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Displayed below are some selected recent viaLibri matches for books published in 1649

        Provincia Insvlae Sardiniae

      Torino 1649 - Carta geografica tratta dalla "Chorographica Descriptio Provinciarum et Conventum.", atlante dell'ordine dei frati cappucini. L'atlante delle province cappuccine era stato iniziato in forma manoscritta dal ministro generale dell'ordine, padre Silvestro da Panicale nel 1632 e doveva servire da sussidio geografico per le visite generali. Alla sua morte il successore Padre Giovanni di Montecaliero, al quale spesso viene erroneamente attribuita la paternità delle carte, incaricò padre Massimino da Guechen di proseguire l'opera. Gli incisori delle lastre furono appunto Massimino da Guechen, Bernardino Burdigalensis e Ludovico Monteregali. La prima edizione fu stampata a Roma nel 1643, la seconda a Torino nel 1649 e quindi nel 1654 ed infine un'altra uscì nel 1712. Per convenzione attribuiamo le mappe al Montecalerio. L'opera mostrava visivamente la diffusione dell'ordine, infatti le diverse carte dell'atlante, che rappresentano nazioni e province, offrono per ognuna di esse la statistica completa dei conventi. Incisione in rame, lievissima gora d'acqua, per il resto in ottimo stato di conservazione. Dimensioni 315 225mm [Attributes: First Edition]

      [Bookseller: Libreria Antiquarius]
 1.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  


        Merlini Anglici Ephemeris, or Generall and Monthly Predictions upon severall Eclipses and Celestial Configurations for the Yeare1649. By William Lilly Student in Astrology. [together with an incomplete version of an original second edition of William Lilly's "Christian Astrology" - 1659 Edition]

      London: Printed for F.Partridgeand H. Blunden. Original Edition (NOT a Reprint).. Overall very good. Extremely Rare !. Original Edition (NOT a Reprint). London, Printed for F.Partridgeand H. Blunden, 1649. Duodecimo. 96 unnumbered pages including portrait - titlepage. Hardcover / 18th century full calf with rebacked 20th century spine. Overall very good. Extremely Rare ! William Lilly (11 May [O.S. 1 May] 1602 – 9 June 1681) has been described as "the most abused as well as the most celebrated astrologer of the seventeenth century". Born the son of a yeoman farmer in Leicestershire, Lilly travelled to London as a youth to take up a servant's position. Seven years later he secured his fortune by marrying his former master's widow, allowing him the leisure to study astrology. In 1644, during the English Civil War, he published the first of many popular astrological texts,and in 1647 he published Christian Astrology, a huge compendium of astrological technique. This was the first of its kind to be printed in the English language rather than Latin, and is said to have tutored "a nation in crisis in the language of the stars". By 1659, Lilly's fame was widely acknowledged and his annual almanac was achieving sales of around 30,000 copies a year. Lilly's autobiography, published towards the end of his life in 1681, at the request of his patron Elias Ashmole, gives candid accounts of the political events of his era, and biographical details of contemporaries that are unavailable elsewhere. It was described, in the late 18th century, as "one of the most entertaining narratives in our language", in particular for the historical portrayal it leaves of men like John Dee, Simon Forman, John Booker, Edward Kelley, including a whimsical first meeting of John Napier and Henry Briggs, respective co-inventors of the logarithm and Briggsian logarithms, and for its curious tales about the effects of crystals and the appearance of Queen Mab. In it, Lilly describes the friendly support of Oliver Cromwell during a period in which he faced prosecution for issuing political astrological predictions. He also writes about the 1666 Great Fire of London, and how he was brought before the committee investigating the cause of the fire, being suspected of involvement because of his publication of images, 15 years earlier, which depicted a city in flames surrounded by coffins. Lilly was a controversial character who was both aided and abetted by powerful friends and enemies. He attracted the attention of many members of Parliament, through the support of Sir Bulstrode Whitelocke, Lord Keeper of the Great Seal of England, (to whom he dedicated his Christian Astrology), but also accused Members of Parliament of engineering charges against him in 1651. To his supporters he was an "English Merlin"; to his detractors he was a "juggling wizard and imposter". He is described as having been a genius at something "that modern mainstream opinion has since decided cannot be done at all", and having developed his stature as the most important astrologer in England through his social and political involvement, as well as his impact on the astrological tradition. (William Lilly)

      [Bookseller: The Time Traveller's Bookshop]
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        Eikon Basilike - The Pourtraicture of His Sacred Majestie in His Solitudes and Sufferings - Together with his Private Prayers used in the time of his restraint and delivered to Dr. Juxon, Bishop of London, immediately before his death.

