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Displayed below are some selected recent viaLibri matches for books published in 1837


         Metodo per addestrare il cavallo con arte facile e naturale. Tradotto dal tedesco da Federico Palmieri marchese di Monferrato primo tenente di cavalleria de' Reali Eserciti di S.M. Siciliana.

      1837 - Napoli, dalla Reale Tipografia della Guerra, 1837, 8vo legatura in mezza pelle ottocentesca con fregi e titoli dorati al dorso, pp. XXI-(2)-322-(2) con otto tavole al tratto e una litografia in antiporta (ediventemente staccatasi nel tempo e riapplicata al risguardo)

      [Bookseller: Libreria Piani già Naturalistica Snc]
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         Corani arabice. Recensionis Flügelianae textum recognitum iterum exprimi curavit Gustavus Mauritius Redslob [.]. Editio stereotypa.

      Leipzig, Karl Tauchnitz, 1837. - 8vo. VIII, 529, (5) pp. Printed in red and black throughout. Contemp. green half calf with gilt spine and marbled boards. First edition of Redslob's revision of Flügel's text, first published in 1834. The orientalist Gustav Leberecht Flügel (1802-70) edited numerous Arabic texts; his Qur'an edition remained the standard for European scholarship for a century. - A good, clean copy of one of the earliest scholarly Quran editions conforming to modern standards. Cf. Enay 115 (1834 ed.). [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat INLIBRIS Gilhofer Nfg. GmbH]
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         The POSTHUMOUS PAPERS Of The PICKWICK CLUB: Containing a Faithful Record of the Perambulations, Perils, Travels, Adventures and Sporting Transactions of the Corresponding Members. Edited by "Boz."

      Carey Lea & Blanchard, Philadelphia 1837 - 5 volumes. Part I: [v] - xii, [13] - 219, [1], 8, 4 pp. Publisher adverts the last 13 pages. 12mo. 7-5/8" x 4-3/8" 'Part I', issued November 1836, of this eventual 5 volume set issued by CLB, with 'Part 5' published in December 1837. The first printing of the initial part somewhat uncommon in the trade, with Patten recording a print run of just 1500cc. Most volumes cocked to varying degrees. Part I cloth abraded at top of rear joint, with some loss. Stain to Part I front board, which is ex-lib, with 19th C bookplate to front paste-down & faint circular stamp in p. 5 top margin. 1876 poi to ffep. Slight gutter break prior to p. 5. Parts II & III with labels mostly worn away. Part IV with rear joint cloth spliting along rear joint up from bottom. A Good set. Original drab paper-wrapped boards over deep rose-colored cloth spines, with printed paper title labels 1st US edition (Smith AMERICAN, pp. 39 - 46). [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Tavistock Books, ABAA]
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         THE POSTHUMOUS PAPERS OF THE PICKWICK CLUB

      Chapman and Hall, London 1837 - Octavo, 609 pages; VG; Bound in dark green leather, spine has burgundy label and gilt lettering; spine sun-faded slightly; boards have a blind-stamped border, gilt rectangle within; all edges of text block gilt; gilt board edges, turn-ins; marbled endpapers; age-toning to pages; some foxing to plates; Has two of the seven Smith points: Page 342, line 5: "S. Veller" uncorrected, Page 432, headline: "F" in "OF" imperfect; illustrated title page and frontispiece; mild shelfwear and rubbing; shelved case 4. Dupont. [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Second Story Books, ABAA]
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         Vie de Mohammed

      Paris, Imprimerie Royale, 1837 - 8vo. 2 parts in one volume. X, 160 pp. (4), 120 pp. Contemp. blindstamped calf, sparsely gilt. Only printed edition of this mediaeval biography of the Prophet, “Mukhtasar tarikh albashar”. Abu’l-Fida, born in Damascus in 1273, was a historian, geographer, military leader, and sultan. [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: EQTNA (Rare Books & Manuscripts)]
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         A volume of contemporary newspaper clippings, pamphlets and broadsheet publications relating to The Edgware Road Murder of 1837.

      London: various publishers,, 1837. Quarto (305 x 180 mm), approximately 100 leaves of clippings, articles and pamphlets mounted on wove paper. Recent brown cloth, dark brown skiver label lettered in gilt. Some wood-engraved illustrations. A few closed-tears to newspaper clippings otherwise in very good condition. A fascinating assemblage of printed material relating to the cause celebre of 1837, the brutal murder and dismemberment, on Christmas Eve 1836, of Hannah Brown by James Greenacre (1785-1837), forever after known as The Edgware Road Murderer. This collection was compiled by someone eagerly following the case and attests to the grip that it exerted on the public mind: at the time of the trial ephemera of all sorts poured onto the market and after his execution "plays based on the Edgware Road murder were given in the penny theatres and an effigy of Greenacre was made for Madame Tussaud's waxwork exhibition" (ODNB). Included here are the scarce Paddington Murder Sheet - a lurid "special" issued by The Weekly Chronicle - and other decidedly uncommon pieces, including Fairburn's comprehensive coverage of the trial and an issue of The New Doctor, with the front page given over to the phrenological aspect of the Greenacre case. "About September 1836, when living at 6 Carpenter's Buildings, Camberwell, Greenacre advertised in The Times for a partner to provide £300 for the commercial exploitation of his washing machine [which he had designed and built while living in the United States]; it was answered by a washerwoman named Hannah Brown. She was the widow of a shoemaker, Thomas Brown, who had met his death at sea when he left her to go to America. She stated that she had just the sum of money Greenacre was looking for, and a marriage between them was arranged for Christmas day 1836 in St Giles, Camberwell. On 24 December, when she joined him at his house, he murdered her. He cut up the body and disposed of the pieces in various localities round London, where they began to be found later in December, the head, for example, in the Regent's Canal at Stepney [the torso was discovered at the exotically named Pineapple Gate, Edgware Road, giving the case its soubriquet]. Inspector Feltham was put in charge of the case and on 24 March 1837 arrested Greenacre, who was preparing to sail for America, at St Alban's Place, Kennington Road. With him was also arrested his mistress, Sarah Gale: Hannah Brown's earrings were found in Gale's possession. Greenacre, who was by now aged fifty-one or fifty-two, of middle height and stout build, was visited in prison by members of parliament and noblemen. The trial at the central criminal court, at which Greenacre appeared clad in a blue coat, a fancy waistcoat, and a black stock, lasted two days, 10 and 11 April 1837, and both defendants were convicted and sentenced to death. Greenacre insisted that Gale had not known about the murder, to which he ultimately admitted, and her sentence was commuted to transportation for life to Australia, where she died in 1888. Greenacre tried to hang himself in his cell, and spent his time writing many letters and explanatory documents. He was hanged on 2 May 1837 in front of Newgate, the execution being witnessed by at least 20,000 persons who gathered over two days; a fairground atmosphere prevailed, with prize-fighters sparring under the gallows to keep the crowd amused. Greenacre showed great self-possession and strength of nerve on the scaffold, where he asked, 'Don't leave me too long in the concourse and make the rope tight'. Back in Newgate, Greenacre's head was shaved for examination by phrenologists before he was buried in the prison. He was survived by four of his children. Plays based on the Edgware Road murder were given in the penny theatres and an effigy of Greenacre was made for Madame Tussaud's waxwork exhibition. Greenacre's death mask, made on 4 May 1837 by J. Miller of Theobald's Road, later became an exhibit in New Scotland Yard's Black Museum, along with handwritten notes which he passed to his counsel during the trial" (ibid.). Contents: "Frontispiece" of a Gothic archway printed on purple paper (probably cut from the front wrapper of a periodical). Autograph letter signed: "Sunday eve[ning] Dear Crow, I send you some Greenacreiana which I saved while cutting out some dramatic scraps – I also send a Satirist [a weekly London scandal sheet] & an Age [another weekly] not having time to clip you out the other tidbits concerning the great Criminal. Pray keep the dramatic bits of both for me. Yours ever Moor(?) [and addressed at the foot to:] Jim Crow Esq". An interesting contemporary letter addressed joshingly to "Jim Crow Esq" – Thomas Dartmouth Rice, the American blackface performer and originator of the persona of "Jim Crow", had performed to enthusiastic audiences in London in 1836. Approximately 45 pages of contemporary newspaper clippings relevant to the case, dated in a contemporary hand. The Edgware-Road Tragedy. Fairburn's Edition of the Trials of Greenacre & Gale, for the Horrible Murder and Mutilation of Hannah Brown; including the evidence at full length, the judge's charge to the jury, and sentence of the prisoners; with the Life of Greenacre, written by himself. London: J. Fairburn, [1837]. 64 pp., Copac locates just two copies in British and Irish institutional libraries (Wales, Royal College of Physicians); OCLC cites seven more (Stanford, Library of Congress, Trial Court Law Library, Wayne State, University of Minnesota, Duke, University of Memphis). Lives of the Most Notorious Highwaymen, Footpads and Murderers, issues 49-53 and 55 (presumably all those concerning this case) [London: Edward Lloyd, 1837]. Wood engraving to each part. The New Doctor, a Medical, Philosophical, and Literary Magazine. No. 48. [London: B.D. Cousins, 1837]. 8 pp. (paginated 377-384); wood engravings accompanying "phrenological description of the head of James Greenacre, the Murderer". Martin's Annals of Crime; or, New Newgate Calendar, and General Record of Tragic Events, including Ancient and Modern Modes of Torture, etc., issues 61-67 and 69. [London: William Mark Clark, 18370. Wood engraving to each part. The Paddington Murder Sheet. With twelve engravings. Being the Trial of James Greenacre, for the Horrible Murder and Mutilation of Hannah Brown; and of Sarah Gale, his Accomplice, for being accessory to the said Murder – A full, correct, and copious Report taken from The Weekly Chronicle Newspaper. Price 2d. London: The Weekly Chronicle, [1837]. Folio, 4 pp. divided into two sections and tipped-in. Wood engravings of Greenacre, the severed head of Brown, and Gale and her young son; also Greenacre's house and individual rooms (including the "room where the horrible mutilation was committed"), scenes where the body parts were discovered, a view of the interior of the Central Criminal Court during the trial, and Greenacre "taking notes at his examination before the magistrate's at Marylebone police-office". A unique collection covering one of the most shocking murder cases of the 19th century and of particular interest for the light that it sheds on the "exploitation of violent crime" in the contemporary print media (L. Perry Curtis, Jr., Jack the Ripper and the London Press, Yale 2001, pp. 67-68).

