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Displayed below are some selected recent viaLibri matches for books published in 1836

        Tah Col O Quoit, A Sauk and Fox Chief

      Philadelphia 1836 - Thomas L. McKenney & James Hall (1785-1859 / 1793-1868) Illustrated plate from the History of the Indian Tribes of North America With Biographical Sketches and Anecdotes of The Principal Chiefs Embellished With One Hundred and Twenty Portraits From The Indian Gallery In The Department of War, at Washington. Philadelphia, 1836 Hand-colored lithograph, after paintings by Charles Bird King, James Otto Lewis, Henry Inman, et al. Paper size: 20 1/4" x 14 1/2"; framed size 27" x 22" From 1816 until 1830, Thomas McKenney was Superintendent of Indian Affairs and one of a very few government officials to defend American Indian interests. When a large delegation of Indians came to see President Monroe in 1821, McKenney commissioned the fashionable portraitist Charles Bird King to paint the principal delegates, dressed in costumes of their choice. Many of the most prominent Indian leaders of the nineteenth century were among King’s sitters, including Sequoyah, Red Jacket, Major Ridge, Cornplanter, and Osceola. The portraits hung in the War Department until l858, when they were moved to the Smithsonian Institute. Most of King’s original portraits were subsequently destroyed in a fire at the Smithsonian in 1865, so their appearance in McKenney and Hall’s publication is the only record of the likenesses of many of the most prominent Indian leaders of the nineteenth century: Sequoyah, Red Jacket, Major Ridge, Cornplanter, and Osceola were numbered among King’s sitters. Andrew Jackson dismissed McKenney in 1830, but allowed him to have the portraits copied by Henry Inman, so that lithographs could be made from McKenney’s “Indian Gallery.” Additional images were taken from paintings by James Otto Lewis, George Catlin and other artists. James C. Hall, a Cincinnati judge and novelist, contributed an historical and anecdotal text. Both authors, not unlike George Catlin, whom they tried to enlist in their own publishing enterprise, saw their work as a means of preserving an accurate visual record of a rapidly disappearing culture. The portfolio nearly bankrupted McKenney as well as the two printing firms who invested in its publication. But their work proved to be much more valuable contribution than they imagined. Catlin’s paintings of Indians were destroyed in a warehouse fire; and James Otto Lewis’ watercolors burned along with those by King in the Smithsonian fire of l865. The McKenney and Hall portraits remain as the most complete and colorful record of the native leaders who made the long journey to Washington to speak for their people.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
 1.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  


        She-Ha-Ka, A Mandan Chief

      - A wonderfully detailed hand colored lithograph with beautiful original color from Thomas L. McKenney and James Hall's historically significant book "History of the Indian Tribes of North America", which was published in Philadelphia in 1836. This print is from the larger folio version and measures 20"x14". From 1816 until 1830, Thomas McKenney was Superintendent of Indian Affairs and one of a very few government officials to defend American Indian interests. When a large delegation of Indians came to see President Monroe in 1821, McKenney commissioned the fashionable portraitist Charles Bird King to paint the principal delegates, dressed in costumes of their choice. Many of the most prominent Indian leaders of the nineteenth century were among King’s sitters, including Sequoyah, Red Jacket, Major Ridge, Cornplanter, and Osceola. The portraits hung in the War Department until l858, when they were moved to the Smithsonian Institute. Most of King’s original portraits were subsequently destroyed in a fire at the Smithsonian in 1865, so their appearance in McKenney and Hall’s publication is the only record of the likenesses of many of the most prominent Indian leaders of the nineteenth century: Sequoyah, Red Jacket, Major Ridge, Cornplanter, and Osceola were numbered among King’s sitters. Andrew Jackson dismissed McKenney in 1830, but allowed him to have the portraits copied by Henry Inman, so that lithographs could be made from McKenney’s “Indian Gallery.” Additional images were taken from paintings by James Otto Lewis, George Catlin and other artists. James C. Hall, a Cincinnati judge and novelist, contributed an historical and anecdotal text. Both authors, not unlike George Catlin, whom they tried to enlist in their own publishing enterprise, saw their work as a means of preserving an accurate visual record of a rapidly disappearing culture. The portfolio nearly bankrupted McKenney as well as the two printing firms who invested in its publication. But their work proved to be much more valuable contribution than they imagined. Catlin’s paintings of Indians were destroyed in a warehouse fire; and James Otto Lewis’ watercolors burned along with those by King in the Smithsonian fire of l865. The McKenney and Hall portraits remain as the most complete and colorful record of the native leaders who made the long journey to Washington to speak for their people. Overall this print is in very good condition with some light foxing and staning.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
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        Meta-Koo-Sega, A Chippeway Warrior

      - A wonderfully detailed hand colored lithograph with beautiful original color from Thomas L. McKenney and James Hall's historically significant book "History of the Indian Tribes of North America", which was published in Philadelphia in 1836. This print is from the larger folio version and measures 20"x14". From 1816 until 1830, Thomas McKenney was Superintendent of Indian Affairs and one of a very few government officials to defend American Indian interests. When a large delegation of Indians came to see President Monroe in 1821, McKenney commissioned the fashionable portraitist Charles Bird King to paint the principal delegates, dressed in costumes of their choice. Many of the most prominent Indian leaders of the nineteenth century were among King’s sitters, including Sequoyah, Red Jacket, Major Ridge, Cornplanter, and Osceola. The portraits hung in the War Department until l858, when they were moved to the Smithsonian Institute. Most of King’s original portraits were subsequently destroyed in a fire at the Smithsonian in 1865, so their appearance in McKenney and Hall’s publication is the only record of the likenesses of many of the most prominent Indian leaders of the nineteenth century: Sequoyah, Red Jacket, Major Ridge, Cornplanter, and Osceola were numbered among King’s sitters. Andrew Jackson dismissed McKenney in 1830, but allowed him to have the portraits copied by Henry Inman, so that lithographs could be made from McKenney’s “Indian Gallery.” Additional images were taken from paintings by James Otto Lewis, George Catlin and other artists. James C. Hall, a Cincinnati judge and novelist, contributed an historical and anecdotal text. Both authors, not unlike George Catlin, whom they tried to enlist in their own publishing enterprise, saw their work as a means of preserving an accurate visual record of a rapidly disappearing culture. The portfolio nearly bankrupted McKenney as well as the two printing firms who invested in its publication. But their work proved to be much more valuable contribution than they imagined. Catlin’s paintings of Indians were destroyed in a warehouse fire; and James Otto Lewis’ watercolors burned along with those by King in the Smithsonian fire of l865. The McKenney and Hall portraits remain as the most complete and colorful record of the native leaders who made the long journey to Washington to speak for their people. This print is in very good, clean condition with light foxing and a few stains, creases and a few small tears around margins. There is some discoloring due to ink residue from the ink of facing book page.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
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        Kee-She-Waa, A Fox Warrior

