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Displayed below are some selected recent viaLibri matches for books published in 1836

        Pa-She-Nine, A Chippewa Chief

      - A wonderfully detailed hand colored lithograph with beautiful original color from Thomas L. McKenney and James Hall's historically significant book "History of the Indian Tribes of North America", which was published in Philadelphia in 1836. This print is from the larger folio version and measures 20"x14". From 1816 until 1830, Thomas McKenney was Superintendent of Indian Affairs and one of a very few government officials to defend American Indian interests. When a large delegation of Indians came to see President Monroe in 1821, McKenney commissioned the fashionable portraitist Charles Bird King to paint the principal delegates, dressed in costumes of their choice. Many of the most prominent Indian leaders of the nineteenth century were among King’s sitters, including Sequoyah, Red Jacket, Major Ridge, Cornplanter, and Osceola. The portraits hung in the War Department until l858, when they were moved to the Smithsonian Institute. Most of King’s original portraits were subsequently destroyed in a fire at the Smithsonian in 1865, so their appearance in McKenney and Hall’s publication is the only record of the likenesses of many of the most prominent Indian leaders of the nineteenth century: Sequoyah, Red Jacket, Major Ridge, Cornplanter, and Osceola were numbered among King’s sitters. Andrew Jackson dismissed McKenney in 1830, but allowed him to have the portraits copied by Henry Inman, so that lithographs could be made from McKenney’s “Indian Gallery.” Additional images were taken from paintings by James Otto Lewis, George Catlin and other artists. James C. Hall, a Cincinnati judge and novelist, contributed an historical and anecdotal text. Both authors, not unlike George Catlin, whom they tried to enlist in their own publishing enterprise, saw their work as a means of preserving an accurate visual record of a rapidly disappearing culture. The portfolio nearly bankrupted McKenney as well as the two printing firms who invested in its publication. But their work proved to be much more valuable contribution than they imagined. Catlin’s paintings of Indians were destroyed in a warehouse fire; and James Otto Lewis’ watercolors burned along with those by King in the Smithsonian fire of l865. The McKenney and Hall portraits remain as the most complete and colorful record of the native leaders who made the long journey to Washington to speak for their people. Overall this print is in very good condition with some light foxing and staning.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
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        Wa-Kawn, A Winnebago Chief

      - A wonderfully detailed hand colored lithograph with beautiful original color from Thomas L. McKenney and James Hall's historically significant book "History of the Indian Tribes of North America", which was published in Philadelphia in 1836. This print is from the larger folio version and measures 20"x14". From 1816 until 1830, Thomas McKenney was Superintendent of Indian Affairs and one of a very few government officials to defend American Indian interests. When a large delegation of Indians came to see President Monroe in 1821, McKenney commissioned the fashionable portraitist Charles Bird King to paint the principal delegates, dressed in costumes of their choice. Many of the most prominent Indian leaders of the nineteenth century were among King’s sitters, including Sequoyah, Red Jacket, Major Ridge, Cornplanter, and Osceola. The portraits hung in the War Department until l858, when they were moved to the Smithsonian Institute. Most of King’s original portraits were subsequently destroyed in a fire at the Smithsonian in 1865, so their appearance in McKenney and Hall’s publication is the only record of the likenesses of many of the most prominent Indian leaders of the nineteenth century: Sequoyah, Red Jacket, Major Ridge, Cornplanter, and Osceola were numbered among King’s sitters. Andrew Jackson dismissed McKenney in 1830, but allowed him to have the portraits copied by Henry Inman, so that lithographs could be made from McKenney’s “Indian Gallery.” Additional images were taken from paintings by James Otto Lewis, George Catlin and other artists. James C. Hall, a Cincinnati judge and novelist, contributed an historical and anecdotal text. Both authors, not unlike George Catlin, whom they tried to enlist in their own publishing enterprise, saw their work as a means of preserving an accurate visual record of a rapidly disappearing culture. The portfolio nearly bankrupted McKenney as well as the two printing firms who invested in its publication. But their work proved to be much more valuable contribution than they imagined. Catlin’s paintings of Indians were destroyed in a warehouse fire; and James Otto Lewis’ watercolors burned along with those by King in the Smithsonian fire of l865. The McKenney and Hall portraits remain as the most complete and colorful record of the native leaders who made the long journey to Washington to speak for their people. This print is in very good, clean condition with light foxing and a few stains, creases and a few small tears around margins. There is some discoloring due to ink residue from the ink of facing book page.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
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        Oche Finceco

      - A wonderfully detailed hand colored lithograph with beautiful original color from Thomas L. McKenney and James Hall's historically significant book "History of the Indian Tribes of North America", which was published in Philadelphia in 1836. This print is from the larger folio version and measures 20"x14". From 1816 until 1830, Thomas McKenney was Superintendent of Indian Affairs and one of a very few government officials to defend American Indian interests. When a large delegation of Indians came to see President Monroe in 1821, McKenney commissioned the fashionable portraitist Charles Bird King to paint the principal delegates, dressed in costumes of their choice. Many of the most prominent Indian leaders of the nineteenth century were among King’s sitters, including Sequoyah, Red Jacket, Major Ridge, Cornplanter, and Osceola. The portraits hung in the War Department until l858, when they were moved to the Smithsonian Institute. Most of King’s original portraits were subsequently destroyed in a fire at the Smithsonian in 1865, so their appearance in McKenney and Hall’s publication is the only record of the likenesses of many of the most prominent Indian leaders of the nineteenth century: Sequoyah, Red Jacket, Major Ridge, Cornplanter, and Osceola were numbered among King’s sitters. Andrew Jackson dismissed McKenney in 1830, but allowed him to have the portraits copied by Henry Inman, so that lithographs could be made from McKenney’s “Indian Gallery.” Additional images were taken from paintings by James Otto Lewis, George Catlin and other artists. James C. Hall, a Cincinnati judge and novelist, contributed an historical and anecdotal text. Both authors, not unlike George Catlin, whom they tried to enlist in their own publishing enterprise, saw their work as a means of preserving an accurate visual record of a rapidly disappearing culture. The portfolio nearly bankrupted McKenney as well as the two printing firms who invested in its publication. But their work proved to be much more valuable contribution than they imagined. Catlin’s paintings of Indians were destroyed in a warehouse fire; and James Otto Lewis’ watercolors burned along with those by King in the Smithsonian fire of l865. The McKenney and Hall portraits remain as the most complete and colorful record of the native leaders who made the long journey to Washington to speak for their people. Overall this print is in very good condition with some light foxing/staining and a few creases and small tears along the margins.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
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        Little Crow, A Sioux Chief