      [Bookseller: Peter Harrington]
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         Wiener Zeitschrift für Kunst, Literatur, Theater und Mode 1837. 1.-4. Quartal in 2 Bänden

      Wien: Friedrich Witthauer 1837 - Gedruckt bei Anton Strauß's Witwe, kompletter Jahrgang 1837 der damals 3 x wöchentlich erscheinenden Zeitschrift (Dienstags, Donnerstags, Samstags), insgesamt 156 Nummern (vom 3. Jänner bis 30. Dezember 1937), mit kritischen Beurteilungen der in Wien aufgeführten Theaterstücke, mit Gedichten, biographischen Skizzen, Reiseberichten, Nekrologen, Erzählungen, Fortsetzungsromanen und Novellen, Literaturblättern, Artikeln über bildende Kunst, Modeberichte usw. und Kupferstiche, beide Bände HLDr. der Zeit mit Rückengoldprägung, insgesamt 1248 Seiten mit allen 52 kolorierten Modebildern (Wiener Moden) und 8 unkolorierten Tafeln (4 Wagenbilder, 4 Meuble-Formen), 14 x 22 cm, Deckel abgeschürft (vor allem an den Kanten), Deckelecken bestoßen, Rücken oben eingerissen, Rückenschildchen teilweise gelöst und abgerissen, innen einige Tafeln leicht gebräunt, sonst schön erhalten, altersgemäß sehr guter Zustand. Book Language/s: de [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Antikvariat Valentinska]
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         A volume of contemporary newspaper clippings, pamphlets and broadsheet publications relating to The Edgware Road Murder of 1837.

      London: various publishers, 1837 - Quarto (305 x 180 mm), approximately 100 leaves of clippings, articles and pamphlets mounted on wove paper. Recent brown cloth, dark brown skiver label lettered in gilt. A few closed-tears to newspaper clippings otherwise in very good condition. Some wood-engraved illustrations. A fascinating assemblage of printed material relating to the cause celebre of 1837, the brutal murder and dismemberment, on Christmas Eve 1836, of Hannah Brown by James Greenacre (1785-1837), forever after known as The Edgware Road Murderer. This collection was compiled by someone eagerly following the case and attests to the grip that it exerted on the public mind: at the time of the trial ephemera of all sorts poured onto the market and after his execution "plays based on the Edgware Road murder were given in the penny theatres and an effigy of Greenacre was made for Madame Tussaud's waxwork exhibition" (ODNB). Included here are the scarce Paddington Murder Sheet - a lurid "special" issued by The Weekly Chronicle - and other decidedly uncommon pieces, including Fairburn's comprehensive coverage of the trial and an issue of The New Doctor, with the front page given over to the phrenological aspect of the Greenacre case. "About September 1836, when living at 6 Carpenter's Buildings, Camberwell, Greenacre advertised in The Times for a partner to provide £300 for the commercial exploitation of his washing machine [which he had designed and built while living in the United States]; it was answered by a washerwoman named Hannah Brown. She was the widow of a shoemaker, Thomas Brown, who had met his death at sea when he left her to go to America. She stated that she had just the sum of money Greenacre was looking for, and a marriage between them was arranged for Christmas day 1836 in St Giles, Camberwell. On 24 December, when she joined him at his house, he murdered her. He cut up the body and disposed of the pieces in various localities round London, where they began to be found later in December, the head, for example, in the Regent's Canal at Stepney [the torso was discovered at the exotically named Pineapple Gate, Edgware Road, giving the case its soubriquet]. Inspector Feltham was put in charge of the case and on 24 March 1837 arrested Greenacre, who was preparing to sail for America, at St Alban's Place, Kennington Road. With him was also arrested his mistress, Sarah Gale: Hannah Brown's earrings were found in Gale's possession. Greenacre, who was by now aged fifty-one or fifty-two, of middle height and stout build, was visited in prison by members of parliament and noblemen. The trial at the central criminal court, at which Greenacre appeared clad in a blue coat, a fancy waistcoat, and a black stock, lasted two days, 10 and 11 April 1837, and both defendants were convicted and sentenced to death. Greenacre insisted that Gale had not known about the murder, to which he ultimately admitted, and her sentence was commuted to transportation for life to Australia, where she died in 1888. Greenacre tried to hang himself in his cell, and spent his time writing many letters and explanatory documents. He was hanged on 2 May 1837 in front of Newgate, the execution being witnessed by at least 20,000 persons who gathered over two days; a fairground atmosphere prevailed, with prize-fighters sparring under the gallows to keep the crowd amused. Greenacre showed great self-possession and strength of nerve on the scaffold, where he asked, 'Don't leave me too long in the concourse and make the rope tight'. Back in Newgate, Greenacre's head was shaved for examination by phrenologists before he was buried in the prison. He was survived by four of his children. Plays based on the Edgware Road murder were given in the penny theatres and an effigy of Greenacre was made for Madame Tussaud's waxwork exhibition. Greenacre's death mask, made on 4 May 1837 by J. Miller of Theobald's Road, later became an exhibit in New Scotland Yard's Black Museum, along with handwritten notes wh

      [Bookseller: Peter Harrington. ABA member]
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         Reichenbach im Vogtland. - Souvenirblatt. - "Reichenbach von der Mittags-Seite".

      - Historische Ortsansicht. Lithographie, koloriert und eiweißgehöht, 1837. 40,5 x 49,2 cm (Darstellung ) / 48,5 x 58,7 cm (Blatt). Mittig innerhalb der Darstellung betitelt. Ferner unterhalb der Darstellung mittig um die Angabe "Verlag der Flinzerschen Leihbibliothek in Reichenbach", links "C. A. Grebner n. d. Natur gezeichnet 1837" und rechts "Lith. u. Gedruckt bei Fr. Krätzschmer in Leipzig" ergänzt. Einzeldarstellungen unterhalb betitelt. - Um die zentrale Darstellung von Reichenbach gruppieren sich acht Detailansichten: " Der Marktplatz von der Mittags-Seite, Das Schloss zu Friesen, Der Marktplatz von der Mitternachts-Seite, Das Thal beim Alaunwerk, Platz vor den obern Thor mit den Gasthäusern zum goldnen Lamm u. Sonne, Das Haus des H. Insp. Baumgarten, Die St. Petri-Kirche, Schule und Waisenhaus und Die Schützenburg". - Blatt leicht fleckig und gering knickspurig. Mit Original Buchfaltung, hier mittig mit kleinem hinterlegten Papieriss. Seltenes Exemplar in einem guten Erhaltungszustand mit ansprechendem Kolorit. Sprache: Deutsch

      [Bookseller: Graphikantiquariat Koenitz]
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         The French Revolution

      London: James Fraser,, 1837. A History. In three volumes. 3 volumes, large duodecimo (190 x 115 mm). Later 19th-century green cross-grain half morocco, flat bands with gilt rules either side to spines, second and fourth compartments gilt-lettered direct, comb-marbled sides, edges sprinkled brown, orange endpapers. Each volume with 20 leaves of lined paper bound in to the rear (mainly left blank), and assiduous though unobtrusive annotations to the margins and terminals blanks (and the rear pastedown of vol. 1), mainly in pencil, with occasional dates in ink, all in a neat 19th-century hand; 2 sheets of note paper annotated in the same hand are laid in to vols. 1 and 2. Extremities and joints rubbed, stripping to morocco on vol. 3 front board, faint spotting to pastedowns and endpapers, tan-burn to the latter from turn-ins, mild ink-staining to vol. 1 p. 356, browning to gutter of vol. 2 pp. 236-7, probably from a page-marker. A very good copy. First edition, one of 1,000 copies printed, this copy without the terminal advert leaf in volume 2, but retaining all the half-titles. "Carlyle wrote his French Revolution as a secular 'tract for the times' and as a warning for his compatriots of the frightful consequences of materialism, utilitarianism and democracy. Scottish puritanism and German romanticism were his lodestars; 'History is the essence of innumerable biographies' was his historical creed. The result is not a work of scholarship but a prose epic, teeming with colourful scenes of dramatic events and imaginative portraits of the leading revolutionaries. The book at once captured the English-speaking world, and has, outside France, moulded popular conception of the French revolution down to the present day" (PMM). The profuse annotations in this copy neatly demonstrate this influence.

      [Bookseller: Peter Harrington]
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         Le illusioni perdute nuove scene della vita di provincia di De Balzac

      Presso Ant. Fort. Stella e Figli - Milano, 1837. ITALIANO 0,04 Tascabile della prima metà dell'800 in stato discreto, coperta illustrata in cartoncino, alcuni segni del tempo, scritta a penna su piatto inferiore. fioritura sparsa, tagli, irregolari e con barbe, poco bruniti, pagine discretamente conservate, cerniera allentata. Su frontespizio timbro ex libris "Dott. Angelo Troisi".VII volume della collana Piccola Biblioteca di Gabinetto ossia di amena lettura tanto tradotte che originali - Serie V. Solo Volume I. USATO

      [Bookseller: Biblioteca di Babele]
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         HISTOIRE GENERALE ET PARTICULIERE DES ANOMALIES DE L'ORGANISATION CHEZ L'HOMME ET LES ANIMAUX TRAITE DE TERALOGIE

      J.B. BAILLIERE, PARIGI 1837 - Francese Volume relativo alle tavole ed all'indice generale delle materie. Frontespizio scurito dal tempo e carta di guardia iniziale con cifra manoscritta a penna. Pagine con stampa dei caratteri ben decisa; presenti fioriture e scurimento ai margini di alcune di queste. Inserimento di 20 tavole illustrate fuori testo con preseza di macchie di umidità. Dorso con strappo inferiore e copertina scurita in alcune zone.

      [Bookseller: Biblioteca di Babele]
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         PEISSENBERG., "Aussicht vom Peissenberg". Schönes Panorama mit Blick vom Ammersee ins Lechtal und die Schweizer Alpen, im Vordergrund Haus und Kapelle sowie Personenstaffage.