      - A wonderfully detailed hand colored lithograph with beautiful original color from Thomas L. McKenney and James Hall's historically significant book "History of the Indian Tribes of North America", which was published in Philadelphia in 1836. This print is from the larger folio version and measures 20"x14". From 1816 until 1830, Thomas McKenney was Superintendent of Indian Affairs and one of a very few government officials to defend American Indian interests. When a large delegation of Indians came to see President Monroe in 1821, McKenney commissioned the fashionable portraitist Charles Bird King to paint the principal delegates, dressed in costumes of their choice. Many of the most prominent Indian leaders of the nineteenth century were among King’s sitters, including Sequoyah, Red Jacket, Major Ridge, Cornplanter, and Osceola. The portraits hung in the War Department until l858, when they were moved to the Smithsonian Institute. Most of King’s original portraits were subsequently destroyed in a fire at the Smithsonian in 1865, so their appearance in McKenney and Hall’s publication is the only record of the likenesses of many of the most prominent Indian leaders of the nineteenth century: Sequoyah, Red Jacket, Major Ridge, Cornplanter, and Osceola were numbered among King’s sitters. Andrew Jackson dismissed McKenney in 1830, but allowed him to have the portraits copied by Henry Inman, so that lithographs could be made from McKenney’s “Indian Gallery.” Additional images were taken from paintings by James Otto Lewis, George Catlin and other artists. James C. Hall, a Cincinnati judge and novelist, contributed an historical and anecdotal text. Both authors, not unlike George Catlin, whom they tried to enlist in their own publishing enterprise, saw their work as a means of preserving an accurate visual record of a rapidly disappearing culture. The portfolio nearly bankrupted McKenney as well as the two printing firms who invested in its publication. But their work proved to be much more valuable contribution than they imagined. Catlin’s paintings of Indians were destroyed in a warehouse fire; and James Otto Lewis’ watercolors burned along with those by King in the Smithsonian fire of l865. The McKenney and Hall portraits remain as the most complete and colorful record of the native leaders who made the long journey to Washington to speak for their people. Overall this print is in very good condition with some light foxing and staining.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
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        Le Soldat du Chene, or Soldier of the Oak, An Osage Chief

      Philadelphia 1836 - Thomas L. McKenney & James Hall (1785-1859 / 1793-1868) Illustrated plate from the History of the Indian Tribes of North America With Biographical Sketches and Anecdotes of The Principal Chiefs Embellished With One Hundred and Twenty Portraits From The Indian Gallery In The Department of War, at Washington. Philadelphia, 1836 Hand-colored lithograph, after paintings by Charles Bird King, James Otto Lewis, Henry Inman, et al. Paper size: 20 1/4" x 14 1/2"; framed size 27" x 22" From 1816 until 1830, Thomas McKenney was Superintendent of Indian Affairs and one of a very few government officials to defend American Indian interests. When a large delegation of Indians came to see President Monroe in 1821, McKenney commissioned the fashionable portraitist Charles Bird King to paint the principal delegates, dressed in costumes of their choice. Many of the most prominent Indian leaders of the nineteenth century were among King’s sitters, including Sequoyah, Red Jacket, Major Ridge, Cornplanter, and Osceola. The portraits hung in the War Department until l858, when they were moved to the Smithsonian Institute. Most of King’s original portraits were subsequently destroyed in a fire at the Smithsonian in 1865, so their appearance in McKenney and Hall’s publication is the only record of the likenesses of many of the most prominent Indian leaders of the nineteenth century: Sequoyah, Red Jacket, Major Ridge, Cornplanter, and Osceola were numbered among King’s sitters. Andrew Jackson dismissed McKenney in 1830, but allowed him to have the portraits copied by Henry Inman, so that lithographs could be made from McKenney’s “Indian Gallery.” Additional images were taken from paintings by James Otto Lewis, George Catlin and other artists. James C. Hall, a Cincinnati judge and novelist, contributed an historical and anecdotal text. Both authors, not unlike George Catlin, whom they tried to enlist in their own publishing enterprise, saw their work as a means of preserving an accurate visual record of a rapidly disappearing culture. The portfolio nearly bankrupted McKenney as well as the two printing firms who invested in its publication. But their work proved to be much more valuable contribution than they imagined. Catlin’s paintings of Indians were destroyed in a warehouse fire; and James Otto Lewis’ watercolors burned along with those by King in the Smithsonian fire of l865. The McKenney and Hall portraits remain as the most complete and colorful record of the native leaders who made the long journey to Washington to speak for their people.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
 5.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  


        Push-Ma-Ta-Ha, A Chactan Warrior

      - A wonderfully detailed hand colored lithograph with beautiful original color from Thomas L. McKenney and James Hall's historically significant book "History of the Indian Tribes of North America", which was published in Philadelphia in 1836. This print is from the larger folio version and measures 20"x14". From 1816 until 1830, Thomas McKenney was Superintendent of Indian Affairs and one of a very few government officials to defend American Indian interests. When a large delegation of Indians came to see President Monroe in 1821, McKenney commissioned the fashionable portraitist Charles Bird King to paint the principal delegates, dressed in costumes of their choice. Many of the most prominent Indian leaders of the nineteenth century were among King’s sitters, including Sequoyah, Red Jacket, Major Ridge, Cornplanter, and Osceola. The portraits hung in the War Department until l858, when they were moved to the Smithsonian Institute. Most of King’s original portraits were subsequently destroyed in a fire at the Smithsonian in 1865, so their appearance in McKenney and Hall’s publication is the only record of the likenesses of many of the most prominent Indian leaders of the nineteenth century: Sequoyah, Red Jacket, Major Ridge, Cornplanter, and Osceola were numbered among King’s sitters. Andrew Jackson dismissed McKenney in 1830, but allowed him to have the portraits copied by Henry Inman, so that lithographs could be made from McKenney’s “Indian Gallery.” Additional images were taken from paintings by James Otto Lewis, George Catlin and other artists. James C. Hall, a Cincinnati judge and novelist, contributed an historical and anecdotal text. Both authors, not unlike George Catlin, whom they tried to enlist in their own publishing enterprise, saw their work as a means of preserving an accurate visual record of a rapidly disappearing culture. The portfolio nearly bankrupted McKenney as well as the two printing firms who invested in its publication. But their work proved to be much more valuable contribution than they imagined. Catlin’s paintings of Indians were destroyed in a warehouse fire; and James Otto Lewis’ watercolors burned along with those by King in the Smithsonian fire of l865. The McKenney and Hall portraits remain as the most complete and colorful record of the native leaders who made the long journey to Washington to speak for their people. Overall this print is in very good condition with some light foxing and staining. Residue from binding on right margin and some creasing. A few small tears along margins.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
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        Apauly-Tustennuggee

