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Displayed below are some selected recent viaLibri matches for books published in 1836

        Galed THE HEBREW REVIEW AND MAGAZINE OF RABBINICAL LITERATURE [all] 3 volumes.

      1834-1836, London, Great Britain - Three quarter leather binding with gilt lettering and ornamentation on spine. On bottom of spine, gilt, are the initials A. C. who was surely the owner who had these volumes bound so attractively. [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Meir Turner]
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        POEMS

      Boston Otis, Broaders and Company 1836 - First Edition. 8vo, publisher’s original brown patterned cloth, with the original paper lettering label on the spine, lettered in black. xiv, (ii),163 pp. A well preserved copy of this fragile book published in original cloth decorated in blind. Internally, the pages are quite clean and fresh and unfoxed, and indeed with some pages unopened and all edges untrimmed. Light aging at the extremities and a tad more with small chips at the head and tail of the spine. A much better copy than is generally encountered. THE AUTHOR’S FIRST BOOK, AND A RARE SURVIVAL. A VERY NICE COLLECTION OF HOLMES’ POEMS some of which are published here for the first time. Scarce in the delicate early cloth. [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Buddenbrooks, Inc. ABAA]
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        ATLAS POUR L'HISTOIRE UNIVERSELLE PAR LE COMTE DE SEGUR.

      - Paris, Furne & Fruger et Brunet, 1836. 26,5x21 cm. Atlas de 20 cartes ou plans se rapportant à l'histoire de l'Antiquité, dessinés et gravés par Ambroise Tardieu. (On trouve notamment les plans des villes d'Athènes, Sparte (ruines), Carthage, Jérusalem, Syracuse, Rome, et Constantinople). Modeste reliure en demi-toile brune. Plats recouverts de papier marbré. Dos lisse portant le titre en lettres dorées. Quelques rousseurs pâles, sinon cartes complètes et en bon état général. Reliure fortement usagée avec manque au dos, mais néanmoins solide. Rare.

      [Bookseller: Librairie de l'Univers]
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        VATHEK (PLUS TWO OTHER GOTHIC NOVELS)

      RICHARD BENTLEY,LONDON 1836 - EXQUISITE BINDING,WITH BRIGHTLY DECORATED COVERS ,LIGHT GREY CALF SPINE,DIVIDED INTO COMPARMENTS WITH THE TITLES AND DECORATIONS IN GILT THEREON,THE NOVELS BOUND INTO THIS ONE VOLUME ARE;VATHEK BY WILLIAM BECKFORD; THE CASTLE OF OTRANTO,BY HORACE WALPOLE,AND THE BRAVO OF VENICE BY M.G.LEWIS,THE BINDING IS SHEER DELIGHT WITH THE TOP EDGE IN LIQUID GOLD WITH PATTERNED SET IN.BOOK SIZE APPROX,SIX AND EIGHT TENTHS INCHES BY FOUR AND FOUR TENTH INCHES.396PP.THE BOOK IS ENCASED IN A FINE GREY SILK STYLE FINISH SLIP-CASE. [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: David Eastwood]
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        Documenta philosophiae Arabum.Quae pro dissertatione ad summos in philosophia honores ab amplissimo in Universitate Fridericia Wilhelmia Rhenana philosophorum ordine rite impetrandos. Ex codd. mss. primus edidit, latine vertit, commentario illustravit.

      Bonnae (Bonn), Typis Regiis Arabicis. In Officina Fr. Baadeni 1836 - Two parts in one volume. Octavo. Pp. (ii), iv, 134, 4; 33 in Arabic. Two title-pages including one to the Arabic part. Includes the 11-point Thesis Statement. Hardcover, bound in contemporary orange paper-covered boards, spine and corners worn; green endpapers, first paste-down lightly stained; all edges gilt; signature to title, split gutter after first blank. In a very good internal condition, interior rather clean and neat. ~ First edition. Very rare. Schmoelders' pioneer work on Islamic philosophy. Containing: "Abu Nasr Alfarabii de rebus studio Aristotelicae philosophiae praemittendis commentatio"; "Abu Ali Ebn Sina, de logica poema"; and "Abu Nasr Alfarabii fontes quaestionum". Added title-page in Arabic: "Rasa`il falsafiyah lilshaykh Abi Nasr al-Farabi wa-lil-shaykh al-ra`ieh Abi Ali ibn Sina". Franciscus August Schmoelders (Schmölders) (1809-1880). Abu Nasr Muhammad ibn Tarkhan ul-Farabi (ca. 870-950).

      [Bookseller: Librarium of The Hague]
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        A New Analytical Method of the Rudiments of Music, with French and English Text [engraved title]: Solfege De Rudolphe. Rodolphe's Solfeggi, Containing Elementary & Progressive Lessons of the use of Musical Academies

      Philadelphia: Published by Fiot, Meignen & Co.. 1836. First. First edition. Tall quarto. 130(2)pp. Contemporary binding with canvas spine with marbled papercovered boards. Some stains on the first several leaves, edges of the spine frayed, an about very good copy. .

      [Bookseller: Between the Covers- Rare Books, Inc. ABA]
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        Biblia oder Die Heilige Schrift

      NP 1836 - 2 vol. 8vo. Continuous pagination. 1027pp. Embossed leather with gilt decoration and lettering to cover and spine. Biblical quotes (probably psalms) to cover and back. Decorated endpapers. All gilt page edges. Both volumes inscribed, signed (by community leaders) and stamped by Jewish community of Strelitz (dated 1862): It is a present to community member Abraham Heine on the occasion of his golden wedding anniversary. A great edition of the basic Jewish religious books, i.e. the 5 Books of Moses, the Prophets, and the later writings. (known also as the acronym Tanakh - Torah, Neviim, Ktuvim). New translation by Yehuda (son of Jonah) b. Johanan d'Allemand from Luther's German text . 1836 reprint from the original 1830 edition which was published in London by Bagster and Thoms. "Das Alte Testament nach der deutschen Uebersetzung D. Martin Luthers." (Darlow and Moule 4346). In Hebrew and German. Fine condition. Tight copies in a stunning binding. [Attributes: Signed Copy; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: ERIC CHAIM KLINE, BOOKSELLER (ABAA ILAB)]
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        JOURNEY THROUGH ARABIA PETRAEA, TO MOUNT SINAI, AND THE EXCAVATED CITY OF PETRA, THE EDOM OF THE PROPHECIES

      London: John Murray. Very Good+. 1836. First Edition. Hardcover. Dark boards with with blindstamped design and sunned towards edges and spine. Some very minor foxing to few pages. Plate pp 184 detached, but present ; Scarce. SIGNED on front endpaper by the Earl of Ellenborough with his bookplate. Frontispiece of "Interior View of the Khasne". One fold-out map and Numerous tissue guarded b&w illustrations; 8vo; xxviii, map, 331, 4 pages .

      [Bookseller: Complete Traveller Antiquarian Bookstore]
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        Taschenbuch für die Einwohner Berlins und der Provinz Brandenburg. Und einem Nachtrag. Zum Gebrauch für Hausbesitzer, Haus- und Vamilienväter, Lehr- und Brotherren, Gewerbebtreibende aller Klassen.

      Carl Heymann, Berlin und Leipzig 1836 - "Auch unter dem Titel: Vollständiges Archiv aller Verordnungen, Verfügungen, Polizei-Gesetze und Bestimmungen, welche auf die bürgerlichen Verhältnisse und das Geschäftsleben der Einwohner Berlins und der Provinz Brandenburg bezug haben." ------------------------ Bauwissenschaftlicher Nachtrag. Auch unter dem Titel: Der Eigenthümer von städtischen und ländlichen Grundstücken oder Praktischer Rathgeber beim Ankauf, Besitz, Bau und Verkauf von Gebäuden aller Art von P. Bigot. Berlin, Heymann, 1836. -------------------- Mit altem Besitzvermerk auf dem vorderen fliegenden Vorsatz mit Bleistift. Titelblatt, sowie Vorwort und Inhaltsverzeichnis am unteren Rand fleckig. Weitere Seiten SEHR GUT UND FRISCH! Einband am vorderen Gelenk gebrochen, Ecken leicht bestoßen, sonst aber gut. Siehe Foto. XII, 820, VI, 178 Seiten. GOLDGEPRÄGTER HalbLeder der Zeit, VollFarbschnitt. [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: BerlinAntiquariat, Karl-Heinz Than]
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        Nachfolge Christi. Ein Gebet-und Erbauungsbuch fur gebildete Katholische Christen. Mit Anwendungen und Betarchtungen von Archer, Bordoni (et al.)