      Kol. Lithographie von Gustav Kraus, 1837, 13 x 48 cm. Pressler 262 Lentner 9799. - Blatt VI aus der 1837 bei Fr. Sauer erschienenen Folge "Alpenblumen". - Mit ausführlichen Erklärungen der Berggipfel, Orte und Flüsse über und unter dem Bild. Feines Kolorit. BAYERN, Oberbayern

      [Bookseller: Buch- und Kunstantiquariat]
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         MANNERS AND CUSTOMS OF THE ANCIENT EGYPTIANS INCLUDING THEIR PRIVATE LIFE, GOVERNMENT, LAWS, ARTS, MANUFACTURES, RELIGION AND EARLY HISTORY; DERIVED FROM A COMPARISON OF THE PAINTINGS, SCULPTURES, AND MONUMENTS STILL EXISTING, WITH THE ACCOUNTS OF ANCIENT AUTHORS

      John Murray, London 1837 - First Edition, complete in three volumes, plus the supplement of index and plates from the Second Series, published by Murray in 1841. Medium 8vo (23cm). Vol I: xxxii, [2], [Errata], 406 pp; four plates (the colour and engraved frontispiece, one b&w plates, one in colour, and one folding at the rear) and numerous engraved vignettes, wood cuts, charts and tables; Vol. II: xxxiv, [Errata], 446 pp; colour frontispiece (plate XIII) plus 8 further plates (4 x b/w, 3 in colour and two folding); Vol. III: xviii, [Errata], 404, 8 pp; colour frontispiece (plate XVII) plus two further plates (one b/w, one coloured): Supplement, with slightly different title ( . Including their Religion, Agriculture, &c. derived from a comparison of the Paintings, Sculptures, and Monuments still existing, with the accounts of ancient authors); xi, 70 plates (nos.18-88, many folding and in colour), (38), 12 pp. Half-title in the Supplement, not supplied in the other vols; off-settting to the titlepage in v.1; original yellow coated endpapers, bound in black sand-grained cloth with gilt Egyptian symbols to the fronts (binding signed by Remnant & Edmonds of London), tips of corners knocked, heads and tails of the spines slilghtly chipped in places; with the bookplates of Robert Newton and J&U Brass. A near Fine set of this major work on Egyptology. Written by a prominent 19th-century Egyptologist, this three-volume book examines the private life, government, laws, arts and religion of the ancient Egyptian people. After its publication in 1837, this title remained the single best authority on ancient Egyptian culture and history for the next 50 years. John Gardner Wilkinson based this work on a 12-year residency in Egypt in which he visited nearly every known ancient Egyptian site. His work would earn him the nickname "the father of British Egyptology". Arriving in Alexandria in 1821, Wilkinson spent twelve years in Egypt and Nubia. In 1823, having learnt to read and write Arabic, he accompanied David Burton to the eastern desert of the Upper Nubia publishing his findings in the journal of the Geographical Society in 1932. He twice ascended the Nile as far as the second cataract and in 1827 carried out major excavations of tombs at Thebes, the findings of which he published in his 'Topographical Survey of Thebes' in 1830. His 'Manners and Customs' is considered the standard work on ancient Egypt, wherein "the statements of ancient writers about Egypt, together with the results of modern excavations and researches conducted by the author and others, were lucidly arranged, explained in a fascinating style, and richly illustrated with plans, engravings, and coloured plates"(DNB. v.XXI; p274-75) Two further volumes on Egyptian religion and mythology were added in 1841. Wilkinson died at Llandovery in 1875; ten years earlier he had presented his collection of Egyptian antiquities to Harrow school accompanied by an elaborate catalogue. [Attributes: First Edition; Signed Copy; Soft Cover]

      [Bookseller: Worlds End Bookshop (ABA, PBFA, ILAB)]
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         Songs &c., chiefly by German Composers. With English Words by James van Sommer, by whom also the Music was ruled and transcribed". / 19th century Manuscript by british composer James van Sommer with transcriptions of German Lieder in poetry form and score. Marvellous original manuscript with early transcriptions into english of some unusual composers. The manuscript in a beautiful and steady hand in ink/ Originales Manuskript von Transkriptionen teilweise ungewoehnlicher Lieder deutscher und europaeischer Komponisten des spaeten 18. und fruehen 19.Jahrhunderts. Wundervolle, sehr akkurate Handschrift.

      [England, possibly Hoxton], James van Sommer, 1837. - Octavo. 157 pages. Modern, unsophisticated Hardcover with new endpapers. Excellent condition.

      [Bookseller: The Time Traveller's Bookshop Ltd.]
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         A Treatise on Bread, and Bread-Making.

      Boston: Light & Stearns, 1 Cornhill, 1837. - 18mo, original dark gray patterned cloth with gilt title on upper cover; 131 pp., [blank], 12 pp. of ads. First edition of this influential work advocating the use of whole grain flour for bread-making. Reverend Sylvester Graham (17941851) was a vegetarian and the inventor of 'Graham bread,' known to us today in the rather corrupted form of the Graham cracker. His advocacy of whole grains and vegetables gave rise to a diet reform movement with strong moralistic overtones: 'In the 1830s, critiques of American food and eating were rampant and shrill, and usually attached to the name of Sylvester Graham, the de facto founder of the diet reform movement in the antebellum United States. During the 1830s and 1840s, the man Ralph Waldo Emerson described as the prophet of bran bread' made a name for himself lecturing and publishing books on diet and proper living.The diet reform movement influenced many Americans who did not consider themselves Grahamites. Nineteenth-century manuscript and published cookbooks included recipes for Graham bread, Protestant ministers offered sermons on the connection between diet and morality, and advice books urged healthy living based on Grahamite principles. In short, the ideas and values of the diet reform movement as initiated by Graham became part of mainstream American culture in the nineteenth century and beyond.' —Lobel, Cindy. Sylvester Graham and Antebellum Diet Reform. CONDITION: Very good, minimal wear, moderate foxing throughout. REFERENCES: Lowenstein (3rd ed.) 211; Bitting, p. 197. [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: James Arsenault & Company, ABAA]
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         Common Ptarmigan. Lagopus mutus

      [by the Author, London 1837 - Lithograph, coloured by hand, by J & E. Gould, printed by C. Hullmandel. Very good condition apart from some overall light soiling. A beautiful image from John Gould's 'The Birds of Europe': a work which, according to Hyman, 'included some of the most remarkable bird drawings ever made'. This plate is from the second of John Gould's great ornithological portfolios. Gould undertook this work not only hoping to build on the success of his first work (on the birds of the Himalaya mountains), but also in an effort to redress the imbalance between the study of local and foreign ornithology. It was his opinion that too much attention had focused on the exotic, whilst the beauty of the more local species was ignored. He wrote in the preface to the work from which this image comes: 'It has been frequently remarked that the productions of distant countries have received a much larger share of attention than those objects by which we are more immediately surrounded; and it is certainly true, that while numerous and costly illustrations have made us acquainted with the Ornithology of most other parts of the world, the Birds of Europe, in which we are, or ought to be, more interested, have not received that degree of attention which they naturally demand. The present work has been undertaken to supply that deficiency.' The images in this work are the first to be published by Gould that show the liveliness of treatment that was to become such a feature of later works. This break from the traditional methods of bird depiction can be largely attributed to the influence of and contributions from Edward Lear: 'They are certainly among the most remarkable bird drawings ever made, [for] it is evident that Lear endowed them with some measure of his own whimsy and intelligence, his energetic curiosity, his self-conscious clumsiness and his unselfconscious charm'. (Hyman) Cf. Anker 169; cf.Balis 101; cf. Fine Bird Books (1990), p. 102; cf.Nissen IVB 371; cf.Sauer 2; cf.Zimmer p. 251.

      [Bookseller: Donald A. Heald Rare Books (ABAA)]
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         Flora's Dictionary

      Fielding Kucas Junar, Baltimore 1837 - Baltimore: Fielding Kucas Junar, 1837. Leather_bound. One volume. Quarto. Flora's Dictionary by Elizabeth Washington Gamble Wirt, as " Mrs. E.W. Wirt, of Virginia".Fifty-six hand coloured original pictorial lithograph plates and with title dedication page to embellished for Miss. Ann Smith. The section of Flora's Dictionary is made of 230 entries arrange alphabetically from Acacia Roses to Zinnia each entry includes a brief definition followed by the appropriate verse.Original publisher's binding in full maroon morocco gilt, the spine in five compartments separated by four raised bands, gilt title, all edges gilt. A beautiful hand colour copy of Flora's.

      [Bookseller: Imperial Fine Books ABAA, ILAB]
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         THE POSTHUMOUS PAPERS OF THE PICKWICK CLUB

      London: Chapman and Hall, 1837. First Edition, With Early Issue Points. Octavo, 609 pages; VG; Bound in dark green leather, spine has burgundy label and gilt lettering; spine sun-faded slightly; boards have a blind-stamped border, gilt rectangle within; all edges of text block gilt; gilt board edges, turn-ins; marbled endpapers; age-toning to pages; some foxing to plates; Has two of the seven Smith points: Page 342, line 5: "S. Veller" uncorrected, Page 432, headline: "F" in "OF" imperfect; illustrated title page and frontispiece; mild shelfwear and rubbing; shelved case 4. Dupont.

      [Bookseller: Second Story Books]
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         Nineteenth Century American Artist's Sketchbook, Containing Pencil Drawings and Watercolors

      Boston, late 1800s. Hardcover. Very Good+. Dark grey mottled cloth over boards, backed in black leather, "Sketch Book" stamped in gilt on upper board; oblong, 140 x 94 mm; approx. pp. 100, a mix of pale blue, pale grey, and dark grey leaves. Contains 25 pencil sketches and 4 watercolors, all landscapes -- mountains, forests, coastal towns. The front paste-down bears a sticker from Frost & Adams Artists Materials, 37 Cornhill, Boston. Also on the front paste-down, the ownership signature and address of George E. [Edward] Niles (1837-1898), a lithographer and painter who kept a studio in Jackson, New Hampshire, where he exhibited the works of many other artists. His wife was the heiress Adams of the Nickel Bank of Boston, and he was in no need of money, so he rarely sold his paintings, and rarely signed his works. He exhibited at the Boston Art Club from 1873 to 1877. SOLD WITH a small oil painting (108 x 73 mm) of a sailboat at sunset, initialed RC, and very pretty.

      [Bookseller: Sanctuary Books]
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         THE POSTHUMOUS PAPERS OF THE PICKWICK CLUB

      London: Chapman and Hall, 1837. First Edition, With Early Issue Points. Octavo, 609 pages; VG; Bound in dark green leather, spine has burgundy label and gilt lettering; spine sun-faded slightly; boards have a blind-stamped border, gilt rectangle within; all edges of text block gilt; gilt board edges, turn-ins; marbled endpapers; age-toning to pages; some foxing to plates; Has two of the seven Smith points: Page 342, line 5: "S. Veller" uncorrected, Page 432, headline: "F" in "OF" imperfect; illustrated title page and frontispiece; mild shelfwear and rubbing; shelved case 4. Dupont.

      [Bookseller: Second Story Books ]
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         The POSTHUMOUS PAPERS Of The PICKWICK CLUB: Containing a Faithful Record of the Perambulations, Perils, Travels, Adventures and Sporting Transactions of the Corresponding Members. Edited by "Boz."

      Philadelphia: Carey Lea & Blanchard, 1837. 1st US edition (Smith AMERICAN, pp. 39 - 46). Original drab paper-wrapped boards over deep rose-colored cloth spines, with printed paper title labels. Most volumes cocked to varying degrees. Part I cloth abraded at top of rear joint, with some loss. Stain to Part I front board, which is ex-lib, with 19th C bookplate to front paste-down & faint circular stamp in p. 5 top margin. 1876 poi to ffep. Slight gutter break prior to p. 5. Parts II & III with labels mostly worn away. Part IV with rear joint cloth spliting along rear joint up from bottom. A Good set.. 5 volumes. Part I: [v] - xii, [13] - 219, [1], 8, 4 pp. Publisher adverts the last 13 pages. 12mo. 7-5/8" x 4-3/8" 'Part I', issued November 1836, of this eventual 5 volume set issued by CLB, with 'Part 5' published in December 1837. The first printing of the initial part somewhat uncommon in the trade, with Patten recording a print run of just 1500cc.