      - A wonderfully detailed hand colored lithograph with beautiful original color from Thomas L. McKenney and James Hall's historically significant book "History of the Indian Tribes of North America", which was published in Philadelphia in 1836. This print is from the larger folio version and measures 20"x14". From 1816 until 1830, Thomas McKenney was Superintendent of Indian Affairs and one of a very few government officials to defend American Indian interests. When a large delegation of Indians came to see President Monroe in 1821, McKenney commissioned the fashionable portraitist Charles Bird King to paint the principal delegates, dressed in costumes of their choice. Many of the most prominent Indian leaders of the nineteenth century were among King’s sitters, including Sequoyah, Red Jacket, Major Ridge, Cornplanter, and Osceola. The portraits hung in the War Department until l858, when they were moved to the Smithsonian Institute. Most of King’s original portraits were subsequently destroyed in a fire at the Smithsonian in 1865, so their appearance in McKenney and Hall’s publication is the only record of the likenesses of many of the most prominent Indian leaders of the nineteenth century: Sequoyah, Red Jacket, Major Ridge, Cornplanter, and Osceola were numbered among King’s sitters. Andrew Jackson dismissed McKenney in 1830, but allowed him to have the portraits copied by Henry Inman, so that lithographs could be made from McKenney’s “Indian Gallery.” Additional images were taken from paintings by James Otto Lewis, George Catlin and other artists. James C. Hall, a Cincinnati judge and novelist, contributed an historical and anecdotal text. Both authors, not unlike George Catlin, whom they tried to enlist in their own publishing enterprise, saw their work as a means of preserving an accurate visual record of a rapidly disappearing culture. The portfolio nearly bankrupted McKenney as well as the two printing firms who invested in its publication. But their work proved to be much more valuable contribution than they imagined. Catlin’s paintings of Indians were destroyed in a warehouse fire; and James Otto Lewis’ watercolors burned along with those by King in the Smithsonian fire of l865. The McKenney and Hall portraits remain as the most complete and colorful record of the native leaders who made the long journey to Washington to speak for their people. This print is in very good, clean condition with light foxing and a few stains, creases and a few small tears around margins. There is some discoloring due to ink residue from the ink of facing book page.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
 7.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  


        Pee Che Kir, A Chippewa Chief

      - A wonderfully detailed hand colored lithograph with beautiful original color from Thomas L. McKenney and James Hall's historically significant book "History of the Indian Tribes of North America", which was published in Philadelphia in 1836. This print is from the larger folio version and measures 20"x14". From 1816 until 1830, Thomas McKenney was Superintendent of Indian Affairs and one of a very few government officials to defend American Indian interests. When a large delegation of Indians came to see President Monroe in 1821, McKenney commissioned the fashionable portraitist Charles Bird King to paint the principal delegates, dressed in costumes of their choice. Many of the most prominent Indian leaders of the nineteenth century were among King’s sitters, including Sequoyah, Red Jacket, Major Ridge, Cornplanter, and Osceola. The portraits hung in the War Department until l858, when they were moved to the Smithsonian Institute. Most of King’s original portraits were subsequently destroyed in a fire at the Smithsonian in 1865, so their appearance in McKenney and Hall’s publication is the only record of the likenesses of many of the most prominent Indian leaders of the nineteenth century: Sequoyah, Red Jacket, Major Ridge, Cornplanter, and Osceola were numbered among King’s sitters. Andrew Jackson dismissed McKenney in 1830, but allowed him to have the portraits copied by Henry Inman, so that lithographs could be made from McKenney’s “Indian Gallery.” Additional images were taken from paintings by James Otto Lewis, George Catlin and other artists. James C. Hall, a Cincinnati judge and novelist, contributed an historical and anecdotal text. Both authors, not unlike George Catlin, whom they tried to enlist in their own publishing enterprise, saw their work as a means of preserving an accurate visual record of a rapidly disappearing culture. The portfolio nearly bankrupted McKenney as well as the two printing firms who invested in its publication. But their work proved to be much more valuable contribution than they imagined. Catlin’s paintings of Indians were destroyed in a warehouse fire; and James Otto Lewis’ watercolors burned along with those by King in the Smithsonian fire of l865. The McKenney and Hall portraits remain as the most complete and colorful record of the native leaders who made the long journey to Washington to speak for their people. Overall this print is in very good condition with some light foxing/staining and a few creases and small tears along the margins.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
 8.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  


        Wa-Kawn, A Winnebago Chief

      - A wonderfully detailed hand colored lithograph with beautiful original color from Thomas L. McKenney and James Hall's historically significant book "History of the Indian Tribes of North America", which was published in Philadelphia in 1836. This print is from the larger folio version and measures 20"x14". From 1816 until 1830, Thomas McKenney was Superintendent of Indian Affairs and one of a very few government officials to defend American Indian interests. When a large delegation of Indians came to see President Monroe in 1821, McKenney commissioned the fashionable portraitist Charles Bird King to paint the principal delegates, dressed in costumes of their choice. Many of the most prominent Indian leaders of the nineteenth century were among King’s sitters, including Sequoyah, Red Jacket, Major Ridge, Cornplanter, and Osceola. The portraits hung in the War Department until l858, when they were moved to the Smithsonian Institute. Most of King’s original portraits were subsequently destroyed in a fire at the Smithsonian in 1865, so their appearance in McKenney and Hall’s publication is the only record of the likenesses of many of the most prominent Indian leaders of the nineteenth century: Sequoyah, Red Jacket, Major Ridge, Cornplanter, and Osceola were numbered among King’s sitters. Andrew Jackson dismissed McKenney in 1830, but allowed him to have the portraits copied by Henry Inman, so that lithographs could be made from McKenney’s “Indian Gallery.” Additional images were taken from paintings by James Otto Lewis, George Catlin and other artists. James C. Hall, a Cincinnati judge and novelist, contributed an historical and anecdotal text. Both authors, not unlike George Catlin, whom they tried to enlist in their own publishing enterprise, saw their work as a means of preserving an accurate visual record of a rapidly disappearing culture. The portfolio nearly bankrupted McKenney as well as the two printing firms who invested in its publication. But their work proved to be much more valuable contribution than they imagined. Catlin’s paintings of Indians were destroyed in a warehouse fire; and James Otto Lewis’ watercolors burned along with those by King in the Smithsonian fire of l865. The McKenney and Hall portraits remain as the most complete and colorful record of the native leaders who made the long journey to Washington to speak for their people. This print is in very good, clean condition with light foxing and a few stains, creases and a few small tears around margins. There is some discoloring due to ink residue from the ink of facing book page.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
 9.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  