      J.J. Weber, Leipzig 1836 - Large 8vo. viii, 368 pp. With an engraved frontispiece after Raphael, engraved title-page printed in red and hand-colored in blue, and 3 engraved plates after Raphael, Overbeck, and Leonardo da Vinci (see below). ADDED: pasted on verso of frontispiece is a lithograph by Franz Hanfstaengl, of Munich, of "Christus vor Jerusalem" by W. Hole. Contemporary German dark brown morocco, profusely gilt and inlaid: in centers a Romaneque cathedral window, surrounded by elaborate ornamental frames build of small and large tools, inlaid in red, outer boarders composed of an leafy ornamental roll, smooth spine gilt and lettered direct, all edges gilt, comb-marbled pastedowns (front flyleaf removed; covers bowed and somewhat worn at extremities; frontipiece with small worm-hole in blank margin; plates and opposing leaves foxed). Overall a good copy with some faults and priced correctly An elaborately gold-tooled German binding, possibly executed in Leipzig (or Munich?), exhibiting elements of the "cathedral" style of bookbinding that was then in fashion in France and England, but found much less frequently in Germany. Indeed, this is a curious and very unusual German example in which decidedly "Victorian" elements can be seen in the design and tooling, presenting a great deal of charm and exuberance. * A contemporary review of this edition was published in "Der Katholik" (Speyer, 1837): "This edition of the excellent book of the followers of Jesus Christ deserves to have a special display because of special splendor and beauty which stands out, and is thus excellently suited as souvenirs for many Christians. The title page is finely illuminated, but the real adornment of the book, which is printed on fine paper with care and taste, can be seen in the four steel engravings: the Cross (after Raphael), Jesus blessing the Children (after Overbeck), the Lord's Supper (after Leonardo da Vinci), and the Transfiguration of Christ (after Raphael). The work has just been published and costs 2 Thaler" (SOURCE: Der Katholik: eine religiose Zeitschrift, 26 Band. 17 Jahr. III-IV Heft. p. 30). * A surprising addition to the ensemble is the lithograph by the studio of Franz Hanfstaengl (1804-1877) who in 1833 founded a lithography studio in Munich; it was to become a major operation, from which lithographic portraits and reproduction of art were produced by the hundreds of thousands (SOURCE: Historisches Lexikon Bayerns). The Kunstverlag Franz Hanfstaengl continued operation until 1980. [Attributes: Soft Cover]

      [Bookseller: Michael Laird Rare Books LLC]
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        Sketches by Boz

      London: John Macrone,, 1836 & 37. Illustrative of Every-Day Life, and Every-Day People. In Two Volumes. [Together with]: The Second Series. Complete in One Volume. Illustrations by George Cruikshank 3 volumes, octavo (volumes I and II 185 × 115 mm, volume III 190 × 120 mm). Late nineteenth-century burgundy half morocco, spines gilt in compartments, marbled sides and endpapers, top edges gilt. Original cloth of volume II mounted to rear endpapers. Engraved frontispiece and 7 plates each to volumes I and II. Frontispiece, engraved title, and 8 plates to volume III. Contemporary annotations to front blank of volume II. Bookplate of William Elliot Baillie and Dickens memorial stamp to each set of front endpapers. Bindings slightly rubbed at the extremities, contents toned with occasional smudges, tanning from inserted and occasionally tipped-in material, marginal ink spot to rear leaves of volume I. A very good set. First editions in book form, early issues with most of the flaws called for by Smith.

      [Bookseller: Peter Harrington]
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        The Anatomy of Melancholy, what it is, with all the kinds, causes, symptoms, Prognostics and Several Cures of It. In Three Partitions ... by Democritus Junior

      Philadelphia: T. Wardle-15, Minor Street, 1836. First American, from the Thirteenth English edition, corrected. To which is now first Prefixed An Account of the Author. First edition was published in 1621. 2 vols., 8vo. xxiv, 461; 612 pp. Original blind-stamped cloth, gilt-stamped spine. In full brown cloth slipcase. Bookplate of Michael Sharpe. Lilly "Grolier 100 Books Famous in English Literature" 18. For the first edition of 1621: PMM 120; Grolier "English" 18; Church 210; Pforzheimer 119; Grolier "Langland to Wither" 30

      [Bookseller: James Cummins Bookseller]
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        Autograph letter signed to Charles Stokes.

      1836 - Buckland, William (1784-1856). Autograph letter signed to Charles Stokes (1783-1853). N.p., 27 Oct. 1836. 3pp. 228 x 187 mm. Small marginal lacuna where seal was broken, light dampstaining along central fold, seal reinforced with clear tape. Letter with excellent scientific content from geologist and paleontologist William Buckland, founder of the Oxford school of geology and author of the best-selling Reliquiae Diluvianae (1823), which promoted a catastrophist version of Earth's history marked by "discontinuous assemblages of organic life being created and dying out" (Dictionary of Scientific Biography). Buckland's letter discusses a significant geological discovery-the relationship between the New Red Sandstone strata in England and in Chemnitz, Germany, based on samples of petrified wood found in both regions."Many thanks for your letter rec'd at Bristol - I was sorry to miss you in the 1?2 day I was in London last week. I write to ask if you have rec'd from Revd. Mr. Bree of Allesley near Coventry some polished thin slices of silicified wood which he promised me to send up to you. I was at Allesley last week whither I have been longing to go for the last 10 years & have ascertained that the matrix from which the silicified wood in the gravel & on the surface of the fields of that district has been derived is the lower region of the New Red Sandstone - this discovery is very important in its relation to the equivalent strata near Chemnitz. "Chemnitz is the site of a Permian-era petrified forest, remarkable for its "outstanding three-dimensional preservation of particularly large fossil remains, made possible by siliceous permineralization, [which] provides the opportunity to study the gross morphology, anatomy and internal organization of plant tissues in a way not allowed by other preservational states" (Lucas et al., p. 8). Bree's samples from Allesley were apparently of a similar nature." shall present a notice of my evidence of identification, to the Geol. Soc. next Wednesday & I shall be glad to transfer to yourself & Brown the examination & description of the nature of the fossil woods of Allesley. I recognized in Bree's collection which is very large, none of the palms and Dendrolites of Cotton and Sprengel all appeared to be nearer to Coniferae but in the greater no. the annular rings of growth were very obscure. If you have received Bree's packet I wish you wd. get ready by Wednesday a short Notice on its contents to be read after my paper which I concluded with saying, if you will permit me, that you & R. Brown have undertaken the botanical examination of the nature of the fossil plants found in the locality. . . ."R. Brown" refers to botanist Robert Brown (1773-1858), best known for naming the cell nucleus and for being the first to observe the seemingly random movement of particles suspended in a liquid or gas - what we now call Brownian motion. Brown's investigations of the cellular tissues of fossilized woods are noted in Buckland's Geology and Mineralogy Considered with Reference to Natural Theology (1836), published the same year this letter was written. Rev. William Thomas Bree (1786-1863), vicar of All Saints' church in Allesley, was a noted observer of all aspects of natural history who wrote many articles and letters on local plants, insects and bird life, a large number of which were published in Loudon's Magazine of Natural History between 1829 and 1837. Buckland's correspondent was Charles Stokes, a stockbroker and amateur geologist who collected specimens of petrified wood. Buckland stated in his letter that he would present his "notice of my evidence of identification" to the Geological Society on the following Wednesday (Nov. 1); however, he did not do so until December 14 (see Proceedings of the Geological Society of London 2 [1838]: 439). Buckland's paper, titled "On the Occurrence of Silicified Trunks of Large Trees in the New Red Sandstone Formation of Poikilitic Series, at Allesley, near Coven [Attributes: Signed Copy; Soft Cover]

      [Bookseller: Jeremy Norman's historyofscience]
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        The Life of Robert, Lord Clive:

      London, John Murray, , 1836. Collected from the Family Papers communicated by The Earl of Powis. 3 volumes, octavo (213 × 131 mm). Contemporary half calf on drab boards, black morocco labels, flat bands to the spines, ornate foliate panels to the compartments, all edges with an attractive, predominantly brown, marbling, a handsome set on the shelf. Engraved portrait frontispiece after Reynolds and a folding map to Volume I. Some foxing, endpapers, portrait and prelims, a touch of damp at the tails of the spines, a little rubbed, very good. First edition. Official life of Clive of India by Sir John Malcolm, another great Indian administrator. Crested bookplates of John Murray, publisher of the work, to the front pastedowns.