      [Bookseller: Tavistock Books, ABAA ]
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         Monthly Diary of a 19th Century Gentleman Photographer.

      1837-1911 61pp ms. on 31 folio leaves, 160pp of ornate German colour-printed calendars with 60pp completed in ms., two folding plates; the odd spot but otherwise internally clean. Attractively bound in early 20th century tree calf, bordered & lettered in gilt, spine dec. in gilt with raised bands; sl. rubbing to hinges, corners, & head of spine.William Maskell, 1814-1890, was a churchman and liturgical scholar who famously - after becoming the domestic chaplain of Henry Phillpotts, Bishop of Exeter - left the Church of England and converted to Catholicism. Following his conversion, Maskell bought The Castle Bude in Cornwall where he lived as a country gentleman and antiquary, becoming a fellow of the London Society of Antiquaries and amassing a large collection of books, carved ivories, and enamels, which were later sold or donated to the British and South Kensington Museums. This diary was written by one of William's three sons, Alfred Ogle Maskell, 1845-1912, a gentleman photographer, lecturer, and art historian. He was one of the founding members of the 'Linked Ring' brotherhood - a society devoted to excellence in photography - and was included in Frederick Hollyer's Portraits of Many Persons of Note, which the V&A describes as 'a pictorial Who's Who of late Victorian and Edwardian celebrities'. The diary begins with 3pp in which Alfred summarises his father's diary entries from the years 1837-1886, and includes entries on the death of William's first wife (Alfred's mother), when he bought three coconut cups in Bristol for £27, when they celebrated mass at Bude for the first time since the Reformation, and when he bought The Castle Bude and Woodleigh with 900 acres.The rest of the diary covers significant dates in Alfred's life from 1861 until 1911, including the dates his brother William leaves for and returns from New Zealand and the ships he travels on, Alfred's extensive travels in Paris, Brussels, St Petersburg, Moscow, Constantinople, Melbourne, Cairo, Geneva, Athens, as well as numerous places in the U.K. Alfred notes that on December 30, 1887 he had several guests including 'Miss Nightingale to dinner', that he 'experimented with new camera' on May 1, 1889, that his book Ivories the catalogue raisonné of the works of Raphael Morgan, was published on May 25, 1905. He also mentions camera club meetings, conferences, lectures, dinners, balls, and various events he attends as well as bicycle rides he goes on. In snippets only a few words long, this diary captures the essence of the busy life of a late Victorian society figure, from misadventures which include a 'canoe accident' and when he was 'laid up with a scalded foot', to high points like the day the '1st photographic salon opened,' and the evening of (famed impressionist photographer) 'George Davison's great dinner party at the Hotel Russell'.

      [Bookseller: Jarndyce Rare Books]
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         The Letters of Charles Lamb with A Sketch of his Life by Thomas Noon Talfourd (2 Vols)

      Edward Moxon 1837 - Edward Moxon, 1837. London. First Edition. Two Volumes. Very Good. Bound in full Morocco leather with gilt rules and decorative tooling. Spines with five raised bands. Marbled endpapers. This set is in exceptional condition. There is wear to the hinges, however both books are secure and well-preserved. Contents are immaculate with no signs of age or browning. [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Rob Zanger Bookseller]
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         The French Revolution. A History. In three volumes.

      London: James Fraser, 1837 - 3 volumes, large duodecimo (190 x 115 mm). Later 19th-century green cross-grain half morocco, flat bands with gilt rules either side to spines, second and fourth compartments gilt-lettered direct, comb-marbled sides, edges sprinkled brown, orange endpapers. Each volume with 20 leaves of lined paper bound in to the rear (mainly left blank), and assiduous though unobtrusive annotations to the margins and terminals blanks (and the rear pastedown of vol. 1), mainly in pencil, with occasional dates in ink, all in a neat 19th-century hand; 2 sheets of note paper annotated in the same hand are laid in to vols. 1 and 2. Extremities and joints rubbed, stripping to morocco on vol. 3 front board, faint spotting to pastedowns and endpapers, tan-burn to the latter from turn-ins, mild ink-staining to vol. 1 p. 356, browning to gutter of vol. 2 pp. 236-7, probably from a page-marker. A very good copy. First edition, one of 1,000 copies printed, this copy without the terminal advert leaf in volume 2, but retaining all the half-titles. "Carlyle wrote his French Revolution as a secular 'tract for the times' and as a warning for his compatriots of the frightful consequences of materialism, utilitarianism and democracy. Scottish puritanism and German romanticism were his lodestars; 'History is the essence of innumerable biographies' was his historical creed. The result is not a work of scholarship but a prose epic, teeming with colourful scenes of dramatic events and imaginative portraits of the leading revolutionaries. The book at once captured the English-speaking world, and has, outside France, moulded popular conception of the French revolution down to the present day" (PMM). The profuse annotations in this copy neatly demonstrate this influence. Dyer p. 85; Printing and the Mind of Man 304; Tarr A8.1. [Attributes: First Edition]

      [Bookseller: Peter Harrington. ABA member]
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         Evenings with Prince Cambaceres, Second Consul, Arch-Chancellor of the Empire, Duke of Parma.

      London, Henry Colburn, 1837. Two volumes, 8vo. Contemporary maroon full morocco, ornamented and lettered in gilt, all edges gilt; pp. xi, 403; xi, 396, two engraved portraits; light wear to extremities, hinges a little weakened, ocaasional spotting; otherwise a clean and fresh set. First edition in English. Jean-Jacques-Regis de Cambacérès was a French legal expert during the Revolutionry 1790s and under Napoleon. He is mainly responsible for the Code Napoléon, which shaped laws and costitutions in Europe. He had been closely associated with Napoleon and was instrumental in the 18th Brumaire of 1799, overthrowing the Directoire. Cambacérès is credited with de-criminalizing homosexuality in Frence, which is not true, despite the fact that he almost openly lived as a homosexual.

      [Bookseller: Henry Sotheran Ltd.]
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         Das Siebengebirge und seine Umgebungen nach den interessanteren Beziehungen dargestellt. Mit zwei geognostischen illuminierten Gebirgscharten, zwei Profilen und vier Ansichten.

      Crefeld, J.H. Funcke, 1837 - X, 266 S. Engelmann II, 950. – Mit Ansichten von Godesberg, Rolandseck/Nonnenwerth, Heisterbach sowie "Trachyt Steinbruch im Stenzelberge", nach Zehler von C. Kramer. – Selten. Ehemaliges Bibliotheksexemplar. Einband leicht beschabt. Innen gut. Sprache: Deutsch Gewicht in Gramm: 500 Kl.-8°. Halbleineneinband der Zeit mit marmoriertem Überzugspapier und grünem Farbschnitt. [Attributes: First Edition]

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Michael Solder]
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         Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club

      An Exceptionally Tall CopyDICKENS, Charles. The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club. With Forty-Three Illustrations, by R. Seymour and Phiz. London: Chapman and Hall, 1837.First edition in book form. Errata uncorrected. Octavo (8 5/8 x 5 1/2 inches; 222 x 140 mm). [4], xvi, 609 pp. Including the half title. With forty-three inserted plates by Seymour, Buss and 'Phiz'. With the Seymour and Buss plates, and with the 'Phiz' plates from early steels. Frontispiece and engraved title in the second state. None of the illustrations are captioned but all are signed. Some lower margins remain uncut.20th-century full red morocco with a gilt medallion portrait of Dickens to front and gilt facsimile signature to rear. Spine compartments paneled and decorated in gilt, gilt spine lettering. Gilt board edges and turn ins. Marbled endpapers. Top edge gilt. Minimal foxing. Text and plates generally very clean. Overall, a near fine, and exceptionally tall, copy of this early title."From a literary standpoint the supremacy of this book has been... firmly established... It was written by Dickens when he was twenty-four and its publication placed the author on a solid foundation from which he never was removed.... It is quite probable that only Shakespeareís Works, the Bible and perhaps the English Prayer Book, exceed "Pickwick Papers" in circulation" (Eckel, 17). "Never was a book received with more rapturous enthusiasm than that which greeted the Pickwick Papers!" (Allibone I:500). Pickwick would be the first volume in which Dickens was acknowledged as the author, rather than using his pen name, "Boz."Gimbel A15. Hatton and Cleaver. Smith, Dickens, I, 3.HBS 67903.$2,000

      [Bookseller: Heritage Book Shop, LLC ]
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         The Legal Obligations of the New Mechanics Bank of Trenton, New Jersey