      [London]. Original Edition (NOT a Reprint).. Very good condition. . Original Edition (NOT a Reprint). [London], 1649. Octavo. (10, including Royal Arms Woodcut and Charles I. portrait bound in just before A3), Folded Emblemata leaf with latin and english explanations, 263 pages with an additional portrait bound in just before page 259. Hardcover / Original, early 19th century or late 18th century full calf with gilt lettering and ornament on spine. The binding was professionally restored with new pastedowns and endpapers. (Extremely professional). Very good condition. The Eikon Basilike (The "Royal Portrait"), The Pourtrature of His Sacred Majestie in His Solitudes and Sufferings, is a purported spiritual autobiography attributed to King Charles I of England. It was published on 9 February 1649, ten days after the King was beheaded by Parliament in the aftermath of the English Civil War in 1649. Written in a simple, moving, and straightforward style in the form of a diary, the book combines irenic prayers urging the forgiveness of Charles's executioners with a justification of royalism and the King's political and military programme that led to the Civil War. It is by no means certain that Charles wrote the book. After the Restoration, John Gauden, bishop of Worcester, claimed to have written it. Scholars continue to disagree about the merits of this claim, though assuming that if Gauden wrote it, he had access to Charles's papers when he did so. Jeremy Taylor is also said to have had a hand in its revision, and to be the source of its title; an earlier draft bore the name Suspiria Regalia, the "Royal Sighs." The frontispiece was engraved by William Marshall. In the first edition, the frontispiece was accompanied by Latin and English verses that explain it. The Eikon Basilike and its portrait of Charles's execution as a martyrdom were so successful that, at the Restoration, a special commemoration of the King on 30 January was added to the Book of Common Prayer, directing that the day be observed as an occasion for fasting and repentance. On 19 May 1660, the Convocation of Canterbury and York canonised King Charles at the urging of Charles II, and added his name to the prayer book. Charles I is the only saint formally canonised by the Church of England. The commemoration was removed from the prayer book by Queen Victoria in 1859. Several Anglican churches and chapels are dedicated to "King Charles the Martyr." The Society of King Charles the Martyr was established in 1894 to work for the restoration of the King's name to the Calendar and to encourage the veneration of the Royal Martyr. (Wikipedia) Some later editions of the Eikon Basilike contained a sworn statement by William Levett, Esq., longtime courtier and groom of the bedchamber to the King, that Levett had witnessed Charles writing the text during the time that Levett accompanied him in his imprisonment on the Isle of Wight. A witness to the King's execution, Levett later helped transport the King's body back to Windsor Castle for burial. Whoever wrote the Eikon Basilike, its author was an effective prose stylist, one who had partaken deeply of the solemn yet simple eloquence of Anglican piety as expressed in Cranmer's Book of Common Prayer. The end result is an image of a steadfast monarch who, while admitting his weaknesses, declares the truth of his religious principles and the purity of his political motives, while trusting in God despite adversity. Charles's chief weakness, it says, was in yielding to Parliament's demands for the head of the Earl of Strafford; for this sin, Charles paid with his throne and his life. Its portrait of Charles as a martyr invited comparison of the King to Jesus. The pathos of this dramatic presentation made it a master stroke of Royalist propaganda. The book was quite popular despite official disapproval during the Protectorate and the Restoration; it went into 36 editions in 1649 alone. In 1657 it even appeared in musical form, with a verse rendering by Thomas Stanley (author) and music by John Wilson (composer). The musical setting blended the austere style of the metrical psalter, favoured by the Puritans, with fashionable (and Catholic) instrumental accompaniment provided by an organ, theorbo, or another such continuo instrument. Because of the favourable impression the book made of the King, Parliament commissioned John Milton to write a riposte to it, which he published under the title Eikonoklastes ("The Icon-Breaker") in 1649. Milton's response sought to portray the image of Charles, and the absolute monarchy he aspired to, as idols, claiming a reverence due only to God, and therefore justly overthrown to preserve the law of God. This theological counterattack failed to dislodge the sentimental narrative of the Eikon itself from public esteem.

