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        KROATIEN DALMATIEN 1665 BLAEU Titel: Illyricum Hodiernum : Quod Scriptores communiter Sclavoniam, Itali Schiavoniam nuncupare solent, in Dalmatiam, Croatiam, Bosnam, et Slavoniam distinguitur. Sed cum ejus majorem partem Turcae obtineant, in Praefecturas eorum more Sanzacatus dictas divisum est, reliquum autem Veneti, Ungari, et Ragusini tenent. Sanzacatus sunt Bosna, Residentia Baßae; Poxega, Cernik; Bihak; Lika et Carbava; Clissa; Herzegowina

      Joan Blaeu (1596-1673) ca. 1665, Amsterdam - Landkarte / map, original altkolorierter Kupferstich, ca. 53x44 cm, mit Widmungskartusche an Petar Zrinski (1621-1671), Titelkartusche unten links, Widmungskartusche unten Mitte de 500 Landkarte

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        Les Conférences de Cassien (2 Tomes - Complet) Traduites en François par le Sieur de Saligny, Docteur en Théologie.

      Seconde édition, 2 vol. petit in-8 reliure de l'époque pleine basane mouchetée, dos à 4 nerfs dorés orné (fleurons), roulettes sur coupes, Chez Charles Savreux, à Paris, 1665, 26 ff., 432 pp. et 4 ff., pp. 433-924 (avec une erreur de placement dans 2 ff. préliminaires au second tome) Rare exemplaire des Conférences de Cassien, traduites par le janséniste Nicolas Fontaine sous le pseudonyme du Sieur de Saligny. Etat satisfaisant (fentes en mors et mq. en coiffes, bon état intérieur, ancien ex-libris ms. Domus Noviomi) Français

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        ]. Theoriae motus cometae anni MDCLXIV ea præferens, quæ ex primis obseruationibus ad futurorum motuum prænotionem deduci potuere, cum noua inuestigationis methodo, tum in eodem, tum in comete nouissimo anni MDCLXV ad praxim reuocata. [Bound with:] Lettere astronomische di Gio: Domenico Cassini al Signor Abbate Ottavio Falconieri sopra il confronto di alcune osservazioni delle comete di questo´ anno M.DC.LXV.

      Rome: Fabio di Falco, 1665. Cassini's theory of comets. First editions of these two exceptionally rare publications on the comet of 1664-5, which was observed my many astronomers, including Auzout, Borelli, Fabri, Hooke, Hevelius, Petit, and Newton as a studnt. The second work is also especially notable for containing the first published description of Jupiter's Great Red Spot. Cassini observed the comet "in the presence of Queen Christina [to whom the first work is dedicated] and formulated on this occasion a new theory (in agreement with the Tychonian system) in which the orbit of the comet is a great circle whose center is situated in the direction of Sirius and whose perigee is beyond the orbit of Saturn" (DSB). The large engraved plate depicts the course of the comet in the southern celestial hemisphere from December 13, 1664 through the middle of January, 1665; it also shows the appearance and direction of the comet's tail. Cassini's detailed observations were made with a powerful new telescope which he describes in the preface to the first work. "Through his friendship with the famous Roman lens-makers Giuseppe Campani and Eustachio Divini, Cassini, beginning in 1664, was able to obtain from them powerful celestial telescopes of great focal length. He used these instruments--very delicate and extremely accurate for the time-- with great skill, and made within several years a remarkable series of observations..." (ibid). OCLC lists Brown (lacking plate) for the first work, and Brown, Cornell, Ohio State for the second. ABPC/RBH lists one copy of Theoriae, bound with Lettere (Bolaffi, 2014, EUR 21,250, modern binding), and the Macclesfield copy of Lettere alone (Sotheby's, 2004, £4800, 18th century boards). "During the early 1660s, Cassini often found himself in Rome overseeing engineering projects for the Papal court, where he took the opportunity in 1664 to make observations of the movements of the comet and publish those observations along with some of his astronomical beliefs. In a letter addressed to Leopoldo, Ottavio Falconeri wrote about the arguments Cassini was hoping to establish in this text. According to Falconieri, Cassini's theory concerned with the motion of comets was aimed at demonstrating that they 'did not move in a straight line perpendicular to the surface of the earth, but along the plane of the greatest circle [beyond the orbit of Saturn]' around the sun, which is itself orbiting the stationary earth. More specifically, as he described in his published works on the topic [the offered works], Cassini believed that the 1664 comet travelled in epicycles around the distant bright star Sirius. While that star orbits the earth. In other words, he believed the comet to be moving around the earth, not the sun, as Falconieri had intimated in his letter to Leopoldo. Additionally, he clearly denied that the rapid movement of the comet when in opposition to the sun could be used by Copernicans as proof of the mobility of the earth, since, according to Cassini, such motion could also be explained within a Tychonic geocentric system. "Therefore, Cassini was proposing a theory that dismissed Galileo's claim about the rectilinear path of comets emanating from vapours in the earth's atmosphere. Furthermore, by placing the comet amongst the sphere of stars, Cassini was proposing a radical departure from most theories since the late sixteenth century on the location and movements of comets. Nevertheless, he still maintained a finite geocentric and geostatic model with circular motion, consistent with Tychonic astronomy" (Boschiero, pp. 223-224). The first observation of Jupiter's Red Spot has sometimes been ascribed to Robert Hooke in 1664, but Falorni has shown that what Hooke observed was almost certainly the shadow of one of Jupiter's moons. "As far as Cassini is concerned, it is beyond doubt that he repeatedly observed a spot quite like our modern Red Spot. It seems likely that his first observations were made at Cittá della Pieve, between the summer and the autumn of 1665; a full report was published the same year in the form of letters directed to the Abbot Falconieri [i.e., the present Lettere]. Cassini's interest in the spot concerned its use in determining the planet's rotation period, which at the time was unproven ... "First he took care to single out - by means of computing - which spots were caused by the transit of a satellite or a satellite's shadow on the planet's disc. Secondly, Cassini demonstrated that the remaining observable spots had to be located on the true surface of the planet. Among these latter, he finally recognized a spot that was exceptionally conspicuous and permanent, and proved ideal for determining a highly reliable rotation period. ""To that first light of distinction then followed the other of detecting amoing the number of the other spots a permanent one which was often seen to return in the same place with the same size and shape. It is the same spot that Yr. Ecc. Was able to see just touching the real northern edge of that belt of Jupiter which, among the three obscurer ones, lies more southerly. That one, which among the spots hitherto observed is the greatest, the most conspicuous and the more permanent ... appeared to be different in colour, not so dark and black [as the shadows], but quite like that of the obscure belts ... different in figure as being, when nearer to the centre, larger in accordance with the line of the belt which it grazes, or narrower when nearer to the circumference" (Lettere, p. 3). With these words Cassini described for the first time Jupiter's Great Red Spot ... "Of all the Spot's distinctive features, Cassini missed only its red colour, but it is out of the question that he would have been able to distinguish it because of the low light-grasp of telescopes of that time" (Falorni, p. 217). Queen Christina's "interest in comets is an instance of the change of ideas from the Renaissance to the Enlightenment. Millenial and messianic predictions associated with comets that were then current in Protestant circles may have influenced her decision to abdicate from the throne of Sweden and her choice of 1654 to do so. The later comet of 1664 carried similar associations and Cassini thought it might be a return of Tycho's new star of 1572" (Cook, p. 122). Cassini had been a member of Christina's circle since her arrival in Rome in 1655, and had dedicated his Specimen observationum Bononiensium (1656) to her. Falconieri was also a member of her circle in Rome. Cassini (1625-1712) was born in Perinaldo, Republic of Genoa. "Cassini's early studies were principally observations of the Sun, but after he obtained more powerful telescopes, he turned his attention to the planets. He was the first to observe the shadows of Jupiter's satellites as they passed between that planet and the Sun. His observation of spots on the surface of the planet allowed him to measure Jupiter's rotational period. In 1666, after similar observations of Mars, he found the value of 24 hours 40 minutes for Mars's rotational period; it is now given as 24 hours 37 minutes 22.66 seconds. Two years later he compiled a table of the positions of Jupiter's satellites that was used in 1675 by the Danish astronomer Ole Romer to establish that the speed of light is finite. In addition, he wrote several memoirs on flood control, and he experimented extensively in applied hydraulics. "Hearing of Cassini's discoveries and work, King Louis XIV of France invited him to Paris in 1669 to join the recently formed Academie des Sciences. Cassini assumed the directorship of the Observatoire de Paris after it was completed in 1671, and two years later he became a French citizen. "Continuing the studies begun in Italy, Cassini discovered the Saturnian satellites Iapetus (1671), Rhea (1672), Tethys (1684), and Dione (1684). He also discovered the flattening of Jupiter at its poles (a consequence of its rotation on its axis). In 1672, as part of a concerted effort to determine the size of the solar system more accurately, Cassini sent his colleague, Jean Richer, to South America so that roughly simultaneous measurements of the position of Mars could be made at Paris and Cayenne, French Guyana, leading to a better value for the Martian parallax and, indirectly, for the distance of the Sun. Between 1671 and 1679 Cassini made observations of the Moon, compiling a large map, which he presented to the Académie. In 1675 he discovered the Cassini Division and expressed the opinion that Saturn's rings were swarms of tiny moonlets too small to be seen individually, an opinion that has been substantiated. In 1683, after a careful study of the zodiacal light, he concluded that it was of cosmic origin and not a meteorological phenomenon, as some proposed. "In 1683 Cassini began the measurement of the arc of the meridian (longitude line) through Paris. From the results, he concluded that Earth is somewhat elongated (it is actually somewhat flattened at the poles). A traditionalist, he accepted the solar theory of Nicolaus Copernicus within limits, but he rejected the theory of Johannes Kepler that planets travel in ellipses and proposed that their paths were certain curved ovals, which came to be known as Cassinians, or ovals of Cassini. Although Cassini resisted new theories and ideas, his discoveries and observations unquestionably place him among the most important astronomers of the 17th and 18th centuries" (Britannica). [Theoriae:] Lalande, p. 261; Riccardi, I 276. J.J. Le F. de. Bib. astronomique, p. 261. [Lettere:] Riccardi I, 277. Boschiero, Experiment and Natural Philosophy in Seventeenth-Century Tuscany, 2007; Cook, Edmond Halley, 1998; Falorni, 'The discovery of the Great Red Spot of Jupiter,' Journal of the British Astronomical Association, vol. 97 (1987), pp. 215-219. Two vols in one, folio (286 x 210 mm), pp [iv] 60 [recte 62] [2] 22 [2], with woodcut diagrams and 1 large folding enrgaved plate in first work; contemporary carta rustica, end papers renewed, some leaves with a little damp staining, a few small worm holes mostly to margin, in all a fine copy of this highly rare work.

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        SCHOLA STEGANOGRAPHICA IN CLASSES OCTO DISTRIBUTA, QUIBUS, PRAETER ALIA MULTA, AC IUCUNDISSIMA, ... (HERBIPOLI). EXCUD. IO, HERTZ. 1665 1665

      (HERBIPOLI). EXCUD. IO, HERTZ. 1665. ...EXPLICANTUR ARTIFICIA NOVA, QUEIS QUILIBET, SCRIBENDO EPISTOLAM QUALIBET DE RE , ET QUOCUNQUE IDIOMATE, POTEST ALTERI ABSENTI, EORUNDEM ARTIFICIORUM CONSCIO, ARCANUM ANIMI SUI CONCEPTUM, SINE ULLA SECRETI LATENTIS SUSPICIONE MANIFESTARE; ET SCRIPTAM AB ALIIS EADEM ARTE, QUACUNQUE LINGUA, INTELLIGERE, ET INTERPRETARI... IN- 4°, PERGAMENA COEVA. (36), 346, (10) PP. CON FINE ANTIPORTA ALLEGORICA, ARME DI FERDINANDO MASSIMILIANO MARCHESE DI BADEN, ALCUNE ILLUSTRAZIONI N.T. E 10 TAVOLE INCISE IN RAME RIPIEGATE F.T. ESEMPLARE CON UN PICCOLO FALLO MARGINALE A P. 309 CHE LEDE UNA DIDASCALIA, ED ALCUNE LIEVI ARROSSATURE NATURALI DELLA CARTA IN POCHE PAGINE, MA DA CONSIDERARSI BEN CONSERVATO. EDIZIONE ORIGINALE. "L'UN DES PLUS CURIEUX ET DES PLUS RARES TRAITÉS SUR LES ÉCRITURES SECRÈTES ET LEURS NOMBREUSES COMBINATIONS..." (BIBLIOTHECA ESOTERICA, 442). "THE AUTHOR'S SYSTEM OF CRYPTOGRAPHI CONTAINS ALSO A MODE OF CONVEYIN SECRETS BY SOUNDS (INCLUDING SINGING AND THE PLAYNG OF AN ORGAN), AND BY OTHER PHYSICAL PHENOMENA" (ZEITLINGER). POGGENDORFF, II, 838. DE BACKER - SEMMERVOGEL, VII, 910-11. GALLAND, BIBLIOGRAPHI OF CRYPTOLOGY, P. 163. CAILLET, BIBLIOGR. DES SCIENCES OCCULTES, III, 10007. MANCA AL CAT DE GUAITA.

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        Traitté d'Horlogiographie, contenant plusieurs manieres de construire, sur toutes surfaces, toutes sortes de lignes horaires & autres cercles de la Sphere. Avec quelques instrumens pour la mesme pratique, et pour conoistre les heures durant la nuit, et l'heure du flus et reflus de la mer. Plus la méthode de couper, en pierre ou en bois, les corps régulièrs et autres Polyëdres, par le cube et par le cylindre. Revue, corrigé et augmenté en cette troisième édition, de plusieurs propositions et figures.

      Paris, chez Jean Dupuis, rue Saint Jacques, à la Couronne d'Or, 1665. 4to. menor; frontispicio grabado en portada, 312 pp. y 72 láminas, dos de ellas plegadas entre el texto. Ejemplar falto de las ocho hojas preliminares y de la página 265-266, así como ligeros puntos de polilla en la página 71-72. Como en todos los ejemplares de esta edición, la numeración de páginas salta de p.80 a p.101, y las numeradas 259 y 260 están duplicadas. Encuadernación de la época, en piel con lomera ornada que presenta una ligera pérdida al pie. Uno de los más completos Tratados de Horología y Gnomónica que trata a la vez de la historia de éstas Artes y de la construción de relojes solares y de diversos aparatos de medida. Contiene capítulos en los que se trata de relojes en Babilonia, así como de notables relojeros judíos e italianos. # Houzeau-Lancaster, 11, 455. # Tardy: Bibliographie Générale de la Mesure du Temps, pp. 220.