      - A wonderfully detailed hand colored lithograph with beautiful original color from Thomas L. McKenney and James Hall's historically significant book "History of the Indian Tribes of North America", which was published in Philadelphia in 1836. This print is from the larger folio version and measures 20"x14". From 1816 until 1830, Thomas McKenney was Superintendent of Indian Affairs and one of a very few government officials to defend American Indian interests. When a large delegation of Indians came to see President Monroe in 1821, McKenney commissioned the fashionable portraitist Charles Bird King to paint the principal delegates, dressed in costumes of their choice. Many of the most prominent Indian leaders of the nineteenth century were among King’s sitters, including Sequoyah, Red Jacket, Major Ridge, Cornplanter, and Osceola. The portraits hung in the War Department until l858, when they were moved to the Smithsonian Institute. Most of King’s original portraits were subsequently destroyed in a fire at the Smithsonian in 1865, so their appearance in McKenney and Hall’s publication is the only record of the likenesses of many of the most prominent Indian leaders of the nineteenth century: Sequoyah, Red Jacket, Major Ridge, Cornplanter, and Osceola were numbered among King’s sitters. Andrew Jackson dismissed McKenney in 1830, but allowed him to have the portraits copied by Henry Inman, so that lithographs could be made from McKenney’s “Indian Gallery.” Additional images were taken from paintings by James Otto Lewis, George Catlin and other artists. James C. Hall, a Cincinnati judge and novelist, contributed an historical and anecdotal text. Both authors, not unlike George Catlin, whom they tried to enlist in their own publishing enterprise, saw their work as a means of preserving an accurate visual record of a rapidly disappearing culture. The portfolio nearly bankrupted McKenney as well as the two printing firms who invested in its publication. But their work proved to be much more valuable contribution than they imagined. Catlin’s paintings of Indians were destroyed in a warehouse fire; and James Otto Lewis’ watercolors burned along with those by King in the Smithsonian fire of l865. The McKenney and Hall portraits remain as the most complete and colorful record of the native leaders who made the long journey to Washington to speak for their people. This print is in very good, clean condition with light foxing and a few stains, creases and a few small tears around margins. There is some discoloring due to ink residue from the ink of facing book page.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
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        Wa-Bish-Kee-Pe-Nas, The White Pigeon, A Chippewa

      - A wonderfully detailed hand colored lithograph with beautiful original color from Thomas L. McKenney and James Hall's historically significant book "History of the Indian Tribes of North America", which was published in Philadelphia in 1836. This print is from the larger folio version and measures 20"x14". From 1816 until 1830, Thomas McKenney was Superintendent of Indian Affairs and one of a very few government officials to defend American Indian interests. When a large delegation of Indians came to see President Monroe in 1821, McKenney commissioned the fashionable portraitist Charles Bird King to paint the principal delegates, dressed in costumes of their choice. Many of the most prominent Indian leaders of the nineteenth century were among King’s sitters, including Sequoyah, Red Jacket, Major Ridge, Cornplanter, and Osceola. The portraits hung in the War Department until l858, when they were moved to the Smithsonian Institute. Most of King’s original portraits were subsequently destroyed in a fire at the Smithsonian in 1865, so their appearance in McKenney and Hall’s publication is the only record of the likenesses of many of the most prominent Indian leaders of the nineteenth century: Sequoyah, Red Jacket, Major Ridge, Cornplanter, and Osceola were numbered among King’s sitters. Andrew Jackson dismissed McKenney in 1830, but allowed him to have the portraits copied by Henry Inman, so that lithographs could be made from McKenney’s “Indian Gallery.” Additional images were taken from paintings by James Otto Lewis, George Catlin and other artists. James C. Hall, a Cincinnati judge and novelist, contributed an historical and anecdotal text. Both authors, not unlike George Catlin, whom they tried to enlist in their own publishing enterprise, saw their work as a means of preserving an accurate visual record of a rapidly disappearing culture. The portfolio nearly bankrupted McKenney as well as the two printing firms who invested in its publication. But their work proved to be much more valuable contribution than they imagined. Catlin’s paintings of Indians were destroyed in a warehouse fire; and James Otto Lewis’ watercolors burned along with those by King in the Smithsonian fire of l865. The McKenney and Hall portraits remain as the most complete and colorful record of the native leaders who made the long journey to Washington to speak for their people. Overall this print is in very good condition with some light foxing and staning.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
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        Timpoochee Bernard, An Uchee Warrior

      - A wonderfully detailed hand colored lithograph with beautiful original color from Thomas L. McKenney and James Hall's historically significant book "History of the Indian Tribes of North America", which was published in Philadelphia in 1836. This print is from the larger folio version and measures 20"x14". From 1816 until 1830, Thomas McKenney was Superintendent of Indian Affairs and one of a very few government officials to defend American Indian interests. When a large delegation of Indians came to see President Monroe in 1821, McKenney commissioned the fashionable portraitist Charles Bird King to paint the principal delegates, dressed in costumes of their choice. Many of the most prominent Indian leaders of the nineteenth century were among King’s sitters, including Sequoyah, Red Jacket, Major Ridge, Cornplanter, and Osceola. The portraits hung in the War Department until l858, when they were moved to the Smithsonian Institute. Most of King’s original portraits were subsequently destroyed in a fire at the Smithsonian in 1865, so their appearance in McKenney and Hall’s publication is the only record of the likenesses of many of the most prominent Indian leaders of the nineteenth century: Sequoyah, Red Jacket, Major Ridge, Cornplanter, and Osceola were numbered among King’s sitters. Andrew Jackson dismissed McKenney in 1830, but allowed him to have the portraits copied by Henry Inman, so that lithographs could be made from McKenney’s “Indian Gallery.” Additional images were taken from paintings by James Otto Lewis, George Catlin and other artists. James C. Hall, a Cincinnati judge and novelist, contributed an historical and anecdotal text. Both authors, not unlike George Catlin, whom they tried to enlist in their own publishing enterprise, saw their work as a means of preserving an accurate visual record of a rapidly disappearing culture. The portfolio nearly bankrupted McKenney as well as the two printing firms who invested in its publication. But their work proved to be much more valuable contribution than they imagined. Catlin’s paintings of Indians were destroyed in a warehouse fire; and James Otto Lewis’ watercolors burned along with those by King in the Smithsonian fire of l865. The McKenney and Hall portraits remain as the most complete and colorful record of the native leaders who made the long journey to Washington to speak for their people. This print is in very good, clean condition with light foxing and a few stains, creases and a few small tears around margins. There is some discoloring due to ink residue from the ink of facing book page.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
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        Ong-Pa_Ton-Ga, or the Big Elk, Chief of the Omahas

      - A wonderfully detailed hand colored lithograph with beautiful original color from Thomas L. McKenney and James Hall's historically significant book "History of the Indian Tribes of North America", which was published in Philadelphia in 1836. This print is from the larger folio version and measures 20"x14". From 1816 until 1830, Thomas McKenney was Superintendent of Indian Affairs and one of a very few government officials to defend American Indian interests. When a large delegation of Indians came to see President Monroe in 1821, McKenney commissioned the fashionable portraitist Charles Bird King to paint the principal delegates, dressed in costumes of their choice. Many of the most prominent Indian leaders of the nineteenth century were among King’s sitters, including Sequoyah, Red Jacket, Major Ridge, Cornplanter, and Osceola. The portraits hung in the War Department until l858, when they were moved to the Smithsonian Institute. Most of King’s original portraits were subsequently destroyed in a fire at the Smithsonian in 1865, so their appearance in McKenney and Hall’s publication is the only record of the likenesses of many of the most prominent Indian leaders of the nineteenth century: Sequoyah, Red Jacket, Major Ridge, Cornplanter, and Osceola were numbered among King’s sitters. Andrew Jackson dismissed McKenney in 1830, but allowed him to have the portraits copied by Henry Inman, so that lithographs could be made from McKenney’s “Indian Gallery.” Additional images were taken from paintings by James Otto Lewis, George Catlin and other artists. James C. Hall, a Cincinnati judge and novelist, contributed an historical and anecdotal text. Both authors, not unlike George Catlin, whom they tried to enlist in their own publishing enterprise, saw their work as a means of preserving an accurate visual record of a rapidly disappearing culture. The portfolio nearly bankrupted McKenney as well as the two printing firms who invested in its publication. But their work proved to be much more valuable contribution than they imagined. Catlin’s paintings of Indians were destroyed in a warehouse fire; and James Otto Lewis’ watercolors burned along with those by King in the Smithsonian fire of l865. The McKenney and Hall portraits remain as the most complete and colorful record of the native leaders who made the long journey to Washington to speak for their people. Overall this print is in very good condition with some light foxing/staining and a few creases and small tears along the margins.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
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        Stum Ma Tu, A Flathead Boy, from the Chinook, or Flatheads