      [Bookseller: Peter Harrington]
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        The Life of Robert, Lord Clive: Collected from the Family Papers communicated by The Earl of Powis.

      London, John Murray, 1836 - 3 volumes, octavo (213 × 131 mm). Contemporary half calf on drab boards, black morocco labels, flat bands to the spines, ornate foliate panels to the compartments, all edges with an attractive, predominantly brown, marbling, a handsome set on the shelf. Some foxing, endpapers, portrait and prelims, a touch of damp at the tails of the spines, a little rubbed, very good. Engraved portrait frontispiece after Reynolds and a folding map to Volume I. First edition. Official life of Clive of India by Sir John Malcolm, another great Indian administrator. Crested bookplates of John Murray, publisher of the work, to the front pastedowns. [Attributes: First Edition]

      [Bookseller: Peter Harrington. ABA member]
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        Twelve Months in the British Legion . By an Officer of the Ninth Regiment

      John Macrone, London, 1836, - (THOMPSON, Charles William). Twelve Months in the British Legion. By an Officer of the Ninth Regiment. L.: John Macrone, 1836. Pp (2),[i]-viii,[1]-273,(1),[i]-xxx,(2). Errata slip tipped-in at rear. 12mo, Riviere binding, full brown calf, gilt dentelle, gilt floral decoration to spine, marbled endpapers and edges. Rebacked with original spine and new black morocco label, edgeworn, two overlapping bookplates to front pastedown, else a very good copy with errata slip. 1,250.00 [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: John W. Doull, Bookseller (A.B.A.C.)]
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        Wa-Bish-Kee-Pe-Nas, The White Pigeon, A Chippewa,

      ca. 1836, Philadelphia - Hand-colored lithograph from an early folio edition of McKenney and Hall's "History of the Indian Tribes of North America". Image size approximately 14-1/8 by 20 inches, matted in an 18 x 24 inch mat. Trace of binding adhesive along one edge else a fine copy with rich vibrant colors. This image is listed on the contents page of Volume I as Wabishkeepenas, or 'The White Pigeon'

      [Bookseller: Thorn Books, ABAA]
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        DE ARCHITECTURA LIBRI DECEM

      Rome: Ex Typis Eiusdem Marinii ad Opus Comparatis in Pompeii Theatro, 1836. Contents quite fresh, covers with soil and some edge chipping, all quite sound. Four volumes. folio. [ii] 12p, lxxii, 320p; [ii] 1-348p, 347-8 repeated, 351-375p; [iv] 266p, xl, 40p; [ii], 52p, 140 plates. Illustrated with copper-engraved plates. Bound in original paper-covered boards with paper spine labels. Probably written between 27 and 23 BC, DE ARCHITECTURA is the only contemporary source on classical architecture to have survived. Divided into ten sections or "books", it covers almost every aspect of Roman architecture. The ten books are: & Town planning, architecture in general, and the qualifications required of an architect; Building materials ;Temples and the orders of architecture, & continuation of book 3; Civil buildings ; Domestic buildings ; Pavements and decorative plasterwork ; Water supplies ; Sciences influencing architecture - geometry, mensuration, astronomy etc.; Use and construction of machines.& Roman architects were significantly different from their modern counterparts, acting as engineers, architects, artists, and craftsmen combined. Vitruvius was very much of this type, a fact reflected in De architectura. He covers a wide variety of subjects which he saw as touching on architecture. This included many aspects which would not seem obvious to modern eyes, ranging from mathematics to astronomy, to meteorology and medicine. In the Roman conception, architecture needed to take into account everything touching on the physical and intellectual life of man and his surroundings.& Avery p. 1071.

      [Bookseller: First Folio]
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        JOCELYN [E.O] Episode. Journal trouvé chez un curé de village.

      Gosselin 1836 - Paris, Charles Gosselin et furne, 1836, 2 vols in-8°, (216x136mm) ; viij-322 ; 328 pp. -- Demi-veau blond glacé ; dos lisse richement orné de motifs romantiques, pièce de titre et de tomaison en veau noir. Imprimé sur vergé fin. Des rousseurs, comme souvent. Reliure de l'époque. TRES BEL EXEMPLAIRE. Edition Originale de l'oeuvre littéraire majeure de l'auteur. ** Références : Carteret II, 24 ; Vicaire IV, 975. [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Librairie Christophe MARCIA]
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        Autograph poem (12 lines) signed.

      Weimar, 7. II. 1836. - Oblong large 8vo. 1 p. Printed under the title "Lehren der Klugheit" ("Lessons of Wisdom"): "Soll dir dein Reden überall gerathen | Sprich mit Kriegern von Gefahr und Thaten, | Mit einem Hirten von der besten Weide, | Mit schönen Frauen was am besten kleide [.] Mit einem Sänger daß sein Lied gefallen | Und so was alle wollen sprich mit allen".

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat INLIBRIS Gilhofer Nfg. GmbH]
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        SECRETARIA DE HACIENDA. SECCION 2. EL EXMO. SR. PRESIDENTE INTERINO DE LA REPÚBLICA MEXICANA SE HA SERVIDO DIRIGME EL DECRETO SIGUE.DURANTE LA GUERRA CON LOS INDIOS BÁRBAROS SE EXPENDERÁ LA PÓLVARA DE CAZADORES EN LOS DEPARTMENTOS DE CHIHUAHUA Y SONORA.[caption title].

      [Mexico. Feb. 24, ]. 1836 - Broadside, 8 x 10 inches. Blank integral leaf present. Split along lower third of spine, contemporary manuscript notations in left blank margin. Quite clean. Very good. An important official decree relating to the Indian wars in northern Mexico. It authorizes both the sale of gun powder in Chihuahua and Sonora (two territories where the Indians were most dangerous) at the price of six reals per pound and permits such government- sold powder to be used by settlers in their efforts to prevent the Indians from invading Mexico. The decree thus covers present-day Arizona. Rare. Not on OCLC.