      [Bookseller: The Time Traveller's Bookshop]
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        Merlini Anglici Ephemeris, or Generall and Monthly Predictions upon severall Eclipses and Celestial Configurations for the Yeare1649. By William Lilly Student in Astrology. [together with an incomplete version of an original second edition of William Lilly's "Christian Astrology" - 1659 Edition]

      London, Printed for F.Partridgeand H. Blunden, 1649. - Original Edition (NOT a Reprint). Duodecimo. 96 unnumbered pages including portrait - titlepage. Hardcover / 18th century full calf with rebacked 20th century spine. Overall very good. Extremely Rare ! William Lilly (11 May [O.S. 1 May] 1602 – 9 June 1681) has been described as "the most abused as well as the most celebrated astrologer of the seventeenth century". Born the son of a yeoman farmer in Leicestershire, Lilly travelled to London as a youth to take up a servant's position. Seven years later he secured his fortune by marrying his former master's widow, allowing him the leisure to study astrology. In 1644, during the English Civil War, he published the first of many popular astrological texts,and in 1647 he published Christian Astrology, a huge compendium of astrological technique. This was the first of its kind to be printed in the English language rather than Latin, and is said to have tutored "a nation in crisis in the language of the stars". By 1659, Lilly's fame was widely acknowledged and his annual almanac was achieving sales of around 30,000 copies a year. Lilly's autobiography, published towards the end of his life in 1681, at the request of his patron Elias Ashmole, gives candid accounts of the political events of his era, and biographical details of contemporaries that are unavailable elsewhere. It was described, in the late 18th century, as "one of the most entertaining narratives in our language", in particular for the historical portrayal it leaves of men like John Dee, Simon Forman, John Booker, Edward Kelley, including a whimsical first meeting of John Napier and Henry Briggs, respective co-inventors of the logarithm and Briggsian logarithms, and for its curious tales about the effects of crystals and the appearance of Queen Mab. In it, Lilly describes the friendly support of Oliver Cromwell during a period in which he faced prosecution for issuing political astrological predictions. He also writes about the 1666 Great Fire of London, and how he was brought before the committee investigating the cause of the fire, being suspected of involvement because of his publication of images, 15 years earlier, which depicted a city in flames surrounded by coffins. Lilly was a controversial character who was both aided and abetted by powerful friends and enemies. He attracted the attention of many members of Parliament, through the support of Sir Bulstrode Whitelocke, Lord Keeper of the Great Seal of England, (to whom he dedicated his Christian Astrology), but also accused Members of Parliament of engineering charges against him in 1651. To his supporters he was an "English Merlin"; to his detractors he was a "juggling wizard and imposter". He is described as having been a genius at something "that modern mainstream opinion has since decided cannot be done at all", and having developed his stature as the most important astrologer in England through his social and political involvement, as well as his impact on the astrological tradition. (William Lilly)

      [Bookseller: The Time Traveller's Bookshop Ltd.]
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        Eikon Basilike - The Pourtraicture of His Sacred Majestie in His Solitudes and Sufferings - Together with his Private Prayers used in the time of his restraint and delivered to Dr. Juxon, Bishop of London, immediately before his death.