        Oche Finceco

      - A wonderfully detailed hand colored lithograph with beautiful original color from Thomas L. McKenney and James Hall's historically significant book "History of the Indian Tribes of North America", which was published in Philadelphia in 1836. This print is from the larger folio version and measures 20"x14". From 1816 until 1830, Thomas McKenney was Superintendent of Indian Affairs and one of a very few government officials to defend American Indian interests. When a large delegation of Indians came to see President Monroe in 1821, McKenney commissioned the fashionable portraitist Charles Bird King to paint the principal delegates, dressed in costumes of their choice. Many of the most prominent Indian leaders of the nineteenth century were among King’s sitters, including Sequoyah, Red Jacket, Major Ridge, Cornplanter, and Osceola. The portraits hung in the War Department until l858, when they were moved to the Smithsonian Institute. Most of King’s original portraits were subsequently destroyed in a fire at the Smithsonian in 1865, so their appearance in McKenney and Hall’s publication is the only record of the likenesses of many of the most prominent Indian leaders of the nineteenth century: Sequoyah, Red Jacket, Major Ridge, Cornplanter, and Osceola were numbered among King’s sitters. Andrew Jackson dismissed McKenney in 1830, but allowed him to have the portraits copied by Henry Inman, so that lithographs could be made from McKenney’s “Indian Gallery.” Additional images were taken from paintings by James Otto Lewis, George Catlin and other artists. James C. Hall, a Cincinnati judge and novelist, contributed an historical and anecdotal text. Both authors, not unlike George Catlin, whom they tried to enlist in their own publishing enterprise, saw their work as a means of preserving an accurate visual record of a rapidly disappearing culture. The portfolio nearly bankrupted McKenney as well as the two printing firms who invested in its publication. But their work proved to be much more valuable contribution than they imagined. Catlin’s paintings of Indians were destroyed in a warehouse fire; and James Otto Lewis’ watercolors burned along with those by King in the Smithsonian fire of l865. The McKenney and Hall portraits remain as the most complete and colorful record of the native leaders who made the long journey to Washington to speak for their people. Overall this print is in very good condition with some light foxing/staining and a few creases and small tears along the margins.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
 10.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  


        Little Crow, A Sioux Chief

      - A wonderfully detailed hand colored lithograph with beautiful original color from Thomas L. McKenney and James Hall's historically significant book "History of the Indian Tribes of North America", which was published in Philadelphia in 1836. This print is from the larger folio version and measures 20"x14". From 1816 until 1830, Thomas McKenney was Superintendent of Indian Affairs and one of a very few government officials to defend American Indian interests. When a large delegation of Indians came to see President Monroe in 1821, McKenney commissioned the fashionable portraitist Charles Bird King to paint the principal delegates, dressed in costumes of their choice. Many of the most prominent Indian leaders of the nineteenth century were among King’s sitters, including Sequoyah, Red Jacket, Major Ridge, Cornplanter, and Osceola. The portraits hung in the War Department until l858, when they were moved to the Smithsonian Institute. Most of King’s original portraits were subsequently destroyed in a fire at the Smithsonian in 1865, so their appearance in McKenney and Hall’s publication is the only record of the likenesses of many of the most prominent Indian leaders of the nineteenth century: Sequoyah, Red Jacket, Major Ridge, Cornplanter, and Osceola were numbered among King’s sitters. Andrew Jackson dismissed McKenney in 1830, but allowed him to have the portraits copied by Henry Inman, so that lithographs could be made from McKenney’s “Indian Gallery.” Additional images were taken from paintings by James Otto Lewis, George Catlin and other artists. James C. Hall, a Cincinnati judge and novelist, contributed an historical and anecdotal text. Both authors, not unlike George Catlin, whom they tried to enlist in their own publishing enterprise, saw their work as a means of preserving an accurate visual record of a rapidly disappearing culture. The portfolio nearly bankrupted McKenney as well as the two printing firms who invested in its publication. But their work proved to be much more valuable contribution than they imagined. Catlin’s paintings of Indians were destroyed in a warehouse fire; and James Otto Lewis’ watercolors burned along with those by King in the Smithsonian fire of l865. The McKenney and Hall portraits remain as the most complete and colorful record of the native leaders who made the long journey to Washington to speak for their people. This print is in very good, clean condition with light foxing and a few stains, creases and a few small tears around margins. There is some discoloring due to ink residue from the ink of facing book page.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
 11.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  


        Wa-Bish-Kee-Pe-Nas, The White Pigeon, A Chippewa

      - A wonderfully detailed hand colored lithograph with beautiful original color from Thomas L. McKenney and James Hall's historically significant book "History of the Indian Tribes of North America", which was published in Philadelphia in 1836. This print is from the larger folio version and measures 20"x14". From 1816 until 1830, Thomas McKenney was Superintendent of Indian Affairs and one of a very few government officials to defend American Indian interests. When a large delegation of Indians came to see President Monroe in 1821, McKenney commissioned the fashionable portraitist Charles Bird King to paint the principal delegates, dressed in costumes of their choice. Many of the most prominent Indian leaders of the nineteenth century were among King’s sitters, including Sequoyah, Red Jacket, Major Ridge, Cornplanter, and Osceola. The portraits hung in the War Department until l858, when they were moved to the Smithsonian Institute. Most of King’s original portraits were subsequently destroyed in a fire at the Smithsonian in 1865, so their appearance in McKenney and Hall’s publication is the only record of the likenesses of many of the most prominent Indian leaders of the nineteenth century: Sequoyah, Red Jacket, Major Ridge, Cornplanter, and Osceola were numbered among King’s sitters. Andrew Jackson dismissed McKenney in 1830, but allowed him to have the portraits copied by Henry Inman, so that lithographs could be made from McKenney’s “Indian Gallery.” Additional images were taken from paintings by James Otto Lewis, George Catlin and other artists. James C. Hall, a Cincinnati judge and novelist, contributed an historical and anecdotal text. Both authors, not unlike George Catlin, whom they tried to enlist in their own publishing enterprise, saw their work as a means of preserving an accurate visual record of a rapidly disappearing culture. The portfolio nearly bankrupted McKenney as well as the two printing firms who invested in its publication. But their work proved to be much more valuable contribution than they imagined. Catlin’s paintings of Indians were destroyed in a warehouse fire; and James Otto Lewis’ watercolors burned along with those by King in the Smithsonian fire of l865. The McKenney and Hall portraits remain as the most complete and colorful record of the native leaders who made the long journey to Washington to speak for their people. Overall this print is in very good condition with some light foxing and staning.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
 12.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  