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        Theoriae motus cometae anni MDCLXIV ea præferens, quæ ex primis obseruationibus ad futurorum motuum prænotionem deduci potuere, cum noua inuestigationis methodo, tum in eodem, tum in comete nouissimo anni MDCLXV ad praxim reuocata. [bound with:] Lettere astronomische di Gio: Domenico Cassini al Signor Abbate Ottavio Falconieri sopra il confronto di alcune osservazioni delle comete di questo´ anno M.DC.LXV.

      Rome: Fabio di Falco, 1665. Cassini's theory of comets. First editions of these two exceptionally rare Cassini publications on the comet of 1664-5. Cassini observed the comet "in the presence of Queen Christina [to whom the first work is dedicated] and formulated on this occasion a new theory (in agreement with the Tychonian system) in which the orbit of the comet is a great circle whose center is situated in the direction of Sirius and whose perigee is beyond the orbit of Saturn." (DSB). Cassini's detailed observations of the comet were made with a powerful new telescope. "Through his friendship with the famous Roman lensmakers Giuseppe Campani and Eustachio Divini, Cassini, beginning in 1664, was able to obtain from them powerful celestial telescopes of great focal length. He used these instruments--very delicate and extremely accurate for the time-- with great skill, and made within several years a remarkable series of observations..." (ibid). In the preface to the work Cassini describes the telescopes, and the first observations made with them. The large engraved plate depicts the course of the comet in the southern celestial hemisphere from December 13 1664 through the middle of January of 1665. It also shows the appearance and direction of the comet's tail in a series of nightly dated observations. The great comet of 1664-5 was observed my many astronomers, including Auzout, Borelli, Fabri, Hooke, Hevelius, and Petit. The second work, addressed to the archaeologist Falconieri, presents further observations on the comet, and Cassini remarks about the observations made by Auzout and Hevelius.OCLC lists: Brown (lacking plate) for the first work, and Brown, Cornell, Ohio State for the second. Two vols in one, folio (286 x 210 mm), pp [iv] 60 [recte 62] [2] 22 [2], with woodcut diagrams and 1 large folding enrgaved plate in first work; contemporary carta rustica, end papers renewed, some leaves with a little damp staining, a few small worm holes mostly to margin, in all a fine copy of this highly rare work.

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        Les élémens de chymie ... reveuz, notez, expliquez & augmentez par I.LD.R.B.IC.E.M. en cette dernière édit. on esté adjoutées plusieurs explications obmises... et plusieurs préparations de remèdes...

      Lyon, Claude Chancey, 1665, in 8°, de 8 ff-384 pp. et 24 ff., ill. de 3 grands bois gravés à pl. page d'instruments chimiques, pl. vélin époque, qq. taches et infimes petits trous de vers en marge sinon bon exemplaire. (cachet d'un cabinet de lecture de Genève au titre, XIXe siècle) Dernière édition augmentée de ce grand classique rare de la chimie du XVII° siècle. C'est un des premiers essais de présentation d'une "doctrine chimique". Mais c'est aussi bien sûr un recueil de recettes pratiques, procédés spagyriques et pratiques de laboratoire. Beguin était, dit Lenglet-Dufresnoy, un artiste habile, sa chimie est très recherchée des connaisseurs. Il est le traducteur du "Cosmopolite" et on lui doit la découverte de certaines substances dont le "calomel". ¶ Caillet n°911 - Duveen p.63 - Dorbon n°5438 "l'édition la plus complète de ce traité d'alchimie publié par Jean Lucas de Roy...".

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        Ab excessu Ludovici XIII, de rebus gallicis historiarum Libri XII

      original, unusual Edition.Bound in full brown sheepskin contemporary. Back with nerves decorated. gilt. Lack head. 2 corners with slight gaps. Work toward the tail joints. ApudFredericum Leonard A Paris 1665 In-4 (24) 42, 69, 64, 58, 72, 72, 142, 44, 40pp. (8) relié

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        THE DISCOVERIE OF WITCHCRAFT, proving, That the compacts and contracts of witches with devils and infernal spirits of familiars, are but erroneous novelties and imaginary conceptions.

      London, printed for A. Clark, and are to be sold by Dixy Page at the Turks-Head, 1665. THIRD EDITION IN 2 PARTS 1665. Folio, approximately 280 x 175 mm, 11 x 7 inches, LACKS HALF TITLE AS USUAL, several woodcut illustrations in the text, pages: [18], 1-292, [12], title page 1-72, [2], last page blank, bound in old calf, new spine at sometime with old gilt lettered label, lettered "Witchcraft Refuted", new endpapers. Spine has amateur repairs to head and tail, covers rubbed and scuffed, corners worn with board just showing, shelf wear to edges, label on spine has been trimmed, title page laid down, no loss to text, following page has small neat repair to top corner, LACKS pages 40-49, Book 4, those pages are replaced from an unknown early (long "s") edition, trimmed and laid down on old paper to match size, the outer and inner margins strengthened with later paper (see attached illustration), the first replacement page duplicates the previous original page, and the final replacement page duplicates some text on page 49, 1 small burn hole affecting 1 word and 3 small holes just affecting letters but easily understood, occasional pale mark and fox spot, neat old ink note to foot of title page, a few other minor faults, otherwise a very good copy. See: Toole-Stott, A Bibliography of English Conjuring, page 206, No. 620; Trevor Hall, A Bibliography of Books on Conjuring in English, page 76, No. 251. MORE IMAGES ATTACHED TO THIS LISTING, ALL ZOOMABLE, FURTHER IMAGES ON REQUEST. POSTAGE AT COST.

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        La venerie royalle, Divisée En IV Parties, Qui Contiennent Les Chasses Du Cerf, Du Lièvre, Du Chevreüil, Du Sanglier, et Du Renard. Avec le dénombrement des Forests & grands Buissons de France, où se doivent placer les logemens, questes, & relais, pour y chasser

      Second edition reprint of the original 1655 plus Dictionary hunters; and illustrated with a frontispiece. This edition is better printed than the first and a slightly larger format. Velin flexible full time. Smooth back with title and date with black tail feather executed in the nineteenth. 2 holes in the white top margin of the frontispiece. Good copy Famous Treaty of venery, the most important seventeenth and intended by the author himself to replace the oldest Fouilloux From the latest edition dates back to 1650.'s Book is much more comprehensive in all respects views and written in a less RELEASED style that is more scientific and accurate; it is increased more in this edition of the dictionary hunters, a very interesting glossary allows you to find words and phrases USIT among hunters. --- Please note that the translation in english is done automatically, we apologize if the formulas are inaccurate. Contact us for any information! Chez Antoine de Sommaville à Paris 1665 in-4 (17x23,5cm) (28) 437pp (9) ; 38pp. relié

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        THE DISCOVERIE OF WITCHCRAFT, proving, That the compacts and contracts of witches with devils and infernal spirits of familiars, are but erroneous novelties and imaginary conceptions.

      London, printed for A. Clark, and are to be sold by Dixy Page at the Turks-Head, 1665.. THIRD EDITION IN 2 PARTS 1665. Folio, approximately 280 x 175 mm, 11 x 7 inches, LACKS HALF TITLE AS USUAL, several woodcut illustrations in the text, pages: [18], 1-292, [12], title page 1-72, [2], last page blank, bound in old calf, new spine at sometime with old gilt lettered label, lettered "Witchcraft Refuted", new endpapers. Spine has amateur repairs to head and tail, covers rubbed and scuffed, corners worn with board just showing, shelf wear to edges, label on spine has been trimmed, title page laid down, no loss to text, following page has small neat repair to top corner, LACKS pages 40-49, Book 4, those pages are replaced from an unknown early (long "s") edition, trimmed and laid down on old paper to match size, the outer and inner margins strengthened with later paper (see attached illustration), the first replacement page duplicates the previous original page, and the final replacement page duplicates some text on page 49, 1 small burn hole affecting 1 word and 3 small holes just affecting letters but easily understood, occasional pale mark and fox spot, neat old ink note to foot of title page, a few other minor faults, otherwise a very good copy. See: Toole-Stott, A Bibliography of English Conjuring, page 206, No. 620; Trevor Hall, A Bibliography of Books on Conjuring in English, page 76, No. 251. MORE IMAGES ATTACHED TO THIS LISTING, ALL ZOOMABLE, FURTHER IMAGES ON REQUEST. POSTAGE AT COST.

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        MEMOIRES DE MONSIEUR DE MONTRESOR. Diverses Pieces durant le Ministere du Cardinal de Richelieu. Relation de Monsieur de Fontrailles. Affaires de Messieurs le Comte de Seissons, Ducs de Guise & de Boüillon, &.c. [Druckermarke Sphère, Rahir "M. 33"] [und:] MEMOIRES DE MONSIEUR DE MONTRESOR, ET Autre Pieces curieuses, pour servir d'esclaircissement à ce qui est contenu au premier Volume. TOME SECOND.

      Leiden Elzevier (Sambix) 1665 - 1 (weißes) Blatt, 2 Blätter (incl. typographischer Titel), 431 Seiten (eine Lage zwischen den Seiten 416 und 425 verbunden, die Seiten 427 bis 431 erneut beigebunden), 1 (weißes) Blatt und 4 Blätter (incl. typographischem Titel), 385 Seiten, 1 (weißes) Blatt. Zwei nahezu einheitliche Pergamentbände der Zeit, mit je fünf durchgezogenenen Pergamentstreifen geheftet und mit seitlich überstehenden Schutzkanten. (13,7 x 8,4 cm, bzw. 12,7 x 7,4 cm; Buchblöcke: 2,9 (Tl. 1) u. 2,2 (Tl.2) cm) 12°. Bérard S. 167 f. Pieters 266 auf S. 462 f. ("Cette édition provient également des presses de Fr. Foppens, de Bruxelles."). Willems 2015 ("A Leyde, chez Jean Sambix le jeune, à la Sphère. T. I: 2 ff. limin. (titre et table). - 431 pp. T. II: 4 ff. limin. - 385 pp. - 1 f. blanc. Les Mémoires de Montrésor avaient paru d'abord sous le voile de l'anonyme dans le Recueil de plusieurs pièces servans à l'histoire moderne, imprimé par A. Vlaq à la Haye, sous la rubrique de Cologne 1663 (n° 1725). La première édition, publiée par Foppens, est de 1664 (il y a des exemplaires sous la date de 1663): A Cologne, chez Jean Sambix le jeune, à la Sphère, 1664, pet. in-12, de 2 ff. limin. et 436 pp. . Le succès de cette publication décida Foppens à la réimprimer dès l'année suivante, avec un second volume, qui se joint indifférement à l'édition de 1664 ou 1665. . Le libraire explique dans la préface que 'l'acceuil que l'on a fait aux Mémoires de M. de Montrésor lui a fait penser plus d'une fois à rechercher ce qui pourrait les augmenter et les esclaircir.' Ce complément n'est donc pas indispensable, et comme les pièces dont il se compose ne se rattachent à l'ouvrage principal qu'en vertu de la fantaisie du libraire, la plupart des exemplaires n'ont que le premier volume, lequel d'ailleurs ne porte point de tomaison. ."). Vergl. Minzloff S. 154. [1664 und 1665, 436 bzw. 385 S.]. Vergl. Brunet V, 1760. Rahir 3141 ("Impr. par Fr. Foppens de Bruxelles. Voy. n° 3114 ['Cologne' 1663/ 1665], 3125 ['Cologne' 1664/ 1665] et 3172 ['Leyde', 1667/ 1665]."). Berghman (Supplément) 554 (" 'La première édition, publiée par Foppens, est de 1663: (la Spehère) A Cologne, chez Jean Sambix le Jeune, à la Sphère. M.DC.LXII, pet. in-12, de 2 ff. limin. (titre et table), 437 pp. et 1 f. blanc. La deuxième édition, avec la même adresse, est de 1664: elle a 2 ff. limin. et 436 pp. La troisième de 1665, est celle que nous décrivons sous le n° 2015. Enfin une dernière édition, également signée Leyde, I. Sambix, 1667, a 2 ff. limin. et 427 pp. Le tome II, daté 1665, n'a été imprimé qu'une fois.' Note communiqué par M. Willems."). Vergl. Berghman 1642 ("Impr. par Fr. Foppens de Bruxelles. Le tome I, qui ne porte pas de tomaison, est de la 2e des quatres éditions données par Foppens. Le tome II (daté 1665), qui n'a été imprimé qu'une fois, contient des pièces qui ne se rattachent que de très loin à l'ouvrage principal."). Socoloff II A 154. Vergl. Motteley (1824) 1746. Vergl. Motteley (1847) S. 25. Montaran 521. Drouot (1946) 752. Vergl. Drouot (1987) 219 [1664/ 1665]. Thulins 148, 313. Vergl. EHC 12.1664.Mon.00 T01 ["Cologne", 1664] u. EHC 12.1664.Mon.00 T02 ["Leyde", 1665]. Weddigen 082. Die beiden einheitlich gebundenen Pergamentbände mit nur geringen Alters- und Gebrauchsspuren. Beide etwas sperrend, innen stellenweise gereinigt und/ oder mit Wasserspuren in den unteren weißen Rändern. Der zweite Band erschien nur in der vorliegenden Auflage von 1665, der erste Band hier in der ersten "Leidener"-Ausgabe von 1665, erstmals erschien er in etwas anderer Form bereits 1663 in "Köln", alle Ausgaben wurden jedoch für die Elzeviere bei Foppens in Brüssel gedruckt. Das fleuron mit dem Büffelkopf in der Foppens'schen Variante Rahir 138 wird mehrfach verwendet, so auf den Seiten 1, 153 und 365 im ersten, und auf Seite 1 im zweiten Band. Einige Schmuckinitialen im ersten, nur eine einzige im zweiten Band, der ornamental insgesamt sparsamer ausgestattet wurde. Die Vignette Rahir 139 wird mehrfach im

      [Bookseller: Heinrich Heine Antiquariat oHG]
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        Wegweiser Zur Höflichkeit. Sampt Beygefügter Hauß-Regel, Wie Ein jedweder in seinem Stand sein Haußwesen anstellen und vollführen sol. Allen Jung und Alt sehr nützlich und dienlich. Neben einem ordentlichen Register. Zum andern mahl in Truck gegeben.