      Trenton [New Jersey], 8 June 1837. Manuscript signed discourse written at the onset of the Panic of 1837, concerning the ethics and obligations of the Mechanics' and Manufacturers' Bank in Trenton which had been established less than three years earlier, by respected Trenton attorney and Whig politician William Halsted (1794-1878) who had recently been elected a Member of the United States Representatives to represent New Jersey, signed and dated in the original by the author. 8vo. 8 pages in manuscript, penned recto and verso, each leaf affixed to the next with two spots of glue to upper margin, measuring approximately 20 x 25 cm, and featuring an embossed cameo of a three-masted barque. William Halstead (1794-1878) was an American Whig Party politician who represented New Jersey at large in the United States House of Representatives from 1837-1839, and again from 1841 to 1843. Halstead graduated from Princeton College in 1812, studied law, and was admitted to the bar in 1816. He commenced practice in Trenton, New Jersey and soon earned a reputation as being one of the city's most distinguished lawyers. He was appointed reporter of the New Jersey Supreme Court on 23 November 1821, and served until 1832. He served as prosecuting attorney for Hunterdon County from 1824-1829 and again from 1833-1837. He published seven volumes of "Halstead's Law Reports". Halstead was elected as a Whig to the Twenty-Fifth United States Congress (4 March 1837 to 3 March 1839). He was again elected to the Twenty-seventh Congress (4 March 1841 to 3 March 1843), serving as chairman of the United States House Committee on Elections. Upon leaving congress, President Zachary Taylor appointed him the title of U.S. Attorney for the District of New Jersey, a role in which he served from 1849 to 1853. He raised the 1st New Jersey Volunteer Cavalry during the American Civil War, and served as its colonel until February 18, 1862. He retired from public life and spent the remainder of his life in Trenton. At the request of the Directors of the Mechanics' and Manufacturers' Bank of Trenton, from a legal standpoint, Halsted answers three specific questions regarding the bank's refusal (inability) to redeem paper currency into specie (silver or gold coins). His erudite assessment surely resulted in careful deliberation by the members of the board, while it provides for us now a scarce period perspective of the historic financial crisis. At the time, the bank's president was William Grant, its board of directors consisted of James Hoy, Ralph H. Shreve, William White, George Dill, Charles G. Green, Edward Waterman, Samuel I. Emley and Samuel Evans, and the cashier was Charles Parker. It is interesting to note that just prior to the crisis at hand, the town of Trenton was in a period of unusual prosperity, with factories, mills, and other buildings being erected throughout. In September 1836 the bank in question had also decided to construct a new building, approved by William Grant, who had become president in April 1837. Completion of the bank, unfortunately, was followed by a season of much financial distress. Halsted's discourse is dated 8 June 1837. A financial assessment of the Mechanics' and Manufacturers' Bank in Trenton was reviewed at the Legislature's General Assembly of 24 October 1837. The results of the investigation were submitted to William Pennington, Governor of the State of New Jersey, on 19 December 1837. Details are published in the "Votes and Proceedings of the Sixty-Second General Assembly of the State of New Jersey." While documentation reveals that this bank, like so many others, found itself unable to honor their notes in specie, the general public of Trenton believed in the stability of the Mechanics Bank and its directors. Perhaps also, the bank was in better condition than others. Following the publication of a detailed banking statement, as seen in the volumes of the Legislature, the State Gazette of 22 December 1837 published this remark, "The condition of The Mechanics Bank is now before the Community and it is proved to be worthy of great confidence." Halsted introduces the purpose of his work: "The following questions have been submitted to me on behalf of the Mechanics and Manufacturers Bank at Trenton, for my opinion." "First. Has the said Bank forfeited its charter by refusing to redeem in specie or other lawful money its bills or notes during the regular hours of doing business?" "Second. Can the Bank after such refusal to redeem its notes in specie lawfully discount paper, make contracts or transact its ordinary business as a banking institution? "Third. Should such refusal to redeem its notes in specie be declared by a competent tribunal a cause of forfeiture; and a judgment of such tribunal be rendered accordingly, would the acts contracts or proceedings of the Bank between the time of the commission of the act so adjudged a cause of forfeiture, and the time of the rendition of the said judgment be valid?" In response to the first question, he opines, doubtless to the Bank's distress, that "the neglect or refusal of the Bank to redeem in specie or other lawful money the notes of Bills issued by the Corporation, is a lawful cause of forfeiture." He clarifies that the failure merely exposes the Bank to proceedings which "may" result in "a judgment of forfeiture against it." On the second matter, he refers to "the language of the highest judicial authority, Chancellor Williamson, in the case of the Morris Canal and Banking Company, and the Society for Establishing the Useful Manufacturers." He goes on to quote Williamson's statement which explains that a corporation's failure to fulfill contractual obligations does not necessitate its extinction, and that it can continue operations. He provides further evidence for the same conclusion, stating, "This opinion of Chancellor Williamson is in accordance with the opinion of Chancellor Kent in the case of Slee against Bloom [New York City, 1822]... that a forfeiture of corporate rights must be judicially ascertained and declared, and that corporate power which may have been abused or abandoned cannot be taken away..." Finally, he turns to the late "Chief Justice Parsons one of the ablest Common Law Lawyers that ever sat upon a bench in the country"... and a trial between the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and the Unions Insurance Company, of which Parsons said, "An information for the purpose of dissolving the Corporation or of seizing its franchises cannot be prosecuted but by the authority of the Commonwealth to be exercised by the Legislation or by the Attorney or Solicitor General under its direction..." Perhaps most significantly, he confirms that "The decisions of the Supreme Courts of New York Connecticut Pennsylvania and Virginia are all in accordance with the opinions above cited." To the great relief of the Directors of the Mechanics' and Manufacturers' Bank of Trenton, he applies the aforementioned legal opinions, to conclude as follows: "... the Bank may, after its refusal to redeem its notes in specie, lawfully discount, and make contracts and pursue its ordinary business as a banking institution... the State only can prosecute for a forfeiture, and may waive the prosecution if it desires; it would be impossible for an individual against whom the bank might bring an action for the recovery of a debt or demand due to it, to set up as a defence that the bank had forfeited its charter... the judgement would therefore precisely be the same in such is case as if no such cause of forfeiture had ever existed... This principle is fully recognized in the case of the Chester Glass Company against Dewey in 16 Massachusetts reports... that the defendant cannot refuse payment for goods sold because the Company were prohibited from trading..." Again favourable for the New Jersey banking institution, his answer to the third issue at hand is rather encouraging, considering the economic crisis and recession that had only just begun. He concludes, "I am clearly of the opinion, that the acts and contracts of the Bank will remain valid and obligatory until the judgment of forfeiture is finally pronounced. Such judgement will not have a retrospective operation... But it will have the effect of preventing the Bank suing in its Corporate name... The judgment operating only for the future all prior acts of the Bank will remain valid." During the great Panic of 1837, most or all banks had insufficient specie to redeem the paper notes which they had issued as currency. On 10 May 1837, banks in New York City, for example, suspended specie payments, meaning that they would no longer redeem commercial paper in specie at full face value. In the spring of 1837 all banks in New Jersey suspended specie payments, resulting in much financial distress for civilians, and in some cases bankruptcy. An act of the Legislature of New Jersey was passed on 11 November 1837, only a few months after this discourse was made, to investigate all banks in the State, titled "An Act to provide for an investigation of the condition of the banks in this state and for other purposes." Other States had similar Acts in place. Following these investigations, the Financial Register of the United States reported that the twelve banks of the State of New Jersey held a combined aggregate of $217,178.71 in specie (actual gold or silver coins), and combined liabilities of $1,137,117.73 in various forms.] As predicted in Halsted's "Opinion" discourse, by a vote of 32 to 17, the New Jersey House of Assembly passed a bill relieving the banks from a forfeiture of their charters, despite not redeeming their notes in specie. As in the examples above, Halsted quotes relevant pronouncements of Chancellor Isaac Halstead Williamson of New Jersey, Chancellor James Kent of New York City, and late Chief Justice Theophilus Parsons of Massachusetts. Isaac Halstead Williamson (1767-1844) was an American politician who served as the eighth Governor of New Jersey from 1817 to 1829. As part of his duties as governor, he served as the judge of the Prerogative Court of New Jersey. He was subsequently Mayor of Elizabethtown, New Jersey, from 1830 to 1833. At the same time, in 1831 and 1832, he was elected to represent Essex County as a member of the New Jersey Legislative Council (now known as the New Jersey State Senate). Despite holding these political offices Williamson continued to practice law. In 1844, he was unanimously elected to be President of the convention that framed the revised New Jersey State Constitution. However, his poor health prevented him from fulfilling this role, and the same year he died. James Kent (1763-1847) was a jurist whose decisions and written commentaries shaped the inchoate common law in the formative years of the United States, and also influenced jurisprudence in England and other common-law countries. He became a justice of the New York Supreme Court in 1798, chief justice of that tribunal in 1804. Serving as chancellor of the New York Court of Chancery (then the highest judicial office in New York) from 1814 to 1823, he is said to have made equity jurisprudence effective for the first time in U.S. legal history. As professor at law, judge and commentator, Kent relied as much as possible on the old English law. Theophilus Parsons (1750-1813) was an American jurist. He served as Chief Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court of Massachusetts from 1806 until his death in Boston in 1813. In politics, he was active as one of the Federalist leaders in the state. Parsons was a member of the state constitutional convention of 1779-1780 and one of the committee of twenty-six who drafted the constitution. He was also a delegate to the state convention of 1788 which ratified the Federal Constitution. According to tradition, he was the author of the famous Conciliatory Resolutions, or proposed amendments to the constitution, which did much to win over Samuel Adams and John Hancock to ratification. His Commentaries on the Laws of the United States (1836) contains some of his more important legal opinions. All three of these men were held in the highest regard, often summoned and respected for their legal opinions. The Mechanics' and Manufacturers' Bank in Trenton was founded in 1834. Situated on the southwest corner of King (now Warren) Street and Second (now State) Street, it replaced the handsome and iconic eighteenth-century home of John Dagworthy which was demolished to erect the bank. It was in the stately home, two years earlier on 23 December 1832, that a large assembly of citizens was held to petition the Legislature for the chartering of the Mechanics and Manufacturers Bank. On 10 January of the year following, a bill was introduced in the House of General Assembly to incorporate the Mechanics and Manufacturers Banking and Insurance Company of Trenton. The bank petition was defeated by the legislators late in the ensuing month. Demand for additional banking facilities continued, however, and during the summer which followed, petitions were circulated and signed in Trenton and its surroundings, "praying for the establishment of the Mechanics and Manufacturers Bank." These petitions were given to Edward S. McIlvaine and were presented to the House of Assembly on 23 October 1833, only to be denied once more on 22 January 1834. However, the opposition did not discourage the business and professional men of Trenton in favor of the Mechanics Bank, who immediately reassembled their forces to dispute the decision, the day after their bill was defeated. It is interesting to note, that the men chosen to appear before the House and ask for reconsideration of the charter measure, were the city's most eminent lawyers, General Samuel R. Hamilton and William Halsted who wrote the present document. These men of the Bar were reinforced by Charles Parker, state treasurer. The appeal had its result as the bill was reconsidered and next day was adopted by a vote of 33 to 16. The measure was then sent to the Senate where on Wednesday, February 19, 1834, it was adopted by a vote of 9 to 4, immediately becoming a law under the caption "An Act to Incorporate the Mechanics and Manufacturers Bank at Trenton." Finally, on 25 September 1834, the Mechanics and Manufacturers Bank was opened for business. Contemporary to the present document: In September 1836 the board decided to build on the corner of the property and contracted with Joseph Witherup for a two-story brick structure at a cost of $3,500. William Grant, who became president in April 1837, supervised the project. Just previous to the decision to build the new bank the people of Trenton experienced a period of unusual prosperity. As one writer put it, "substantial and elegant buildings were going up in all parts of the city," with "seven factories in full operation and two other mills being built." Completion of the bank, unfortunately, was followed by a season of much financial distress and specie payment was suspended all over the country. The stability of the Mechanics Bank and the good work of its officers and directors was apparent, according to contemporary sources, for the State Gazette of 22 December 1837 made this comment, following the publication of a detailed banking statement: "The condition of The Mechanics Bank is now before the Community and it is proved to be worthy of great confidence." The Mechanics and Manufacturers Bank in Trenton would survive the ensuing period of economic depression which struck the whole nation, and continue operating until 1919.