      Original Edition (NOT a Reprint). Octavo. (10, including Royal Arms Woodcut and Charles I. portrait bound in just before A3), Folded Emblemata leaf with latin and english explanations, 263 pages with an additional portrait bound in just before page 259. Hardcover / Original, early 19th century or late 18th century full calf with gilt lettering and ornament on spine. The binding was professionally restored with new pastedowns and endpapers. (Extremely professional). Very good condition. The Eikon Basilike (The "Royal Portrait"), The Pourtrature of His Sacred Majestie in His Solitudes and Sufferings, is a purported spiritual autobiography attributed to King Charles I of England. It was published on 9 February 1649, ten days after the King was beheaded by Parliament in the aftermath of the English Civil War in 1649. Written in a simple, moving, and straightforward style in the form of a diary, the book combines irenic prayers urging the forgiveness of Charles's executioners with a justification of royalism and the King's political and military programme that led to the Civil War. It is by no means certain that Charles wrote the book. After the Restoration, John Gauden, bishop of Worcester, claimed to have written it. Scholars continue to disagree about the merits of this claim, though assuming that if Gauden wrote it, he had access to Charles's papers when he did so. Jeremy Taylor is also said to have had a hand in its revision, and to be the source of its title an earlier draft bore the name Suspiria Regalia, the "Royal Sighs." The frontispiece was engraved by William Marshall. In the first edition, the frontispiece was accompanied by Latin and English verses that explain it. The Eikon Basilike and its portrait of Charles's execution as a martyrdom were so successful that, at the Restoration, a special commemoration of the King on 30 January was added to the Book of Common Prayer, directing that the day be observed as an occasion for fasting and repentance. On 19 May 1660, the Convocation of Canterbury and York canonised King Charles at the urging of Charles II, and added his name to the prayer book. Charles I is the only saint formally canonised by the Church of England. The commemoration was removed from the prayer book by Queen Victoria in 1859. Several Anglican churches and chapels are dedicated to "King Charles the Martyr." The Society of King Charles the Martyr was established in 1894 to work for the restoration of the King's name to the Calendar and to encourage the veneration of the Royal Martyr. (Wikipedia)Some later editions of the Eikon Basilike contained a sworn statement by William Levett, Esq., longtime courtier and groom of the bedchamber to the King, that Levett had witnessed Charles writing the text during the time that Levett accompanied him in his imprisonment on the Isle of Wight. A witness to the King's execution, Levett later helped transport the King's body back to Windsor Castle for burial. Whoever wrote the Eikon Basilike, its author was an effective prose stylist, one who had partaken deeply of the solemn yet simple eloquence of Anglican piety as expressed in Cranmer's Book of Common Prayer. The end result is an image of a steadfast monarch who, while admitting his weaknesses, declares the truth of his religious principles and the purity of his political motives, while trusting in God despite adversity. Charles's chief weakness, it says, was in yielding to Parliament's demands for the head of the Earl of Strafford for this sin, Charles paid with his throne and his life. Its portrait of Charles as a martyr invited comparison of the King to Jesus. The pathos of this dramatic presentation made it a master stroke of Royalist propaganda. The book was quite popular despite official disapproval during the Protectorate and the Restoration it went into 36 editions in 1649 alone. In 1657 it even appeared in musical form, with a verse rendering by Thomas Stanley (author) and music by John Wilson (composer). The musical setting blended the austere style of the metrical psalter, favoured by the Puritans, with fashionable (and Catholic) instrumental accompaniment provided by an organ, theorbo, or another such continuo instrument. Because of the favourable impression the book made of the King, Parliament commissioned John Milton to write a riposte to it, which he published under the title Eikonoklastes ("The Icon-Breaker") in 1649. Milton's response sought to portray the image of Charles, and the absolute monarchy he aspired to, as idols, claiming a reverence due only to God, and therefore justly overthrown to preserve the law of God. This theological counterattack failed to dislodge the sentimental narrative of the Eikon itself from public esteem.

      [Bookseller: The Time Traveller's Bookshop]
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        Jan Luyken.

      Ecce Homo [zie de mens, Johannes 19:5]. Pontius Pilatus toont Christus aan het volk in Jeruzalem. Gewassen tekening met pen en bruine inkt en houtskool door Jan Luyken (Amsterdam 1649-1712): De tekening is een ontwerp voor een van de door Jan en zijn zoon Caspar Luyken ge?llustreerde Bijbels. Afmeting ca. 16,1 x 27,6 cm.Pontius Pilatus toont Christus aan het volk in Jerusalem. De tekening is een ontwerp voor een gravure in Luykens platenbijbel, die in Amsterdam in verschillende edities is uitgebracht. Luyken nam daarvoor de ge?llustreerde bijbels van Albrecht D?rer en Lucas van Leyden als voorbeeld.J. Immerzeel schreef in 1842 dat Jan Luyken ?in teeken- en etskunst eene hoogte van vermaardheid bereikt, die alleen het doel wordt van genie?n.? In vele voorstellingen ?duidt de rijkheid van zijn ordonnanties het geoefend oog genoegzaam aan, dat hij alle onderwerpen met al die oplettendheid en zorg bewerkt heeft, als zijne vlugge en geestige manier van werken toeliet. Hoe vindingrijk, doordacht en oordeelkundig zijn Luyken?s groote Bijbelprenten in de zamenstelling van groote partijen en groeperingen van duizenden figuren, waaronder zelfs de kleinste op verre afstanden een eigen karakter hebben! Wie wist als hij, zooveel aan het wonderbare grenzende verscheidenheid aan zijne beelden te brengen en er met een enkele trek uitdrukking en waarheid aan te geven?? Daarnaast was Luyken ?volleerd in de regelen der perspectief en bouwkunde, en toonde ook in het laatste vak zijne rijke verbeeldingskracht en zijnen uitmuntenden smaak.??In bijna al zijn grootere en kleinere kunstwerken heerscht een verwonderlijk effect en harmonie; zijne figuren zijn doorgaans vast geteekend; doch over het costumm bekommerde hij zich weinig, volgde daarin meestal zijne vrije phantasie.?Provenance: verso geannoteerd Bought at the Sale of Mr. Reveley drawings May 11. 1852. (In whose ?Notices? this drawing is mentioned.)Prijs: ?3.150,- (incl. lijst).