      Frankfurt a. M., Egidius Vogel für Johann David Zunner, 1665. 12°. Mit illustr. Kupfertitel. 7 Bll., 260 S., Pgmt. d. Zt. m. dreiseitigem Rotschnitt u. 2 Schließen. Dritte u. letzte Ausgabe dieses seltenen, anonym erschienenen Anstandsbuches. - Rücken etw. brüchig u. mit zwei Fehlstellen. Gebräunt. - VD17, 547:660474N (nur zwei Nachweise). Versand D: 12,00 EUR Hausväterliteratur, Hauswirtschaft, Anstandsbuch, Anstandsbücher, Wegweiser Zur Höflichkeit. Sampt Beygefügter Hauß-Regel

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Wolfgang Friebes]
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        Occasional Reflections upon several Subiects [sic]. Whereto is premis'd a Discourse about such Kind of Thoughts.

      London: W. Wilson for Henry Herringman, 1665. 1st Edition. Hardcover. 8vo - over 7¾ - 9¾" tall. Two parts in one volume. 8vo (165 x 106 mm). [40], 1-80, 161-264, 1-229, [11] pp. A8 a8 b4 B-F8 M-R8 S4 Aa-Pp8. Title printed in red and black, imprimatur leaf before title, advertisement leaf after S4 not included. "Occasional reflections. The IV. section" (caption title) has separate pagination and register. Quires G-L and p. 81-161 are omitted but the text is continuous. Later calf (boards and extremities rubbed). Text only little browned, some ink underlinings in text, upper margin trimmed close affecting page numbers on a few leaves. Provenance: The library of Hugh Selbourne (small ink stamp to title verso and p.51). Good copy. ----Fulton 64; Wing B4005, Honeyman 464. - FIRST EDITION. Largely written whilst on holiday at Stalbridge in Dorset, Boyle reflects upon many subjects including angling ('Upon Fishing with a counterfeit Fly' and 'Upon Catching Store of Fish at a Baited Place'), 'Upon the Sports being interrupted by Rainy-weather' and 'Upon the Eating of Oysters', "Boyle's discursive style made him the object of playful satire, and Swift confesses that the present work was the inspiration of his 'Occasional Meditations on a Broomstick', and it is usually stated that Reflection III of Section VI on 'The Eating of Oysters' (p. 194) gave birth to Gulliver's Travels." (Fulton). "The book was once wrongly attributed to Isaac Walton." (Honeyman 464). Very Good.

      [Bookseller: Milestones of Science Books]
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        A Treatise of the Laws of the Forest, Wherein is declared . . . the Original and beginning of Forests . . . Collected, as well out of the Common Laws and Statutes of this Land [etc.]. The Third Edition Corrected, and much Inlarged. Wing M554 (variant)

      The rare variant issue of the last 17th century edition of the first treatise on the law of the King's forest, much expanded from the first published edition of 1598, restoring substantial portions (including the last five chapters) there omitted. Contemporary calf, rebacked, a very good copy, with the elaborate bookplate of John Francis Neylan (printed by John Henry Nash); the Taussig copy. Printed for the Company of Stationers, London, 1665.

      [Bookseller: Meyer Boswell Books, Inc.]
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        Some Motive and Incentives to the Love of God, Pathetically Discours'd of in a Letter to a Friend. The Fourth Edition, much Corrected.

      London: Printed for Henry Herringman, 1665. 4th Edition. Hardcover. 8vo - over 7¾ - 9¾" tall. 8vo (162 x 104 mm). [18], 173 [1] pp. Signatures: A-M8. Contemporary calf, spine with 4 raised bands (boards, spine and extremities rubbed, upper hinge split but holding). Internally only very little browned. Provenance: The library of Hugh Selbourne (small ink stamp to half-title verso and p.51). Good copy. ----Fulton 4. Fourth Edition of Boyles first separate work. The type of this edition is entirely reset from the previous. Known under the title "Seraphick Love" from the running head used in all 17th -century English editions, it did not find a place on the title-page until the 1693 Latin edition (see Fulton, p.2). Though perhaps as little known as any of Robert Boyle's numerous writings, there is much interest attaching to this work, as well as something of a romance in his life. By 1752, the work had been carried through fifteen English editions or variants. The text was written by Boyle when he was but 22 years old and is in the form of a letter addressed to Lindamor, 'a learned youth, well-born and well-bred.' It was suggested that this imaginary character, who appears in a number of Boyle's writings, was in fact no other than Boyle himself. (Fulton, p.3). Very Good.

      [Bookseller: Milestones of Science Books]
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        Réflexions ou sentences et maximes morales.

      Paris, Claude Barbin, 1665. ____ Edition originale du premier recueil des "Maximes" de La Rochefoucauld. C'est la première édition publiée en France avec l'autorisation de l'auteur, elle contient 318 maximes. En tête d'ouvrage on trouve un frontispice attribué à Poussin et gravé par Picart. Exemplaire de second état, avec les nombreux feuillets cartonnés signalés par Tchemerzine. 23 lignes à la page. La Rochefoucault surveilla attentivement l'impression de cette édition et corrigea et ajouta des maximes à l'aide de cartons (des nouveaux feuillets montés sur onglets). Les autres éditions publiées en 1665, à 22 lignes par pages, sont des contrefaçons. Petit manque le long du bord d'un plat. Exemplaire en reliure de l'époque, condition des plus rares, la plupart des exemplaires connus ayant été reliés à nouveau par des amateurs au XIXe siècle. Tchermerzine IV, 34. *****. In-12. Collation : frontispice, (48), 150, (10) pp. Vélin. (Reliure de l'époque.).

      [Bookseller: Hugues de Latude]
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        Land-Lords Law:

      12mo., (18) + 171 + (1)pp., wanting the preliminary blank, contemporary plain ruled sheep. A fine copy.Publisher: London, printed for Henry Twyford, Thomas Dring, and John Place.Year: 1665Edition: First edition: variant issue. Wing M.1803. Goldsmiths (1756) has another issue of 143pp. Sweet & Maxwell I, p.460 (#9).

      [Bookseller: John Drury Rare Books]
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        Physico-mathesis de lumine, coloribus, et iride, aliisque adnexis libri duo, in quorum primo asseruntur nova experimenta, & rationes ab iis deductae pro substantialitate luminis...

      First edition Bologna: heirs of Vittorio Benacci for Girolamo Bernia, 1665. A fine copy of Grimaldi's only publication. This very important book contains the first account of the diffraction of light discovered by the author and it marks the first scientific attempt to establish a comprehensive wave theory of light. ?Macclesfield 943 (lacking the 2nd title); Arnoud de Vitry 429; Honeyman 1559. The diffraction experiments which Grimaldi describes here show "that a new mode of transmission of light had been discovered and that this mode contradicts the notion of an exclusively rectilinear passage of light. Diffraction thus gave prima facie evidence for a fluid nature of light. The name 'diffraction' comes from the loss of uniformity observed in the flow of a stream of water as it 'splits apart' around a slender obstacle placed in its path." (DSB). Grimaldi repeatedly states that colors are not something different from light but are modifications of light produced by the fine structure of the bodies which reflect it, and probably consisting of an alteration in the type of motion and in the velocity of the light. The different colors are produced when the eye is stimulated by light oscillations whose velocities differ. All these views were of fundamental importance for the subsequent development of optics. Newton was aware of Grimaldi's work, though only secondhand. The Englishman's great contribution to the knowledge of diffraction is his set of careful measurements which made clear the periodic nature of the phenomenon. Provenance: old inscription to letter press title, previous stamp scrapped away and another three letter stamp in the same area. Parkinson, Breakthroughs p. 103. 4to (252 x 184 mm), fully complete with the often lacking additional letter press title page: pp. [22], 1-535 [536:blank], [14:index], [2: Riccioli's address about the author]. Binding: contemporary vellum, manuscript lettering to spine, edges sprinkled in red, letter press title and a4 with some light damp staining, a few upper margins with some mild smudging, otherwise fine and clean througout - a very fine and unsophisticated copy.

      [Bookseller: SOPHIA RARE BOOKS]
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        Opera omnia quae extant, philosophica, moralia, politica, historica ... in quibus complures alii tractatus, quos brevitatis causa praetermittere visum est, comprehensi sunt, hactenus nunquam conjunctim edita, jam vero summo studio collecta, uno volumine comprehensa, & ab innumeris mendis repurgata: cum indice rerum ac verborum universali absolutissimo. His praefixa est auctoris vita.

      Francofurti ad Moenum Impensis Joannis Baptistae Schonwtteri, typis Matthaei Kempfferi, 1665. 1665 Early collected Latin edition of Bacon's works, including The History of the Reign of King Henry the Seventh; Sylva Sylvarum; The Essays, or Counsels, Civil and Moral; The Wisdom of the Ancients; Advancement and Proficiency of Learning; The Phenomena of the Universe or a Natural and Experimental History for the foundation of Philosophy. Folio; 10 preliminary leaves, 1324 numbered columns, 29pp index, with the engraved portrait frontispiece of Bacon (often lacking) as Lord Keeper of the Great Seal of England and Lord Chancellor by Wenceslaus Hollar after Simon van de Passe (originally the frontispiece of 'Sylva Sylvarum, 1626) and the title page, with a magnificent engraved publisher's device, printed in red and black, decorative head- and tail-pieces and initials. Each of the eight works also has a separate title page, with a woodcut vignette, and the imprint date Anno MDCLXIV; pagination is continuous throughout. Contemporary full vellum, the spine lettered in brown ink in a contemporary hand. Vellum worn and stained, short splits to joints top and bottom, but binding holding tight and firm; pages deeply and evenly browned (not foxed), but not displeasingly so, the paper still fresh and supple. A Very Good completely unsophsitcated copy. OCLC Number: 38614269. Very Good

      [Bookseller: Fine Editions Ltd.]
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        Hippocratis magni coacae praenotiones. Opus admirabile, intres libros distributum

      Apus Stephanum Gamoner. New edition, rare, after the original appeared in 1588 in Paris. --- Please note that the translation in english is done automatically, we apologize if the formulas are inaccurate. Contact us for any information! Apus Stephanum Gamoner Genevae (Genève) 1665 in-folio (22x36,5cm) (12) 578pp. (54) relié

      [Bookseller: Librairie Le Feu Follet]
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        He Palaia Diatheke Kata Tous Hebdomekonta [In Greek]. Vetus Testamentum Graecum Ex Versione Septuaginta Interpretum, Juxta Exemplar Vaticanum Romae Editum

      Cambridge:: Excusum per Joannem Field, Typographum Academicum,, 1665. Second Edition. Hardcover. Very Good. SECOND ENGLISH EDITION of the Septuagint. Two Volumes. 12mo. 5 9/16 x 3 inches. [ii], 19, [1], 755 (i.e.: 767, page numbers 647-648 and 685-694 repeat), [1 blank]; 516, 273, [1 blank] pp. Title page (in Vol. I only; no separate title-page is called for in Vol. II when bound in two volumes) printed within a ruled border, printer's device on title page, Latin Preface in Vol. I by John Pearson, Aprocrypha added at the end of Vol. II, text in Greek; text clean, unmarked, margins trimmed close, occasionally just affecting the headlines. Bound in early nineteenth-century full crimson morocco, covers decorated in blind, raised bands, two compartments in the spine decorated in blind, spine titled in gilt, all edges gilt, turn-ins decorated in gilt; binding square and tight, minor shelf wear. Bookplate of the Duke of Sussex on front paste-down of Volume I. Very Good. This edition of the Septuagint is based on the Codex Vaticanus and its sixteenth century revision, now the textus receptus of the Greek Old Testament. The first English-language translation of the Septuagint was based on this edition. The Preface is by John Pearson (1612-1686), English theologian and scholar, and Bishop of Chester. The Preface defends the 72 translators of the Greek Bible from the criticisms of Jerome (347-420). PROVENANCE: with the bookplate of the Duke of Sussex on the front paste-down of Volume I. The title was conferred on 27 November 1801 upon Prince Augustus Frederick (1773-1843), the sixth son of George III, but since the Duke had no legitimate issue, the title became extinct on his death in 1843. The Duke of Sussex was President of the Royal Society from 1830 to 1838, and had a keen interst in biblical studies and Hebrew. REFERENCE: Darlow and Moule, Historical Catalogue ... of Holy Scripture, No. 4702; Wing, Short-Title Catalogue, B2719. Does not include the New Testament Volume printed the same year.

      [Bookseller: John Howell for Books]
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        Diatribae Thomae Willisii Doc. Med. & Profess. Oxon. De febribus vindicatio adversus Edmundum De Meara Ormoniensem Hibernum M.D.