        Timpoochee Bernard, An Uchee Warrior

      - A wonderfully detailed hand colored lithograph with beautiful original color from Thomas L. McKenney and James Hall's historically significant book "History of the Indian Tribes of North America", which was published in Philadelphia in 1836. This print is from the larger folio version and measures 20"x14". From 1816 until 1830, Thomas McKenney was Superintendent of Indian Affairs and one of a very few government officials to defend American Indian interests. When a large delegation of Indians came to see President Monroe in 1821, McKenney commissioned the fashionable portraitist Charles Bird King to paint the principal delegates, dressed in costumes of their choice. Many of the most prominent Indian leaders of the nineteenth century were among King’s sitters, including Sequoyah, Red Jacket, Major Ridge, Cornplanter, and Osceola. The portraits hung in the War Department until l858, when they were moved to the Smithsonian Institute. Most of King’s original portraits were subsequently destroyed in a fire at the Smithsonian in 1865, so their appearance in McKenney and Hall’s publication is the only record of the likenesses of many of the most prominent Indian leaders of the nineteenth century: Sequoyah, Red Jacket, Major Ridge, Cornplanter, and Osceola were numbered among King’s sitters. Andrew Jackson dismissed McKenney in 1830, but allowed him to have the portraits copied by Henry Inman, so that lithographs could be made from McKenney’s “Indian Gallery.” Additional images were taken from paintings by James Otto Lewis, George Catlin and other artists. James C. Hall, a Cincinnati judge and novelist, contributed an historical and anecdotal text. Both authors, not unlike George Catlin, whom they tried to enlist in their own publishing enterprise, saw their work as a means of preserving an accurate visual record of a rapidly disappearing culture. The portfolio nearly bankrupted McKenney as well as the two printing firms who invested in its publication. But their work proved to be much more valuable contribution than they imagined. Catlin’s paintings of Indians were destroyed in a warehouse fire; and James Otto Lewis’ watercolors burned along with those by King in the Smithsonian fire of l865. The McKenney and Hall portraits remain as the most complete and colorful record of the native leaders who made the long journey to Washington to speak for their people. This print is in very good, clean condition with light foxing and a few stains, creases and a few small tears around margins. There is some discoloring due to ink residue from the ink of facing book page.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
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        Ong-Pa_Ton-Ga, or the Big Elk, Chief of the Omahas

      - A wonderfully detailed hand colored lithograph with beautiful original color from Thomas L. McKenney and James Hall's historically significant book "History of the Indian Tribes of North America", which was published in Philadelphia in 1836. This print is from the larger folio version and measures 20"x14". From 1816 until 1830, Thomas McKenney was Superintendent of Indian Affairs and one of a very few government officials to defend American Indian interests. When a large delegation of Indians came to see President Monroe in 1821, McKenney commissioned the fashionable portraitist Charles Bird King to paint the principal delegates, dressed in costumes of their choice. Many of the most prominent Indian leaders of the nineteenth century were among King’s sitters, including Sequoyah, Red Jacket, Major Ridge, Cornplanter, and Osceola. The portraits hung in the War Department until l858, when they were moved to the Smithsonian Institute. Most of King’s original portraits were subsequently destroyed in a fire at the Smithsonian in 1865, so their appearance in McKenney and Hall’s publication is the only record of the likenesses of many of the most prominent Indian leaders of the nineteenth century: Sequoyah, Red Jacket, Major Ridge, Cornplanter, and Osceola were numbered among King’s sitters. Andrew Jackson dismissed McKenney in 1830, but allowed him to have the portraits copied by Henry Inman, so that lithographs could be made from McKenney’s “Indian Gallery.” Additional images were taken from paintings by James Otto Lewis, George Catlin and other artists. James C. Hall, a Cincinnati judge and novelist, contributed an historical and anecdotal text. Both authors, not unlike George Catlin, whom they tried to enlist in their own publishing enterprise, saw their work as a means of preserving an accurate visual record of a rapidly disappearing culture. The portfolio nearly bankrupted McKenney as well as the two printing firms who invested in its publication. But their work proved to be much more valuable contribution than they imagined. Catlin’s paintings of Indians were destroyed in a warehouse fire; and James Otto Lewis’ watercolors burned along with those by King in the Smithsonian fire of l865. The McKenney and Hall portraits remain as the most complete and colorful record of the native leaders who made the long journey to Washington to speak for their people. Overall this print is in very good condition with some light foxing/staining and a few creases and small tears along the margins.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
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        Stum Ma Tu, A Flathead Boy, from the Chinook, or Flatheads

      Philadelphia 1836 - Thomas L. McKenney & James Hall (1785-1859 / 1793-1868) Illustrated plate from the History of the Indian Tribes of North America With Biographical Sketches and Anecdotes of The Principal Chiefs Embellished With One Hundred and Twenty Portraits From The Indian Gallery In The Department of War, at Washington. Philadelphia, 1836 Hand-colored lithograph, after paintings by Charles Bird King, James Otto Lewis, Henry Inman, et al. Paper size: 20 1/4" x 14 1/2"; framed size 27" x 22" From 1816 until 1830, Thomas McKenney was Superintendent of Indian Affairs and one of a very few government officials to defend American Indian interests. When a large delegation of Indians came to see President Monroe in 1821, McKenney commissioned the fashionable portraitist Charles Bird King to paint the principal delegates, dressed in costumes of their choice. Many of the most prominent Indian leaders of the nineteenth century were among King’s sitters, including Sequoyah, Red Jacket, Major Ridge, Cornplanter, and Osceola. The portraits hung in the War Department until l858, when they were moved to the Smithsonian Institute. Most of King’s original portraits were subsequently destroyed in a fire at the Smithsonian in 1865, so their appearance in McKenney and Hall’s publication is the only record of the likenesses of many of the most prominent Indian leaders of the nineteenth century: Sequoyah, Red Jacket, Major Ridge, Cornplanter, and Osceola were numbered among King’s sitters. Andrew Jackson dismissed McKenney in 1830, but allowed him to have the portraits copied by Henry Inman, so that lithographs could be made from McKenney’s “Indian Gallery.” Additional images were taken from paintings by James Otto Lewis, George Catlin and other artists. James C. Hall, a Cincinnati judge and novelist, contributed an historical and anecdotal text. Both authors, not unlike George Catlin, whom they tried to enlist in their own publishing enterprise, saw their work as a means of preserving an accurate visual record of a rapidly disappearing culture. The portfolio nearly bankrupted McKenney as well as the two printing firms who invested in its publication. But their work proved to be much more valuable contribution than they imagined. Catlin’s paintings of Indians were destroyed in a warehouse fire; and James Otto Lewis’ watercolors burned along with those by King in the Smithsonian fire of l865. The McKenney and Hall portraits remain as the most complete and colorful record of the native leaders who made the long journey to Washington to speak for their people.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
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        Ke Wa Din, or the North Wind, Chippeway Chief