      [Bookseller: Inter-Antiquariaat MEFFERDT & DE JONGE]
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        Binnenhof en Buitenhof Den Haag - Blaeu, 1649.

      Binnenhof en Buitenhof Den Haag - ?Curia Hollandiae Exterior?? en ?Curia Hollandiae Interior??Met de hand gekleurde kopergravures uitgegeven door Joan Blaeu ca. 1649. Afm.: 39 x 53 cm en 41.5 x 52.5 cm.Het Buitenhof aan de Hofvijver. Een aantal figuren te paard, kinderen doen de ruiters op speelgoed paarden na. In de achtergrond doorwaden vier ruiters de vijver.Op het Binnenhof met zonnewijzer en middeleeuwse Ridderzaal, brengt iemand met een kruiwagen een koffer, een zwaard en andere bagage naar de koetsen die op hun passagiers staan te wachten. De gebouwen zijn en detail weergeven. Voor de Ridderzaal staat nog een aantal gebouwen die later zijn afgebroken. Ook de dakbedekking van verschillende gebouwen is tijdens de 19e-eeuwse restauratie geheel veranderd.Deze stadsgezichten werden gegraveerd voor Blaeu?s fameuze Stedenboek der Vereenighe Nederlanden uitgegeven na de 80-jarige oorlog.Prijs: ?2.450,- (2 stuks, incl. lijst, incl. 21% BTW).

      [Bookseller: Inter-Antiquariaat MEFFERDT & DE JONGE]
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        De Consolatione libri V. Cum prefatione P. Bertii.

      Amesterodami, Apud Ioannem Blaeu 1649 - In-32 (9,2 X 6 cm), 175 pp., reliure d'époque plein maroquin rouge, dos à quatre nerfs finement orné, coupes guillochées, tranches dorées (reliure d'époque. Texte encadré, figure allégorique insérée dans la page de titre, lettrine et culs-de-lampe. Ex-Libris manuscrit "Sauvayat via Burgendis" (quelques piqûres). [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: H. PICARD ET FILS, depuis 1902]
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        Grolla

      Amsterdam Amsterdam. unbound. very good. Map. Engraving with original hand coloring. Image measures 16.25" x 20.75". Exquisite town plan of Grolla in Holland, circa 1649, shown in an unusual panoramic birds-eye view. Features the fortress and the surrounding pastoral landscape. Includes a coat of arms, which is hand burnished with beautiful gold leaf. Cartouche and scale are also decorated in gold leaf. Wonderful vignette in bottom left corner of two men fighting on horseback. Latin text on verso. Published around the time of the Spanish acknowledgment of the Dutch Republic in "Novum Ac Magnum Theatrum Urbium Belgicae Liberae Ac Foederataee" ("Town books of the Netherlands"). Many of the town plans included in this publication emphasized their strategic importance in response to the Spanish occupation. One of the most famous mapmakers of his time, Willem Blaeu (1571-1638) and his family worked out of Amsterdam. This series was published by his son Johannes (c. 1599-1673), who took over the business upon his father's death. Overall toning, chipping to edges.

      [Bookseller: Argosy Book Store]
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        Joh. Fred. Gronovii. Ad L. & M. Annaeos Senecas Notae

      Lvgd. Batav. : Ex Officina Elseviriana 1649 - 12mo. 12 leaves, 429, [22] p. ; 14 cm. Bound in contemporary vellum. Good binding and cover. Minimal soiling to covers. Latin. Clean, unmarked pages with minimal toning. Please feel free to view our photographs. Johann Friedrich Gronovius, was a German classical scholar and critic. Born in Hamburg, he studied at several universities and travelled in England, France and Italy. In 1643, he was appointed professor of rhetoric and history at Deventer, and in 1658 to the Greek chair at Leiden, where he remained until his death. Gronovius edited and annotated Statius, Plautus, Livy, Tacitus, Aulus Gellius and Seneca's tragedies. In addition, he was the author of Commentarius de sestertiis (1643) and of an edition of Hugo Grotius's De jure belli et pacis (1660), amongst numerous other works. His Observationes contain a number of brilliant emendations. [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Sequitur Books]
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        Anastasii bibliothecarii historia ecclesiastica, sive chronographia tripertita. Collata ad Ms. exemplar longobard. vetustiss. Gasinens. biblioth.unde Rom. Exemplar. Manavit. Nunc denuo ad fidem veterum libroum emendata. Accendunt notae Caroli Annibalis Fabroti IC.