      Philadelphia 1836 - Thomas L. McKenney & James Hall (1785-1859 / 1793-1868) Illustrated plate from the History of the Indian Tribes of North America With Biographical Sketches and Anecdotes of The Principal Chiefs Embellished With One Hundred and Twenty Portraits From The Indian Gallery In The Department of War, at Washington. Philadelphia, 1836 Hand-colored lithograph, after paintings by Charles Bird King, James Otto Lewis, Henry Inman, et al. Paper size: 20 1/4" x 14 1/2"; framed size 27" x 22" From 1816 until 1830, Thomas McKenney was Superintendent of Indian Affairs and one of a very few government officials to defend American Indian interests. When a large delegation of Indians came to see President Monroe in 1821, McKenney commissioned the fashionable portraitist Charles Bird King to paint the principal delegates, dressed in costumes of their choice. Many of the most prominent Indian leaders of the nineteenth century were among King’s sitters, including Sequoyah, Red Jacket, Major Ridge, Cornplanter, and Osceola. The portraits hung in the War Department until l858, when they were moved to the Smithsonian Institute. Most of King’s original portraits were subsequently destroyed in a fire at the Smithsonian in 1865, so their appearance in McKenney and Hall’s publication is the only record of the likenesses of many of the most prominent Indian leaders of the nineteenth century: Sequoyah, Red Jacket, Major Ridge, Cornplanter, and Osceola were numbered among King’s sitters. Andrew Jackson dismissed McKenney in 1830, but allowed him to have the portraits copied by Henry Inman, so that lithographs could be made from McKenney’s “Indian Gallery.” Additional images were taken from paintings by James Otto Lewis, George Catlin and other artists. James C. Hall, a Cincinnati judge and novelist, contributed an historical and anecdotal text. Both authors, not unlike George Catlin, whom they tried to enlist in their own publishing enterprise, saw their work as a means of preserving an accurate visual record of a rapidly disappearing culture. The portfolio nearly bankrupted McKenney as well as the two printing firms who invested in its publication. But their work proved to be much more valuable contribution than they imagined. Catlin’s paintings of Indians were destroyed in a warehouse fire; and James Otto Lewis’ watercolors burned along with those by King in the Smithsonian fire of l865. The McKenney and Hall portraits remain as the most complete and colorful record of the native leaders who made the long journey to Washington to speak for their people.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
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        Ke Wa Din, or the North Wind, Chippeway Chief

      - A wonderfully detailed hand colored lithograph with beautiful original color from Thomas L. McKenney and James Hall's historically significant book "History of the Indian Tribes of North America", which was published in Philadelphia in 1836. This print is from the larger folio version, although the paper has been cropped down from its original size of 18.5"x11.5". From 1816 until 1830, Thomas McKenney was Superintendent of Indian Affairs and one of a very few government officials to defend American Indian interests. When a large delegation of Indians came to see President Monroe in 1821, McKenney commissioned the fashionable portraitist Charles Bird King to paint the principal delegates, dressed in costumes of their choice. Many of the most prominent Indian leaders of the nineteenth century were among King’s sitters, including Sequoyah, Red Jacket, Major Ridge, Cornplanter, and Osceola. The portraits hung in the War Department until l858, when they were moved to the Smithsonian Institute. Most of King’s original portraits were subsequently destroyed in a fire at the Smithsonian in 1865, so their appearance in McKenney and Hall’s publication is the only record of the likenesses of many of the most prominent Indian leaders of the nineteenth century: Sequoyah, Red Jacket, Major Ridge, Cornplanter, and Osceola were numbered among King’s sitters. Andrew Jackson dismissed McKenney in 1830, but allowed him to have the portraits copied by Henry Inman, so that lithographs could be made from McKenney’s “Indian Gallery.” Additional images were taken from paintings by James Otto Lewis, George Catlin and other artists. James C. Hall, a Cincinnati judge and novelist, contributed an historical and anecdotal text. Both authors, not unlike George Catlin, whom they tried to enlist in their own publishing enterprise, saw their work as a means of preserving an accurate visual record of a rapidly disappearing culture. The portfolio nearly bankrupted McKenney as well as the two printing firms who invested in its publication. But their work proved to be much more valuable contribution than they imagined. Catlin’s paintings of Indians were destroyed in a warehouse fire; and James Otto Lewis’ watercolors burned along with those by King in the Smithsonian fire of l865. The McKenney and Hall portraits remain as the most complete and colorful record of the native leaders who made the long journey to Washington to speak for their people. This print is in fair condition with foxing and staining throughout, creases and a few small tears around margins. Paper has been cropped down. There is discoloring due to ink residue from the ink of facing book page and paper missing from left margin.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
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        The Complete Angler or the contemplative man's recreation being a discourse of rivers, fish-ponds, fish and fishing and instructions on how to angle for a trout or grayling in a clear stream by Charles Cotton, with original memoirs and notes by Sir Harris Nicholas.

      London: William Pickering; Printed by C. Whittingham 1836 - First Nicolas edition. 2 volumes. Size of binding: 7 ½ in. x 10 7/8 in. Pagination: Vol. I: [16], ccxii, [2], 129; Vol. II: [2], [131]-436, [32]. 61 engraved plates and other illustrations. Dark green crushed morocco spine, sides, and corner-pieces with five raised bands on the spine, and gilt titling and designs, and marbled paper over boards. With matching marbled paper end-papers. Top-edge gilt. Bound by Wood, London with their stamp present. Very minor rubbing to cover corners. A large paper copy: the paper measures 7 ¼ in. x 10 5/8 in. A bookplate has been removed from the front paste-down of each volume. The volumes have been previously collated and sold by B. Quaritch with their penciled notation present. These are fine copies, clean, unmarked, and with bright plates. One of the finest "Anglers" ever published. The set weights 9 ½ lbs. Postage may be extra on this item. [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Peter Keisogloff Rare Books, Inc.]
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        The Complete Angler - by Izaak Walton and - Charles Cotton - With Original Memoirs and Notes by Sir Harris Nicolas

      London: William Pickering, 1836. First Nicholas Edition. Printed by C. Whittingham. Took Court, Chancery Lane. 2 vols., 8vo. Engraved title-page, 48 engraved plates, two pages of music and two woodcuts of the Walton seal, 9 head-pieces, and 2 portraits of Walton. Full contemporary pebbled brown morocco gilt, boards with arms of Trinity College within elaborate ruled borders, spine tooled in gilt in 6 compartments, Cambridge arms at top and bottom, raised bands, inner dentelles gilt, a.e.g., marbled endpapers by Wiseman, Cambridge. Some toning of margins, sporadic foxing, and offsetting from plates at front and back. Very good. Coigney 44; Keynes 94 . One of the finest illustrated editions of Walton ever published. Pickering employed 27 of the most prominent artist, painters, and engravers to illustrate it