      - A wonderfully detailed hand colored lithograph with beautiful original color from Thomas L. McKenney and James Hall's historically significant book "History of the Indian Tribes of North America", which was published in Philadelphia in 1836. This print is from the larger folio version, although the paper has been cropped down from its original size of 18.5"x11.5". From 1816 until 1830, Thomas McKenney was Superintendent of Indian Affairs and one of a very few government officials to defend American Indian interests. When a large delegation of Indians came to see President Monroe in 1821, McKenney commissioned the fashionable portraitist Charles Bird King to paint the principal delegates, dressed in costumes of their choice. Many of the most prominent Indian leaders of the nineteenth century were among King’s sitters, including Sequoyah, Red Jacket, Major Ridge, Cornplanter, and Osceola. The portraits hung in the War Department until l858, when they were moved to the Smithsonian Institute. Most of King’s original portraits were subsequently destroyed in a fire at the Smithsonian in 1865, so their appearance in McKenney and Hall’s publication is the only record of the likenesses of many of the most prominent Indian leaders of the nineteenth century: Sequoyah, Red Jacket, Major Ridge, Cornplanter, and Osceola were numbered among King’s sitters. Andrew Jackson dismissed McKenney in 1830, but allowed him to have the portraits copied by Henry Inman, so that lithographs could be made from McKenney’s “Indian Gallery.” Additional images were taken from paintings by James Otto Lewis, George Catlin and other artists. James C. Hall, a Cincinnati judge and novelist, contributed an historical and anecdotal text. Both authors, not unlike George Catlin, whom they tried to enlist in their own publishing enterprise, saw their work as a means of preserving an accurate visual record of a rapidly disappearing culture. The portfolio nearly bankrupted McKenney as well as the two printing firms who invested in its publication. But their work proved to be much more valuable contribution than they imagined. Catlin’s paintings of Indians were destroyed in a warehouse fire; and James Otto Lewis’ watercolors burned along with those by King in the Smithsonian fire of l865. The McKenney and Hall portraits remain as the most complete and colorful record of the native leaders who made the long journey to Washington to speak for their people. This print is in fair condition with foxing and staining throughout, creases and a few small tears around margins. Paper has been cropped down. There is discoloring due to ink residue from the ink of facing book page and paper missing from left margin.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
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        The Complete Angler or the contemplative man's recreation being a discourse of rivers, fish-ponds, fish and fishing and instructions on how to angle for a trout or grayling in a clear stream by Charles Cotton, with original memoirs and notes by Sir Harris Nicholas.

      London: William Pickering; Printed by C. Whittingham 1836 - First Nicolas edition. 2 volumes. Size of binding: 7 ½ in. x 10 7/8 in. Pagination: Vol. I: [16], ccxii, [2], 129; Vol. II: [2], [131]-436, [32]. 61 engraved plates and other illustrations. Dark green crushed morocco spine, sides, and corner-pieces with five raised bands on the spine, and gilt titling and designs, and marbled paper over boards. With matching marbled paper end-papers. Top-edge gilt. Bound by Wood, London with their stamp present. Very minor rubbing to cover corners. A large paper copy: the paper measures 7 ¼ in. x 10 5/8 in. A bookplate has been removed from the front paste-down of each volume. The volumes have been previously collated and sold by B. Quaritch with their penciled notation present. These are fine copies, clean, unmarked, and with bright plates. One of the finest "Anglers" ever published. The set weights 9 ½ lbs. Postage may be extra on this item. [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Peter Keisogloff Rare Books, Inc.]
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        The Complete Angler - by Izaak Walton and - Charles Cotton - With Original Memoirs and Notes by Sir Harris Nicolas

      London: William Pickering, 1836. First Nicholas Edition. Printed by C. Whittingham. Took Court, Chancery Lane. 2 vols., 8vo. Engraved title-page, 48 engraved plates, two pages of music and two woodcuts of the Walton seal, 9 head-pieces, and 2 portraits of Walton. Full contemporary pebbled brown morocco gilt, boards with arms of Trinity College within elaborate ruled borders, spine tooled in gilt in 6 compartments, Cambridge arms at top and bottom, raised bands, inner dentelles gilt, a.e.g., marbled endpapers by Wiseman, Cambridge. Some toning of margins, sporadic foxing, and offsetting from plates at front and back. Very good. Coigney 44; Keynes 94 . One of the finest illustrated editions of Walton ever published. Pickering employed 27 of the most prominent artist, painters, and engravers to illustrate it

      [Bookseller: James Cummins Bookseller]
 18.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  


        The complete angler or the contemplative man's recreation being a discourse of rivers, fish-ponds, fish and fishing ( 2 volumes, for more images of this copy see our Rare Fish Books site)

      William Pickering, London 1836 - First Nicholas Edition. 4to - over 9¾" - 12" tall. 2 volumes, pp. [16], ccxii, [2], 129; [2], [131]-436, [32]; 61 steel engraved plates from designs by Thomas Stothard and J. Inskipp. Each volume measures 7 3/4" x 10 3/4." Outstanding period full crushed green morocco bindings, raised bands, gilt titles, elaborate gilt floral compartments, ornately floral gilt boards, in the manner of Roger Payne, marbled endpapers, a.e.g. Hinges slightly rubbed but very solid. A very handsom copy of one of the finest illustrated editions of Walton ever published. For this extensively illustrated edition, Pickering employed 27 of the most prominent artist, painters, and engravers of the day. Hinges slightly rubbed but very solid. A little scuffing to the leather. Varying degrees of offsetting/browning from plates and occasional light foxing as typical of much 19th century paper and ink. Coigney 44. Bookplate.