      Typ. Regia, 1649. In fol. (cm. 44,5), p. pelle con d. rinforzato in tela, cc.nn. 4 + pp. 263. SEGUE: Anastasii bibliothecarii, Historia de vitis Romanorum Pontificum, ab Petro Apot. ad Nicolaum I, numquam hactenus typis excusa, deinde vita Hadriani II et Stephani VI, auctore Guillelmo bibliothecario.- cc.nn. 7 + pp. 313 + cc.nn. 3. Testate, finaline e capilettere su pregevoli e ricche inc. Carta forte. Ampi marg. Tagli spruzzati rossi. Nervi. Mende ai piatti ed al d. , sommariamente rinforzato con tela. Antichi forellini.

      [Bookseller: Libreria Cicerone M.T.]
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        Eikon Basilike ( in Greek). The Pourtraicture of His Sacred Maiestie in His Solitude and Sufferings; With a Perfect Copie of Prayers Used by His Majesty in the Time of his Sufferings

      n.p. (London): n.p., 1649. Early Edition. Hardcover. Very good. 12mo. (4),260,pp. This edition is likely a variant of Madan #8, or a mixed 12 from Newcomb's printings for No 7(see Madan, p. 18). Without a frontispiece portrait nor any other illustration. Possibly defective, ending with leaf M10 and the word '"Finis" and thus probably not bound with the Letter from the Prince as described by Madan in No. 8. Originally attributed to Charles I, it is now acknowledged that the author is John Gauden. There were at least 40 different English editions printed in 1649, some hurriedly, as this copy must have been Contemporary full brown calf tooled in blind on the boards and on the spine. Joints cracked, but firm; head of spine and lettering labels nearly perished; old library stamp and bookplate; else a good copy.

      [Bookseller: Thorn Books]
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        Observationes politicae, super nuperis Galliae motibus.

      - (Holland?), 1649. 12:o. 110 s. Enstaka lager- och småfläckar. Fina marginaler. Fint rött halvmarokängband från mitten av 1800-talet, guldornerad rygg, röda pappärmar med förgylld ram, något blekt rygg. Äldre namnteckning ?Recklin?? på titelbladet. Ur Ericsbergs bibliotek. Collijn sp. 778. Se Runeby s. 410ff. Detta är duodesupplagan, som troligen är tryckt i Holland. I Paris trycktes tidigare samma år en upplaga i kvarto. Detta är ett konstitutionellt ställningstagande av Rosenhane mot enväldiga tyranner, personifierade av kardinal Mazarin, vilken Rosenhane i skriften direkt angriper. Rosenhane förfäktar här samma åsiker och synpunkter som han framfört i den svenska debatten, nämligen att makten skulle delas mellan monarken och rådet, dvs högadeln. Diplomaten, riksrådet och hovmannen Schering Rosenhane (1609-63) skickades 1647, efter att ha varit observatör vid fredsförhandlingarna i Münster, som svensk minister till Paris, med uppdrag att skaffa franska subsidier till Sverige. Rosenhane sympatiserade dock med Frondens opposition mot Mazarin, vilket misskrediterade honom hos denne, och efter att ha publicerat denna broschyr, vilken fick mycket uppmärksamhet, blev situationen för Rosenhane omöjlig i Paris och Kristina fick återkalla honom till Sverige. Han skickades dock genast ut på nya uppdrag. Närmast hamnade han som medlare mellan Sverige och ärkestiftet Bremen.

      [Bookseller: Centralantikvariatet]
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        Annales Ecclesiastici, ex XII tomis Caesssaris Baronii.

      Impensis Soc. Typ, 1649. In 4°, p.pelle , cc.nn. 14 + pp. 724 + cc.nn. 49. Front. su ricca inc. a tutta p. di Gaultier. Nervi. Capilettera. Finalina. Lievi gore al marg. sup.

      [Bookseller: Libreria Cicerone M.T.]
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        Stadsplattegrond van Gouda.