      [Bookseller: James Cummins Bookseller]
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        The complete angler or the contemplative man's recreation being a discourse of rivers, fish-ponds, fish and fishing ( 2 volumes, for more images of this copy see our Rare Fish Books site)

      William Pickering, London 1836 - First Nicholas Edition. 4to - over 9¾" - 12" tall. 2 volumes, pp. [16], ccxii, [2], 129; [2], [131]-436, [32]; 61 steel engraved plates from designs by Thomas Stothard and J. Inskipp. Each volume measures 7 3/4" x 10 3/4." Outstanding period full crushed green morocco bindings, raised bands, gilt titles, elaborate gilt floral compartments, ornately floral gilt boards, in the manner of Roger Payne, marbled endpapers, a.e.g. Hinges slightly rubbed but very solid. A very handsom copy of one of the finest illustrated editions of Walton ever published. For this extensively illustrated edition, Pickering employed 27 of the most prominent artist, painters, and engravers of the day. Hinges slightly rubbed but very solid. A little scuffing to the leather. Varying degrees of offsetting/browning from plates and occasional light foxing as typical of much 19th century paper and ink. Coigney 44. Bookplate.

      [Bookseller: Rare Fish Books]
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        Charter of Incorporation: Bye-Laws: Regulations: and Grant of Arms [with] Supplemental Charter [and Bye-Laws] [with] Thirteen Annual Reports of the Society's Council [with] Seven Related Documents

      V.p. 1836-72, London - Later buckram, ex-library, good clean copies, twenty-two publications and 734 pages in total; a complete listing gladly provided An extensive run of annual reports and related materials of the Society during its early years, seemingly unrecorded, providing considerable biographical detail and much insight into professional and educational concerns of attorneys and solicitors [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Meyer Boswell Books, Inc., member ABAA]
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        De La Prostitution Dans La Ville De Paris Consideree Sous Le Rapport De L'Hygiene Publique, De La Morale Et De L'Administration; Ouvrage Appuye De Documens Statistiques, . Precede D'Une Notice . Sur La Vie . De L'Auteur Par F. Leuret

      Paris : J. -B. Bailliere 1836 - Physical desc. : complete in 2 volumes. : ill. , maps ; 22 cm. Subject: Prostitution - France - Paris - History - 19th century. Paris (France) - Social conditions. Liste des ouvrages publie s par Parent-Duchatelet": v. 1, p. Xxii-xxiv. Finely and uniformly bound in modern aniline calf over marble boards. Raised bands with the titles blocked direct in gilt. Spine compartments uniformly tooled in gilt. An exceptional copy - scans and additional bibliographic detail on request. 2 Kg. 1 pp. [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: MW Books Ltd.]
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        PRIVATE JOURNAL OF A CRUIZE [sic] IN THE U.S. SCHOONER ENTERPRISE LT. A.S. CAMPBELL ESQ. COMMANDING IN THE EAST INDIAS & CHINA SEAS [manuscript title].

      [Various places at sea and in port in the Indian Ocean, Gulf of Siam, and China Sea, as described below]. July 12, 1835 - April 7, 1836. - [118]pp. manuscript on 12 1/2 x 8-inch sheets of paper. A total of some 32,500 words. Includes a pen and ink sketch of "The Town of Zanzibar from the Harbour," and of the island of "Pemba." Plus a fragment of a sheet of paper containing a few caricatures and a sketch of the U.S.S. Peacock. Title-leaf and the following text leaf with a long repaired tear; some slight edge wear or staining to the leaves. In very good condition. In a half morocco and cloth clamshell case, spine gilt. An absolutely outstanding American naval manuscript, this is the journal kept by Midshipman Henry Cadwalader for the first nine months of his voyage as part of the United States Navy's East India Squadron. Cadwalader sailed on the U.S.S. Peacock, the flagship of the squadron, and on the U.S.S. Enterprise, the squadron's supporting schooner. The journal is rich with his observations on the places he visited, including Zanzibar, Bombay, Ceylon, and Batavia. Though he went to sea as a teenager, Cadwalader seems to have been well educated (he was a scion of a notable Philadelphia family), and his journal is well written and lively, filled with keen observations of his life on board ship and of the various places he visited on his voyage. The journal gives an excellent picture of life at sea for a young man in the 1830s. Cadwalader is reflective and introspective, yet keenly observant of his surroundings and of the character of the men on his ship and of the natives and British colonizers he encountered. His journal is also an exceptionally early account by an American of Zanzibar, India, and Indonesia. In all, it is one of the most interesting, textured, and detailed American naval manuscripts we have ever encountered. Henry Cadwalader (1817-44) came from a distinguished military lineage: his grandfather, Brig. Gen. John Cadwalader, commanded Pennsylvania troops in several important Revolutionary War battles, and his father, Major General Thomas Cadwalader, commanded a Pennsylvania militia brigade during the War of 1812. Henry Cadwalader was appointed a midshipman in the U.S. Navy on December 13, 1832 and became a "passed midshipman" on July 8, 1839. At the time he undertook this voyage to the East, he was only in his late teens, and very early in his naval career. The Enterprise and the Peacock sailed on an expedition to the Indian Ocean and East Indies for the purpose of obtaining information and negotiating treaties of friendship and commerce with Eastern powers. Among the places the ships visited over the course of the three- year cruise were Muscat, Oman, Ceylon, India, Java, Siam, Cochin, China, the Bonin Islands, Hawaii, Mexico, and California. Cadwalader began his voyage in the Enterprise, but transferred to the commanding ship of the expedition, the Peacock, at Bombay. Cadwalader's journal covers the first nine months of the voyage, from New York to Bangkok. The journal begins with a manuscript titlepage which includes a list of the officers on board the Enterprise, with Henry Cadwalader listed as one of four midshipmen. The text opens with an entry noting that the Peacock and Enterprise departed Rio de Janeiro bound for the East Indies on Sunday, July 12, 1835. Cadwalader writes that he expects to be transferred at some point to the Peacock, and spends the opening passages of his journal describing life on board the schooner. These initial entries give an excellent impression of life on board an American naval vessel for a teenaged midshipman, describing Cadwalader's daily duties, the drudgery, hazards, and joys of life on board ship, and conveying a youthful sense of wonder at the world. For example, in an entry for August 8, he writes: "Had the morning watch - scrubbed decks & paint work, &c. At 7 bells drank a cup of coffee with [Midshipman] Forbes sitting on the Bitts. Came below at about quarter of 9, washed & eat breakfast, mended my clothes, stowed my locker & read a little Shakespeare. Did not feel well - a swelling under my throat. I h

      [Bookseller: William Reese Company - Americana]
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        FREE THOUGHT) REASON, THE ONLY ORACLE OF MAN; OR, A COMPENDIOUS SYSTEM OF NATURAL RELIGION. BY COL. ETHAN ALLEN. TO WHICH IS ADDED, CRITICAL REMARKS ON THE TRUTH AND HARMONY OF THE FOUR GOSPELS, WITH OBSERVATIONS ON THE INSTRUCTIONS [FIRST ATHEIST PUBL]

