet penetrated into a virgin Ethiopian place. In fact wherever we have been the yanks have one time & another been before us and culled them out for soldiers or Sambo has taken his chance and gone north. The fact is the quicker Sambo learns to take care of himself and is made so to do the better. But it wont by apprenticeing him to some one who only cares to get the most possible out of him. Forcing him to work for set wages to remain in a fixed place, & to toil for a man who buys of the government his industry is but a mockery of Freedom. Sambo has the same right & must be treated like any other human & not as if his skin hid under its somber hue a different nature, or a soul governed by different impulses passions & motives. Who cares whether the world has cotton princes or not. Let the production run out if need be. Don't bother yourself about obtuse fancies on the negro question & his industry. Take no thought about large Estates going to waste & without culture. Have no anxiety but that human nature & niger nature will work out its own salvation if you give it a chance. Sambo wont work if you feed him a plumb pudding and send down a lot of infatuated people who should make little nigs. fully acquainted with general geography, the distribution of offices, universal History in 24 l. (See website for full description)

      [Bookseller: Seth Kaller Inc.]
 23.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  


         The Nile Basin. Part I. Showing Tanganyika to be Ptolemy's Western Lake Reservoir. A memoir read before the Royal Geographical Society, November 14, 1864. With prefatory remarks . Part II. Captain Speke's Discovery of the Source of the Nile. A review by James M'Queen .

      London Tinsley Brothers 1864 - First edition. 8vo., 195pp., 4 pages ads at end, 3 maps, original purple-brown cloth gilt, neat repairs to joints and spine, old stamps to verso of title and last leaf, a very good copy. Scarce. Following the death of Speke, on the eve of his proposed debate with Burton concerning the source of the Nile, there was a great increase in sympathy for the unfortunate explorer. Indeed, in Speke's obituary in the Times, he was credited with being the true discoverer of this holy grail of African adventurers. All this was too much for Burton who delivered before the Royal Geographical Society the speech he had intended for his debate with Speke. This lecture is here printed for the first time, along with MacQueen's highly critical remarks on Speke. MacQueen had first confronted Speke in a meeting of the R.G.S. in June 1859, questioning the accuracy of his quoted latitudes relative to vegetation at which Speke was evasive. Burton tried to make out that he bore Speke no ill-will, but contemporary reviews saw the book as a tasteless attack upon a dead man. Penzerp74-75; Casada 49. [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Shapero Rare Books]
 24.   Check availability:     ZVAB     Link/Print  


         A Mission to Gelele King of Dahome With notices of the so called Amazons the Grand Customs the Yearly Customs the Human Sacrifices the Present State of the Slave Trade and the Negros Place in Nature

      Second edition. 2 vols. Each with a frontispiece and other plates. 8vo. Original maroon publisher's cloth, gilt; professionally repaired, very good. pp. xvii, 386; vi, 413,London, Tinsley Brothers,

      [Bookseller: Maggs Bros. Ltd.]
 25.   Check availability:     Direct From Seller     Link/Print  


         OUR MUTUAL FRIEND

      Chapman & Hall, London 1864 - 20 parts in 19. Some advert variances (+/-) from that found listed in Hatton & Cleaver; specific collation supplied on request. Illustrated with 40 plates by Marcus Stone. 8vo. 8-3/4" x 5-5/8" Age-toning. 1st two parts, as well as the final, show some wear & edge chipping. Part 12 with largish chip to top of front wrapper, affected "April". Part 15 lacking tip of front wrapper lower corner. Part 18 with tear to rear wrapper fore-edge. Overall condition of Parts: VG - VG+. Case: Some minor wear, with interior lip showing some chafing at top corners [from removal of top portion's tight fit]. Overall, VG+. Original green printed wrappers. Housed in a custom chemise and deep green full morocco pull-apart case, with elaborate gilt decoration to spine 1st edition (Hatton & Cleaver, pp. 345 - 370). [Attributes: Soft Cover]

      [Bookseller: Tavistock Books, ABAA]
 26.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  


         Our Mutual Friend.