      J. Blaeu, Amsterdam 1649 - Stadsplattegrond met opstanden van gebouwen en huizen. Maat blad is 54 bij 64 cm. Nederlandse tekst op achterzijde.Kopergravure, uitgegeven in 1649 te Amsterdam door Joan Blaeu in Toonneel der Steden. Hoogte 41,5 cm. breedte 53 cm Height (cm): 38 Width (cm): 49,5 , Illustrated

      [Bookseller: Antiquariaat Meuzelaar]
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        Jan Luyken.

      Ecce Homo [zie de mens, Johannes 19:5]. Pontius Pilatus toont Christus aan het volk in Jeruzalem. Gewassen tekening met pen en bruine inkt en houtskool door Jan Luyken (Amsterdam 1649-1712): De tekening is een ontwerp voor een van de door Jan en zijn zoon Caspar Luyken ge?llustreerde Bijbels. Afmeting ca. 16,1 x 27,6 cm.Pontius Pilatus toont Christus aan het volk in Jerusalem. De tekening is een ontwerp voor een gravure in Luykens platenbijbel, die in Amsterdam in verschillende edities is uitgebracht. Luyken nam daarvoor de ge?llustreerde bijbels van Albrecht D?rer en Lucas van Leyden als voorbeeld.J. Immerzeel schreef in 1842 dat Jan Luyken ?in teeken- en etskunst eene hoogte van vermaardheid bereikt, die alleen het doel wordt van genie?n.? In vele voorstellingen ?duidt de rijkheid van zijn ordonnanties het geoefend oog genoegzaam aan, dat hij alle onderwerpen met al die oplettendheid en zorg bewerkt heeft, als zijne vlugge en geestige manier van werken toeliet. Hoe vindingrijk, doordacht en oordeelkundig zijn Luyken?s groote Bijbelprenten in de zamenstelling van groote partijen en groeperingen van duizenden figuren, waaronder zelfs de kleinste op verre afstanden een eigen karakter hebben! Wie wist als hij, zooveel aan het wonderbare grenzende verscheidenheid aan zijne beelden te brengen en er met een enkele trek uitdrukking en waarheid aan te geven?? Daarnaast was Luyken ?volleerd in de regelen der perspectief en bouwkunde, en toonde ook in het laatste vak zijne rijke verbeeldingskracht en zijnen uitmuntenden smaak.??In bijna al zijn grootere en kleinere kunstwerken heerscht een verwonderlijk effect en harmonie; zijne figuren zijn doorgaans vast geteekend; doch over het costumm bekommerde hij zich weinig, volgde daarin meestal zijne vrije phantasie.?Provenance: verso geannoteerd Bought at the Sale of Mr. Reveley drawings May 11. 1852. (In whose ?Notices? this drawing is mentioned.)Prijs: ?3.150,- (incl. lijst).

      [Bookseller: Inter-Antiquariaat MEFFERDT & DE JONGE]
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        Vlissingen.

      Kopergravure, 1649 - . Blaeu. Herkomst: 'Toonneel der Steden'. Verso: Latijnse tekst. Afmeting: 53,5 x 42,5 cm. Geleverd in passe-partout.

      [Bookseller: Antiquariaat De Boekenbeurs]
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        Edynburgum. [Edinburgh]

      Frankfurt: 1649 - Size: 305 × 395 mm. Copperplate engraving. Very good condition, folds as issued. A wonderful engraving of the city of Edinburgh, as it was when Merian first published it during the seventeenth century. The castle is seen seen to the left, with the city spread out below it. Ships are seen beyond the port of Leith on the Firth of Forth. Two men on horseback gallop towards the city in the foreground, and a coat of arms is found in the top left corner. Merian was a Swiss born engraver and publisher, who lived and worked in Frankfurt. Published in the "Neuwe Archontologia Cosmica".

      [Bookseller: Peter Harrington. ABA member]
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        Premier (-Cinquième) Factum ou Defenses de Messire Philippes de la Mothe-Houdancourt, Duc de Cardonne et Maréchal de France, ci-devant Vice-Roy et Capitaine Général de Catalogne

      Paris, Louis Sevestre (puis François Noel), 1649. - 5 ouvrages en 1 volume in-4. 39pp. (1). + 64pp. + 69pp. (1). + 84pp. + 36pp. Demi veau mod. genr. anc, dos à nerfs. Edition Originale. Le Comte Philippe de la Mothe-Houdancourt (1605-1657) avait pris la tête en 1641 de l'armée française de Catalogne, qui dérouta les forces espagnole en diverses occasions. Il fut nommé duc de Cardona et vice-roi de Catalogne de 1642 à 1644 et, en 1652, il mena la résistance dans Barcelone assiégée par les troupes castillanes. Ce rare recueil réunit les cinq mémoires publiés pour sa réhabilitation, après que diverses calomnies aient été répandues sur son compte dans la ville de Paris et à la Cour. Très bon exemplaire. [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Librería Comellas]
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        Delft - Joan Blaeu, 1649.