      [Bookseller: Rare Fish Books]
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        Charter of Incorporation: Bye-Laws: Regulations: and Grant of Arms [with] Supplemental Charter [and Bye-Laws] [with] Thirteen Annual Reports of the Society's Council [with] Seven Related Documents

      V.p. 1836-72, London - Later buckram, ex-library, good clean copies, twenty-two publications and 734 pages in total; a complete listing gladly provided An extensive run of annual reports and related materials of the Society during its early years, seemingly unrecorded, providing considerable biographical detail and much insight into professional and educational concerns of attorneys and solicitors [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Meyer Boswell Books, Inc., member ABAA]
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        De La Prostitution Dans La Ville De Paris Consideree Sous Le Rapport De L'Hygiene Publique, De La Morale Et De L'Administration; Ouvrage Appuye De Documens Statistiques, . Precede D'Une Notice . Sur La Vie . De L'Auteur Par F. Leuret

      Paris : J. -B. Bailliere 1836 - Physical desc. : complete in 2 volumes. : ill. , maps ; 22 cm. Subject: Prostitution - France - Paris - History - 19th century. Paris (France) - Social conditions. Liste des ouvrages publie s par Parent-Duchatelet": v. 1, p. Xxii-xxiv. Finely and uniformly bound in modern aniline calf over marble boards. Raised bands with the titles blocked direct in gilt. Spine compartments uniformly tooled in gilt. An exceptional copy - scans and additional bibliographic detail on request. 2 Kg. 1 pp. [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: MW Books Ltd.]
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        PRIVATE JOURNAL OF A CRUIZE [sic] IN THE U.S. SCHOONER ENTERPRISE LT. A.S. CAMPBELL ESQ. COMMANDING IN THE EAST INDIAS & CHINA SEAS [manuscript title].

      [Various places at sea and in port in the Indian Ocean, Gulf of Siam, and China Sea, as described below]. July 12, 1835 - April 7, 1836. - [118]pp. manuscript on 12 1/2 x 8-inch sheets of paper. A total of some 32,500 words. Includes a pen and ink sketch of "The Town of Zanzibar from the Harbour," and of the island of "Pemba." Plus a fragment of a sheet of paper containing a few caricatures and a sketch of the U.S.S. Peacock. Title-leaf and the following text leaf with a long repaired tear; some slight edge wear or staining to the leaves. In very good condition. In a half morocco and cloth clamshell case, spine gilt. An absolutely outstanding American naval manuscript, this is the journal kept by Midshipman Henry Cadwalader for the first nine months of his voyage as part of the United States Navy's East India Squadron. Cadwalader sailed on the U.S.S. Peacock, the flagship of the squadron, and on the U.S.S. Enterprise, the squadron's supporting schooner. The journal is rich with his observations on the places he visited, including Zanzibar, Bombay, Ceylon, and Batavia. Though he went to sea as a teenager, Cadwalader seems to have been well educated (he was a scion of a notable Philadelphia family), and his journal is well written and lively, filled with keen observations of his life on board ship and of the various places he visited on his voyage. The journal gives an excellent picture of life at sea for a young man in the 1830s. Cadwalader is reflective and introspective, yet keenly observant of his surroundings and of the character of the men on his ship and of the natives and British colonizers he encountered. His journal is also an exceptionally early account by an American of Zanzibar, India, and Indonesia. In all, it is one of the most interesting, textured, and detailed American naval manuscripts we have ever encountered. Henry Cadwalader (1817-44) came from a distinguished military lineage: his grandfather, Brig. Gen. John Cadwalader, commanded Pennsylvania troops in several important Revolutionary War battles, and his father, Major General Thomas Cadwalader, commanded a Pennsylvania militia brigade during the War of 1812. Henry Cadwalader was appointed a midshipman in the U.S. Navy on December 13, 1832 and became a "passed midshipman" on July 8, 1839. At the time he undertook this voyage to the East, he was only in his late teens, and very early in his naval career. The Enterprise and the Peacock sailed on an expedition to the Indian Ocean and East Indies for the purpose of obtaining information and negotiating treaties of friendship and commerce with Eastern powers. Among the places the ships visited over the course of the three- year cruise were Muscat, Oman, Ceylon, India, Java, Siam, Cochin, China, the Bonin Islands, Hawaii, Mexico, and California. Cadwalader began his voyage in the Enterprise, but transferred to the commanding ship of the expedition, the Peacock, at Bombay. Cadwalader's journal covers the first nine months of the voyage, from New York to Bangkok. The journal begins with a manuscript titlepage which includes a list of the officers on board the Enterprise, with Henry Cadwalader listed as one of four midshipmen. The text opens with an entry noting that the Peacock and Enterprise departed Rio de Janeiro bound for the East Indies on Sunday, July 12, 1835. Cadwalader writes that he expects to be transferred at some point to the Peacock, and spends the opening passages of his journal describing life on board the schooner. These initial entries give an excellent impression of life on board an American naval vessel for a teenaged midshipman, describing Cadwalader's daily duties, the drudgery, hazards, and joys of life on board ship, and conveying a youthful sense of wonder at the world. For example, in an entry for August 8, he writes: "Had the morning watch - scrubbed decks & paint work, &c. At 7 bells drank a cup of coffee with [Midshipman] Forbes sitting on the Bitts. Came below at about quarter of 9, washed & eat breakfast, mended my clothes, stowed my locker & read a little Shakespeare. Did not feel well - a swelling under my throat. I h

      [Bookseller: William Reese Company - Americana]
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        FREE THOUGHT) REASON, THE ONLY ORACLE OF MAN; OR, A COMPENDIOUS SYSTEM OF NATURAL RELIGION. BY COL. ETHAN ALLEN. TO WHICH IS ADDED, CRITICAL REMARKS ON THE TRUTH AND HARMONY OF THE FOUR GOSPELS, WITH OBSERVATIONS ON THE INSTRUCTIONS [FIRST ATHEIST PUBL]