      Chapman & Hall. 1864-65 - FIRST EDITION. With illustrations by Marcus Stone. XX original parts in XIX. Orig. green pictorial wrappers; some sl. chipped at fore-edge, spines cracking in places, the occasional tear; several spines carefully repaired, spine defective Part XVIII. In dark blue cloth fold-over box. Collated with Hatton & Cleaver. A good-plus set, retaining nearly all the original advertisements. With the following omissions: Part XI, lacks slip to follow plates; Part XIV, lacks 4pp Economic Life Assurance ad. to follow plates (often missing); Part XVI, lacks 2pp ad. for Mappin, Webb & Co.; Part XIX/XX, lacks 4pp Economic Life Assurance ad. to follow plates. The De Jongh?s ad. in Part IX is in a different state from that described in H&C; The 4pp ad. for Chapman & Hall in Part VI is bound in upside down. N.B. With the slip for Foreign Bank Notes in Part XIX/XX, ?often found wanting?. [Attributes: First Edition; Soft Cover]

      [Bookseller: Jarndyce, The 19th Century Booksellers]
 27.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  


         WALK ACROSS AFRICA or Domestic Scenes from My Nile Journal.

      Edinburgh William Blackwood and Sons 1864 - First edition. With the folding map contained in pocket in back cover. 8vo, in fine period three-quarter dark green calf and marbled boards, red morocco lettering label gilt, elaborate gilt tooled panels within compartments of the spine, quite handsome. xviii, 452 pp. A very desirable copy indeed, internally exceptionally clean and fresh, the very handsome binding very well preserved indeed, The RARE first edition of one of the most elusive of the early African exploring books. James Grant accompanied Speke on his journey across Africa to solve the riddle of the source of the Nile. Meant as a companion to Speke’s account of the journey, Grant explores the "ordinary life and pursuits, the habits and feelings of the natives" and the economic potential of the countries they traveled. [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Buddenbrooks, Inc. ABAA]
 28.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  


         A walk across Africa or domestic scenes from my Nile journal.

      Blackwood Edinburgh and London 1864 - First edition. 8vo., xviii, 452pp., later half calf gilt, red morocco label, an excellent copy. One of the scarcer Nile accounts. "A monumental work of exploration, this represents Grant's experiences travelling with John Hanning Speke from Zanzibar to the source of the Nile at Lake Victoria, naming Ripon Falls, then trekking down river to the Mediterranean Sea. There are numerous descriptions of the terrain and people, with sporting incidents throughout ." - Czech. Czech p66. [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Shapero Rare Books]
 29.   Check availability:     ZVAB     Link/Print  


         A Chronicle of England 55 BC - 1485 AD

      London, Longman Green 1864 - In a magnificent full red Morocco gilt binding I do believe this copy is the equal of any offered today at any price and definitely superior to most.condition is great, colours are fresh and bright. Written and illustrated by James E.Doyle, the designs engraved and printed in colour by Edmund Evans of London. The text within borders is perfect, clean as new as are the superb bright plates. Title in red and black. The binding uses heavy beveled edge boards with extensive gilt borders and central arms to both front and rear, the spine with high raised bands with fleur de lies in compartments, swirl marbled end papers, all ends gilt, nothing loose or out of line, a few slight rubs to the binding and bottom edge.joints perfect. Light inscription to the first owner dated 1864. Both the book and its binding are as English as you could be and in truly lovely condition throughout with 81 illustrations. It measures 220 x 280 x 60 mm's and weighs 3 kg. Please view the photographs for more information. We sell rare books priced fairly for both collections and investments, always putting the buyer first on price and a safe, fast registered delivery. All my items for sale are guaranteed to be as described. Everything advertised has been viewed and verified as the description indicates. All items will be posted within 1 to 2 working days after payment has been received. Items are guaranteed to be very well packaged prior to postage. Tracking details will be forwarded to the purchaser. [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Markisons]
 30.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  


         Regulations in Reference to Four Per Cent. Treasury Department. Confederate States of America

      Richmond, VA 1864 - Single sheet, 8 1/2 by 5 1/4 inches. Lightweight newsprint-style paper. Page is toned, lightly soiled with minor chipping to edges. Light vertical crease. Confederate imprint. Trenholm was Secretary of the Treasury of the Confederate States of America during the last year of the Civil War and was in office starting July 18, 1864. Regulations were in reference to Four Percent Certificates that had been received by Tax Collectors on an informal basis that were not in strict accordance with instructions. Regulations mention the impact of military operations on mail communications. ; 8vo 8" - 9" tall; 1 pp [Attributes: First Edition; Soft Cover]

      [Bookseller: Back of Beyond Books, ABAA]
 31.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  


         The Dolomite Mountains: Excursions through Tyrol, Carinthia, Carniola, & Friuli in 1861, 1862, & 1863.