      G. W. & A. J. Matsell and Wm. Sinclair, New York And Philadelphia 1836 - THEOLOGY; 12mo 7" - 7½" tall; -FIRST ATHEIST PUBLICATION in America- (Free Thought) Reason, the Only Oracle of Man; or, A Compendious System of Natural Religion. By Col. Ethan Allen. To which is added, Critical Remarks on the Truth and Harmony of the Four Gospels, with Observations on the Instructions given by Jesus Christ, and the Doctrines of Christianity. By a Free Thinker. Original muslin boards, quite darkened (orig. Paper spine label worn but readable. The two works are separately paged, have separate title pages, and are separated by an integral blank leaf. American Imprints 35708. A later edition of Allen's Oracle, originally printed in Bennington in 1784, considered the first anti-religious or atheistic work published in America. Following in Allen's footsteps, "A Free Thinker" finds the Virgin birth and similar "improbable stories (we use his phrase) to be impediments to conventional reliance on the Gospels. 106, [2], 70, [1] pp. , with 4 page "Catalogue of Liberal Works," for sale by G. W. & A. J. Matsell. Volume is sound with light foxing. Provenance- Hall Park McCullough bookplate. ; 0 [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: poor man's books (mrbooks)]
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        RICOGLITORE ITALIANO E STRANIERO,ossia rivista mensuale europea di scienze, lettere, belle arti, bibliografia e variet? (1836-1837), Milano, Stella A. Fortunato e figli, 1836

      - ANNO TERZO 1836 (due volumi formato 14,5 x 23,5) rilegatura mz, pergamena con titoli su tasselli ai dorsi. Primo semestre pagine 840 - secondo semestre pagine 820 ANNO QUARTO 1837 (due volumi formato 14,5 x 23,5) rilegatura mz. pergamena con titoli su tasselli ai dorsi. Primo semestre pagine 860 - secondo semestre pagine 808 i quattro volumi vengono offerti in blocco a

      [Bookseller: Ferraguti service s.a.s. - Rivisteria]
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        The Port of London

      London, 1836. Tinted lithograph, 26 x 37.5 cms, short tear with old repair on verso. From “Sketches at Home and Abroad”, printed by Charles Hullmandel for Charles Tilt. London Bridge and the Monumnet can be glimpsed through a forest of masts. Print

      [Bookseller: Bryars and Bryars]
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        ATLAS HISTORIQUE DES ETATS EUROPEENS, ET DE TOUS LES PAYS EN RAPPORT AVEC L'EUROPE, COMPOSE D'UNE SUITE DE CARTES GEOGRAPHIQUES ET DE TABLEAUX CHRONOLOGIQUES ET GENEALOGIQUES.

      L. HACHETTE ; DEUXIEME EDITION 1836 - RO30109525: 61 pages. Nombreux tableaux généalogique. Cartes manquantes. In-Folio Cartonné. Etat d'usage. Couv. défraîchie. Dos satisfaisant. Intérieur frais Classification Dewey : 912-Atlas, cartes et plans [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: le-livre]
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        Musee Royal de Naples, peintures, bronzes et statues erotiques du cabinet secret, avec leur explication par M. C. F., contenant 60 gravures coloriees.

      Impr. d'Everat for Abel Ledoux Paris 1836 - Quarto (30 x 23 cm). Half-title, title, [3], xxx, 159 pp., 60 hand-coloured plates engraved by A. Delvaux and protected by tissue guards; foxing to text, only light and marginal to plates, later red half staight-grained morocco gilt, a very handsome copy. A fully hand-coloured copy of the best edition - here in a lovely binding, with wide margings and fresh plates, showing erotic subjects in a classic Roman manner, taken the secret cabinet of the King of Naples, some pieces coming from Pompei and Herculaneum. About half the plates depict sculpture of various media, while the other half show scenes, individual people, Gods and couples, often with a touch of humour. Published five years earlier under a slightly different title, the first edition had only 41 plates without colour. The present edition is often found without colour either. Gay-Lemmonyer III, 682. [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Shapero Rare Books]
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        Narrative of the Arctic Land Expedition to the mouth of the Great Fish River, and along the shores of the Arctic Ocean, in the years 1833, 1834, and 1835

      London: John Murray, 1836 - Back volunteered to search for the lost Ross expedition. Here he describes his trip through north central Canada down the Slave to Great Slave Lake, then to the Great Fish River (which he discovered) and finally to the Arctic Coast. He makes important observations of the Aurora Borealis here, too. It was on this journey that Back named Montreal Island. 'As a literary composition this work may rank higher than any former volume produced by the Northern expeditions' (Lande) First edition. 8vo. Illustrated with folding map at end and numerous plates. Contemporary half calf and marbled boards, rebacked with fine period spine, morocco label. Contemporary bookplate of Anthony MacTier "of Durris". Fine copy, clean and bright. Streeter 3704; Wagner-Camp 58b; Field 64; Hill 42; Lande 935; Arctic Bib. 851; Sabin 2613; TPL 1873 [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: James Cummins Bookseller, ABAA]
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        MUSEE ROYAL DE NAPLES, peintures, bronzes et statues erotiques du Cabinet Secret, avec leur explications par

      Ledoux,, Parigi, 1836 - in-folio, pp. XXX, (4), 159, (2), bella leg. m. tela coeva con fregi e tit. oro al d. Con 60 tavv. raff. oggetti d'arte e dipinti con scene erotiche e licenzione, soprattutto falliche, conservati al Museo di Napoli. Nel tit. le tavv. sono annunciate a colori ma la coloritura era probabilmente eseguita a mano con acquarellatura successiva e non colorate in lastra: infatti le nostre sono in bianco e nero al naturale. Il curatore della raccolta (1799-1853) fu incaricato dell'opera dall'Ambasciata di Francia. Gli oggetti, per la loro oscenità, furono a lungo tenuti nascosti fino al 1819 quando Francesco I venne in visita al Museo e propose di creare una sala "riservata". Tra i pezzi più noti qui riprodotti il gruppo marmoreo di Pan e capra proveniente da Ercolano. Bell'esempl. [326]

      [Bookseller: SCRIPTORIUM Studio Bibliografico]
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        Narrative of the Arctic Land Expedition to the Mouth of the Great Fish River, and Along the Shores of the Arctic Ocean, In the Years 1833, 1834, and 1835.

      London, John Murray, 1836 - Octavo. An ex-library copy, bookplate to front pastedown, small stamp verso of title, gilt ink accession number to the spine only, neatly recased in the original brown diapered cloth, new endpapers, title gilt to spine within gilt panel. Plates somewhat browned, map torn without loss, a little shaken, cloth slightly rubbed and sunned at the spine, a very good copy. Lithographic frontispiece and 15 other plates, folding map at the rear, tables to the text. First edition. Back had previously gained considerable experience as an arctic explorer through his participation in the abortive Buchan expedition and Franklin's two overland expeditions. Back was "one of the first competent artists to penetrate into the Canadian Arctic"; the many water-colours and drawings which he produced and which enhance his narratives and those of Franklin "are now considered an invaluable record of early northern history" [DCB]. Although Back was highly valued by the British Admiralty, he was not a popular personality and he developed a fairly controversial reputation as a dandy, womaniser and hopeless egocentric. The privately financed, government-assisted expedition described in this narrative was undertaken in 1833, for the purpose of aiding members of the Second Ross expedition, from whom no one had heard since 1828. They were also to conduct scientific investigations and a geographical survey of an unknown section of arctic coast. They travelled overland from Montreal to Slave River and Great Slave Lake, and descended the Thleweechodozeth or Great Fish River (later renamed the Black River) to the arctic coast, thence along Chanttrey Inlet to Ogle Point. "The ice prevented Back's proposed survey of the coast, and after again wintering at Fort Reliance he reached La Chêne, the Hudson Bay station where he had started over two years before, in August 1835, having travelled 7500 miles, including 1200 of discovery. Besides his discovery of a river over 440 miles long, he had made important observations of the Aurora Borealis, and had given the name of Montreal to an island afterwards sadly familiar in connection with the fate of Franklin. In September 1835 Back reached England, and received a hero's welcome. He was awarded the Royal Geographical Society's gold medal, and was promoted by the Admiralty to the rank of captain on 30 September 1835, by order in council—an honour that no other officer in the navy had received except William IV." [ODNB] ". now regarded as one of the finest travel books of the nineteenth century." [Howgego] Howgego B3. [Attributes: First Edition]