      [Bookseller: William Reese Company - Americana]
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        The Anatomy of Melancholy, what it is, with all the kinds, causes, symptoms, Prognostics and Several Cures of It. In Three Partitions . by Democritus Junior

      Philadelphia: T. Wardle-15, Minor Street, 1836 - First American, from the Thirteenth English edition, corrected. To which is now first Prefixed An Account of the Author. First edition was published in 1621. 2 vols., 8vo. xxiv, 461; 612 pp. Original blind-stamped cloth, gilt-stamped spine. In full brown cloth slipcase. Bookplate of Michael Sharpe. Lilly "Grolier 100 Books Famous in English Literature" 18. For the first edition of 1621: PMM 120; Grolier "English" 18; Church 210; Pforzheimer 119; Grolier "Langland to Wither" 30 [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: James Cummins Bookseller, ABAA]
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        Red Jacket. Seneca War Chief

      Philadelphia: E. C. Biddle, 1836. A fine image from McKenney and Hall's 'Indian Tribes of North America': `One of the most important [works] ever published on the American Indians' (Field),` a landmark in American culture' (Horan) and an invaluable contemporary record of a vanished way of life. One of the most famous images of a Native American, this portrait of Red Jacket depicts one of the most important Indian leaders and spokesmen of the early national period. Red Jacket was born into the Seneca tribe, near present-day Geneva, New York, about 1750. Fighting on the British side during the American Revolution, as did most of the Iroquois, he habitually worn a red coat presented to him by the British, hence the origin of his English name (his real name, Sagoyewatha, means "Keeper Awake"). It was as an orator that Red Jacket became famous, speaking out forthrightly in the years after the Revolution for the rights of his people. He played a prominent role in negotiations with the new Federal government, heading a delegation of fifty to Philadelphia in 1792. There President Washington presented him with a special peace medal, a large oval silver plate with an image of Washington shaking his hand engraved upon it. Red Jacket wore this medal in every portrait painted of him (today it is in the Buffalo Historical Society). Red Jacket was not unopposed in his leadership, and he fought both to protect his nation against white encroachment and enemies within. In 1801 opponents within the tribe managed to put him on trial for witchcraft, punishable by death; in a famous display of his oratorical skills, he successfully defended himself. In the 19th century, as continued settlement of upstate New York pressed against Iroquois lands, he became internationally famous for his articulate espousal of Indian rights; for example, a pamphlet entitled Indian Eloquence, published in 1811, gave translations of some of his speeches. He battled for his people with words against missionaries and white governments, trying to preserve the lands and rights of the Seneca. By the 1820's, as McKenney notes, he was as great an object of wonder for visitors to upstate New York as Niagara Falls. In 1827 Red Jacket paid a visit to Washington, to argue his unhappiness over the doings of missionaries among the Seneca with Thomas McKenney, then head of the Bureau of Indian Affairs, and President Adams. It was on this visit that Charles Bird King painted the porrtrait after which this image was engraved. Red Jacket died a few years later, in 1830. McKenney and Hall's 'Indian Tribes of North America' has long been renowned for its faithful portraits of Native Americans. The portraits are largely based on paintings by the artist Charles Bird King, who was employed by the War Department to paint the Indian delegates visiting Washington D.C., forming the basis of the War Department's Indian Gallery. Most of King's original paintings were subsequently destroyed in a fire at the Smithsonian, and their appearance in McKenney and Hall's magnificent work is thus our only record of the likenesses of many of the most prominent Indian leaders of the nineteenth century. Numbered among King's sitters were Sequoyah, Red Jacket, Major Ridge, Keokuk, and Black Hawk. After six years as Superintendent of Indian Trade, Thomas McKenney had become concerned for the survival of the Western tribes. He had observed unscrupulous individuals taking advantage of the Native Americans for profit, and his vocal warnings about their future prompted his appointment by President Monroe to the Office of Indian Affairs. As first director, McKenney was to improve the administration of Indian programs in various government offices. His first trip was during the summer of 1826 to the Lake Superior area for a treaty with the Chippewa, opening mineral rights on their land. In 1827, he journeyed west again for a treaty with the Chippewa, Menominee , and Winebago in the present state of Michigan. His journeys provided an unparalleled opportunity to become acquainted with Native American tribes. When President Jackson dismissed him from his government post in 1830, McKenney was able to turn more of his attention to his publishing project. Within a few years, he was joined by James Hall, a lawyer who had written extensively about the west. McKenney and Hall saw their work as a way of preserving an accurate visual record of a rapidly disappearing culture. (Gilreath). Cf. Howes M129; cf. Bennett 79; cf. Field 992; cf. Lipperheide Mc 4; cf. Reese, American Color Plate Books, 24; cf. Sabin 43410a. Hand-coloured lithograph by Lehman & Duval in excellent condition.

      [Bookseller: Donald Heald Rare Books]
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        Monstra animalium duplicia per anatomen indagata habito respectu ad physiologiam medicinam forensem et artem obstetriciam.

      Leipzig, L. Voss, 1828-1836. - 2 Teile in 1 Band. 15 Kupfertafeln, X, 142 S. - VIII, 234 S. 4°. Marmorierter Pappband im Stil der Zeit mit Rückenschild. Erste Ausgabe dieser Spezialmonographie über doppelleibige Mißgeburten. - Hirsch/H. I, 336; Schwalbe, Doppelbildungen 115, 238, 251, 263, 270 und 289. - Wohl die erste Publikation, die in der Morphologie der Missbildungen ausschließlich die sogenannten Doppelbildungen abhandelt. Schwabe zufolge sind darunter Körper zu verstehen, welche mindestens eine teilweise Verdopplung der Körperachsen aufweisen. Die nach Zeichnungen des Verfassers von Schröter gestochenen Tafeln mit Darstellung zahlreicher Mißbildungen. - Hans Karl Leopold Barkow (1798-1873) legte bereits 1821 eine Dissertation zu diesem Thema vor. 1822 wurde er Prosector und Privatdozent in Greifswald. 1826 erfolgte seine Berufung als außerordentlicher Professor und Prosector an die Universität von Breslau, wo er bis zu seinem Tode blieb. Seine Arbeiten sind "größtentheils mit vielen und vortrefflichen Abbildungen versehen und wurden demzufolge in selbstloser Hingabe an die Wissenschaft ohne Aussicht auf materiellen Gewinn veröffentlicht" (H./H.). - Titel mit Bibl.-Stempel und Abgabevermerk. [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat im Hufelandhaus GmbH]
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        A New Dictionary of the English Language

      London - William Pickering 1836 - Afirst editionofA New Dictionary of the English Languageby Charles Richardson. Volume I A-K, volume II L-Z and with a Preliminary Essay to front of volume II. In two volumes complete. First edition. Second in importance in early English dictionaries only to Johnson. Charles Richardson (1775 - 1865) was an English teacher, lexicographer, and linguist. A philologist of the school of John Horne Tooke. In 1815 he published Illustrations to English Philology, consisting of a critical examination of Samuel Johnson's A Dictionary of the English Language and a reply to Dugald Stewart's criticism of Horne Tooke's Diversions of Purley. In 1818 the opening portions of an English lexicon, by Richardson, appeared in the Encyclopdia Metropolitana. In 1834 he issued the prospectus of a New English Dictionary, and the work itself was published by Pickering in parts between January 1835 and the spring of 1837. The dictionary is a republication of the lexicon, with improvements and additions. Richardson's principle was to rely on etymology. Despite many technical failings the work was commended by the Quarterly Magazine and the Gentleman's Magazine. An abridged edition, without the quotations, appeared in 1839, with a new preface, but uncorrected. Richardson also published a book on the study of language, an explanation of Tooke's Diversions of Purley (1854). He contributed papers to the Gentleman's Magazine, and wrote essays on English Grammar and English Grammarians, and on Fancy and Imagination. Previous owner's bookplates to front pastedown. Condition: In buckram bindings. Externally, generally smart but with slight wear to extremities, fading to spine and slight rubbing and marksto boards. Internally, firmly bound. Bright but with slight background foxing in places and handling marks. With heavier foxing to endpapers and slight tidemarks to first and last few pages of volume II. Overall: VERY GOOD. [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Rooke Books PBFA]
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        THE WAR IN FLORIDA: BEING AN EXPOSITION OF ITS CAUSES, AND AN ACCURATE HISTORY OF THE CAMPAIGNS OF GENERALS CLINCH, GAINES AND SCOTT.By a Late Staff Officer.

      Baltimore: Lewis and Coleman, 1836. - viii,184pp. plus three folding maps. Original green ribbed cloth. Cloth a bit darkened and rubbed. Two closed tears in folding frontispiece map. Quite clean internally. Very good. This copy bears the ownership signature on the front pastedown of Admiral John A. Dahlgren of the United States Navy. Dahlgren, head of the Union Navy's ordnance department, developed several important innovations during the Civil War. A significant history of the Seminole War, by a participant. "Unsparingly critical of Jackson, Jesup and the Secretary of War" - Howes. The maps are "A Map of the Seat of War in Florida, 1836"; plans of the "Battle and Massacre Ground of Major Dade and Command Dec. 28th, 1835"; and "Camp Izard on the Ouithlacoochee River Feb. 29, 1836." Potter was a former United States military officer who was wounded at Camp Izard. CLARK III:225. HOWES P515, "aa." STREETER SALE 1236. SABIN 64673. FIELD 548, 1628. SERVIES 1902.