      [Bookseller: Voyager Press Rare Books & Manuscripts]
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         Vice President Richard M. Johnson's personal autograph ledger book with hundreds of signatures of Senators, Supreme Court Justices, Presidents, and more

      Washington, D.C., 1837. hardcover. very good(-). Museum-quality offering of Vice President Richard M. Johnson's personal autograph ledger book -- 87 leaves consisting of over 290 signatures, assembled during his tenure in office, 1837 - 1841, and containing most of the signatures of the 27th Congress, five United States Presidents, the complete Van Buren Cabinet, six Supreme Court Justices, and virtually every major national political figure of the era. More importantly, this book is a virtual roll call of the very Senators who elected him Vice President of the United States! And it must not be forgotten that this was the only time in the history of this county that such an event took place. Johnson's ownership signature is boldly written on the blank page following the publisher's indentation with the very next page consisting of Martin Van Buren and his complete Cabinet. The next two pages comprise sitting Supreme Court Justices James M. Wayne, Philip P. Barbour, John McKinley and John Catron. From this point Johnson has divided the book by States, with each respective Senators signing first, followed by members of the House of Representatives, on their designated pages. In addition to Van Buren, some of the more familiar names include John Quincy Adams, Franklin Pierce, James Buchanan, Millard Fillmore, Roger Taney (Chief Justice), Daniel Webster, Henry Clay, John C. Calhoun, Thomas H. Benton, Levi Woodbury Henry A. Wise, William A. Graham, John J. Crittenden, John W. Crockett (Son of Davie Crockett who died at age 44), John Forsyth, Caleb Cushing, Francis Granger, Joel Roberts Poinsett, Henry D. Gilpin, James K. Paulding, Robert M.T. Hunter, John N. Niles, William Smith, Henry Hubbard, J.C. Bates, J.W. Huntington, Joseph Trumbull, Thomas Clayton, Richard H. Bayard, and William C. Preston. Condition: The covers have been strengthened and reinforced. The binding appears tight with only the two center pages loosened. All signatures are boldly written and are generously spaced. Very good(-) condition. Museum-quality offering of Vice President Richard M. Johnson's personal autograph ledger book -- 87 leaves consisting of over 290 signatures, assembled during his tenure in office, 1837 - 1841, and containing most of the signatures of the 27th Congress, five United States Presidents, the complete Van Buren Cabinet, six Supreme Court Justices, and virtually every major national political figure of the era. More importantly, this book is a virtual roll call of the very Senators who elected him Vice President of the United States! And it must not be forgotten that this was the only time in the history of this county that such an event took place. Johnson's ownership signature is boldly written on the blank page following the publisher's indentation with the very next page consisting of Martin Van Buren and his complete Cabinet. The next two pages comprise sitting Supreme Court Justices James M. Wayne, Philip P. Barbour, John McKinley and John Catron. From this point Johnson has divided the book by States, with each respective Senators signing first, followed by members of the House of Representatives, on their designated pages. In addition to Van Buren, some of the more familiar names include John Quincy Adams, Franklin Pierce, James Buchanan, Millard Fillmore, Roger Taney (Chief Justice), Daniel Webster, Henry Clay, John C. Calhoun, Thomas H. Benton, Levi Woodbury Henry A. Wise, William A. Graham, John J. Crittenden, John W. Crockett (Son of Davie Crockett who died at age 44), John Forsyth, Caleb Cushing, Francis Granger, Joel Roberts Poinsett, Henry D. Gilpin, James K. Paulding, Robert M.T. Hunter, John N. Niles, William Smith, Henry Hubbard, J.C. Bates, J.W. Huntington, Joseph Trumbull, Thomas Clayton, Richard H. Bayard, and William C. Preston. Condition: The covers have been strengthened and reinforced. The binding appears tight with only the two center pages loosened. All signatures are boldly written and are generously spaced. Very good(-) condition.American military officer and Vice-President of the United States. During the Battle of the Thames, October 5th 1813, he was severely wounded while killing the Indian Chief Tecumseh. In 1836 he was nominated for Vice President on the ticket with Martin Van Buren, but he failed to receive a majority of the Electoral vote. Instead, he became the only Vice President ever elected by the United States Senate by a vote of 33 to 16, on February 8, 1837. During his four years in office, Johnson broke 17 tie votes, a record exceeded by only one of his Vice-Presidential successors.

      [Bookseller: Argosy Book Store ]
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         The Story of the Three Bears.

      London: Porter and Wright, 60 Pall-Mall, 1837. Hardcover. Good. vi, 29pp [10] leaves of plates. Bound in original decorative paper covered boards and illustrated with 10 wood engraved plates. The book has had a new spine added as the original was nonexistent. The boards are soiled and rubbed/worn at extremities, the rear cover having some juvenile ink marks. Most of the pages inside have minor foxing and marks as this was a favorite childrens story. One of the plates has a light ink mark in the image. Someone has written !!!Alas!!! on the final page. Not a great copy but a very scarce book of a much loved fairy tale. Please note the binding appears to have originally been as a hard back, myself and the conservator agreed on this. The only copy on COPAC has paper wrappers only. The editions found on the Toronto library web site from the Osbourne collection, one has been rebound later, another copy is also bound in paper wrappers. The publisher may have sold the book either as a bound hard copy or in original paper wrappers. This is the first collected edition of this early version of Goldilocks and the Three Bears. It original appeared in print in Volume Four of The Doctor, 1837, by Robert Southey. The first illustrated version of The Three Bears story with text by George Nicol appeared that Christmas. In 1841, Nicols version was re-issued by Wright with two additional tales: The Wolf and the Seven Kids ( a tale from Brothers Grimm read by Great Bear. Having wished the story to become more widely known, Southey was pleased with the success of Nicols version. Surviving copies of any early edition are quite scarce. Any text of the story dated before 1850 is a rare and desirable possession (Quayle, 73.)Originally accepted as an invention by Southey, the tale almost certainly has an oral history that predates The Doctors 1837 publication. In 1951 a manuscript entitled The Story of the Three Bears related appeared. It was dated September 1831, written and illustrated by Eleanor Mure and presented to her nephew Horace Broke as a birthday gift. Although traditional versions make the storys porridge thief a fox, both Mures and Southeys tales make their thief a heroine, a disagreeable old woman. By 1850, the intruder appears for the first time as a little girl named Silver Hair; and in 1868, Golden hair. The first use of the name Goldilocks, which is now universally attached to the story occurs in Old Nursery Stories and Rhymes, published 1904. See Muir, 124; Qualye, 73; Carpenter & Prichard, 524.

      [Bookseller: Roe and Moore]
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         Vice President Richard M. Johnson's personal autograph ledger book with hundreds of signatures of Senators, Supreme Court Justices, Presidents, and more

      Washington, D.C., 1837. hardcover. very good(-). Museum-quality offering of Vice President Richard M. Johnson's personal autograph ledger book -- 87 leaves consisting of over 290 signatures, assembled during his tenure in office, 1837 - 1841, and containing most of the signatures of the 27th Congress, five United States Presidents, the complete Van Buren Cabinet, six Supreme Court Justices, and virtually every major national political figure of the era. More importantly, this book is a virtual roll call of the very Senators who elected him Vice President of the United States! And it must not be forgotten that this was the only time in the history of this county that such an event took place. Johnson's ownership signature is boldly written on the blank page following the publisher's indentation with the very next page consisting of Martin Van Buren and his complete Cabinet. The next two pages comprise sitting Supreme Court Justices James M. Wayne, Philip P. Barbour, John McKinley and John Catron. From this point Johnson has divided the book by States, with each respective Senators signing first, followed by members of the House of Representatives, on their designated pages. In addition to Van Buren, some of the more familiar names include John Quincy Adams, Franklin Pierce, James Buchanan, Millard Fillmore, Roger Taney (Chief Justice), Daniel Webster, Henry Clay, John C. Calhoun, Thomas H. Benton, Levi Woodbury Henry A. Wise, William A. Graham, John J. Crittenden, John W. Crockett (Son of Davie Crockett who died at age 44), John Forsyth, Caleb Cushing, Francis Granger, Joel Roberts Poinsett, Henry D. Gilpin, James K. Paulding, Robert M.T. Hunter, John N. Niles, William Smith, Henry Hubbard, J.C. Bates, J.W. Huntington, Joseph Trumbull, Thomas Clayton, Richard H. Bayard, and William C. Preston. Condition: The covers have been strengthened and reinforced. The binding appears tight with only the two center pages loosened. All signatures are boldly written and are generously spaced. Very good(-) condition. Museum-quality offering of Vice President Richard M. Johnson's personal autograph ledger book -- 87 leaves consisting of over 290 signatures, assembled during his tenure in office, 1837 - 1841, and containing most of the signatures of the 27th Congress, five United States Presidents, the complete Van Buren Cabinet, six Supreme Court Justices, and virtually every major national political figure of the era. More importantly, this book is a virtual roll call of the very Senators who elected him Vice President of the United States! And it must not be forgotten that this was the only time in the history of this county that such an event took place. Johnson's ownership signature is boldly written on the blank page following the publisher's indentation with the very next page consisting of Martin Van Buren and his complete Cabinet. The next two pages comprise sitting Supreme Court Justices James M. Wayne, Philip P. Barbour, John McKinley and John Catron. From this point Johnson has divided the book by States, with each respective Senators signing first, followed by members of the House of Representatives, on their designated pages. In addition to Van Buren, some of the more familiar names include John Quincy Adams, Franklin Pierce, James Buchanan, Millard Fillmore, Roger Taney (Chief Justice), Daniel Webster, Henry Clay, John C. Calhoun, Thomas H. Benton, Levi Woodbury Henry A. Wise, William A. Graham, John J. Crittenden, John W. Crockett (Son of Davie Crockett who died at age 44), John Forsyth, Caleb Cushing, Francis Granger, Joel Roberts Poinsett, Henry D. Gilpin, James K. Paulding, Robert M.T. Hunter, John N. Niles, William Smith, Henry Hubbard, J.C. Bates, J.W. Huntington, Joseph Trumbull, Thomas Clayton, Richard H. Bayard, and William C. Preston. Condition: The covers have been strengthened and reinforced. The binding appears tight with only the two center pages loosened. All signatures are boldly written and are generously spaced. Very good(-) condition. American military officer and Vice-President of the United States. During the Battle of the Thames, October 5th 1813, he was severely wounded while killing the Indian Chief Tecumseh. In 1836 he was nominated for Vice President on the ticket with Martin Van Buren, but he failed to receive a majority of the Electoral vote. Instead, he became the only Vice President ever elected by the United States Senate by a vote of 33 to 16, on February 8, 1837. During his four years in office, Johnson broke 17 tie votes, a record exceeded by only one of his Vice-Presidential successors.