      1864 - London, Longman, 1864, 8vo bella legatura in mezzo marocchino rosso con angoli rinforzati, dorso finemente lavorato con titolie fregi dorati , taglio superiore in oro, pp. XX-576 e con sei tavole + due carte geografiche ripiegate. Numerose incisioni in legno nel testo, le sei cromolitografie sono : Monte Civetta con il lago e il villaggio di Alleghe, il Catinaccio, il Sasso Lungo e il Sasso Piatto, il Pelmo dal monte Zucco, la Croda Malcora presso Cortina, Castel Pietra in Primiero e due grandi carte geografiche colorate intitolate : "Map of the South Eastern Alps" e "Geological Map of part of the district of Predazzo, St. Cassian, and the Seisser Alp in South Tyrol". Stupenda descrizione delle Dolomiti per ricchezza di tavole e notizie di questa prima edizione della più importante opera a carattere turistico che contiene oltre a notizie storiche e delle ascese ad alcune vette, un interessante capitolo scientifico (geografia, mineralogia, geologia). In eccellenti condizioni.

      [Bookseller: Libreria Piani già Naturalistica Snc]
 32.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  


         Margaret Denzil?s History. Annotated by her husband. Reprinted from the ?Cornhill Magazine?.

      Smith, Elder & Co. 1864 - FIRST EDITION. 2 vols. Original green sand-grained cloth, boards blocked in blind, spine decorated and lettered in gilt. Apart from two slightly loose gatherings in vol. I, FINE. 2pp ads. in both volumes. Sadleir 1064; Wolff 2741. Greenwood was one of the leading editors of the late Victorian period, as well as a journalist and novelist. He wrote the final chapters to Mrs. Gaskell?s Wives & Daughters after her death, and also to Thackeray?s Denis Duval. Margaret Denzil?s History was first published in the Cornhill Magazine November 1863 to October 1864, a ?sensation? novel involving adoption, bigamy, seduction and suspected murder, though in fact no actual murder takes place. Sutherland?s synopsis skilfully negotiates the intricacies of an extremely complicated plot. [Attributes: First Edition; Soft Cover]

      [Bookseller: Jarndyce, The 19th Century Booksellers]
 33.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  


         What Led to the Discovery of the Source of the Nile

      Edinburgh and London: William Blackwood and Sons,, 1864. Octavo. Original reddish-brown cloth, titles to spine gilt, blind panels to the boards, green coated endpapers, binder's ticket of Edmonds & Remnants to the rear pastedown. Frontispiece, folding map of the Somali coast and double-page map of Eastern Africa. Complete with the publisher's 32-page catalogue to rear. Spine rolled, mild darkening to cloth in places, more consistent on the spine, a few trivial marks, light spotting to prelims and folding map, nevertheless an excellent copy, internally clean, the gilt spine-decoration notably bright. First edition of Speke's account of his momentous discovery of Lakes Victoria and Tanganyika, undoubtedly less common that his Journal of the Discovery of the Source of the Nile, especially so in collector's condition; this copy in a variant binding with smaller lettering on the spine and "Capt. Speke" with the letter "t" in superscript. Although it was published the year after the Journal, this work documents the first expedition arranged by the Royal Geographical Society, during which his corrosive rift with Burton first developed over Speke's disputed sighting of Victoria. Speke "had the choice in What Led … of escalating the quarrel or letting things stand as they were. In the event, he did not dramatically change the status quo, but neither did he let slip some chances to challenge Burton further, especially in his account of how he happened to go alone to the Victoria Nyanza" (Carnochan, The Sad Story of Burton, Speke, and the Nile, p. 62).

      [Bookseller: Peter Harrington]
 34.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  