      [Bookseller: William Reese Company - Americana]
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        Syria, The Holy Land & Asia Minor Illustrated. In A Series Of One Hundred And Twenty Views, Drawn From Nature By W.H.Bartlett, William Purser, And Thomas Allom

      London: Peter Jackson., [1836-38]., 1836. 3 Volumes. 4to. pp. 2 p.l., 80; 76; 100, [4]index. 2 steel-engraved maps & 120 steel-engraved plates (incl. additional titles). without the engraved frontis. portrait, as usual. contemporary half chagrin, gilt edges (extremities slightly rubbed, occasional light foxing, dampstaining to margins of plates at beginning of Vols. I & III & to lower outer portion of plates in Vol. II). First Edition. Including views of Damascus, Balbec, Antioch, Tripoli, Rhodes, Lebanon, Beirut, Jaffa, Caipha, Alexandria, Sidon, Acre, Eden, Jerusalem, Bethany, &c. Blackmer 291. Röhricht 1690. Tobler p. 167.. F. Hardcover.

      [Bookseller: D & E Lake Ltd. (ABAC, ILAB)]
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        Syria, the Holy Land & Asia Minor illustrated. In a series of views drawn from nature by W. H. Bartlett, William Purser, etc. (3 volumes)

      London: Fisher, Son & Co., 1836-7 - Three volumes, all plates present and in very good condition. Marbled covers and end papers. quarter leather. Volume 1 has cracked hinge and the leather spine loose at the hinge ( can be repaired), volume 3 also has an issue with a piece of the leather covering the spine (also repairable), chipped at base of spine. . Digital photos upon request. [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Atticus Books]
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        A Chart of the Red Sea, from Jiddah, to the Straits of Bab-el-Mandeb, Surveyed in the Years 1830, 31, 32, & 33, By Capt[ai]n T. Elwon & Lieu[tenan]t H. N. Pinching, and completed in 1833 and 1834 by Com[man]der R. Moresby, Indian Navy. T.G. Carless Lieu[tenan]t and Draughts[ma]n I.N.

      London, John Walker, Geographer to the Honourable East India Company, August 1st 1836 [but 1850]. - Engraved sea chart on two sheets, numerous soundings and a few coastal profiles, tracks of the Ship Palinurus, many place names in Arabic and English, watermarked 'J. Watman 1850', a few minor tears to margins. Large and detailed chart of the southern part of the Red Sea. The survey was carried out by Commander Robert Moresby aboard the 'Palinurus' a ship of the newly formed Indian Navy (formerly the Bombay Marine). The chart was held in such great esteem at the time that Richard Burton mentions it in his work 'First Footsteps in East Africa' (1856), in which he quotes from the 'Quarterly Review' (No. cxxix. Dec. 1839): In five years, the admirable maps of that coral-bound gulf - the Red Sea - were complete: the terrors of the navigation had given place to the confidence inspired by excellent surveys. In 1829 the Thetis of ten guns, under Commander Robert Moresby, convoyed the first coal ship up the Red Sea, of the coasts of which this skilful and enterprising seaman made a cursory survey, from which emanated the subsequent trigonometrical operations which form our present maps. Two ships were employed, the 'Benares' and 'Palinurus', the former under Commander Elwon, the latter under Commander Moresby. It remained, however, for the latter officer to complete the work. Some idea may be formed of the perils these officers and men went through, when we state the 'Benares' was forty-two times aground. He goes on to quote: The beautiful maps of the Red Sea, drafted by the late Commodore Carless, then a lieutenant, will ever remain permanent monuments of Indian Naval Science, and the daring of its officers and men.

      [Bookseller: Daniel Crouch Rare Books LLP]
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        The Portfolio; Or a Collection of State Papers Illustrative of the History of Our Times, Volumes I, III, IV and V.

      James Ridgway and Sons 1836 - Published in 1836 by James Ridgway and Sons. Four volumes out of five. Internally very good with clean, unmarked pages. Beautiful hand painted map of the Caucasus Mountains and other interesting fold out plates are in excellent condition. Good binding and covers, with some cracking on the spine of Volume III. One quarter red leather covers and corners, with gold gilt lettering on the spines. Oriental Club book plate on inside cover and imprint on bottom of the spine. Some rubbing. See our photographs of these. Ships daily. These volumes consist of Russian state papers that were published by David Urquhart, who was serving as a diplomat for the United Kingdom in the court of the Ottoman Sultan. His outspoken anti-Russian and pro-Turkish politics eventually saw him recalled in 1837, shortly after the publication of these books. His work and writing helped establish the relationship between Britain and the Ottoman Empire, contributing to their alliance in the Crimean War in the 1850s. [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Sequitur Books]
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        LONG-TAILED DUCK [OLDSQUAW]. [Pl. 312].

      London: R. Havell, . 1836 - 26 x 39 1/4 inches. Handcolored engraving with aquatint and etching, paper watermarked "J. Whatman / 1836." Fine. A fine image contrasting the indolence of the two drakes (one in summer and one in winter plumage) as they bask contentedly on the rocks, with the industry of the female Oldsquaw, diligently scouring the water surface for food, as her three young hurry along beside her, anxious not to stray too far from the protection she affords. One drake goes no further then opening an eye to watch the passing scene, the second raises himself from the basking position, and turns his head for a better view. "Owing to their reiterated cries these birds are named "'Noisy Ducks'; but they have various appellations, among others those of 'Old Wives,' and 'Old Squaws.' Although like all sea-ducks, 'Old Wife' swims deeply, it moves with a grace and celerity, which, if not superior to those of any of its tribe, are at least equal; and when the weather is rough, and the waters agitated, it raises its tail in the same manner as the Ruddy Duck and Pintail. When advancing in smooth water, its speed is such as to cause a considerable swell before it, such as sea-faring persons usually call a 'bone.' Like all others of its tribe, it also prefers swimming against both wind and tide, as then it can sooner take wing if necessary. In calm and pleasant weather.it is fond of throwing its body almost over, and of pluming itself in that position" - Audubon, THE BIRDS OF AMERICA (New York & Philadelphia, 1840-44) Vol. VI, p.381. "'Long-tailed Duck', the name applied in England to this smart looking sea duck, was the name Audubon used. Oldsquaw, the colorful North American name, derived from local lore, refers to the bird's talkative habits.Another phonetically derived name for it was 'south-southerly.' Oldsquaws are circumpolar, ranging throughout the arctic and sub-arctic regions of both the New World and the Old, resorting to tundra ponds to raise their families. In winter, except for the Great Lakes.they seem to prefer the salt water of the Atlantic and Pacific. They are easily recognized, in flight over the sea, by their white bodies and totally dark wings, the only ducks so patterned" - Peterson. Susanne M. Low, A GUIDE TO AUDUBON'S Birds of America (New Haven & New York, 2002), pp.163. R.T. & V.M. Peterson, AUDUBON'S Birds of America (London, 1981) 73.