      [Bookseller: Peter Harrington. ABA member]
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        John Ross, A Cherokee Chief

      - A wonderfully detailed hand colored lithograph with beautiful original color from Thomas L. McKenney and James Hall's historically significant book "History of the Indian Tribes of North America", which was published in Philadelphia in 1836. This print is from the larger folio version and measures 20"x14". From 1816 until 1830, Thomas McKenney was Superintendent of Indian Affairs and one of a very few government officials to defend American Indian interests. When a large delegation of Indians came to see President Monroe in 1821, McKenney commissioned the fashionable portraitist Charles Bird King to paint the principal delegates, dressed in costumes of their choice. Many of the most prominent Indian leaders of the nineteenth century were among King’s sitters, including Sequoyah, Red Jacket, Major Ridge, Cornplanter, and Osceola. The portraits hung in the War Department until l858, when they were moved to the Smithsonian Institute. Most of King’s original portraits were subsequently destroyed in a fire at the Smithsonian in 1865, so their appearance in McKenney and Hall’s publication is the only record of the likenesses of many of the most prominent Indian leaders of the nineteenth century: Sequoyah, Red Jacket, Major Ridge, Cornplanter, and Osceola were numbered among King’s sitters. Andrew Jackson dismissed McKenney in 1830, but allowed him to have the portraits copied by Henry Inman, so that lithographs could be made from McKenney’s “Indian Gallery.” Additional images were taken from paintings by James Otto Lewis, George Catlin and other artists. James C. Hall, a Cincinnati judge and novelist, contributed an historical and anecdotal text. Both authors, not unlike George Catlin, whom they tried to enlist in their own publishing enterprise, saw their work as a means of preserving an accurate visual record of a rapidly disappearing culture. The portfolio nearly bankrupted McKenney as well as the two printing firms who invested in its publication. But their work proved to be much more valuable contribution than they imagined. Catlin’s paintings of Indians were destroyed in a warehouse fire; and James Otto Lewis’ watercolors burned along with those by King in the Smithsonian fire of l865. The McKenney and Hall portraits remain as the most complete and colorful record of the native leaders who made the long journey to Washington to speak for their people. Overall this print is in very good condition with some light foxing/staining.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
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        Mogg's Strangers Guide To London. Exhibiting all the various Alterations & Improvements complete to the Present Time. Extended to Greenwich and Blackwall.

      1836 - London, 1836. Original colour. Dissected and laid on linen, as issued. Total 500 x 805mm. A fine and detailed map of London published the year before Queen Victoria came to the throne. This example is not the standard edition: it has been extended east to encompass the Isle of Dogs and Greenwich Park. Of interest is the addition of the London and Greenwich Railway, the first steam railway to have a terminus in London, London Bridge Station, which opened in December that year. Also Trafalgar Square is marked four years before construction started. Underneath the map is a 500-point key with references to the grid on the map, which does not include the extension. HOWGEGO: 238, variant of state 8, noted as 'B.M. copy has additional section'.

      [Bookseller: Altea Antique Maps]
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        OEUVRES du comte DE LACEPEDE comprenant l'histoire naturelle des quadrupèdes ovipares, des serpens, des poissons et des cétacés.

      Duménil 1836 - 3 volumes in-8 ( 220 X 135 mm ) de 488 480 et 427 pages, demi-chagrin ocre, dos à nerfs ornés de caissons à froid. ( Reliures de l'époque ). 164 planches finement gravées sur acier, représentant au moins 500 animaux. Bons exemplaires. faune zoologie serpents poissons

      [Bookseller: Tiré à Part]
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        Nature

      Munroe 1836 - First Edition, First Printing, SIGNED by Ralph Waldo Emerson on a receipt for funds laid in the book. This is the TRUE FIRST EDITION with with page 94 misnumbered 92. An attractive copy that has wear to the spine, and soiling to the panels. The binding is tight, and the pages have some foxing with water stains to several pages not effecting the text. The text is present and readable. There is no writing, marks or bookplates in the book. Overall, a scarce copy of the author's first book seldom found in any edition. Trades and offers considered. [Attributes: First Edition; Signed Copy; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Quintessential Rare Books, LLC]
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        Pehriska-Ruhpa

      London, Paris, Coblenz 1836 - Karl Bodmer Illustrated plate from Travels in the Interior of North America Paris, 1832-1843 Hand-colored aquatint engraving Paper size approximately 17 1/2” x 22 1/2” 35” x 28 1/2” framed Karl Bodmer was a little-known Swiss painter when he was chosen by Prince Maximilian of Prussia to accompany his voyage to America, in order to document in pictorial terms the expedition. With the rest of Maximilian’s company, the two traveled among the Plains Indians from 1832 to 1834, a time when the Plains and the Rockies were still virtually unknown. They arrived in the West before acculturation had begun to change the lives of the Indians, and Bodmer, who was a protegé of the great naturalist von Humbolt, brought a trained ethnologist’s eye to the task. The Bodmer/Maximilian collaboration produced a record of their expedition that is incontestably the finest early graphic study of the Plains tribes. Maximilian and Bodmer journeyed from St. Louis up the Missouri River on the American Fur Company steamboat “Yellowstone,” stopping at a series of forts built by the Fur Company and meeting their first Indians at Bellevue. The travelers continued on another steamboat, “Assiniboin,” to Fort Union, where they met the Crees and Assiniboins. The expedition spent its first winter at Fort Clark, where the Mandans in particular excited Bodmer’s attention, although he was also to draw the Minatarri and Crow peoples. The explorers continued by keelboat to Fort Mackenzie, which proved to be the westernmost point of their journey. After living among and studying the Blackfeet for several weeks, Maximilian decided that it was too dangerous to continue, so the travelers returned southward, reaching St. Louis in May 1834. After the conclusion of the journey, Bodmer spent four years in Paris supervising the production of the aquatints made from his drawings. These prints rank with the finest Western art in any medium, and they are the most complete record of the Plains Indians before the epidemics of the mid-19th century had decimated their numbers, and before the white man’s expansion had taken their lands. In contrast to other artist-explorers of the 19th century, such as George Catlin, Bodmer was well-trained in the classic European tradition. The work that he did in America is considered to be the high point of a distinguished career. Perhaps more significant, the plates made from Bodmer's sketches were the first truly accurate images of the Plains Indians to reach the general public. Because the 1837 smallpox epidemic killed more than half the Blackfeet and almost all the Mandans, Bodmer’s visually striking work, together with prince Maximilian’s detailed studies of these tribes, form the primary accounts of what became virtually lost cultures. These spectacular and atmospheric images are important and beautiful records of the landscape of the American West as it appeared when Bodmer saw it, just before westward expansion took hold and began the indelible transformation of the frontier.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
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        Über die Verschiedenheit des menschlichen Sprachbaues und ihren Einfluss auf die geistige Entwickelung des Menschengeschlechts.