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         Arthur T. Pierson - Personal Golden Wedding Scrapbook

      - Arthur T. Pierson 1837-1911. Major Christian leader. Preached over 13,000 sermons. Wrote over 50 books. Gave Bible lectures as part of a transatlantic preaching ministry that made him famous in Scotland and England. He was consulting editor for the Scoffield reference bible. Friends of D.L. Moody and George Mueller and C.H. Spurgeon, whom he succeeded at the Metropolitan Tabernacle in London from 1891-1893. Over 9.75" x 12". Very good to good. First page lettered by Pierson; reads "To my darling wife, a memorial of 50 years"; drawn symbol and a signature of Pierson; photos and photographic illustrations, other illustrations, a few color; handwritten captions often in poetry below pictures. Some other applicable paper information laying loose at end of book. Heavy string bound cloth binder. Some wear/rubbing at external edges; pages very good condition. [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Cross and Crown Rare Books]
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         Voyages et aventures du capitaine Bonneville. A l'ouest des Etats-Unis d'Amérique, au-delà des montagnes Rocheuses

      - Charpentier, Paris 1837, In-8 (13x21cm), 328pp. et 348pp., 2 volumes reliés. - Edition. Leganti in marmo periodo di cartone marrone. indietro liscio. parti del titolo e il numero del volume adornate con pelle blu. Tracce di attrito in tappi, bit e angoli. lentiggini pallide sparse, soprattutto nei margini. Nizza copia. - [FRENCH VERSION FOLLOWS] Edition originale, rare. Reliures en cartonnages brun marbré d'époque. Dos lisses. Pièces de titre et de tomaison ornés de maroquin marine. Traces de frottements en coiffes, mors et coins. Rousseurs pâles éparses, principalement dans les marges. Bel exemplaire. En 1835, Washington Irving fit la connaissance d'un militaire d'origine française revenu après 3 ans d'une expédition dans l'ouest, par delà les montagnes Rocheuses. A l'aide de ses conversations et de son manuscrit composé de nombreuses notes, l'auteur écrivit ce récit de voyages. Les premiers chapitres font état de la situation des compagnies commerciales américaines et de leurs relations avec l'ouest. Le reste est occupé par la relation de l'expédition du capitaine Bonneville et de ses 110 hommes. On y trouvera de nombreux récits sur les chasses aux bisons, les tribus indiennes (corbeaux noirs, ours blanc) et notamment sur Tueur de daims, le fameux héros de la trilogie de Fenimore Cooper, notamment dans son roman le plus célèbre : Le dernier des Mohicans. NB : Cet ouvrage est disponible à la librairie sur demande sous 48 heures.

      [Bookseller: Librairie Feu Follet]
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         Vice President Richard M. Johnson's personal autograph ledger book with hundreds of signatures of Senators, Supreme Court Justices, Presidents, and more

      Washington, D.C. 1837 - Museum-quality offering of Vice President Richard M. Johnson's personal autograph ledger book -- 87 leaves consisting of over 290 signatures, assembled during his tenure in office, 1837 - 1841, and containing most of the signatures of the 27th Congress, five United States Presidents, the complete Van Buren Cabinet, six Supreme Court Justices, and virtually every major national political figure of the era. More importantly, this book is a virtual roll call of the very Senators who elected him Vice President of the United States! And it must not be forgotten that this was the only time in the history of this county that such an event took place. Johnson's ownership signature is boldly written on the blank page following the publisher's indentation with the very next page consisting of Martin Van Buren and his complete Cabinet. The next two pages comprise sitting Supreme Court Justices James M. Wayne, Philip P. Barbour, John McKinley and John Catron. From this point Johnson has divided the book by States, with each respective Senators signing first, followed by members of the House of Representatives, on their designated pages. In addition to Van Buren, some of the more familiar names include John Quincy Adams, Franklin Pierce, James Buchanan, Millard Fillmore, Roger Taney (Chief Justice), Daniel Webster, Henry Clay, John C. Calhoun, Thomas H. Benton, Levi Woodbury Henry A. Wise, William A. Graham, John J. Crittenden, John W. Crockett (Son of Davie Crockett who died at age 44), John Forsyth, Caleb Cushing, Francis Granger, Joel Roberts Poinsett, Henry D. Gilpin, James K. Paulding, Robert M.T. Hunter, John N. Niles, William Smith, Henry Hubbard, J.C. Bates, J.W. Huntington, Joseph Trumbull, Thomas Clayton, Richard H. Bayard, and William C. Preston. Condition: The covers have been strengthened and reinforced. The binding appears tight with only the two center pages loosened. All signatures are boldly written and are generously spaced. Very good(-) condition. Museum-quality offering of Vice President Richard M. Johnson's personal autograph ledger book -- 87 leaves consisting of over 290 signatures, assembled during his tenure in office, 1837 - 1841, and containing most of the signatures of the 27th Congress, five United States Presidents, the complete Van Buren Cabinet, six Supreme Court Justices, and virtually every major national political figure of the era. More importantly, this book is a virtual roll call of the very Senators who elected him Vice President of the United States! And it must not be forgotten that this was the only time in the history of this county that such an event took place. Johnson's ownership signature is boldly written on the blank page following the publisher's indentation with the very next page consisting of Martin Van Buren and his complete Cabinet. The next two pages comprise sitting Supreme Court Justices James M. Wayne, Philip P. Barbour, John McKinley and John Catron. From this point Johnson has divided the book by States, with each respective Senators signing first, followed by members of the House of Representatives, on their designated pages. In addition to Van Buren, some of the more familiar names include John Quincy Adams, Franklin Pierce, James Buchanan, Millard Fillmore, Roger Taney (Chief Justice), Daniel Webster, Henry Clay, John C. Calhoun, Thomas H. Benton, Levi Woodbury Henry A. Wise, William A. Graham, John J. Crittenden, John W. Crockett (Son of Davie Crockett who died at age 44), John Forsyth, Caleb Cushing, Francis Granger, Joel Roberts Poinsett, Henry D. Gilpin, James K. Paulding, Robert M.T. Hunter, John N. Niles, William Smith, Henry Hubbard, J.C. Bates, J.W. Huntington, Joseph Trumbull, Thomas Clayton, Richard H. Bayard, and William C. Preston. Condition: The covers have been strengthened and reinforced. The binding appears tight with only the two center pages loosened. All signatures are boldly written and are generously spaced. Very good(-) condition. American military office [Attributes: Signed Copy; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Argosy Book Store, ABAA, ILAB]
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         Homöopathische Heilversuche an Pferden. Von einem Laien. 2. ganz umgearb. Aufl.

      Magdeburg, W. Heinrichshofen, 1837. - XXXVIII, 295 S., 8°, Marmorierter Pappband d. Zt. mit Rückenschild (= Homöopathische Heilversuche an kranken Hausthieren. Erster Brief [von 3]: Heilung der Pferde). - Gegenüber der ersten Auflage (1835) wesentlich erweitert; es erschienen noch zwei weitere Bde. zu Rindern (1836) u. Schafen (1843). Obwohl sich der Verfasser als "Laie" bezeichnet, muss er tiefe Kenntnisse in der veterinär-homöpathischen Tierheilkunde besessen haben (u.a. erwähnt er die isopathischen Mittel nach Hering u. Lux). Mit einem alphabetisch geordneten Verzeichnis der vorkommenden Arzneien u. der behandelten Krankheiten im Anhang. - Einband tlw. beschabt u. berieben, sonst ein sehr gutes Expl. - Selten.

      [Bookseller: Versandantiquariat Hans-Jürgen Lange]
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         Souvenirs des travaux du Simplon, Par R. Céard, Ancien procureur général a Genève [.], fils de feu N. Céard, ingénieur des ponts et chaussées de France [.], sous l'inspection duquel ont été éxécutés les travaux du Simplon

      G Fick, Geneva 1837 - Rebound in plain grey cloth with black label to spine. 22 lithographed plates by Engelmann and 8 maps and plans (1 folding) by Frutgier, title and text within borders, half-title. Some foxing through out. Some offsetting on pages opposite plates. First edition, scarce. Appointed by the First Consul as chief engineer of the department of Léman, Nicolas Céard, engineer of the bridges and roads, conceived the magnificent work of the route of the Simplon, which he executed in spite of immense difficulties in the space of five years, of 1801 to 1806. In this large volume folio, his son Robert, in order to rehabilitate the role of his father, traces the main phases and difficulties of the creation of the Simplon road. This work is enriched with 30 lithographic plates including 1 folded card and 20 views, generally fig. by V. Adam, Ed. Hostein del. and lit., Lith. from Engelmann to Paris; 1 plate with plan and section of fountain, view at mid-page (Calame del., Dunant Lith.); 8 geographical plans of projects (Johann Burdallet del., Lith of Frutiger) .The views represent bridges (Saltine, Ganther, Alto, Barracks, Crevola), the Fountain of Florimont, galleries (Schalbet , Algaby, Gondo, Isella, Crevola), Pas de Gondo, glaciers (Kaltwasser, Saaserberg), the Bernese Alps, Gorges (Gondo), the last plate shows the "Tomb of Mr Ns Céard in the cemetery of Héry. Size: Tall 4to [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Henry Pordes Books Ltd]
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         THE POSTHUMOUS PAPERS OF THE PICKWICK CLUB

      London: Chapman and Hall, 1837. First Edition, With Early Issue Points. Octavo, 609 pages; VG; Bound in brown cloth, front board and spine rebacked, rear board new; some foxing to plates; Has four of the seven Smith points: Page 341, line 1: Correct reading of "inde-licate;" Page 342, line 5: "S. Veller" uncorrected, Page 432, headline: "F" in "OF" imperfect, Page 400, line 21: "this friends" for "his friends."; contains the two "suppressed" plates by Robert William Buss from Part Three, The Cricket Match (Ch. 7, opposite p. 69), and The Arbor Scene (Ch. 8, opposite p. 74), "neither of which gave Dickens satisfaction" (Hatton & Cleaver, p. 20), in their first state; lacking illustrated title page; shelved case 4. Dupont.

      [Bookseller: Second Story Books]
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         Movements of the British Legion, With Strictures on the Course of Conduct Pursued by Lieutenant-General Evans

      London: Simpkin, Marshall, and Co., J. Macrone, and E. Wilson, 1837. Hardcover. Near fine. Second Edition. To Which is added, with new views, A Continuation of the Operations from the 5th of May, 1836, to the close of March, 1837. xvi, [2], 330 p. 24 cm. Frontispiece, one map, 5 other lithograph plates. Bound in burgundy leather with marbled paper boards. New endpapers. Presentation copy inscribed by the author on title page. John Richardson, born 1796 in Queenston, was the first Canadian novelist to achieve an international reputation; his best-known novel, Wacousta, was in print for over a century. As a soldier he distinguished himself before he was 17 years old and as a journalist he played a significant role in the 1837 Rebellions. He was undoubtedly one of the most colourful figures in Upper Canada and one of the most obnoxious. Excitable, belligerent, haughty, and quick to take offence, his life was a succession of quarrels and controversies, one of which concerns this book. When civil war broke out in Spain between the legitimate monarch, Queen Isabella, and the pretender to the throne, Don Carlos, in 1834, Richardson enlisted in a British Auxiliary Legion, was promoted to the rank of captain, and later to that of major. After the storming of San Sebastian, he was created a Knight of Saint Ferdinand (K.S.F.) by Queen Isabella. While convalescing in London from a wound in 1836, he issued the first edition of this volume, in which he defended the Legion and its commander, General Sir De Lacy Evans, against the hostile criticism of the Tories in the House of Commons. But when Richardson heard that he had been passed over by General Evans in a list of promotions and decorations, he added a section to his book, bitterly attacking Evans as a cowardly and incompetent commander. He then reissued the book in 1837 as this volume, Movements of the British Legion with Strictures on the Course of Conduct Pursued by Lieutenant-General Evans. Never one to drop a quarrel lightly, Richardson followed this up with a second attack, The Personal Memoirs of Major Richardson as connected with the singular oppression of that officer while in Spain by Lieutenant-General Sir De Lacy Evans, published in Montreal in 1838 after Richardson had returned to Canada. The final assault was made in a satirical novel in which Evans is the thinly-disguised villianJack Brag in Spain, published serially in the early 1840s in Richardson's Brockville newspaper, The New Era. On the title page, Richardson inscribes this book for his old friend George Frederick de Rottenburg, a British Army officer who arrived in Canada in the 1830s, departing Canada in 1852. George Frederick was the son of Major-General Francis de Rottenburg, a Swiss-born officer who served in Britain's army.