      London: At the house of John Martyn & James Allestry, at the sign of the Bell in St. Paul's churchyard, 1665. First edition, extremely rare, and in an untouched contemporary binding, of pioneering Oxford physician and physiologist Richard Lower's first and rarest book. Variously known as Diatribae and Vindicatio, De febribus vindication is a strident defence of Thomas Willis's Diatribae duae medico-philosophicae (London, 1658-9), against the criticisms of Irish physician Edmund O'Meara published in his Examen Diatribae Thomae Willisii de febribus (1665). "Lower served for at least ten years as Willis's 'research assistant' ... the best testimony of their harmonious relations is to be found in the present work by Lower, which is a valiant defence of Willis, and incidentally a book of considerable interest to the historian of science since it contains a preliminary statement of Lower's views concerning the functions of the heart and lungs" (Fulton, p. 13). "Lower's book is, in fact, the repository of some of the most important ideas that fretted the minds of his contemporaries. He defended Harveian circulatory physiology, and the role of the thoracic duct in nutrition; he substituted chemical principles for the four humours and constantly upheld the experimental method in medicine. When he wrote Vindicatio Richard Lower was the leading physiologist in Oxford. He had investigated the transfusion of blood and other fluids; he had studied the difference between venous and arterial blood as well as aspects of respiration, nutrition, and body heat, all in terms of a chemico-mechanical philosophy which reached maturity in Tractatus de Corde (1669). Richard Lower's Vindicatio is a rare book. Antoine Portal (1770-3), who reviewed O'Meara's Examen, was unable to obtain a copy of Vindicatio, and in his bibliography of Lower's works John Fulton traced only eight copies" (Dewhurst, p. vii). ESTC locates copies in fourteen British and Irish libraries, and just six elsewhere (BN, Cornell, NLM, NSU, UCLA and Yale). ABPC/RBH list no copy in the past fifty years. "Boyle's chemical trials on blood, Lower's vivisectional experiments on its color, Locke's speculations about air, fermentation, and the creation of arterial blood -- all were part of a broader, emergent conception of a corpuscular and chemical approach to Harveian problems. Just as the Oxonians believed that experimental challenge best revealed nature, so were the foundations of their own Harveianism revealed in response to a challenge upon their doyen, Thomas Willis. In early 1665 the elderly Bristol physician Edmund Meara published a severe quasi-Galenic critique of Willis's ideas on blood and fever. Dick Lower, as Ward noted, responded. Lower saw Meara's criticisms not just as an affront to Willis, but as an attack upon the entire tradition to which Harvey's work had given rise. During the early months of 1665, most certainly at breakneck speed, Lower wrote out his Vindicatio of Willis's Diatribae duae, and it was published by Martyn and Allestry about early May 1665. "Although Lower's book was in format very much a page-by-page refutation of Meara, it displays an overall logic proceeding from Lower's unified conception of physiological processes. As he said in dedicating the book to Boyle, he was defending not just Willis, but the entire new way of philosophizing; in this enterprise, Lower asked Boyle, as its guardian, for his blessing. One would only be following Lower's intentions in analyzing the major themes of the Vindicatio synoptically, rather than plodding sequentially from insult to invective. Lower proved himself as much a master of the literary dagger as of the dissecting knife, but there is no need to be bound by his polemical purposes. "The book's leitmotiv was the primacy of the blood as a locus of physiological processes. Although this theme was forced upon him by the nature of the debate Willis believed fevers arose in the blood, while Meara thought they were lodged in the solids Lower soon made it clear that on this point he was defending not so much Willis as Harvey. To prove the importance of the blood, he cited again and again Harvey's proof, in De generatione, that it was the first-generated part of the embryo. The blood was the first formed, as Harvey and Willis correctly believed, because it was the vehicle of the soul; Lower, like those before him, adduced the well-worn scriptural confirmation. He even turned Meara's charge of impiety against Harvey back upon the Irishman; if the Scriptures said that the divine spark was in the blood, how could any good Christian deny it? "Moreover, Lower, in focusing on the importance of the blood, attempted to justify his analysis of blood components by appeal to Harvey. Harvey, Lower said, had given first place to the blood for good Aristotelian reasons: that it was composed of similar and dissimilar parts. Lower then made Harvey an honorary corpuscularian by interpreting this to mean that the arterial blood was a homogeneous substance, while venous blood was a heterogeneous one. This could easily be seen, Lower said, if one cut the carotid artery of a dog; the blood was the same color throughout and had no darker parts, no crassamentum negrum. In contrast, blood drawn from the jugular vein and allowed to stand in a bowl acquired a thin florid top and a darker bottom, as it separated into its blood components. All of this disproved Meara's absurd four-humors theory of the blood and justified Harvey's conclusions. Lower then went on, in a lengthy "Digressio de natura sanguinis," to establish a true "anatomy" of the blood, based upon chemical and physiological experiments. These conceptions of the various fractions of the blood and their constituent particles were drawn, Lower said, from a set of lectures that Willis had given recently at Oxford. In the subsequent pages, Lower's and Willis's ideas were so intermixed that it is impossible to differentiate them. Nor is it necessary to do so. Lower and Willis had collaborated for so long that their views on blood as a particulate, fermentable substance had long since fused. "The defense of the primacy of the blood was, in Lower's mind, only part of the defense of all of Harvey's findings concerning the motion and nature of the blood. Meara accepted a kind of circulatory motion, but Lower ridiculed it not being truly Harveian. He recapitulated how the blood's motion was due to the contraction of the heart and to the arrangement of the cardiac valves. He accused Meara of being an anti-Copernican in the field of medicine, wanting to turn back the tide of recent discoveries in favor of older ideas. According to Lower, this Harveian tradition also included the discovery of the lacteals, the lymphatics, and the thoracic duct, discoveries that complemented Harvey's own of the circulation. Lower did not know that Harvey had never accepted the thoracic duct, so he righteously chided Meara for neglecting both it and the implications it had for a proper explanation of nutrition. Thus Meara still believed that the liver made blood from chyle, a position one could not maintain if one accepted both Harvey's circulation and Pecquet's duct. "Taking another page from De generatione, Lower argued through the book that the blood was the seat of heat in the body. Meara's idol, he charged, was some calidum innatum that was separate and independent from the fluids of the body. This was false. Insofar as the body had heat, it was contained in the blood. But in attempting to defend Harvey on this point, and Willis as a follower of Harvey, Lower betrayed the fact that he, under the tutelage of Willis, had evolved a system of physiological explanation that was, in many important senses, far removed from the Harveian problems and themes upon which it was based. He accepted totally Willis's idea of the blood as a fermentative liquid, composed of particles of salt, sulphur, and spirit, in a watery vehicle. This fermentation was responsible for the blood being able to convert chyle into itself. The heat in the blood resulted from this same fermentable nature. "The process by which heat was brought out of the blood, ascension, was a key concept in Lower's physiological scheme. It took place in the left ventricle of the heart, as the result of contact between the blood and a nitrosulphurous ferment. The heat forced out of the blood in this way was then, by the muscular beat of the heart, distributed throughout the body. The enkindling of the inflammable, sulphurous particles of the blood in this way constituted the flamma vitalis, a combustion that was unlike common fire in that it gave off no light or visible flame. As Willis had noted in the De fermentation, Lower said, this ascension was a sudden commotion, a sudden resolving of the particles in the blood. "Lower's ideas on blood color and on the function of respiration were subordinate to this life-giving process of ascension. Because the enkindled blood was distributed to all parts of the body, when it returned to the heart via the veins, its heat was spent. Lower even went so far as to assert that, since the true ascension of the blood did not take place until it reached the left ventricle, the blood in the lungs was the same as that found in the veins. The color and the consistency of the blood, he affirmed, depended upon the flame or ferment of the heart. Lower was later to regret his rash desire for consistency. "Lower's reflections on respiration occurred very much as afterthoughts to his more important ideas on the composition of the blood and the changes it underwent in the heart. Since the blood was, in some sense, a liquid in combustion, it needed the lungs to rid itself of its smokey wastes. This was the function of expiration: to rid the blood of vapors and effluvia. that the blood was mixed by the motion of the lungs during the pulmonary transit. This was why fish had gills as analogues to lungs. He also gave the function of inspiration in straightforward terms: "in order that the blood, in its passage [through the lungs], may be impregnated with the nitrous food of the air." The phrase that Lower used in both of his explanations of the function of inspiration, the aeris pabulum nitrosum, was the same one that Bathurst had used more than a decade previously in his lectures. "Moreover, Lower said, how much the inspired air conduced to the preservation of the vital fire of the heart could be seen in a simple experiment in vivorum animalium dissection. The experiment he related was exactly the one that his friends, Millington and Needham, had reported to the Royal Society just a few months earlier and which had so impressed Boyle. One waited until the heart of a dissected animal had stopped beating. Then a tube was inserted into the thoracic duct, or into the vena cava, a breath of air was blown through it, and the heart's motion could be restored. The cause of this effect, Lower said, seems to be that in dying animals, the fire of life outlived the motion of the lungs and could be re-enkindled by particles of air. The increased fire in the sinus of the heart stimulated the animal spirits in the fibers of the heart, which excited a contraction and a subsequent pulse. "Such a summary of Lower's physiological ideas looks well past the polemical purposes that occasioned the Vindicatio. But that attitude is not unhistorical; Lower's contemporaries did the same. Oldenburg wrote a brief review of the work for the Philosophical Transactions of 5 June 1665 that completely neglected the invective. The book was, he said, a "small, but very ingenious and Learned Treatise," in which Lower reported on "many considerable Medical and Anatomical inquiries." Oldenburg cited certain of Lower's discussions as of greatest interest: the primacy of the blood and whether it performed the function of sanguification; whether the motion of the blood, after the heart ceased, argued that life and the pulse rested ultimately in the blood; new experiments to prove that chyle was not transmuted into blood by the liver; the nature of the blood and the difference between venous and arterial blood; and "what the uses of the Lungs are in hot animals." A man like Oldenburg, conversant with the traditions of research at Oxford, saw past the ephemeral issues of the debate. "One can see at every juncture in the Vindicatio the themes that had run through almost two decades of physiological work at Oxford: the close attention paid to Harvey's work, especially the De generatione; the importance of the blood and the reasons for the differences between its two species; the treatment of heat as a process linked to the blood and its composition; and the belief that the blood absorbed a nitrous food during the pulmonary transit. The belief in the pabulum nitrosum is especially indicative of the shared nature of conceptual frameworks in the Oxford group. Lower's Vindicatio of 1665 was the first published work since Ent's Apologia (1641) that mentioned a nitrous substance in the air that had a respiratory function. Judged by the standards of formal "publication," Lower had put forward a "new" idea in a new explanatory context. Yet he felt he was doing no such thing. The notion was simply part of the conceptual tradition of the social community within which he had come to scientific maturity. The idea, like many others, had been promulgated long before it had been published" (Frank, pp. 188-192). A second edition of Lower's Vindicatio was published at Amsterdam in 1666 (Fulton 3); this is the only subsequent edition until Kenneth Dewhurst's facsimile and English translation in 1983. Lower's defence was answered by Conly Cassin in his Willisius male vindicates sive Medicus Oxoniensis mendacitatis & inscitiae detectus, published at Dublin in 1667. The tract is referred to by Lower in the Introduction to De Corde. Richard Lower was born in 1632 into the Cornish gentry, educated by Richard Busby at Westminster School, and elected to a Studentship at Christ Church [College, Oxford] in 1649. He took his BA in February 1653, and MA in June 1655. Lower came gradually into the study of medicine, eventually accumulating his BM and DM in 1665, a few years after he had lost his Studentship at Christ Church for failing to be ordained. In 1666 Lower married a widow possessed of a neighbouring manor in Cornwall, and in 1667 settled in London. The same year he became FRS and a candidate in the Royal College of Physicians. Lower's admission as FRCP in 1675 coincided with his growing practice in aristocratic circles, and, in Wood's phrasing, 'no man's name was more cried up at court than his.' The strong Whig sympathies of Lower lost him practice in the early 1680s, but he re-emerged as a favourite after the Glorious Revolution, and remained prominent until his relatively early death in January 1691. Dewhurst (ed.), Richard Lower's Vindicatio. A defence of the experimental method, A facsimile edition, 1983; Frank, Harvey and the Oxford Physiologists, 1980; Fulton, A Bibliography of Two Oxford Physiologists: Richard Lower (1631-1691), John Mayow (1643-1679), 2 (no. 1 is the same work with A7/8 in their original state, but Fulton admits that "the original issue with leaves A7 and 8 uncancelled has not yet been found"); ESTC R3593; Wing L3308. Not in Garrison-Morton or Wellcome (the latter has the 1666 Amsterdam edition but not the first edition; the former has neither). 8vo (156 x 92 mm), pp. [xv], 194, [1, errata], including initial imprimatur (dated 22 March 1664, i.e. 1665) printed in A1v and errata on O2r, A7/8 cancels, as usual. Contemporary blind-ruled English calf, lettered in manuscript (rubbed, with splitting of upper joint and slight loss to spine at head and foot), endpapers sprung revealing printers' waste within binding. A fine and crisp unsophisticated copy.

      [Bookseller: SOPHIA RARE BOOKS]
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        [Caribbean] [Slavery] Histoire Naturelle et Morale des Iles Antilles de l'Amerique. Enrichie d'un grand nobre de belles Figures en taille douce, des Places & des Raretez les plus considerables, qui y sont decrites. / Avec un Vocabulaire Caraibe. / Seconde Edition. / Reveue & augmentee de plusieurs Descriptions, & de quelques eclaircissemens, qu'on desiroit en la precedente

      Second Edition A Roterdam Chez Arnout Leers M. DC. LXV [1665] 4to: [34],583,[13]pp,with extra engraved title, three folding plates, and 46 plates of various sizes included in the text, displaying the settlements and natural history of the Antilles and the Caribbean. Bound in late 18th or early 19th century paper-covered boards, spine and corners green, boards pink, red morocco lettering piece gilt?a remarkably elegant presentation. An excellent copy, generally clean pages, clear print and ample margins throughout; mildly and uniformly toned, hint of damp-staining at top edge of first few gatherings; all plates in excellent impressions (blank outer margin of engraved title trimmed to plate mark without affecting engraving); very pretty (and sturdy) early binding. Sabin 72316. Nissen ZBI 3448. Landis, European Americana 665/173. Brunet III, 206. Near Fine Augmented, revised, and enlarged Second Edition (first published, in French, in 1658) of one of the most significant seventeenth century sources on the natural history and ethnography of the West Indies, their peoples, trade, flora and fauna, with digressions on the Eskimo and Indian nations, early European settlements of Florida, Georgia, the Appalachians, and Greenland, and, importantly, the African slave trade, the sugar trade, and sugar plantations. The first parts relates principally to the natural history of the islands, and the second to the manners, custom, religion and arts of their peoples. A vocabulary of the Carib language rounds out the content. "Much of the material may have been collected by De Poincy, but the principal or rather sole compiler of the work appears to have been Charles de Rochefort, pastor of the French Protestant church at Rotterdam, who had resided several years in the West Indies. His name and profession are given in full only on the title of the Dutch translation published at Rotterdam in 1662. . . . Notwithstanding, . . . the work is an important and valuable contribution to our knowledge of the Antilles and their inhabitants." (Sabin). N. B. With few exceptions (always identified), we only stock books in exceptional condition, carefully preserved in archival, removable polypropylene sleeves. All orders are packaged with care and posted promptly. Satisfaction guaranteed.

      [Bookseller: Fine Editions Ltd.]
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        Memoires du Mareschal de Bassompierre contenant l'histoire de sa vie.

      Chez Pierre Marteau[Elzevier?]. Edition à la même date que l'originale, et à la même adresse, mais qui ne possède pas la même collation. En outre, le volume I ne contient pas le fleuron que l'on trouve sur l'originale, bien qu'il se trouve sur la page de titre du second volume ; le matériel typographique est sensiblement différent pour les pages de titre. Chez Pierre Marteau[Elzevier?] A Cologne 1665 In-16 (7,5x13cm) (2) 403pp. et (2) 493pp. 2 tomes en 2 volumes reliés

      [Bookseller: Librairie Le Feu Follet]
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        Autograph letter, signed, to church officials in Soriano]. Rome, 24 October 1696. Folio (27 x 19.5 cm). In Italian in brown ink on paper, formerly folded for sending, addressed on the outside, and sealed with black wax, stamped through the paper (with the seal preserved).