      Berlin Druckerei der Königlichen Akademie der Wissenschaften 1836 - The Philosophy of Speech HUMBOLDT, Wilhelm von. Über die Verschiedenheit des menschlichen Sprachbaues und ihren Einfluss auf die geistige Entwickelung des Menschengeschlechts. Berlin: Gedruckt in der Druckerei der Königlichen Akademie der Wissenschaften, 1836. First edition of the first clear statement of the principle in ethnolinguistics that languages express the individuality and culture of their speakers, and that historical change in a language should be correlated with historical change within its culture. Quarto (10 3/8 x 8 1/16 inches; 263 x 218 mm). xi, [1, blank], 511, [1, blank] pp. Publisher’s half brown cloth over marbled boards. Spine lettered in gilt. Spine and extremities neatly repaired, some light surface wear and sunning to spine. Boards with some chipping. Very light foxing to first and last gatherings. Housed in a quarter morocco clamshell. Overall, an excellent copy. "In this, his philological testament, Humboldt attempts the classification of peoples according to language. More important than the classification itself was the corollary to it, which seemed to Humboldt to imply that the development of individual languages is affected by physiology, ethnography, history, geography, political and religious relationships, and that stages in the cultural development of peoples leave strongly marked traces in their languages. In the words of A.H. Sayce, a great philologist of our own day: "This essay first clearly laid down that the character and structure of a language expresses the inner life and knowledge of the speakers, and that languages must differ from one another in the same way and to the same degree as those who use them.What Humboldt terms the inner form of the language is just that mode of denoting the relations between the part of a sentence which reflects the manner in which a particular body of men regards the world about them’" (Printing and the Mind of Man). Wilhelm von Humboldt (1767-1835), elder brother of scientist Alexander von Humboldt, was a writer, philologist, and prominent representative of the eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century humanistic school of thought. He introduced far-reaching school and university reforms into Prussia as part of the general reforms before and after the Wars of Liberation. Über die Verschiedenheit des menschlichen Sprachbaues und ihren Einfluss auf die geistige Entwickelung des Menschengeschlechts is a revision of his introduction to Über die Kawi-Sprache auf der Insel Java (Berlin: 1836). Printing and the Mind of Man 301. HBS 65394. $4,500 [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Heritage Book Shop, ABAA]
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        A Mandan Village

      London, Paris, Coblenz 1836 - Karl Bodmer Illustrated plate from Travels in the Interior of North America Paris, 1832-1843 Hand-colored aquatint engraving Paper size approximately 17 1/2” x 22 1/2” 35” x 28 1/2” framed Karl Bodmer was a little-known Swiss painter when he was chosen by Prince Maximilian of Prussia to accompany his voyage to America, in order to document in pictorial terms the expedition. With the rest of Maximilian’s company, the two traveled among the Plains Indians from 1832 to 1834, a time when the Plains and the Rockies were still virtually unknown. They arrived in the West before acculturation had begun to change the lives of the Indians, and Bodmer, who was a protegé of the great naturalist von Humbolt, brought a trained ethnologist’s eye to the task. The Bodmer/Maximilian collaboration produced a record of their expedition that is incontestably the finest early graphic study of the Plains tribes. Maximilian and Bodmer journeyed from St. Louis up the Missouri River on the American Fur Company steamboat “Yellowstone,” stopping at a series of forts built by the Fur Company and meeting their first Indians at Bellevue. The travelers continued on another steamboat, “Assiniboin,” to Fort Union, where they met the Crees and Assiniboins. The expedition spent its first winter at Fort Clark, where the Mandans in particular excited Bodmer’s attention, although he was also to draw the Minatarri and Crow peoples. The explorers continued by keelboat to Fort Mackenzie, which proved to be the westernmost point of their journey. After living among and studying the Blackfeet for several weeks, Maximilian decided that it was too dangerous to continue, so the travelers returned southward, reaching St. Louis in May 1834. After the conclusion of the journey, Bodmer spent four years in Paris supervising the production of the aquatints made from his drawings. These prints rank with the finest Western art in any medium, and they are the most complete record of the Plains Indians before the epidemics of the mid-19th century had decimated their numbers, and before the white man’s expansion had taken their lands. In contrast to other artist-explorers of the 19th century, such as George Catlin, Bodmer was well-trained in the classic European tradition. The work that he did in America is considered to be the high point of a distinguished career. Perhaps more significant, the plates made from Bodmer's sketches were the first truly accurate images of the Plains Indians to reach the general public. Because the 1837 smallpox epidemic killed more than half the Blackfeet and almost all the Mandans, Bodmer’s visually striking work, together with prince Maximilian’s detailed studies of these tribes, form the primary accounts of what became virtually lost cultures. These spectacular and atmospheric images are important and beautiful records of the landscape of the American West as it appeared when Bodmer saw it, just before westward expansion took hold and began the indelible transformation of the frontier.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
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        Southern portion of the Gulf of Mexico with inset charts of Jamaica, Mobile Bay, the Harbour of Vera Cruz, the Harbour of Tampico]

      J. W. Norie & Co, London 1836 - A large, handsomely engraved chart of the Gulf of Mexico south of Cuba and including all of the Caribbean Islands, the eastern coast of Central America and the northern coast of South America John William Norie was the leading chartmaker and writer on navigation of his time. Born in London, he attached himself to William Heather at an early age and by the age of 25 was making charts independently. William Heather ran a shop for navigators known as the Naval Academy and the Naval Warehouse. (Dickens later used the Naval Warehouse in Dombey and Son). It sold nautical instruments, sea charts, guides and instructional books on navigation. By 1815, Heather had retired, and Norie was in command. His accomplishments were considerable and lasting, including several atlases of sea charts: Complete West India Pilot (first published in 1828), from which this chart comes; East India Pilot (1816); North Sea & Baltic Pilot (1824); Complete North America and United States Pilot (1825); as well as general works on navigation, most notably The Epitome of Practical Navigation (1805), which was the standard work throughout the 19th century. This highly detailed, large chart shows all of Jamaica, Santo Domingo, all of the Caribbean Islands, the north coast of South America and the east coast of Central America. It includes inset charts of Jamaica, Mobile Bay (Alabama), Vera Cruz and Tampico. Black and white copper engraving. Four vertical creases where folded, multiple creases at centerfold. Repaired split in center fold about two inches long. There are erasible pencil lines and dates that chronicle a sea voyage].

      [Bookseller: Donald A. Heald Rare Books (ABAA)]
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        The Works of William Cowper, Esq. Comprising His Poems, Correspondence, and Translations. 15 Volumes.