         Journal 'D' of William D. Olmsted & Co. September 1, 1863 through June 29, 1864

      [ Genessee County, New York ]: Not published, 1864. First Edition. Boards. Very Good. First Edition. 360 numbered pages plus notations on endpapers. Folio (9 x 13 3/4 inches). Stamped reverse calf with leather with diced leather reinforcements on the edges and center of spine.Three compartment labels on the spine: "Journal | D | W.D.O. & Co." the middle on red leather, the others on brown. Marbled endpapers. "W. D. Olmsted & Co. Journal D" inked on flyleaf. Entirely manuscript journal/ledger in multiple hands with additional notes on the blank endpapers. Sound, if worn. Boards. Beer's work "Our County and it's people, A Descriptive work on Genessee County, New York", 1890 includes the following biographical note on William D. Olmsted: "Olmsted, William D. p. o. Oakfield, N. Y., was born in Le Roy, February 19, 1832, a son of Stephen and Barbara (Parmelee) Olmsted. His father was a native of Vermont and came to Genesee county at an early day, with less than one dollar in money and an axe, and took up land in Le Roy; he died in 1883. W. D. Olmsted was educated at Cary Collegiate Seminary and Old Round House at Le Roy. After finishing his schooling he engaged in the milling business. As an upright, trustworthy citizen Mr. Olmsted has established an undoubted claim, and his interest in the good of his town and its people is worthy of note. His wife was Frances A. Parmelee, who has borne him two sons - Carlos P. and Herbert W." The journal records many interesting items. One entry J Lathrop & Co [bankers in Le Roy] draft $1000 Sep 1,, 1863. Another J Lathrop & Co. to cash: "To this amt Pennsylvannia money" for $150.Many transactions with certain kinds and amounts of lumber - we see pine, oak, hemlock, black walnut moulding, etc. Projects include doors, windows, sash, coffin, clapboards, shingles, norway [pine?], bead, moulding, matched, lath bundles, etc. Many mentions of Batavia Yard (lumber yard?). Each transaction with named customer or supplier, amount, and details about what was being sold/purchased. Mention of turning, machine work, sawing, etc. Hundreds of names of customers, private and institutional. Oddities like glazing street lamps, ash for a cider press, ballusters, and the normal like railroad/railway and cartage charges. That's in the first 50 pages or so we scanned through. A quick flip through finds on p166 "To paid for a soldier" $5, use of saw, and 223 feet of culls. Shortly after Bot. Sleigh Shoes. A wealth of research possibilities into a type of business not often found.

      [Bookseller: Kuenzig Books, ABAA/ILAB ]
 35.   Check availability:     ABAA     Link/Print  


        Journals and Reports of Two Voyages to the Glenelg River, and the North-West Coast of Australia. 1863-4

      1864 - First edition. Text in double-column. 8vo. Original printed stiff green wrappers, rebacked, unopened, ms. ink notations to upper wrapper, else fine. The Brooke-Hitching copy. 88pp. Perth, A. Shenton, Very rare, this is just the second copy to appear on the market since 1978. A group of pastoralists lead by Kenneth Brown and Frederick Panter made two expeditions to the Kimberly region of Western Australia and specifically the Glenelg River. ?Sailing from Champion Bay in June 1863 in the schooner Flying Foam, Brown, Martin and Hammersley arrived in Doubtful Bay, from where they ascended to the lower rapids of the Glenelg and explored a land route to Camden Harbour. Returning to the mouth of the Glenelg they continued to Collier Bay, explored the shores of Shoal Bay and found a river that flowed into the southeastern corner of Secure Bay. During the voyage Martin named Maitland Bay after Brown's brother. The following year Brown filed a suit against Burges and others, seeking payment for his part in the expedition, but they case was evenutally settled out of court. A second expedition, mounted in 1864 by Martin, Frederick Kennedy Panter and others, took a party from Champion Bay to Brecknock Harbour and the Bedout Islands? (Howgego). Reprinted from the Perth Gazette, it is divided into five sections: ?Journal of a voyage of exploration to the Glenelg River and the North-west coast of Australia, 1863?; ?Report for the information of . the Governor of Western Australia and the promoters of the North-Western Expedition of 1864, on the voyage and the resources of the districts explored?; ?Mr. Panter's report? by Frederick Kennedy Panter; ?Journal of a voyage of exploration to Brecknock Harbor and Roebuck Bay on the North-West Coast of Australia in March, April and May, 1864?; and ?The Aborigines of the district of Roebuck Bay.? This last section includes a vocabulary of the ?sea-coast tribes ? and ?natives of the interior.? Unlike this copy, Ferguson mentions that some include two maps. Ferguson, 11015 and 12302; Wantrup 188; Howgego, B77. [Attributes: Soft Cover]

      [Bookseller: Maggs Bros. Ltd ABA, ILAB, PBFA, BA]
 36.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  

______________________________________________________________________________
More rare books found from 1864


      Home     Wants Manager     Library Search     561 Years   Links     Contact      Search Help      Terms of Service     


Copyright © 2017 viaLibri™ Limited. All rights reserved.