      - Letter written in Italian by Sabino Mariani (1665-1721) in Rome, Papal ambassador and financial officer of the Apostolic Dataria, to the Priory[?] of the Province[?] of Viterbo at Soriano concerning financial matters. In 1697 Mariani was already making plans to go to China in connection with the Propaganda Fide's efforts there. In 1702 he left for China as part of a diplomatic and missionary expedition, accompanying the papal legate Cardinal Charles Maillard de Tournon (1668-1710), appointed by Pope Clement XI. This embassy was charged with the task of inspecting and reporting on the general state of the missions and to settle the Christian rites controversy regarding the Chinese converts.With some old folds, a small hole in first leaf, slight affecting 2 letters of one word, and some very minor foxing. The recipient tore the paper around the seal to open the letter, but part of the piece torn out, including the entire seal, still survives as it was secured with wax to another part of the leaf for sending. In good condition.

      [Bookseller: ASHER Rare Books]
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        Relation de la Conduite présente de la Cour de France.

      Leiden: Antoine Du Val 1665. 12mo (12,9 x 7,0 cm). (2), 106 pp. Full polished calf, covers with gilt triple-fillet frame, spine richly gilt decorated with gilt-lettered morocco letterpiece and 5 raised bands, all edges gilt, gilt inner dentelles, board edges with a gilt fillet, linen bookmark. Typographic title page with Foppens's Sphere as printer's device. With a headpiece and an endpiece. Original edition of a work that was pirated by Elzevier. The Relation provides a highly critical overview of the situation of France in 1664, giving attention to King Louis XIV and his family, the administration and the ministers, the financial situation and economy, especially the unjust distribution of wealth and the high taxes, the legal system (Chambre de Justice, imprisonment &c), military force &c. According to Willems, our edition, published by Foppens from Brussels, is the original one and has been pirated the same year by Daniel Elzevier. Splendid masterbinding, signed Lebrun at the foot of the spine. Lebrun, a pupil of René Simier, worked in Paris between 1830 and 1860. Endpaper with an armorial ex-libris of M.D.V. and an old name (Gaillard) in ink on title page. First page with slight damage to ink of headpiece and a few letters. A desirable rare edition in a splendid masterbinding. For a full description and more images please visit www.zaalbooks.nl .

      [Bookseller: Zaal Books]
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        Typus Montis Vesuvii prout ab autore a. 1638 visus fuit

      1665. Rara rappresentazione in sezione del Vesuvio, pubblicata nell'opera Mundus subterraneus, la cui prima edizione fu pubblicata nel 1665. Un monumentale trattato di geologia, in 12 libri, corredato di numerose illustrazioni Secondo Kircher la stuttura della Terra è cavernosa, fatta di grandi cavità e di condotti di collegamento, nei quali si trovano, percorrendo starde separate e condotti volta per volta speciali, aria, acqua e fuoco. Nell'opera Mundus subterranesus, l'autore descrive la Terra a partire da queste cavità: al centro della Terra si trovano acque e fuochi che escono all'esterno attraverso i fiumi e attraverso i vulcani. L'opera si basa anche sulle osservazioni compiute durante un unico, breve ma movimentato, viaggio a Malta, con escursioni naturalistiche in Sicilia e a Napoli (1637-1638). La sosta siciliana avvenne in un momento in cui l'Etna e lo Stromboli non erano quiescenti e il ritorno verso Roma fu reso avventuroso da un violento terremoto (marzo 1638) che colpì la costa calabra proprio all'arrivo di Kircher. A Napoli, il Vesuvio manifestava un'attività che, pur non pericolosa, completava il quadro 'infernale' che il gesuita vide alla solfatara di Pozzuoli e ai Campi Flegrei. Del resto, solo pochi anni prima, nel 1631, si era registrata l'eruzione più violenta e distruttiva del vulcano, dopo quella del 79 d.C, con più di 4.000 vittime. In questa bella illustrazione, l'autore rappresenta il vulcano in sezione, come se si trattasse di un edificio di cui viene segnalata la presenza di gallerie e camini secondari. Kircher riferisce che la circonferenza dell'orlo crateico misura circa 4 km e il suo fondo raggiunge una profondità quasi prossima al livello del mare. Acquaforte, finemente colorata a mano, in ottimo stato di conservazione. "Very unusual view with a cut-away to reveal the interior of Vesuvius erupting with smoke and flames billowing forth. A small village named Portici is shown in the foreground. This is from ""Mundus Subterraneu"": the most geological of Kircher's works, published the first time in Amsterdam, 1665. This book is notable for containing early plates of the Earth's interior, and views of spectacular eruptions of Mt. Vesuvius and Mt. Etna. Plato's Atlantis is represented as an island in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean. Kircher also examines water and fire cycles--providing detailed explanations of hydrophylacia (modern aquifers) and pyrophylacia (modern magma chambers). Furthermore, this is one of the first books dealing with speleology. Kircher's book is far-ranging in his attempt to avoid the split between science, philosophy and religion It was, in part, based on Kircher's observations of the eruption of Vesuvius and the two weeks of earthquakes that shook Calabria in 1638. From December 1631 to January 1632, explosive activity at Vesuvius caused a caldera collapse, a tsunami, mud flows, scorched farms, and up to 4,000 deaths. It was the volcano's most destructive eruption since 79 AD. The volcano was still rumbling several years later when, in 1638, it received a distinguished visitor: Athanasius Kircher, a German Jesuit mathematician and linguist living in Rome. Unlike his sensible contemporaries, he didn't admire the volcano from a respectable distance. He descended into the active crater. Etching, hand coloured, in very good condition." Amsterdam Amsterdam 420 370

      [Bookseller: Libreria Antiquarius]
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        De Medicina Libri Octo, ex recognitione Joh. Antonidae vander Linden

      [24]-592-[8] pages, dont le Lugduni Batavorum [Leyde], Apud Salomonem Wagenaer, 1665, in-12, [24]-592-[8] pages, dont le titre-frontispice, vélin rigide à petits recouvrements de l'époque, entièrement tacheté à l'encre brune, pièce de titre brune, Seconde édition, rare, du texte de Celsus procuré par Jan Antonides Van der Linden, après celle parue à Leyde chez Jean Elzevier en 1657. Guy Patin, à qui l'ouvrage est dédié, eut part à cette version en fournissant à Van der Linden des exemplaires corrigés des mains de Jean Fernel, Chapelain et autres savants. L'un des plus anciens documents médicaux en Occident, après ceux d'Hippocrate ; il faisait partie à l'origine d'un recueil encyclopédique, Artes, désormais perdu. Le manuscrit du De Medica fut quant à lui redécouvert à Milan en 1443. Il se divise en deux parties, l'une traitant des maladies pouvant être traitées par la diète et des régimes particuliers, la seconde de celles qui peuvent être guéries par les médicaments ou grâce à l'intervention chirurgicale ; dans la première se trouvent les premières occurrences de folie et de maladie cardiaque ; la seconde décrit quant à elle les premiers emplois de la ligature, comprend d'excellentes descriptions de la lithotomie et de l'herniotomie latérales et introduit la notion de chirurgie plastique. Cachet ex-libris ancien au dos du titre gravé. Wellcome II, 318. Krivatsy, n° 2334. Willems, n° 797 pour l'édition elzévirienne.

      [Bookseller: Librairie Alain Brieux]
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        Cheiroplotheke Seu D. Ioannis Sculteti, Physici & Chirurgi apud Vlmenses olim felicissimi Armamentarium Chirurgicum, XLIII Tabulis Aeri elegantissime incisis, nec ante hac visis, exornatum.

      Venetiis M.DC.LXV. Typis Combi & La Nou. Venice 1665 - Octavo; Additional engraved title page, [14], 317,[11]. 44 engraved plates, complete. Old binding of quarter vellum, "rustica" covers, ms lettering to spine, later endpapers. The engraved title page is slightly edge frayed, browned, and slightly loose, there is some browning to the preliminary leaves, some slight marginal staining in the early parts of the volume, some damp[ staining last few leaves, few plates with slight corner damp stain, but much of the text is clean. The binding is a little bit loose at the front gutter margin. Overall this is a good copy ofd a very scarce and important medical work. Johann Schultes (1595-1645) was a German surgeon and this work was first published in folio in 1655, and in ovtavo in 1650. An important work which contains a complete catalogue of surgical imstruments, It contains the first known depictions of several operations still performed today. COPAC lists only three copies of this imprint : BL/Wellcome/Manchester. Overall a Good copy. [Attributes: Soft Cover]

      [Bookseller: Neil Summersgill Ltd ABA,PBFA,ILAB.]
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        Proverbes en Rimes ou Rimes en Proverbes

      Gabriel Quinet, Paris 1665 - Early leather backed boards, worn at edges, hinges starting but still sound. Very clean internally, trimmed a little close touching letters on the fore edge in the preface. Scarce. Brunet III 921. De Guinzbourg's bookplate on endpaper from his proverb collection. Size: duodecimo (12mo). Quantity Available: 1. Shipped Weight: Under 1 kilo. Category: Language & Linguistics; Poetry. Inventory No: 045825. [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Pazzo Books (ABAA-ILAB)]
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        Homer a la Mode A Mock Poem Upon the First and Second Books of Homer's Iliads

      Oxford: Printed by H[enry].H[all]. for Ric. Davis, 1665. Second edition. [4], 120 pp., with half-title. Collation: A^4(-A4) B-H^8 I^4. 12mo. Contemporary blind-ruled sheep, rebacked, later spine label. Covers worn, text toned, a few manuscript computations in margins. Second edition. [4], 120 pp., with half-title. Collation: A^4(-A4) B-H^8 I^4. 12mo. The second reprint of 1665, following the first edition of 1664. Conforms to Madan III, no. 2719 (errata corrected, Preface line 5 ending "Latine Trasla-" etc.) save for the presence of the half-title, which Madan claims is not found in this printing. As the half-title A1 is conjugate with the errata leaf A4 it follows that the removal of the latter resulted in the loss of the former in most copies. This copy a rare example with the half-title preserved. Wing S2132; ESTC R183632; Madan III, 2719. Provenance: James Dalley (signature, 1777); Thomas Jolley (bookplate); David M. Franklin (signature, Edinburgh, 1861); Alexander Gardyne (ownership stamp on verso of title, 1883); Robert S Pirie (bookplate, purchased from Maggs, 1994)

      [Bookseller: James Cummins Bookseller]
 32.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  


        Neu-erfundenes Trenchir-Buch. Darinnen begrissen wie man die Trenchir-Kunst sichtbarlich erlernen die Speisen nach unterschiedene Hoffund Landarrh ordentlich uff Tafel setzen nach Kunst.

      1665 - Rarissime édition originale du traité sur l'art de trancher la viande.Exemplaire conservé dans son beau vélin ivoire de l'époque, condition très rare pour ce type d'ouvrage. Leipzig, 1665.In-8 oblong de (2) ff. y compris 1 frontispice, 83 pp., 7 planches dépliantes, 8 planches hors texte à pleine page, (1) f. entre les pp. 30 et 31, la p. 75 est sur double-page. Plein vélin ivoire, encadrement de filets à froid sur les plats, dos lisse, tranches bleues. Reliure de l'époque.194 x 160 mm. / Extremely rare first edition of the treatise on the art of slicing meat.Copy preserved in its beautiful contemporary ivory vellum, a very rare condition of this kind of work. Leipzig, 1665.Oblong 8vo [194 x 160 mm] of (2) ll. including 1 frontispiece, 83 pp., 7 folding plates 8 full page plates out of pagination, (1) l. between pp. 30 and 31, p. 75 is on double page. Full ivory vellum, blind-stamped fillet on the covers, flat spine, blue edges. Contemporary binding. [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Librairie Camille Sourget]
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        Della Geografia Trasportata Al Morale. All ... (Monsignore) Gio. Paolo Zaccaria (etc.)

      12. Vort., Titelbl., 16 nn. Bll., 476 S., mit e. Zierrahmen u. e. Vignette am Titelblatt, sowie Kopfleisten, Vignetten, Initialen u. Schlußvignetten. Biegsamer Pappband d. Zeit, mit verblasster alter Rückenbeschriftung, Einband in gutem Zustand, geringer Wurmfraß im hinteren Vorsatz. Buchblock knapp u. etwas schief beschnitten, vermutlich wegen fehlerhafter Bogenfaltung Textverlust auf S. 159. Mit e. alten handschriftlichen Jahreszahl (1665) am Vortitel, Buchstaben von alter Hand am vorderen Spiegel u. e. alten Beschriftung am unteren Schnitt. BN VIII,324. Vgl. DeBacker-S. I,975 (Ausg. Milano 1664). Diz. Encycl. d. lett. ital. I,274. BBKL 1,399 - B. (1608-1685), gilt als e. d. fruchtbarsten und auch literarisch bedeutsamsten jesuitischen Schriftsteller, e. Klassiker d. italienischen Prosa, der "si espresse in uno stilo fastoso e ridondante definito ... magnifico". Unter seinen zahlreichen Werken fanden seine geschichtlichen und biographischen Arbeiten besondere Beachtung.

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Löcker]
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        La Metamorphose des yeux de Philis, changez en astres. Pastoralle. Représentée par la Troupe Royale, Et mise au Theatre, par M. Boursault.