      Baldwin and Cradock, London 1836 - Each volume has an engraved frontis, title page with an engraving and another title page. Pages all edges gilt. Firmly bound with blue/white endpapers in brown covers 6 3/4" tall with gilt titles and decorations on the spine. A Young Memorial Library Kingham Hill book label is pasted to the inside of the front cover. There are a few fox spots on the endpapers & some browning to the illustrated pages at the front, but the text is very nice being clean and crisp. Published 1836 and later volumes 1837. There are small library numbers written in white on the spines above the dates. Overall a bright set. [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Recycling Books]
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        Autograph letter signed to James Smith

      Cambridge, 1836. <p>Peacock, George (1791-1858). Autograph letter signed to James Smith (1781-1867). 1 page plus integral blank. Trinity College [Cambridge], January 24, 1836. 228 x 187 mm. Small marginal tears at upper edge, a few tiny tears along folds, but very good otherwise. Docketed by the recipient. </p><p>From mathematician George Peacock, lecturer in mathematics at Trinity College, Cambridge and one of the prime movers behind the reform of mathematics teaching at the University; he was a founder, along with Charles Babbage and John Herschel, of the Analytical Society, the purpose of which was to introduce at Cambridge the differential notation for calculus. His correspondent was Scottish geologist James Smith of Jordanhill, who made significant contributions to the post-Tertiary geology of Scotland and was one of the few early British supporters of Agassiz&#146;s glacial theory. Smith was the father of mathematician Archibald Smith (1813-72), who had just graduated with distinction from Trinity College: He was Senior Wrangler, the title given to Cambridge&#146;s top mathematics student, and also winner of Cambridge&#146;s prestigious Smith Prize in mathematics. Peacock congratulates the elder Smith on his son&#146;s achievements: </p><p>"Allow me to offer you my most hearty congratulations upon the splendid honors which have been gained by your son: though these honors have been long anticipated, it must be very satisfactory to you, as it is to myself, to [. . .] their complete fulfillment. </p><p>"The examination which he passed was of the most distinguished kind: & I believe that there has been no example equally remarkable since the time of Profr. Airy. </p><p>"He is a mathematician of the very highest order & I feel extremely anxious that such rare talents, which have been so carefully cultivated, should not be lost to the cause of science . . . </p><p>The younger Smith fulfilled Peacock&#146;s hopes: He made significant contributions to the study of terrestrial magnetism, issued tables for correcting magnetic compass observations aboard ship, and in 1862 published the Admiralty Manual for Ascertaining and Applying the Deviations of the Compass Caused by the Iron in a Ship. His work was of critical importance to British navigation. &#147;Profr. Airy&#148; refers to George Biddell Airy (1801-92), who had also been one of Peacock&#146;s students; he was the Plumerian professor of astronomy at Cambridge as well as Britain&#146;s Astronomer Royal. </p>

      [Bookseller: Jeremy Norman's Historyofscience.com]
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        Oeuvres de Molière précédées d'une notice sur sa vie et ses ouvrages par M. Sainte-Beuve. Vignettes de Tony Johannot.

      Paris, Paulin, 1835-1836 - 2 vol. gr. in-8, 768, (2) et 895, (2) pp., portrait, nombreuses vignettes gravées sur bois, texte encadré d'un double filet noir ; demi-maroquin rouge à coins, mors et coins soulignés d'un filet doré ; dos à nerfs orné de fil. dorés et caissons de fiL gras dor., palettes dorées en tête et en queue. Quelques rousseurs, très petit manque à une coiffe, reliure légèrement frottée aux coupes et coins. Deux prospectus (soit 4 ff.) ont été reliés par erreur à l'intérieur du "Médecin malgré lui" et du "Misanthrope" à la fin du T. 1. Premier tirage des 800 vignettes et du portrait de Molière en frontispice, d'après Tony Johannot. Séduisant exemplaire à grandes marges et bien relié. cf. Carteret, Le Trésor du bibliophile, p. 410 : "Très beau livre, rare en belle condition et fort estimé à juste titre, pour son admirable illustration, . " [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Jean-Pierre AUBERT]
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        Works of William Cowper, Esq., comprising his poems, correspondence and translations. With a life of the author by the editor, Robert Southey.

      Baldwin and Cradock, London 1836 - Set 15 volumes. fronts, plates and ports. v. 1-3 Life and works of Cowper, by R. Southey --v.3-7. Letters -- v 8. Miscellaneous, poems. Olney hymms. Anit-Thelyphthora. Table talk and other poems. Translations from Vincet Bourne -- v. 9 Translations from Madame de La Mothe-Guion. The task. Tirocinium. John Gilpin and other poems -- v. 10 Posthumous poems. Translations from Vicent Bourne. Translations of the Latin and Italian poems of Milton. Epigrams tr. from the Latin of Owen. Translations of Greek verses. Translations from the Fables of Gay. Adam: a scared drama, tr. from the Italian of Andreini -- v. 11-12. Translation of Home's Iliad -- v. 13-14 Translation of Homer's Odyssey -- v. 15. Letters. Papers in the Connoisseur. Fragments of a commentary on Paradise lost. Wm. Cowper 1731-1800. Vol 7 has small dark stain at top of spinr. Size: 12mo - over 6¾" - 7¾" tall [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Alcuin Books, ABAA]
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        The Travels of Richard and John Lander, Into the Interior of Africa, for the Discovery of the Course and Termination of the Niger: From Unpublished Documents in the Possession of the Late Capt. John William Barber Fullerton.

      John Saunders, London 1836 - Spine relaid on half-leather over marbled boards. Marbled endpapers. 782pp. Frontispiece portrait of Richard Lander. Illustrated title-page + 7 engraved plates including a map. Some foxing but otherwise a very good tight copy of this scarce book. [Attributes: First Edition]

      [Bookseller: Scrivener's Books and Bookbinding]
 36.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  


        Johnsoniana; or, Supplement to Boswell.

      London John Murray 1836 - Octavo. xxii, 530 pp. First edition, extra-illustrated with engraved portraits. In red morocco by Kelliegram; original cloth covers and spine bound in. Front cover has onlaid oval leather portrait of Johnson within gilt panel and sprays; gilt panels and lettering between raised bands on spine; green silked endpapers with gilt turn-ins; gilt. A.e.g. A fine copy of a handsome binding. [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Bromer Booksellers, Inc., ABAA]
 37.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  


        Der Zahnarzt von Gerhard Dow Zahnarzt

      Franz Hanfstengl 1836. Motivmass: 32,0x26,0 Blattmass: 60,0x45,0 Lithographie leichte Stockflecken Schwarzweiß.

      [Bookseller: Conzen Kunsthandel Düsseldorf GbR]
 38.   Check availability:     ZVAB     Link/Print  


        The Life and Adventures of Jonathan Jefferson Whitlaw; or Scenes on the Mississippi (Complete in 3 Volumes)

      Richard Bentley 1836 - Richard Bentley, London, 1836. Hardcover 3 volume set, this being the second edition. The Life and Adventures of Jonathan Jefferson Whitlaw; or Scenes on the Mississippi, With fifteen engravings by Auguste Hervieu. Quarter-bound in brown leather over green cloth. Gilt lettering to spines & blind-stamped banding. Slightly worn extremites. Leather to spines is rubbed, with some loss. Internally pages a little tanned, with nice clear text & bright engravings. Bindings firm. DISPATCHED FROM THE UK WITHIN 24 HOURS ( BOOKS ORDERED OVER THE WEEKEND DISPATCHED ON MONDAY) BY ROYAL MAIL. ALL OVERSEAS ORDERS SENT BY AIR MAIL. [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: HALCYON BOOKS]
 39.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  

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