      [Bookseller: William Reese Company - Americana]
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        Long-Tailed Duck [Oldsquaw]

      London 1836 - From the first edition of "The Birds of America." A fine image contrasting the indolence of the two drakes (one in summer and one in winter plumage) as they bask contentedly on the rocks, with the industry of the female Oldsquaw, diligently scouring the water surface for food, as her three young hurry along beside her, anxious not to stray too far from the protection she affords. One drake goes no further then opening an eye to watch the passing scene, the second raises himself from the basking position, and turns his head for a better view. "Owing to their reiterated cries these birds are named 'Noisy Ducks;' but they have various appellations, among others those of 'Old Wives,' and 'Old Squaws.' Although like all sea-ducks, 'Old Wife' swims deeply, it moves with a grace and celerity, which, if not superior to those of any of its tribe, are at least equal; and when the weather is rough, and the waters agitated, it raises its tail in the same manner as the Ruddy Duck and Pintail. When advancing in smooth water, its speed is such as to cause a considerable swell before it, such as sea-faring persons usually call a 'bone.' Like all others of its tribe, it also prefers swimming against both wind and tide, as then it can sooner take wing if necessary. In calm and pleasant weather.it is fond of throwing its body almost over, and of pluming itself in that position" (J. J. Audubon, Birds of America , New York & Philadelphia: 1840-1844, vol. VI, p.381). "'Long-tailed Duck,' the name applied in England to this smart looking sea duck, was the name Audubon used. Oldsquaw, the colorful North American name, derived from local lore, refers to the bird's talkative habits.Another phonetically derived name for it was 'south-southerly.' Oldsquaws are circumpolar, ranging throughout the arctic and sub-arctic regions of both the New World and the Old, resorting to tundra ponds to raise their families. In winter, except for the Great Lakes.they seem to prefer the salt water of the Atlantic and Pacific. They are easily recognized, in flight over the sea, by their white bodies and totally dark wings, the only ducks so patterned" (R. T. & V. M. Peterson, Audubon's Birds of America , London: 1981, no. 73). Susanne M. Low, A Guide to Audubon's Birds of America , New Haven & New York: 2002, p.163. Hand-coloured engraving with aquatint and etching by R. Havell, 1836, paper watermarked "J. Whatman / 1836" [Attributes: First Edition]

      [Bookseller: Donald A. Heald Rare Books (ABAA)]
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        Texas

      J. Clarke & Co, Lexington, KY 1836 - Period cloth, original paper label on spine. (A bit worn and stained). Housed in a black morocco backed box. Provenance: S. V. Pfeuffer, New Braunfels, TX (inked stamp on title) Scarce early Texas promotional tract, dedicated to Stephen F. Austin. This is Mrs. Holley's second book on Texas, intended as a practical and informative guide for emigrant's to the area. Despite the title, which is similar to the author's Baltimore 1833 book, this is a completely different work. Jenkins calls it "a much more important book." Included herein is a general history of Texas to May 5, 1836, a printing of the Texas and Mexican constitutions, Stephen Austin's farewell address of March 7, and specific information regarding settlements, towns, business and banking matters, transportation and communication facilities, etc. The Hooker "Map of the State of Coahuila and Texas" was published several times, with revisions to reflect the changing face of Texas. This edition is quite striking, with the grants colored. There are numerous additions to this map over past issues. While her earlier book served to promote the enthusiastic interest of prospective emigrants to Texas, Mrs. Holley in this work provides the hard facts of what they would find there. As Stephen F. Austin's cousin, she was in a position to know. Though the 1833 Holley commands a higher price than the 1836, the 1836 is seldom offered on the rare book market and is particularly rare complete with the map. S.V. Pfeuffer, whose collection stamp is on the titlepage, was one of the most significant early collectors of Texana. He formed a legendary collection in the late 19th and early 20th century. Streeter Texas 1207; Raines, p.116; Howes H593 "aa"; Sabin 32528; Graff, Fifty Texas Rarities 15; Basic Texas Books 94; Vandale, Texianameter 88. (7 x 4 1/4 inches). viii, 410pp. Hand-coloured folding map. [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Donald A. Heald Rare Books (ABAA)]
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        Harlequin Duck

      London 1836 - From the first edition of "Birds of America" The drawings for the Harlequin Ducks were done by Audubon and his son, John Woodhouse, near Eastport, Maine. The two birds on the right of the image (2. Female, on top, and 3. Young Male, Third Year) were drawn by the younger Audubon and the Old Male on the left was drawn by John James. The Harlequin Duck is aptly named both because of its multi-colored feathers but also for its surprising and unusual ways, like the clownish and mischievious Harlequin of the Commedia dell' Arte. Its love of the turbulent waters around Maine, Nova Scotia and Labrador is an example of character not typical of ducks. They are found in the northwest and northeast of the United States and occasionally in the Great Lakes. They are also inhabitants of Iceland. Low, A Guide to Audubon's "Birds of America"; Petersen, Audubon's Birds of America. Drawn from nature by J.J. Audubon, engraved, printed and colored by Robert Havell, 1836. Watermarked: " J. Whatman 1836" [Attributes: First Edition]

      [Bookseller: Donald A. Heald Rare Books (ABAA)]
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        The Knickerbocker, New-York Monthly Magazine: 57 Volumes, 1836-1865

      New York: Clark & Edson; John Allen, [et al.]. (1836-1865). First. Periodical Magazine. 57 volumes. Octavos, some illustrated with engraved plates. A near-complete run of consecutive volumes from 1836-1865 of Lewis Gaylord Clark's influential monthly magazine, known for its comic wit and for debuting the work of the best American writers of the day. Among the many complete works included in this run are the first printed appearances of Nathaniel Hawthorne's "The Fountain of Youth" (re-titled "Dr. Heidegger's Experiment" in Twice-Told Tales) and "Edward Fane's Rosebud," Longfellow's "A Psalm of Life", Jeremiah Reynold's "Mocha Dick, or The White Whale of the Pacific", John Water's "The Iron Foot-step," and Francis Parkman's "The Oregon Trail," (published in 21 installments from 1847-1849). Also included are numerous contributions by Washington Irving and other members of the famous "Knickerbocker Group." An ex-library set with bookplates, perforated stamp on the title pages or first text page: 30 volumes are bound in contemporary half calf and marbled paper boards, 23 in later dark green cloth, 1 in contemporary publisher's cloth, and 3 unbound volumes (each consisting of six monthly issues) in the original wrappers. Volumes 17-18 bound in one without the January, March, May, July, and December issues of 1841, else a complete consecutive run from July, 1836 - October, 1865. The calf spines are worn and scuffed, a few volumes with detached boards and dampstaining, overall a fair set. .

      [Bookseller: Between the Covers- Rare Books, Inc. ABA]
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        Waa Top E Not, Chippewa nation

      Philadelphia 1836 - Thomas L. McKenney & James Hall (1785-1859 / 1793-1868) Illustrated plate from the History of the Indian Tribes of North America With Biographical Sketches and Anecdotes of The Principal Chiefs Embellished With One Hundred and Twenty Portraits From The Indian Gallery In The Department of War, at Washington. Philadelphia, 1836 Hand-colored lithograph, after paintings by Charles Bird King, James Otto Lewis, Henry Inman, et al. Paper size: 20 1/4" x 14 1/2"; framed size 27" x 22" From 1816 until 1830, Thomas McKenney was Superintendent of Indian Affairs and one of a very few government officials to defend American Indian interests. When a large delegation of Indians came to see President Monroe in 1821, McKenney commissioned the fashionable portraitist Charles Bird King to paint the principal delegates, dressed in costumes of their choice. Many of the most prominent Indian leaders of the nineteenth century were among King’s sitters, including Sequoyah, Red Jacket, Major Ridge, Cornplanter, and Osceola. The portraits hung in the War Department until l858, when they were moved to the Smithsonian Institute. Most of King’s original portraits were subsequently destroyed in a fire at the Smithsonian in 1865, so their appearance in McKenney and Hall’s publication is the only record of the likenesses of many of the most prominent Indian leaders of the nineteenth century: Sequoyah, Red Jacket, Major Ridge, Cornplanter, and Osceola were numbered among King’s sitters. Andrew Jackson dismissed McKenney in 1830, but allowed him to have the portraits copied by Henry Inman, so that lithographs could be made from McKenney’s “Indian Gallery.” Additional images were taken from paintings by James Otto Lewis, George Catlin and other artists. James C. Hall, a Cincinnati judge and novelist, contributed an historical and anecdotal text. Both authors, not unlike George Catlin, whom they tried to enlist in their own publishing enterprise, saw their work as a means of preserving an accurate visual record of a rapidly disappearing culture. The portfolio nearly bankrupted McKenney as well as the two printing firms who invested in its publication. But their work proved to be much more valuable contribution than they imagined. Catlin’s paintings of Indians were destroyed in a warehouse fire; and James Otto Lewis’ watercolors burned along with those by King in the Smithsonian fire of l865. The McKenney and Hall portraits remain as the most complete and colorful record of the native leaders who made the long journey to Washington to speak for their people.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
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        Thayendanegea, The Great Captain of the Six Nations