      1665 - Edition originale de la pièce la plus rare de Boursault. Exemplaire de dédicace relié en maroquin bordeaux de l'époque armorié. Paris, N. Pepingué, 1665.In-12 de (2) ff., (10) ff., 46 pp., (2) ff.bl. Annotations manuscrites sur la garde blanche. Relié en plein maroquin bordeaux, plats richement ornés d'un double encadrement de filets et d'une roulette dorés, grandes initiales « C » entrelacées et couronnées aux angles au sein d'un motif de palmes dorées, grandes armes frappées or au centre, dos à nerfs richement orné, coupes décorées. Reliure de l'époque. 146 x 82 mm. / First edition of Boursault's rarest play. Dedication copy bound in contemporary burgundy morocco with arms. Paris, N. Pepingué, 1665.12mo [146 x 82 mm] of (2) ll., (10) ll., 46pp., (2) bl.ll. Handwritten notes on the blank margin. Bound in full burgundy morocco, richly decorated covers with gilt double fillets and border, large ?C? initials interlaced and crowned on the corners within a gilt palm leaves pattern, large gilt coat of arms on the center, spine ribbed and richly decorated. Contemporary binding. [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Librairie Camille Sourget]
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        Homer a la Mode. A Mock Poem Upon the First and Second Books of Homer's Iliads

      Printed by H[enry].H[all]. for Ric. Davis, Oxford 1665 - Second edition. [4], 120 pp., with half-title. Collation: A^4(-A4) B-H^8 I^4. 12mo. The second reprint of 1665, following the first edition of 1664. Conforms to Madan III, no. 2719 (errata corrected, Preface line 5 ending "Latine Trasla-" etc.) save for the presence of the half-title, which Madan claims is not found in this printing. As the half-title A1 is conjugate with the errata leaf A4 it follows that the removal of the latter resulted in the loss of the former in most copies. This copy a rare example with the half-title preserved. Wing S2132; ESTC R183632; Madan III, 2719. Provenance: James Dalley (signature, 1777); Thomas Jolley (bookplate); David M. Franklin (signature, Edinburgh, 1861); Alexander Gardyne (ownership stamp on verso of title, 1883); Robert S Pirie (bookplate, purchased from Maggs, 1994) Contemporary blind-ruled sheep, rebacked, later spine label. Covers worn, text toned, a few manuscript computations in margins [4], 120 pp., with half-title. Collation: A^4(-A4) B-H^8 I^4. 12mo

      [Bookseller: James Cummins Bookseller, ABAA]
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        ALLE DE WERCKEN, Zoo Oude als Nieuwe van de Herr JACOB CATS ridder Oudt Raedt-pensionaris van HOLLANDT, e C.

      I. I. SCHIPPER, op de Keysers-gracht, AMSTERDAM 1665. Vol. in -8 grande (20 x 24,5 cm.), legatura ottocentesca mezza pelle marrone con angoli, piatti cartonati marmorizzati in tinta, titoli in oro entro riquadro marrone scuro al dorso, pp. (16), 120, (16), 2, 32, (4), 15, (9), 202, (8), 36, (8), 175, (13), 278, (8), 76, (2), 32, (6), 26, (6), 26, 9, (3), 82 con innumerevoli incisioni (circa 400) nel testo e a p.pagina. Condizioni generali buone, salvo il frontespizio principale e le prime 2-3 pag. che presentano strappetti riparati. OPERA RARA A TROVARSI COSI' COMPLETA. SECOLO XVII (seconda metà)

      [Bookseller: Bottigella - Stampe Antiche e Libri D'ar]
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        Via vitae aeternae iconibus illustrata per Boetium a Bolswert

      Apud Hieronymum et Ioan Bapt. Verduffen, 1665. Ledereinband Stark wurmstichige Ausgabe (stellenweise fehlen Buchstaben) , Deckel stark lagerspurig, Buchrücken mit einzelnen Anrissen (je ca. 2cm), Seiten altersgemäß angedunkelt und stellenweise stockfleckig/ angerissen im Einband, S. 353-368 lose, rotbrauner Farbschnitt, Schließbänder vorhanden und intakt Versand D: 2,90 EUR

      [Bookseller: Versand-Antiquariat Konrad von Agris]
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        Homer a la Mode. A Mock Poem Upon the First and Second Books of Homer's Iliads

      Oxford: Printed by H[enry].H[all]. for Ric. Davis, 1665. Second edition. [4], 120 pp., with half-title. Collation: A^4(-A4) B-H^8 I^4. 12mo. Contemporary blind-ruled sheep, rebacked, later spine label. Covers worn, text toned, a few manuscript computations in margins. Second edition. [4], 120 pp., with half-title. Collation: A^4(-A4) B-H^8 I^4. 12mo. The second reprint of 1665, following the first edition of 1664. Conforms to Madan III, no. 2719 (errata corrected, Preface line 5 ending "Latine Trasla-" etc.) save for the presence of the half-title, which Madan claims is not found in this printing. As the half-title A1 is conjugate with the errata leaf A4 it follows that the removal of the latter resulted in the loss of the former in most copies. This copy a rare example with the half-title preserved. Wing S2132; ESTC R183632; Madan III, 2719. Provenance: James Dalley (signature, 1777); Thomas Jolley (bookplate); David M. Franklin (signature, Edinburgh, 1861); Alexander Gardyne (ownership stamp on verso of title, 1883); Robert S Pirie (bookplate, purchased from Maggs, 1994)

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        Le Jardin du Comte d'Althann. Vue des treillages du Jardin de S(on) E(xcellence) le General Comte d'Althann en face. Schöne Ansicht der Gartenanlage des Palais Althan vom Palais aus. Altkoloriertes Guckkastenblatt um 1740

      Original-Kupferstich bei Daumont (in der Platte signiert) auf rückseitig unbedrucktem Büttenblatt mit dekorativ abgesetztem Plattenrand, Plattengröße ca. 23 x 39 cm, Passepartoutgröße 39 x 53 cm, von alter Hand koloriert, unter Passepatout montiert, geglättete Mittelfalz, sauber und sehr gut erhalten, von größter Seltenheit und für uns antiquarisch anderenorts nicht nachweisbar Graf Gundacker von Althan (1665-1747), kaiserlicher General, Hofkriegsrat, Diplomat und Hofbaudirektor, erwarb das Grundstück 1729, auf dem er ein Palais mit prächtigem Garten errichten ließ, das aber schon 1745 weiter verkauft wurde und schließlich in das Eigentum von Michael von Barich überging, nachdem auch die heutige Barichgasse benannt ist

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        Manuscript Vellum Documents - Manor Court Roll Housed in a Leather Cylindrical Clamshell Case - Land Owned by King Charles II

      Norfolk, 1665. Methwold in Norfolk, 1665-1674. Manuscript manor court roll from Methwold Manor, which was then being leased from King Charles II by John Berkeley, 1st Baron Berkeley of Stratton (1602-1678), tenant-in-chief (or vassal-in-chief) of Methwold Manor, and also founder and co-proprietor of what is now the state of New Jersey. These are the lordship's retained copies, comprising 12 manuscript documents written successively on 30 vellum leafs, each with text recto and verso, and each signed in the original by Thomam Thornley who played a principle role in the administrator of the manor. Text is primarily in Latin, though some documents contain some detail in both Latin and English. Documents are stitched together and rolled into a scroll, the outer document being a two piece vellum indenture for land and sheep, written entirely in English, The manor roll is housed in a leather cylindrical clamshell case measuring approximately 31 cm in height and 13 cm in diameter. Latin documents measure approximately 67 x 26 cm, some marginally larger. The outer two part document measures 102 x 30 cm, and forms the wrap to the lot, its end trimmed to a point (loss to text), where a string has been affixed to roll and tie the documents with. Some age-toning, indication of moisture to one document, otherwise in very good and original condition, beautifully preserved, complete, a fine example of exceedingly scarce early primary source manorial court roll documents. Recorded in the annals of Norfolk, and corroborated by these seventeenth century manuscript documents, John Berkeley, 1st Baron of Stratton (1602-1678), held Methwold Manor by lease from the Crown, specifically his friend Charles II. He most likely acquired the land between 1650 and 1650. Lord Berkley of Stratton was closely associated in politics and colonial affairs, with both King Charles II and James II of England, and thus became one of the two founders of the Province of New Jersey - the British colony in North America, being co-proprietor of New Jersey from 1664 to 1674. He was also one of the eight Lords Proprietors to be granted control of the Province of Carolina. Interesting to note, the manor court roll documents coincide with the period that Lord Berkeley co-owned New Jersey, an appointment which consumed much of his time. The documents are all signed by a Thomam Thornley, most likely Berkeley's steward, hired to manage his holdings in Methwold for the time. The Baron died in 1678, only four years after the last document here was made, the rights to Methwold Manor, which was leased from King Charles II, then bequeathed to Baron Berkeley's widow Christiana. Upon the king's death in 1685, the king's widow Catherine, Queen Dowager, gained the title to the land. Subsequently, in 1687, she made a new lease for Methwold Manor with Christiana, effectively creating a most unusual circumstance for the period, a land indenture between two widows. Christina evidently granted all rights and obligations associated with the manor to her sons, firstly Charles Berkeley, 2nd Baron of Stratton, then John Berkeley, 3rd Baron of Stratton. It is John Berkeley's (junior) will that reveals the latter history of Methwold manor and that confirms its connection to the founder of New Jersey. [In this period, a 'manor' was a tract of land granted by royal charter, being a feudal ownership of the land with rights of inheritance.] The National Archives, Kew, holds a document from 1671 pertaining to Methwold Manor and others in the region, otherwise any record of it, from this period, is scarce. Neither the Norfolk Parish Registers, nor the Norfolk Archdeacon's Transcripts, nor the Norfolk Bishop's Transcripts, (three separate indexes to baptisms, marriages and burials), have information prior to 1725 for Methwold. Several names are listed in these documents, making this an excellent primary source for the manor. This is an original court roll for the Manor of Methwold in the county of Norfolk, the Lord of the Manor being John Berkeley, Lord Proprietor of the American colony of Carolina, and founder and proprietor of New Jersey. Comprising significant manorial documents made in a neat seventeenth century hand, preserved here is an entire decade's transactions. Being in the good graces of King Charles II, Lord Berkeley was not only the recipient of two very desirable tracts of land in America, he was also granted a lease for the Manor of Methwold, a region and village of special interest to Charles II for its delectable muel rabbits. He also held other feudal lands in the Kingdom of England. At Methwold Manor, Lord Berkeley demanded a manorial court be held annually, to deal with matters of land tenure, administration of the manor, and tenant agreements. Typically, the lord or his steward presided over the court session, whilst the parish clerk would write the record on the manorial rolls, suggesting that Lord Berkeley himself may have been physically present for some of these proceedings, in the final few years of his life. The activities of a manorial court sessions, were kept in a court roll, also called a manorial roll. The records contained entries relating to the rents and holdings, deaths, alienations, and successions of the customary tenants or copyholders. As seen here, entries usually began with the date of the proceeding and an introduction to the Lord of the Manor, followed by a list of jurors selected from the manor, apologies and/or fines for those manorial tenants unable to attend the court. General matters such as a failure to maintain highways or gates are followed by specific items such as the death and inheritance of a tenant since the last court, and any surrenders of land, forfeits, or licences to let. Where land changed hands between customary tenants, a copy of the relevant entry in the court roll constituted the tenant's title to his holding, and this form of land tenure therefore became known as copyhold. In this particular manorial court roll, Baron John Berkeley of Stratton is named as Lord of the Manor in the documents made from 1665 to 1668, the year of his death. Thomam Thornley is also named in the introductions, and his signature is seen on all of the documents, suggesting that he was Berkeley's right hand man, his steward, as opposed to simply a parish clerk. The 1669 document no longer names Berkeley, although it is still Thomam Thornley who is managing the affairs of the manor on behalf of the Berkeley family. In 1673 Adm [Admiral] John Berkeley is named, being the second son of the aforementioned John Berkeley, and the 3rd Baron of Stratton after succeeding his late elder brother. Following the introductory statement is the list of jurors, whom are also tenants of Methwold Manor. Several of the present documents also conclude with a 'constabular jurat' which names the parties who had a judicial function and who were sworn to oath for the proceeding. Matters recorded here concern the tenants' permissible usage of the land, and some very specific and