      G. W. & A. J. Matsell and Wm. Sinclair, New York And Philadelphia 1836 - THEOLOGY; 12mo 7" - 7½" tall; -FIRST ATHEIST PUBLICATION in America- (Free Thought) Reason, the Only Oracle of Man; or, A Compendious System of Natural Religion. By Col. Ethan Allen. To which is added, Critical Remarks on the Truth and Harmony of the Four Gospels, with Observations on the Instructions given by Jesus Christ, and the Doctrines of Christianity. By a Free Thinker. Original muslin boards, quite darkened (orig. Paper spine label worn but readable. The two works are separately paged, have separate title pages, and are separated by an integral blank leaf. American Imprints 35708. A later edition of Allen's Oracle, originally printed in Bennington in 1784, considered the first anti-religious or atheistic work published in America. Following in Allen's footsteps, "A Free Thinker" finds the Virgin birth and similar "improbable stories (we use his phrase) to be impediments to conventional reliance on the Gospels. 106, [2], 70, [1] pp. , with 4 page "Catalogue of Liberal Works," for sale by G. W. & A. J. Matsell. Volume is sound with light foxing. Provenance- Hall Park McCullough bookplate. ; 0 [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: poor man's books (mrbooks)]
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        RICOGLITORE ITALIANO E STRANIERO,ossia rivista mensuale europea di scienze, lettere, belle arti, bibliografia e variet? (1836-1837), Milano, Stella A. Fortunato e figli, 1836

      - ANNO TERZO 1836 (due volumi formato 14,5 x 23,5) rilegatura mz, pergamena con titoli su tasselli ai dorsi. Primo semestre pagine 840 - secondo semestre pagine 820 ANNO QUARTO 1837 (due volumi formato 14,5 x 23,5) rilegatura mz. pergamena con titoli su tasselli ai dorsi. Primo semestre pagine 860 - secondo semestre pagine 808 i quattro volumi vengono offerti in blocco a

      [Bookseller: Ferraguti service s.a.s. - Rivisteria]
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        The Port of London

      London, 1836. Tinted lithograph, 26 x 37.5 cms, short tear with old repair on verso. From “Sketches at Home and Abroad”, printed by Charles Hullmandel for Charles Tilt. London Bridge and the Monumnet can be glimpsed through a forest of masts. Print

      [Bookseller: Bryars and Bryars]
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        ATLAS HISTORIQUE des ETATS EUROPEENS . Edition ORIGINALE Française 1836

      - Paris . Librairie HACHETTE & chez les auteurs . 1836 . Edition originale française , traduit de l' allemand . Un grand volume in-folio , cartonnage modeste bleu , dos toile à etiquette manuscrite . Montage sur ONGLETS , faux-titre , titre , 4 pages : présentation & table , 39 Tableaux Synchroniques sur 69 pages , 16 + 1 Tableaux Généalogiques , et DIX - HUIT CARTES COLORIÈES à DOUBLE - PAGE . Ensemble de toute fraicheur , sans rousseurs ni inscription . 33 x 48 cm , NON ROGNÈ , à grandes marges . [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: LA FRANCE GALANTE]
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        ATLAS HISTORIQUE DES ETATS EUROPEENS, ET DE TOUS LES PAYS EN RAPPORT AVEC L'EUROPE, COMPOSE D'UNE SUITE DE CARTES GEOGRAPHIQUES ET DE TABLEAUX CHRONOLOGIQUES ET GENEALOGIQUES.

      L. HACHETTE ; DEUXIEME EDITION 1836 - RO30109525: 61 pages. Nombreux tableaux généalogique. Cartes manquantes. In-Folio Cartonné. Etat d'usage. Couv. défraîchie. Dos satisfaisant. Intérieur frais Classification Dewey : 912-Atlas, cartes et plans [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: le-livre]
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        Musee Royal de Naples, peintures, bronzes et statues erotiques du cabinet secret, avec leur explication par M. C. F., contenant 60 gravures coloriees.

      Impr. d'Everat for Abel Ledoux Paris 1836 - Quarto (30 x 23 cm). Half-title, title, [3], xxx, 159 pp., 60 hand-coloured plates engraved by A. Delvaux and protected by tissue guards; foxing to text, only light and marginal to plates, later red half staight-grained morocco gilt, a very handsome copy. A fully hand-coloured copy of the best edition - here in a lovely binding, with wide margings and fresh plates, showing erotic subjects in a classic Roman manner, taken the secret cabinet of the King of Naples, some pieces coming from Pompei and Herculaneum. About half the plates depict sculpture of various media, while the other half show scenes, individual people, Gods and couples, often with a touch of humour. Published five years earlier under a slightly different title, the first edition had only 41 plates without colour. The present edition is often found without colour either. Gay-Lemmonyer III, 682. [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Shapero Rare Books]
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        Narrative of the Arctic Land Expedition to the mouth of the Great Fish River, and along the shores of the Arctic Ocean, in the years 1833, 1834, and 1835

      London: John Murray, 1836 - Back volunteered to search for the lost Ross expedition. Here he describes his trip through north central Canada down the Slave to Great Slave Lake, then to the Great Fish River (which he discovered) and finally to the Arctic Coast. He makes important observations of the Aurora Borealis here, too. It was on this journey that Back named Montreal Island. 'As a literary composition this work may rank higher than any former volume produced by the Northern expeditions' (Lande) First edition. 8vo. Illustrated with folding map at end and numerous plates. Contemporary half calf and marbled boards, rebacked with fine period spine, morocco label. Contemporary bookplate of Anthony MacTier "of Durris". Fine copy, clean and bright. Streeter 3704; Wagner-Camp 58b; Field 64; Hill 42; Lande 935; Arctic Bib. 851; Sabin 2613; TPL 1873 [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: James Cummins Bookseller, ABAA]
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        MUSEE ROYAL DE NAPLES, peintures, bronzes et statues erotiques du Cabinet Secret, avec leur explications par

      Ledoux,, Parigi, 1836 - in-folio, pp. XXX, (4), 159, (2), bella leg. m. tela coeva con fregi e tit. oro al d. Con 60 tavv. raff. oggetti d'arte e dipinti con scene erotiche e licenzione, soprattutto falliche, conservati al Museo di Napoli. Nel tit. le tavv. sono annunciate a colori ma la coloritura era probabilmente eseguita a mano con acquarellatura successiva e non colorate in lastra: infatti le nostre sono in bianco e nero al naturale. Il curatore della raccolta (1799-1853) fu incaricato dell'opera dall'Ambasciata di Francia. Gli oggetti, per la loro oscenità, furono a lungo tenuti nascosti fino al 1819 quando Francesco I venne in visita al Museo e propose di creare una sala "riservata". Tra i pezzi più noti qui riprodotti il gruppo marmoreo di Pan e capra proveniente da Ercolano. Bell'esempl. [326]

      [Bookseller: SCRIPTORIUM Studio Bibliografico]
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