      - A wonderfully detailed hand colored lithograph with beautiful original color from Thomas L. McKenney and James Hall's historically significant book "History of the Indian Tribes of North America", which was published in Philadelphia in 1836. This print is from the larger folio version and measures 20"x14". From 1816 until 1830, Thomas McKenney was Superintendent of Indian Affairs and one of a very few government officials to defend American Indian interests. When a large delegation of Indians came to see President Monroe in 1821, McKenney commissioned the fashionable portraitist Charles Bird King to paint the principal delegates, dressed in costumes of their choice. Many of the most prominent Indian leaders of the nineteenth century were among King’s sitters, including Sequoyah, Red Jacket, Major Ridge, Cornplanter, and Osceola. The portraits hung in the War Department until l858, when they were moved to the Smithsonian Institute. Most of King’s original portraits were subsequently destroyed in a fire at the Smithsonian in 1865, so their appearance in McKenney and Hall’s publication is the only record of the likenesses of many of the most prominent Indian leaders of the nineteenth century: Sequoyah, Red Jacket, Major Ridge, Cornplanter, and Osceola were numbered among King’s sitters. Andrew Jackson dismissed McKenney in 1830, but allowed him to have the portraits copied by Henry Inman, so that lithographs could be made from McKenney’s “Indian Gallery.” Additional images were taken from paintings by James Otto Lewis, George Catlin and other artists. James C. Hall, a Cincinnati judge and novelist, contributed an historical and anecdotal text. Both authors, not unlike George Catlin, whom they tried to enlist in their own publishing enterprise, saw their work as a means of preserving an accurate visual record of a rapidly disappearing culture. The portfolio nearly bankrupted McKenney as well as the two printing firms who invested in its publication. But their work proved to be much more valuable contribution than they imagined. Catlin’s paintings of Indians were destroyed in a warehouse fire; and James Otto Lewis’ watercolors burned along with those by King in the Smithsonian fire of l865. The McKenney and Hall portraits remain as the most complete and colorful record of the native leaders who made the long journey to Washington to speak for their people. This print is in very good, clean condition with light foxing and a few stains, creases and a few small tears around margins. There is some discoloring due to ink residue from the ink of facing book page.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
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        Nah-Et-Luc-Hopie

      - A wonderfully detailed hand colored lithograph with beautiful original color from Thomas L. McKenney and James Hall's historically significant book "History of the Indian Tribes of North America", which was published in Philadelphia in 1836. This print is from the larger folio version and measures 20"x14". From 1816 until 1830, Thomas McKenney was Superintendent of Indian Affairs and one of a very few government officials to defend American Indian interests. When a large delegation of Indians came to see President Monroe in 1821, McKenney commissioned the fashionable portraitist Charles Bird King to paint the principal delegates, dressed in costumes of their choice. Many of the most prominent Indian leaders of the nineteenth century were among King’s sitters, including Sequoyah, Red Jacket, Major Ridge, Cornplanter, and Osceola. The portraits hung in the War Department until l858, when they were moved to the Smithsonian Institute. Most of King’s original portraits were subsequently destroyed in a fire at the Smithsonian in 1865, so their appearance in McKenney and Hall’s publication is the only record of the likenesses of many of the most prominent Indian leaders of the nineteenth century: Sequoyah, Red Jacket, Major Ridge, Cornplanter, and Osceola were numbered among King’s sitters. Andrew Jackson dismissed McKenney in 1830, but allowed him to have the portraits copied by Henry Inman, so that lithographs could be made from McKenney’s “Indian Gallery.” Additional images were taken from paintings by James Otto Lewis, George Catlin and other artists. James C. Hall, a Cincinnati judge and novelist, contributed an historical and anecdotal text. Both authors, not unlike George Catlin, whom they tried to enlist in their own publishing enterprise, saw their work as a means of preserving an accurate visual record of a rapidly disappearing culture. The portfolio nearly bankrupted McKenney as well as the two printing firms who invested in its publication. But their work proved to be much more valuable contribution than they imagined. Catlin’s paintings of Indians were destroyed in a warehouse fire; and James Otto Lewis’ watercolors burned along with those by King in the Smithsonian fire of l865. The McKenney and Hall portraits remain as the most complete and colorful record of the native leaders who made the long journey to Washington to speak for their people. Overall this print is in very good condition with some light foxing/staining.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
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        Wa Na Ta, Grand Chief of the Sioux

      Philadelphia 1836 - Thomas L. McKenney & James Hall (1785-1859 / 1793-1868) Illustrated plate from the History of the Indian Tribes of North America With Biographical Sketches and Anecdotes of The Principal Chiefs Embellished With One Hundred and Twenty Portraits From The Indian Gallery In The Department of War, at Washington. Philadelphia, 1836 Hand-colored lithograph, after paintings by Charles Bird King, James Otto Lewis, Henry Inman, et al. Paper size: 20 1/4" x 14 1/2"; framed size 27" x 22" From 1816 until 1830, Thomas McKenney was Superintendent of Indian Affairs and one of a very few government officials to defend American Indian interests. When a large delegation of Indians came to see President Monroe in 1821, McKenney commissioned the fashionable portraitist Charles Bird King to paint the principal delegates, dressed in costumes of their choice. Many of the most prominent Indian leaders of the nineteenth century were among King’s sitters, including Sequoyah, Red Jacket, Major Ridge, Cornplanter, and Osceola. The portraits hung in the War Department until l858, when they were moved to the Smithsonian Institute. Most of King’s original portraits were subsequently destroyed in a fire at the Smithsonian in 1865, so their appearance in McKenney and Hall’s publication is the only record of the likenesses of many of the most prominent Indian leaders of the nineteenth century: Sequoyah, Red Jacket, Major Ridge, Cornplanter, and Osceola were numbered among King’s sitters. Andrew Jackson dismissed McKenney in 1830, but allowed him to have the portraits copied by Henry Inman, so that lithographs could be made from McKenney’s “Indian Gallery.” Additional images were taken from paintings by James Otto Lewis, George Catlin and other artists. James C. Hall, a Cincinnati judge and novelist, contributed an historical and anecdotal text. Both authors, not unlike George Catlin, whom they tried to enlist in their own publishing enterprise, saw their work as a means of preserving an accurate visual record of a rapidly disappearing culture. The portfolio nearly bankrupted McKenney as well as the two printing firms who invested in its publication. But their work proved to be much more valuable contribution than they imagined. Catlin’s paintings of Indians were destroyed in a warehouse fire; and James Otto Lewis’ watercolors burned along with those by King in the Smithsonian fire of l865. The McKenney and Hall portraits remain as the most complete and colorful record of the native leaders who made the long journey to Washington to speak for their people.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
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        Hunting the Buffalo