peculiar restrictions in keeping with ancient tradition as well as practical guidelines. Following the general rules and regulations, personal tenancy matters are described and resolved on an individual basis for specific parties. The outer document of the roll is a two piece vellum indenture, unique to the others, written entirely in English and pertaining to a land lease and mentioning Methwold's famous sheep. The name Robert Walpole appears in this document, perhaps Whig politician Colonel Robert Walpole (1650-1700) whose father ardently supported Charles II, or his son Sir Robert Walpole, 1st Earl of Orford, the British statesman who is generally regarded as the de facto first Prime Minister of Great Britain. Excerpts from the earliest manuscript (This document is mostly in Latin, with some clauses in English): [Methwold, 1665] "Methwold de Lantastr... nobilis Jonis Ini Berkeley Baron de Stratton... tent i manio... sextimo annoq uni millimo sextentimo sexagosimo-quinto... & Thomam Thornley." "Jurat.... Abraham Younge... Abraham Russell... Thomas Goodridge... Joheb Sutter... Thomas Johnson... Johnathon Arowsmith... Joheb Wright... Thomas Paine." "We agree that... three shilling favour... to the Lord of the Manor. " "... no dirtt shall be digged in any [xx] of the common, but in the plaine plate... And that any man shall digg but sixe thousand for his tenement... If any shall offend in this he shall forfeit tenne shillings to the [vassal?] aforesaid, And the dirtt shall be digged according to the old agreement." "... no flaggs shall be digged at any [gate?] on the common... but from the tenth daie of May untill the tenth daie of June... if any man shall digge any after... it shall be lawful for the [xxx] to dispose of them." "... no hoggs shall be fixt upon the comon [xx], and that it shall be lawful for the [xx] to impound them..." End excerpts. [Items of peripheral interest: Abraham Younge, mentioned above, made and signed a petition for Methwold, against the river drainage taking place, specifically a dam which was erected, mentioning that some 1700 sheep and 300-400 beeves had been fed on the land previously.] During the medieval era, village stewards represented the lord, effectively controlling the town or city. Although stewards were essentially servants, they wielded a great deal of power. In villages, stewards might be called upon for judicial matters. In the lord's absence, the steward was in charge, which emphasizes their role as trustworthy and loyal servants who acted in the best interests of their masters. Various duties were imposed in a feudal system, such obligations owed by a vassal to his lord can be categorised into four types: military (auxilium), court duties (consilium), special taxes (aids) and incidents. Court duties encompassed everything from guarding grounds or castles, rendering advice in council, providing squires, and even in some cases providing de facto hostages. Lord Berkeley's manor court roll is a superb and important primary source record of feudal manorialism. These vellum leafs reveal specific interests and values of English nobles and royals, as well as the conditions and constraints under which peasants lived. In addition, they illustrate the court duties (consilium) which were often entrusted and assigned to a village steward or vassal, one who was most trusted and favoured by the Lord of the Manor. Methwold ("Middle forest") is a civil parish in the English county of Norfolk. Situated in the Hundred of Grimeshou, when in 1399 King Henry IV of England claimed the throne, Methwold was vested to the Crown. As the 2nd Duke of Lancaster, and having ultimately acquired the land from his father, Methwold was from then on to be held by the succeeding kings or queens, as Dukes of Lancaster (currently Queen Elizabeth II). Methwold became famous for its abundance and excellence of its rabbits which were sold by poulterers as "Muel Rabbits". King Charles II was so very pleased with a meal of muel rabbits from his own manor, that was reputed to have subsequently granted the village a charter for a market to be held on Tuesdays, as well as exemption from road and bridge tolls. Also satisfying his love of gambling sports, there he also viewed a cock-fight, which was popular in the district. Maps from the 16th century show a huge warren of 1500 acres on the sandy soil to the south east of the village. The settlement had become a Market town but the parish lands had changed again in the 1630s as a result of Vermuyden's comprehensive plan for draining the many thousands of acres of fen. As a result, large new allotments (severals') were granted to the Crown and to private individuals from the former common fens. Following the English Civil Wars further cuts were made (including the New Bedford River) and large blocks of fenland were allocated to investors. Some traces of the ownership at that time can still be seen in names such as Kings Lynn and Queen's Ground in Methwold, tracts of land which are believed to have been claimed from the drainage which was approved by Charles I and then granted to his friends and associates. During the reign of Charles II, at the time of these documents, Methwold was transitioning from a Tudor society dominated by nobility, gentry and merchants, to a region of small farming and smaller tenantry. Modest homes of wooden frames filled with chalk and mortar began to dot the countryside. The parish is large, some 4900 hectares (12108 acres) in area, and encompasses the village of Methwold, and hamlets of Methwold Hythe to the west. The village of Methwold was once substantial and notable. Today it retains some of the buildings from its greatest eras, including St. George's Church, the Old Vicarage which dates from the 15th century. John Berkeley (1602-1678), first Baron Berkeley of Stratton, Co-Founder and Proprietor of New Jersey, and Lord Proprietor of [North] Carolina, was closely associated with James, Duke of York (later King), as well as his brother King Charles II of England, through which gained great political advancement, prominence, and fortune. He is connected to the colonial history of the United States of America as well as the historical monarchy of Great Britain. Some of his notable appointments include: Member of Parliament for Heytesbury in 1640; Royalist Commissary-General under Sir Ralph Hopton during the English Civil War; Controller of the Duke of York's household in 1652; Commissioner of the Navy 1660-1664; Governor of Galway, Ireland in 1661-1664; Lord-President of Connaught between 1662 and 1666; Privy Counsellor in 1663; Chief Commissioner for executing the office of Master General of the Ordnance from 1665 to 1670, and Ambassador to France from 1675 to 1676. In 1670 he went to Ireland as Lord Lieutenant, holding that office for two years. He was raised to peerage and created 1st Baron Berkeley of Stratton, Cornwall [England] on 19 May 1658, during King Charles II's exile in Brussels. Upon Berkeley's return from his three-year tenure as the Lord-Lieutenant of Ireland, in 1665 he began building Berkeley House, a palace near Piccadilly, which would finally be completed in 1673. In 1668 Berkeley bought Twickenham Park, where he and his family would be buried. A skillful politician, John Berkeley was president of the important Council for Foreign Plantations, making many decisions affecting British possessions in America. From 1663 until his death, he was one of the eight Lords Proprietors of the colony of Carolina. On 24 March 1663, King Charles II signed the first Charter for the colony known as the Province of Carolina, granting liberal authority over a gigantic tract of land in the New World to eight of his strongest supporters in his restoration to the Crown after the English Civil War, naming them Lords Proprietors. A subsequent charter was made in 1665. He was also co-proprietor of New Jersey from 1664 to 1674. In 1665, Berkeley and Sir George Carteret drafted the Concession and Agreement, a proclamation for the structure of the government for the Province of New Jersey. The document also provided freedom of religion in the colony. Berkeley sold his share of New Jersey in 1674 to a group of Quakers because of the political difficulties between New York Governor Richard Nicolls, Carteret, and himself. This effectively split New Jersey into two colonies: East Jersey, belonging to Carteret, and West Jersey. The division remained until 1702 when West Jersey went bankrupt, at which time the Crown then took back and subsequently re-unified the colony. Upon his death in 1678, his share of Carolina was sold to John Archdale, who became governor of Carolina from 1694 to 1696. [Of peripheral interest: Sir William Berkeley (1605-1677), brother of John Berkeley, was Governor of Virginia from 1640-1652 and 1660-1675.] John Berkeley, 1st Baron Berkeley of Stratton, (1602- 1678) was baptized at Hanworth, London, England. He was the son of Sir Maurice Berkeley and Elizabeth Killigrew. Circa 1661-62 he married Christiana Riccard (1639-1698) née Riccard, the only daughter of a wealthy London alderman and MP, and merchant of East India Company, Sir Andrew Riccard. They lived in the Berkeley House in London for a number of years, and had three children, as follows: ? Honorable Charles Berkeley, 2nd Baron Berkeley of Stratton (1662-1681), Captain of a man-of-war HMS Tiger ? Admiral John Berkeley, 3rd Baron Berkeley of Stratton (1663-1697), an English admiral who participated in the Nine Years' War ? William Berkeley, 4th Baron Berkeley of Stratton (died 24 March 1741), a politician and judge, Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster 1710-1714, First Lord of Trade from 1714-1715 ? Anne Berkeley, their only daughter The final will and testament of his second son, Admiral John Berkeley (1663-1697), reveals the history of inheritance, as far as the rights to Methwold Manor is concerned. It also confirms that the lessor was King Charles II. The will was made on 25 April 1696, and was proved on 15 April 1697 by his younger brother William. At the time of his will being proved, his mother Christiana, Lady Berkeley, was the lease holder. Catherine of Braganza, Queen of England, Scotland and Ireland, widow of King Charles II, was the lessor, who inherited the leasehold title upon his death. The following is a transcript of the will, as published in "Miscellanea Genealogica et Heraldica": Volume V, London 1894. John, Lord Berkeley, 3rd Baron of Stratton, co. Cornwall. Will dated 25 Apr. 1696; codicil; proved 15 Apr. 1697 by his brother Wm, Lord Berkeley of Stratton. "To be buried in the Vault at Twittenham with my father & brother. All my Manors, lands, etc. (except hereinafter mentioned), to my sons (if any) in succession, & their heirs, remr in default to my brother Wm Berkeley & his heirs, remr to my sister Dame Anne Cullum & her heirs, remr to Mr John Berkeley of Stoke & his heirs, remr to my right heirs. My Manor & Lordship of Methwold, co. Norfolk, & other lands, etc., named in an Indenture of Lease dat. 1 July 1687, between H.M. Katherine, Queen Dowager, & her Trustees of 1 part, & my mother Christian, Lady Berkeley, of the other part, after the decease of my sd mother, to such eldest son as I shall have on the body of my wife, remr in default to my brother Wm Berkeley. By Ind're 24 Mar. 1691, between me & my wife Jane, Lady Berkeley, & my brother Wm Berkeley of 1 part, Wm Longueville & Martin Folkes, esq", of the 2nd part, & Sir Wm Temple, Bart., Sir John Temple, Knt., & Henry Temple, Esqr, of the 3d part, certain lands, etc., for 100 years in trust to raise portions for such children as I might have, & whereas I have an only da. Mary Berkeley, but my wife may be now enceinte, but should I have no son, or other da", then my da. Mary to have certain provisions under the said Trust. To my wife £200 yearly by Warrant under H.M. Privy Seal, until the sum of £2000 is paid, & all my goods & household stuff, & also the goods I lately gave my mother to go to my wife at my mother's decease. My brother Wm Berkeley, Sir John Hawles, & Tho" Mawle, to be Ex'ors, & they, with Sir John Temple, to be guardians of my sd da. during minority." Berkeley. Feudalism as practiced in the Kingdom of England was a state of human society which was formally structured and stratified on the basis of land tenure and the varieties thereof. Society was thus ordered around relationships derived from the holding of land, which landholdings are termed "fiefdoms, fiefs, or fees". These political and military customs existed in medieval Europe, having developed around 700 A.D., flourished up to about the first quarter of the 14th century, and declined until their legal abolition in England with the Tenures Abolition Act 1660. Under the English feudal system, the person of the king was the only absolute "owner" of land. All nobles, knights and other tenants, termed vassals, merely "held" land from the king, who was thus at the top of the "feudal pyramid". When feudal land grants were of indefinite or indeterminate duration, such grants were deemed freehold, while fixed term and non-hereditable grants were deemed non-freehold. However, even freehold fiefs were not unconditionally heritable--before inheriting, the heir had to pay a suitable feudal relief. . Very Good.