      [Bookseller: Attic Books]
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         Movements of the British Legion, with Strictures on the Course of Conduct Pursued by Lieutenant-General Evans

      Simpkin, Marshall, and Co. et al, London 1837 - xii, 330 p. 22 cm. Frontispiece and 6 other full-page engravings. Half red leather with marbled boards. "Second Edition. To Which is Added, with New Views, A Continuation of the Operations from the 5th of May, 1836, to the close of March, 1837." Corners a little bumped. Some light spotting to plate across from p. 291. To Canadians, Major John Richardson may be best remembered for his novel "Wacousta." But in 1835, Richardson joined the British auxiliary legion raised for service in Spain during the First Carlist War. His journal of the movements of the legion, published in 1836, along with this next edition of the work, were used by the Tories to embarrass the Whig government of Lord Melbourne, whose representatives retaliated by making personal attacks on Richardson. But the troubles of the British Legion were internal as well. Richardson, describing his sufferings at the hands of its commander, Lt.-Gen. George de Lacy Evans, exposes the petty intrigues of military adventurers and place-seekers. His personal memoirs, published in 1838, and a satirical novel, "Jack Brag in Spain," continued his exposé of the British Legion. While still serving in Spain, Richardson was brought before a military court for discrediting the reputation of the legion, a charge altered to "cowardice in battle." Richardson, who had been wounded in the campaign, was exonerated, and promoted to major in 1836. Afterwards, his books, which had been published anonymously, carried his name and rank as seen here. [Attributes: Soft Cover]

      [Bookseller: Attic Books (ABAC, ILAB)]
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         Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club With Forty-Three Illustrations, by R. Seymour and Phiz.

      London Chapman and Hall 1837 - An Exceptionally Tall Copy DICKENS, Charles. The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club. With Forty-Three Illustrations, by R. Seymour and Phiz. London: Chapman and Hall, 1837. First edition in book form. Errata uncorrected. Octavo (8 5/8 x 5 1/2 inches; 222 x 140 mm). [4], xvi, 609 pp. Including the half title. With forty-three inserted plates by Seymour, Buss and 'Phiz'. With the Seymour and Buss plates, and with the 'Phiz' plates from early steels. Frontispiece and engraved title in the second state. None of the illustrations are captioned but all are signed. Some lower margins remain uncut. 20th-century full red morocco with a gilt medallion portrait of Dickens to front and gilt facsimile signature to rear. Spine compartments paneled and decorated in gilt, gilt spine lettering. Gilt board edges and turn ins. Marbled endpapers. Top edge gilt. Minimal foxing. Text and plates generally very clean. Overall, a near fine, and exceptionally tall, copy of this early title. "From a literary standpoint the supremacy of this book has been. firmly established. It was written by Dickens when he was twenty-four and its publication placed the author on a solid foundation from which he never was removed. It is quite probable that only Shakespeare’s Works, the Bible and perhaps the English Prayer Book, exceed "Pickwick Papers" in circulation" (Eckel, 17). "Never was a book received with more rapturous enthusiasm than that which greeted the Pickwick Papers!" (Allibone I:500). Pickwick would be the first volume in which Dickens was acknowledged as the author, rather than using his pen name, "Boz." Gimbel A15. Hatton and Cleaver. Smith, Dickens, I, 3. HBS 67903. $2,000 [Attributes: Signed Copy; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Heritage Book Shop, ABAA]
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         THE POSTHUMOUS PAPERS OF THE PICKWICK CLUB

      Chapman and Hall, London 1837 - Octavo, 609 pages; VG; Bound in brown cloth, front board and spine rebacked, rear board new; some foxing to plates; Has four of the seven Smith points: Page 341, line 1: Correct reading of "inde-licate;" Page 342, line 5: "S. Veller" uncorrected, Page 432, headline: "F" in "OF" imperfect, Page 400, line 21: "this friends" for "his friends."; contains the two "suppressed" plates by Robert William Buss from Part Three, The Cricket Match (Ch. 7, opposite p. 69), and The Arbor Scene (Ch. 8, opposite p. 74), "neither of which gave Dickens satisfaction" (Hatton & Cleaver, p. 20), in their first state; lacking illustrated title page; shelved case 4. Dupont. [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Second Story Books, ABAA]
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         Schriften zur reinen Philosophie. Philosophische Anthropologie.

      8. Gewebebde. 8 Bde. (komplett) in der Reihe "Sämtliche Schriften": Bd. 1-8. Nach den Ausgaben letzter Hand zusammengestellt und eingeleitet von Gert König und Lutz Geldsetzer. Nachdruck der Originalausgabe von 1837. 2. Aufl. Rückenschilder zum Teil abgerieben, sonst tadellos.

      [Bookseller: Plesse Antiquariat Minzloff]
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         Pickwick in der Fremde oder: Die Reise in Frankreich. Aus dem Englischen des G.W.M.Reynolds bearbeitet von Dr.Ludwig Herrig. 4 Bände in 2 mit 14 (8+6) Falt-Kupfern - geb. Deutsche Erstausgaben

      Anmerkungen zum Buch: Die englische Erstausgabe "Abroad or, the Tour in France" erschien 1837/8 als Folgeroman die deutsche EA 1841 (siehe mein Angebot) in allen Buch-Suchsystemen habe ich nur ein zweites Exemplar in deutscher Sprache gefunden, nämlich ein signiertes Exemplar, es wird in der Bayerischen Staatsbibliothek zu München aufbewahrt! Zum Autor: er lebte von 1814 - 1879, sein Werk war umfangreicher als das von Thackeray oder Dickens. Interessant ist, dass "The Pickwick-Papers", deutsch "Die Pickwickier", von Charles Dickens ebenfalls im Jahre 1837 als Folgeroman erschienen! Noch interessanter ist, dass in beiden Werken gleichnamige Figuren agieren ... u.a. Mister Pickwick, Tracy Tupman, Nathaniel Winkle, Samuel und Tony Weller ??? Wie ist das zu erklären? Wer hat von wem abgekupfert ??? Oder gibt es dafür eine ganz einfache Erklärung ... gab es Zusammenarbeit ??? Den Goldprägedruck "Marryat's Werke" auf den Buchrücken kann ich mir eigentlich nur so erklären, dass ein etwas unkundiger Bibliothekar im vorletzten Jahrhundert diese fälschlich (bei Restaurierung oder Neubindung) so beschriften ließ ... Frederik Marryat lebte von 1792 - 1848 und schrieb (mehr oder weniger auch zur selben Zeit unzählige vor allem von der Seefahrt handelnde Romane ... vielleicht bestehen auch ganz andere Zusammenhänge ??? Viele Fragen, keine Antworten ... die Suchsysteme konnten sie mir jedenfalls bis heute nicht beantworten - vielleicht können Sie helfen welche zu finden, Dankeschön! Für diese soeben gelesenen Zeilen kann ich keine Gewähr übernehmen - ich bitte um Verständnis! Pergament-Rücken mit Goldprägedruck/marmorierte Pappe. Rundum berieben und bestoßen, Buchblöcke stabil und gerade Seiten vollständig, teils leicht fleckig Namenseintragungen mit Datum auf Buchdeckelinnenseite in beiden Bänden sind 14 (8+6)zeitgenössische, sehr eindrucksvolle Kupfertafeln - zwei attraktiv ausgestattete, sehr ordentliche und zudem extrem seltene Ausgaben! Der Versand erfolgt per versicherter Sendung zu meinen Konditionen!

      [Bookseller: hienheimer]
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        The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club. With forty-three illustrations by R. Seymour and Phiz.

      London: Chapman and Hall, 1837 - Octavo (208 x 128 mm). Early 20th-century green morocco by Charles McLeish, titles to spine gilt in compartments, decorative frames gilt to covers, turn-ins and edges gilt. Binder's initials to rear pastedown. Minor rubbing to extremities, spine lightly toned, occasional foxing to plates; an excellent copy. Etched vignette title page, frontispiece, 41 plates by Robert Seymour, R. W. Buss, and H. K. Browne. First edition, early issue with the two Buss plates present (facing pages 69 and 74) and all the plates in early states with page numbers as called for, but no titles or imprints, and the vignette title-page with the signboard reading "Veller" (corrected to "Weller" in later issues). Pickwick Papers, Charles Dickens's first novel, transformed the obscure journalist into England's most famous writer in a matter of months. The first monthly instalment was issued in an edition of 1,000 copies in April 1836. The book became a publishing sensation after the introduction of Sam Weller in chapter 10, the fourth instalment, issued in July 1836, after which the publishers reprinted the earlier instalments so that readers could catch up. For that reason, even in parts, copies are almost impossible to find in uniform first state. By the time the book was issued in November 1837, many textual corrections had been made. Booksellers often list numerous (and confusing) text points that might conceivably apply to a perfect set of Pickwick Papers as originally issued in parts, but all these points could never be found together in the issues in book form. The serial was originally intended to be primarily a vehicle for the cartoons of Robert Seymour, until he committed suicide after the first number was published. Robert William Buss then took over, but he was inexperienced in steel engraving and had to be replaced. The final choice, Hablot Knight Browne (Phiz), was to be Dickens's chosen collaborator for the next two decades. For later issues Phiz illustrated parts IV–XX, re-engraved the Seymour plates and entirely replaced the Buss plates. This copy is handsomely bound by Charles McLeish, with his initials gilt to the rear pastedown. McLeish was one of T. E. Lawrence's favourite binders, of whom he wrote: "McLeish is a good workman: which, in the RAF, and by RAF standards, is the highest praise" (TEL - Correspondence with Bernard and Charlotte Shaw, II, p. 99). Smith I.3. [Attributes: First Edition]

      [Bookseller: Peter Harrington. ABA member]
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