      - A wonderfully detailed hand colored lithograph with beautiful original color from Thomas L. McKenney and James Hall's historically significant book "History of the Indian Tribes of North America", which was published in Philadelphia in 1836. This print is from the larger folio version and measures 20"x14". From 1816 until 1830, Thomas McKenney was Superintendent of Indian Affairs and one of a very few government officials to defend American Indian interests. When a large delegation of Indians came to see President Monroe in 1821, McKenney commissioned the fashionable portraitist Charles Bird King to paint the principal delegates, dressed in costumes of their choice. Many of the most prominent Indian leaders of the nineteenth century were among King’s sitters, including Sequoyah, Red Jacket, Major Ridge, Cornplanter, and Osceola. The portraits hung in the War Department until l858, when they were moved to the Smithsonian Institute. Most of King’s original portraits were subsequently destroyed in a fire at the Smithsonian in 1865, so their appearance in McKenney and Hall’s publication is the only record of the likenesses of many of the most prominent Indian leaders of the nineteenth century: Sequoyah, Red Jacket, Major Ridge, Cornplanter, and Osceola were numbered among King’s sitters. Andrew Jackson dismissed McKenney in 1830, but allowed him to have the portraits copied by Henry Inman, so that lithographs could be made from McKenney’s “Indian Gallery.” Additional images were taken from paintings by James Otto Lewis, George Catlin and other artists. James C. Hall, a Cincinnati judge and novelist, contributed an historical and anecdotal text. Both authors, not unlike George Catlin, whom they tried to enlist in their own publishing enterprise, saw their work as a means of preserving an accurate visual record of a rapidly disappearing culture. The portfolio nearly bankrupted McKenney as well as the two printing firms who invested in its publication. But their work proved to be much more valuable contribution than they imagined. Catlin’s paintings of Indians were destroyed in a warehouse fire; and James Otto Lewis’ watercolors burned along with those by King in the Smithsonian fire of l865. The McKenney and Hall portraits remain as the most complete and colorful record of the native leaders who made the long journey to Washington to speak for their people. Overall this print is in very good condition with some foxing and staining.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
 40.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  


        Tah Col O Quoit, A Sauk and Fox Chief

      Philadelphia 1836 - Thomas L. McKenney & James Hall (1785-1859 / 1793-1868) Illustrated plate from the History of the Indian Tribes of North America With Biographical Sketches and Anecdotes of The Principal Chiefs Embellished With One Hundred and Twenty Portraits From The Indian Gallery In The Department of War, at Washington. Philadelphia, 1836 Hand-colored lithograph, after paintings by Charles Bird King, James Otto Lewis, Henry Inman, et al. Paper size: 20 1/4" x 14 1/2"; framed size 27" x 22" From 1816 until 1830, Thomas McKenney was Superintendent of Indian Affairs and one of a very few government officials to defend American Indian interests. When a large delegation of Indians came to see President Monroe in 1821, McKenney commissioned the fashionable portraitist Charles Bird King to paint the principal delegates, dressed in costumes of their choice. Many of the most prominent Indian leaders of the nineteenth century were among King’s sitters, including Sequoyah, Red Jacket, Major Ridge, Cornplanter, and Osceola. The portraits hung in the War Department until l858, when they were moved to the Smithsonian Institute. Most of King’s original portraits were subsequently destroyed in a fire at the Smithsonian in 1865, so their appearance in McKenney and Hall’s publication is the only record of the likenesses of many of the most prominent Indian leaders of the nineteenth century: Sequoyah, Red Jacket, Major Ridge, Cornplanter, and Osceola were numbered among King’s sitters. Andrew Jackson dismissed McKenney in 1830, but allowed him to have the portraits copied by Henry Inman, so that lithographs could be made from McKenney’s “Indian Gallery.” Additional images were taken from paintings by James Otto Lewis, George Catlin and other artists. James C. Hall, a Cincinnati judge and novelist, contributed an historical and anecdotal text. Both authors, not unlike George Catlin, whom they tried to enlist in their own publishing enterprise, saw their work as a means of preserving an accurate visual record of a rapidly disappearing culture. The portfolio nearly bankrupted McKenney as well as the two printing firms who invested in its publication. But their work proved to be much more valuable contribution than they imagined. Catlin’s paintings of Indians were destroyed in a warehouse fire; and James Otto Lewis’ watercolors burned along with those by King in the Smithsonian fire of l865. The McKenney and Hall portraits remain as the most complete and colorful record of the native leaders who made the long journey to Washington to speak for their people.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
 41.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  


        She-Ha-Ka, A Mandan Chief

      - A wonderfully detailed hand colored lithograph with beautiful original color from Thomas L. McKenney and James Hall's historically significant book "History of the Indian Tribes of North America", which was published in Philadelphia in 1836. This print is from the larger folio version and measures 20"x14". From 1816 until 1830, Thomas McKenney was Superintendent of Indian Affairs and one of a very few government officials to defend American Indian interests. When a large delegation of Indians came to see President Monroe in 1821, McKenney commissioned the fashionable portraitist Charles Bird King to paint the principal delegates, dressed in costumes of their choice. Many of the most prominent Indian leaders of the nineteenth century were among King’s sitters, including Sequoyah, Red Jacket, Major Ridge, Cornplanter, and Osceola. The portraits hung in the War Department until l858, when they were moved to the Smithsonian Institute. Most of King’s original portraits were subsequently destroyed in a fire at the Smithsonian in 1865, so their appearance in McKenney and Hall’s publication is the only record of the likenesses of many of the most prominent Indian leaders of the nineteenth century: Sequoyah, Red Jacket, Major Ridge, Cornplanter, and Osceola were numbered among King’s sitters. Andrew Jackson dismissed McKenney in 1830, but allowed him to have the portraits copied by Henry Inman, so that lithographs could be made from McKenney’s “Indian Gallery.” Additional images were taken from paintings by James Otto Lewis, George Catlin and other artists. James C. Hall, a Cincinnati judge and novelist, contributed an historical and anecdotal text. Both authors, not unlike George Catlin, whom they tried to enlist in their own publishing enterprise, saw their work as a means of preserving an accurate visual record of a rapidly disappearing culture. The portfolio nearly bankrupted McKenney as well as the two printing firms who invested in its publication. But their work proved to be much more valuable contribution than they imagined. Catlin’s paintings of Indians were destroyed in a warehouse fire; and James Otto Lewis’ watercolors burned along with those by King in the Smithsonian fire of l865. The McKenney and Hall portraits remain as the most complete and colorful record of the native leaders who made the long journey to Washington to speak for their people. Overall this print is in very good condition with some light foxing and staning.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
 42.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  


        Meta-Koo-Sega, A Chippeway Warrior

      - A wonderfully detailed hand colored lithograph with beautiful original color from Thomas L. McKenney and James Hall's historically significant book "History of the Indian Tribes of North America", which was published in Philadelphia in 1836. This print is from the larger folio version and measures 20"x14". From 1816 until 1830, Thomas McKenney was Superintendent of Indian Affairs and one of a very few government officials to defend American Indian interests. When a large delegation of Indians came to see President Monroe in 1821, McKenney commissioned the fashionable portraitist Charles Bird King to paint the principal delegates, dressed in costumes of their choice. Many of the most prominent Indian leaders of the nineteenth century were among King’s sitters, including Sequoyah, Red Jacket, Major Ridge, Cornplanter, and Osceola. The portraits hung in the War Department until l858, when they were moved to the Smithsonian Institute. Most of King’s original portraits were subsequently destroyed in a fire at the Smithsonian in 1865, so their appearance in McKenney and Hall’s publication is the only record of the likenesses of many of the most prominent Indian leaders of the nineteenth century: Sequoyah, Red Jacket, Major Ridge, Cornplanter, and Osceola were numbered among King’s sitters. Andrew Jackson dismissed McKenney in 1830, but allowed him to have the portraits copied by Henry Inman, so that lithographs could be made from McKenney’s “Indian Gallery.” Additional images were taken from paintings by James Otto Lewis, George Catlin and other artists. James C. Hall, a Cincinnati judge and novelist, contributed an historical and anecdotal text. Both authors, not unlike George Catlin, whom they tried to enlist in their own publishing enterprise, saw their work as a means of preserving an accurate visual record of a rapidly disappearing culture. The portfolio nearly bankrupted McKenney as well as the two printing firms who invested in its publication. But their work proved to be much more valuable contribution than they imagined. Catlin’s paintings of Indians were destroyed in a warehouse fire; and James Otto Lewis’ watercolors burned along with those by King in the Smithsonian fire of l865. The McKenney and Hall portraits remain as the most complete and colorful record of the native leaders who made the long journey to Washington to speak for their people. This print is in very good, clean condition with light foxing and a few stains, creases and a few small tears around margins. There is some discoloring due to ink residue from the ink of facing book page.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
 43.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  

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