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        Gesamtansicht

      Kupferstich, (um 1665), 52 cm x 22,5 cm, unter Glas gerahmt (71,5 cm x 44 cm) (im rechten Teil etwas gebräunt, sonst sauberes Blatt)

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        Manor Court Roll of Lands Leased from King Charles II By John Berkeley, Baron of Stratton - Text Primarily in Latin

      Methwold in Norfolk, 1665-1674. Manuscript manor court roll from Methwold Manor, which was then being leased from King Charles II by John Berkeley, 1st Baron Berkeley of Stratton (1602-1678), tenant-in-chief (or vassal-in-chief) of Methwold Manor, and also founder and co-proprietor of what is now the state of New Jersey. These are the lordship's retained copies, comprising 12 manuscript documents written successively on 30 vellum leafs, each with text recto and verso, and each signed in the original by Thomam Thornley who played a principle role in the administrator of the manor. Text is primarily in Latin, though some documents contain some detail in both Latin and English. Documents are stitched together and rolled into a scroll, the outer document being a two piece vellum indenture for land and sheep, written entirely in English, The manor roll is housed in a leather cylindrical clamshell case measuring approximately 31 cm in height and 13 cm in diameter. Latin documents measure approximately 67 x 26 cm, some marginally larger. The outer two part document measures 102 x 30 cm, and forms the wrap to the lot, its end trimmed to a point (loss to text), where a string has been affixed to roll and tie the documents with. A fine example of exceedingly scarce early primary source manorial court roll documents. Recorded in the annals of Norfolk, and corroborated by these seventeenth century manuscript documents, John Berkeley, 1st Baron of Stratton (1602-1678), held Methwold Manor by lease from the Crown, specifically his friend Charles II. He most likely acquired the land between 1650 and 1650. Lord Berkley of Stratton was closely associated in politics and colonial affairs, with both King Charles II and James II of England, and thus became one of the two founders of the Province of New Jersey - the British colony in North America, being co-proprietor of New Jersey from 1664 to 1674. He was also one of the eight Lords Proprietors to be granted control of the Province of Carolina. Interesting to note, the manor court roll documents coincide with the period that Lord Berkeley co-owned New Jersey, an appointment which consumed much of his time. The documents are all signed by a Thomam Thornley, most likely Berkeley's steward, hired to manage his holdings in Methwold for the time. The Baron died in 1678, only four years after the last document here was made, the rights to Methwold Manor, which was leased from King Charles II, then bequeathed to Baron Berkeley's widow Christiana. Upon the king's death in 1685, the king's widow Catherine, Queen Dowager, gained the title to the land. Subsequently, in 1687, she made a new lease for Methwold Manor with Christiana, effectively creating a most unusual circumstance for the period, a land indenture between two widows. Christina evidently granted all rights and obligations associated with the manor to her sons, firstly Charles Berkeley, 2nd Baron of Stratton, then John Berkeley, 3rd Baron of Stratton. It is John Berkeley's (junior) will that reveals the latter history of Methwold manor and that confirms its connection to the founder of New Jersey. [In this period, a 'manor' was a tract of land granted by royal charter, being a feudal ownership of the land with rights of inheritance.] The National Archives, Kew, holds a document from 1671 pertaining to Methwold Manor and others in the region, otherwise any record of it, from this period, is scarce. Neither the Norfolk Parish Registers, nor the Norfolk Archdeacon's Transcripts, nor the Norfolk Bishop's Transcripts, (three separate indexes to baptisms, marriages and burials), have information prior to 1725 for Methwold. Several names are listed in these documents, making this an excellent primary source for the manor. This is an original court roll for the Manor of Methwold in the county of Norfolk, the Lord of the Manor being John Berkeley, Lord Proprietor of the American colony of Carolina, and founder and proprietor of New Jersey. Comprising significant manorial documents made in a neat seventeenth century hand, preserved here is an entire decade's transactions. Being in the good graces of King Charles II, Lord Berkeley was not only the recipient of two very desirable tracts of land in America, he was also granted a lease for the Manor of Methwold, a region and village of special interest to Charles II for its delectable muel rabbits. He also held other feudal lands in the Kingdom of England. At Methwold Manor, Lord Berkeley demanded a manorial court be held annually, to deal with matters of land tenure, administration of the manor, and tenant agreements. Typically, the lord or his steward presided over the court session, whilst the parish clerk would write the record on the manorial rolls, suggesting that Lord Berkeley himself may have been physically present for some of these proceedings, in the final few years of his life. The activities of a manorial court sessions, were kept in a court roll, also called a manorial roll. The records contained entries relating to the rents and holdings, deaths, alienations, and successions of the customary tenants or copyholders. As seen here, entries usually began with the date of the proceeding and an introduction to the Lord of the Manor, followed by a list of jurors selected from the manor, apologies and/or fines for those manorial tenants unable to attend the court. General matters such as a failure to maintain highways or gates are followed by specific items such as the death and inheritance of a tenant since the last court, and any surrenders of land, forfeits, or licences to let. Where land changed hands between customary tenants, a copy of the relevant entry in the court roll constituted the tenant's title to his holding, and this form of land tenure therefore became known as copyhold. In this particular manorial court roll, Baron John Berkeley of Stratton is named as Lord of the Manor in the documents made from 1665 to 1668, the year of his death. Thomam Thornley is also named in the introductions, and his signature is seen on all of the documents, suggesting that he was Berkeley's right hand man, his steward, as opposed to simply a parish clerk. The 1669 document no longer names Berkeley, although it is still Thomam Thornley who is managing the affairs of the manor on behalf of the Berkeley family. In 1673 Adm [Admiral] John Berkeley is named, being the second son of the aforementioned John Berkeley, and the 3rd Baron of Stratton after succeeding his late elder brother. Following the introductory statement is the list of jurors, whom are also tenants of Methwold Manor. Several of the present documents also conclude with a 'constabular jurat' which names the parties who had a judicial function and who were sworn to oath for the proceeding. Matters recorded here concern the tenants' permissible usage of the land, and some very specific and peculiar restrictions in keeping with ancient tradition as well as practical guidelines. Following the general rules and regulations, personal tenancy matters are described and resolved on an individual basis for specific parties. The outer document of the roll is a two piece vellum indenture, unique to the others, written entirely in English and pertaining to a land lease and mentioning Methwold's famous sheep. The name Robert Walpole appears in this document, perhaps Whig politician Colonel Robert Walpole (1650-1700) whose father ardently supported Charles II, or his son Sir Robert Walpole, 1st Earl of Orford, the British statesman who is generally regarded as the de facto first Prime Minister of Great Britain. Excerpts from the earliest manuscript (This document is mostly in Latin, with some clauses in English): [Methwold, 1665] "Methwold de Lantastr... nobilis Jonis Ini Berkeley Baron de Stratton... tent i manio... sextimo annoq uni millimo sextentimo sexagosimo-quinto... & Thomam Thornley." "Jurat.... Abraham Younge... Abraham Russell... Thomas Goodridge... Joheb Sutter... Thomas Johnson... Johnathon Arowsmith... Joheb Wright... Thomas Paine." "We agree that... three shilling favour... to the Lord of the Manor. " "... no dirtt shall be digged in any [xx] of the common, but in the plaine plate... And that any man shall digg but sixe thousand for his tenement... If any shall offend in this he shall forfeit tenne shillings to the [vassal?] aforesaid, And the dirtt shall be digged according to the old agreement." "... no flaggs shall be digged at any [gate?] on the common... but from the tenth daie of May untill the tenth daie of June... if any man shall digge any after... it shall be lawful for the [xxx] to dispose of them." "... no hoggs shall be fixt upon the comon [xx], and that it shall be lawful for the [xx] to impound them..." End excerpts. [Items of peripheral interest: Abraham Younge, mentioned above, made and signed a petition for Methwold, against the river drainage taking place, specifically a dam which was erected, mentioning that some 1700 sheep and 300-400 beeves had been fed on the land previously.] During the medieval era, village stewards represented the lord, effectively controlling the town or city. Although stewards were essentially servants, they wielded a great deal of power. In villages, stewards might be called upon for judicial matters. In the lord's absence, the steward was in charge, which emphasizes their role as trustworthy and loyal servants who acted in the best interests of their masters. Various duties were imposed in a feudal system, such obligations owed by a vassal to his lord can be categorised into four types: military (auxilium), court duties (consilium), special taxes (aids) and incidents. Court duties encompassed everything from guarding grounds or castles, rendering advice in council, providing squires, and even in some cases providing de facto hostages. Lord Berkeley's manor court roll is a superb and important primary source record of feudal manorialism. These vellum leafs reveal specific interests and values of English nobles and royals, as well as the conditions and constraints under which peasants lived. In addition, they illustrate the court duties (consilium) which were often entrusted and assigned to a village steward or vassal, one who was most trusted and favoured by the Lord of the Manor. Methwold ("Middle forest") is a civil parish in the English county of Norfolk. Situated in the Hundred of Grimeshou, when in 1399 King Henry IV of England claimed the throne, Methwold was vested to the Crown. As the 2nd Duke of Lancaster, and having ultimately acquired the land from his father, Methwold was from then on to be held by the succeeding kings or queens, as Dukes of Lancaster (currently Queen Elizabeth II). Methwold became famous for its abundance and excellence of its rabbits which were sold by poulterers as "Muel Rabbits". King Charles II was so very pleased with a meal of muel rabbits from his own manor, that was reputed to have subsequently granted the village a charter for a market to be held on Tuesdays, as well as exemption from road and bridge tolls. Also satisfying his love of gambling sports, there he also viewed a cock-fight, which was popular in the district. Maps from the 16th century show a huge warren of 1500 acres on the sandy soil to the south east of the village. The settlement had become a Market town but the parish lands had changed again in the 1630s as a result of Vermuyden's comprehensive plan for draining the many thousands of acres of fen. As a result, large new allotments (severals') were granted to the Crown and to private individuals from the former common fens. Following the English Civil Wars further cuts were made (including the New Bedford River) and large blocks of fenland were allocated to investors. Some traces of the ownership at that time can still be seen in names such as Kings Lynn and Queen's Ground in Methwold, tracts of land which are believed to have been claimed from the drainage which was approved by Charles I and then granted to his friends and associates. During the reign of Charles II, at the time of these documents, Methwold was transitioning from a Tudor society dominated by nobility, gentry and merchants, to a region of small farming and smaller tenantry. Modest homes of wooden frames filled with chalk and mortar began to dot the countryside. The parish is large, some 4900 hectares (12108 acres) in area, and encompasses the village of Methwold, and hamlets of Methwold Hythe to the west. The village of Methwold was once substantial and notable. Today it retains some of the buildings from its greatest eras, including St. George's Church, the Old Vicarage which dates from the 15th century. John Berkeley (1602-1678), first Baron Berkeley of Stratton, Co-Founder and Proprietor of New Jersey, and Lord Proprietor of [North] Carolina, was closely associated with James, Duke of York (later King), as well as his brother King Charles II of England, through which gained great political advancement, prominence, and fortune. He is connected to the colonial history of the United States of America as well as the historical monarchy of Great Britain. Some of his notable appointments include: Member of Parliament for Heytesbury in 1640; Royalist Commissary-General under Sir Ralph Hopton during the English Civil War; Controller of the Duke of York's household in 1652; Commissioner of the Navy 1660-1664; Governor of Galway, Ireland in 1661-1664; Lord-President of Connaught between 1662 and 1666; Privy Counsellor in 1663; Chief Commissioner for executing the office of Master General of the Ordnance from 1665 to 1670, and Ambassador to France from 1675 to 1676. In 1670 he went to Ireland as Lord Lieutenant, holding that office for two years. He was raised to peerage and created 1st Baron Berkeley of Stratton, Cornwall [England] on 19 May 1658, during King Charles II's exile in Brussels. Upon Berkeley's return from his three-year tenure as the Lord-Lieutenant of Ireland, in 1665 he began building Berkeley House, a palace near Piccadilly, which would finally be completed in 1673. In 1668 Berkeley bought Twickenham Park, where he and his family would be buried. A skillful politician, John Berkeley was president of the important Council for Foreign Plantations, making many decisions affecting British possessions in America. From 1663 until his death, he was one of the eight Lords Proprietors of the colony of Carolina. On 24 March 1663, King Charles II signed the first Charter for the colony known as the Province of Carolina, granting liberal authority over a gigantic tract of land in the New World to eight of his strongest supporters in his restoration to the Crown after the English Civil War, naming them Lords Proprietors. A subsequent charter was made in 1665. He was also co-proprietor of New Jersey from 1664 to 1674. In 1665, Berkeley and Sir George Carteret drafted the Concession and Agreement, a proclamation for the structure of the government for the Province of New Jersey. The document also provided freedom of religion in the colony. Berkeley sold his share of New Jersey in 1674 to a group of Quakers because of the political difficulties between New York Governor Richard Nicolls, Carteret, and himself. This effectively split New Jersey into two colonies: East Jersey, belonging to Carteret, and West Jersey. The division remained until 1702 when West Jersey went bankrupt, at which time the Crown then took back and subsequently re-unified the colony. Upon his death in 1678, his share of Carolina was sold to John Archdale, who became governor of Carolina from 1694 to 1696. [Of peripheral interest: Sir William Berkeley (1605-1677), brother of John Berkeley, was Governor of Virginia from 1640-1652 and 1660-1675.] John Berkeley, 1st Baron Berkeley of Stratton, (1602- 1678) was baptized at Hanworth, London, England. He was the son of Sir Maurice Berkeley and Elizabeth Killigrew. Circa 1661-62 he married Christiana Riccard (1639-1698) née Riccard, the only daughter of a wealthy London alderman and MP, and merchant of East India Company, Sir Andrew Riccard. They lived in the Berkeley House in London for a number of years, and had three children, as follows: •Honorable Charles Berkeley, 2nd Baron Berkeley of Stratton (1662-1681), Captain of a man-of-war HMS Tiger •Admiral John Berkeley, 3rd Baron Berkeley of Stratton (1663-1697), an English admiral who participated in the Nine Years' War •William Berkeley, 4th Baron Berkeley of Stratton (died 24 March 1741), a politician and judge, Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster 1710-1714, First Lord of Trade from 1714-1715 •Anne Berkeley, their only daughter The final will and testament of his second son, Admiral John Berkeley (1663-1697), reveals the history of inheritance, as far as the rights to Methwold Manor is concerned. It also confirms that the lessor was King Charles II. The will was made on 25 April 1696, and was proved on 15 April 1697 by his younger brother William. At the time of his will being proved, his mother Christiana, Lady Berkeley, was the lease holder. Catherine of Braganza, Queen of England, Scotland and Ireland, widow of King Charles II, was the lessor, who inherited the leasehold title upon his death. The following is a transcript of the will, as published in "Miscellanea Genealogica et Heraldica": Volume V, London 1894. John, Lord Berkeley, 3rd Baron of Stratton, co. Cornwall. Will dated 25 Apr. 1696; codicil; proved 15 Apr. 1697 by his brother Wm, Lord Berkeley of Stratton. "To be buried in the Vault at Twittenham with my father & brother. All my Manors, lands, etc. (except hereinafter mentioned), to my sons (if any) in succession, & their heirs, remr in default to my brother Wm Berkeley & his heirs, remr to my sister Dame Anne Cullum & her heirs, remr to Mr John Berkeley of Stoke & his heirs, remr to my right heirs. My Manor & Lordship of Methwold, co. Norfolk, & other lands, etc., named in an Indenture of Lease dat. 1 July 1687, between H.M. Katherine, Queen Dowager, & her Trustees of 1 part, & my mother Christian, Lady Berkeley, of the other part, after the decease of my sd mother, to such eldest son as I shall have on the body of my wife, remr in default to my brother Wm Berkeley. By Ind're 24 Mar. 1691, between me & my wife Jane, Lady Berkeley, & my brother Wm Berkeley of 1 part, Wm Longueville & Martin Folkes, esq", of the 2nd part, & Sir Wm Temple, Bart., Sir John Temple, Knt., & Henry Temple, Esqr, of the 3d part, certain lands, etc., for 100 years in trust to raise portions for such children as I might have, & whereas I have an only da. Mary Berkeley, but my wife may be now enceinte, but should I have no son, or other da", then my da. Mary to have certain provisions under the said Trust. To my wife £200 yearly by Warrant under H.M. Privy Seal, until the sum of £2000 is paid, & all my goods & household stuff, & also the goods I lately gave my mother to go to my wife at my mother's decease. My brother Wm Berkeley, Sir John Hawles, & Tho" Mawle, to be Ex'ors, & they, with Sir John Temple, to be guardians of my sd da. during minority." Berkeley. Feudalism as practiced in the Kingdom of England was a state of human society which was formally structured and stratified on the basis of land tenure and the varieties thereof. Society was thus ordered around relationships derived from the holding of land, which landholdings are termed "fiefdoms, fiefs, or fees". These political and military customs existed in medieval Europe, having developed around 700 A.D., flourished up to about the first quarter of the 14th century, and declined until their legal abolition in England with the Tenures Abolition Act 1660. Under the English feudal system, the person of the king was the only absolute "owner" of land. All nobles, knights and other tenants, termed vassals, merely "held" land from the king, who was thus at the top of the "feudal pyramid". When feudal land grants were of indefinite or indeterminate duration, such grants were deemed freehold, while fixed term and non-hereditable grants were deemed non-freehold. However, even freehold fiefs were not unconditionally heritable--before inheriting, the heir had to pay a suitable feudal relief.

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        Oath taken by the Knights of Bath

      , 1665. 1665. Manuscript in ink. Laid down onto a sheet of card, old folds, insect damage, text largely unaffected. Good. Manuscript in ink. The oath is actually a modified version of that taken by Roman soldiers in the time of Ceasars, binding themselves to love their sovereign above all earthly creatures, and for his rights and dignities to be ready to die at any time.The five signatories here are: Algernon Percy, 10th Earl of Northumberland; Edward Montagu, 2nd Earl of Manchester; James Butler, 1st Duke of Ormonde; Montague Bertie, Earl of Lindsey; and James Howard, 3rd Earl of Suffolke. J.E. Tyler "Oaths, their Origin, Nature and History" in The Monthly Review, vol.1, 1834, p401

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        Kynalopekomachia. Der Hunde Fuchsenstreit. Lübeck, v. Rohdensche Buchhandlung, 1835. 1 w. Bl., Vortitel, Titel, 150 S., 2 w. Bll. Mit sechs Radierungen von Otto Speckter auf aufgewalztem China. Spät. Hldr. m. RVerg. u. marmor. Deckeln (Vorsatz mit Stempelsignatur 'Devauchelle').

      Rümann 2494 Seebaß 1665 Ehmke-H. 10.- Erste Ausgabe.- LKJ III, 441: 'Speckters Tierliebe und die Genauigkeit im Erfassen der Kreatur zeigten sich vor allem in den Radierungen zur 'Kynalopekomachia' des Freiherrn von Rumohr, seines Gönners von Jugend auf ...' - Dezenter Namenseintrag 'Weymann' (?) auf Vortitel.- Schönes, frisches, breitrandiges Exemplar in einem schön gearbeiteten Einband aus der Werkstatt des Pariser Buchbinders Devauchelle.

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        De Medicina Libri Octo, ex recognitione Joh. Antonidae vander Linden

      1665 - [24]-592-[8] pages, dont le Lugduni Batavorum [Leyde], Apud Salomonem Wagenaer, 1665, in-12, [24]-592-[8] pages, dont le titre-frontispice, vélin rigide à petits recouvrements de l'époque, entièrement tacheté à l'encre brune, pièce de titre brune, Seconde édition, rare, du texte de Celsus procuré par Jan Antonides Van der Linden, après celle parue à Leyde chez Jean Elzevier en 1657. Guy Patin, à qui l'ouvrage est dédié, eut part à cette version en fournissant à Van der Linden des exemplaires corrigés des mains de Jean Fernel, Chapelain et autres savants. L'un des plus anciens documents médicaux en Occident, après ceux d'Hippocrate ; il faisait partie à l'origine d'un recueil encyclopédique, Artes, désormais perdu. Le manuscrit du De Medica fut quant à lui redécouvert à Milan en 1443. Il se divise en deux parties, l'une traitant des maladies pouvant être traitées par la diète et des régimes particuliers, la seconde de celles qui peuvent être guéries par les médicaments ou grâce à l'intervention chirurgicale ; dans la première se trouvent les premières occurrences de folie et de maladie cardiaque ; la seconde décrit quant à elle les premiers emplois de la ligature, comprend d'excellentes descriptions de la lithotomie et de l'herniotomie latérales et introduit la notion de chirurgie plastique. Cachet ex-libris ancien au dos du titre gravé. Wellcome II, 318. Krivatsy, n° 2334. Willems, n° 797 pour l'édition elzévirienne. [Attributes: Hard Cover]

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