      HET GROOTSTEDELIJKE DELFT?Delfi Batavorum vernacule Delft?, kopergravure, uitgegeven te Amsterdam door Joan Blaeu in 1649. Afm. (prent) 37,7 x 48,5 cm. In de tijd met de hand gekleurd. Verso: Beschrijving van Delft in het Latijn.Deze plattegrond werd uitgegeven na de Vrede van M?nster in 1648 als onderdeel van Joan Blaeu?s stedenboek Toonneel der Steden van de Vereenighde Nederlanden.De Amsterdamse cartograaf en uitgever Joan Blaeu stelde zich tot taak de doelstellingen van Abraham Ortelius (befaamd door uitgave van de eerste moderne atlas in 1578) en Georg Braun en Franz Hogenberg (bekend door hun eind 1600 verschenen stedenboek) tegelijk te realiseren, door aan zijn uit vele delen bestaande wereldatlas ook een aantal stedenboeken toe te voegen.Het Stedenboek van de Verenigde Nederlanden verscheen in 1649 in een Latijnse editie; de Nederlandse werd in 1652 gedrukt. De in dit werk opgenomen kaarten waren voor een gedeelte al in oudere kaartwerken gepubliceerd; 21 stuks bijvoorbeeld in Boxhorns Theatrum Hollandiae uit 1632. Andere kaarten werden geheel nieuw voor Blaeu?s Stedenboek vervaardigd.Prijs: ?1.950,-.

      [Bookseller: Inter-Antiquariaat MEFFERDT & DE JONGE]
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        Jan Luyken.

      Ecce Homo [zie de mens, Johannes 19:5]. Pontius Pilatus toont Christus aan het volk in Jeruzalem. Gewassen tekening met pen en bruine inkt en houtskool door Jan Luyken (Amsterdam 1649-1712): De tekening is een ontwerp voor een van de door Jan en zijn zoon Caspar Luyken geïllustreerde Bijbels. Afmeting ca. 16,1 x 27,6 cm.Pontius Pilatus toont Christus aan het volk in Jerusalem. De tekening is een ontwerp voor een gravure in Luykens platenbijbel, die in Amsterdam in verschillende edities is uitgebracht. Luyken nam daarvoor de geïllustreerde bijbels van Albrecht Dürer en Lucas van Leyden als voorbeeld.J. Immerzeel schreef in 1842 dat Jan Luyken ?in teeken- en etskunst eene hoogte van vermaardheid bereikt, die alleen het doel wordt van genieën.? In vele voorstellingen ?duidt de rijkheid van zijn ordonnanties het geoefend oog genoegzaam aan, dat hij alle onderwerpen met al die oplettendheid en zorg bewerkt heeft, als zijne vlugge en geestige manier van werken toeliet. Hoe vindingrijk, doordacht en oordeelkundig zijn Luyken?s groote Bijbelprenten in de zamenstelling van groote partijen en groeperingen van duizenden figuren, waaronder zelfs de kleinste op verre afstanden een eigen karakter hebben! Wie wist als hij, zooveel aan het wonderbare grenzende verscheidenheid aan zijne beelden te brengen en er met een enkele trek uitdrukking en waarheid aan te geven?? Daarnaast was Luyken ?volleerd in de regelen der perspectief en bouwkunde, en toonde ook in het laatste vak zijne rijke verbeeldingskracht en zijnen uitmuntenden smaak.??In bijna al zijn grootere en kleinere kunstwerken heerscht een verwonderlijk effect en harmonie; zijne figuren zijn doorgaans vast geteekend; doch over het costumm bekommerde hij zich weinig, volgde daarin meestal zijne vrije phantasie.?Provenance: verso geannoteerd Bought at the Sale of Mr. Reveley drawings May 11. 1852. (In whose ?Notices? this drawing is mentioned.)Prijs: ?3.150,- (incl. lijst).

      [Bookseller: Inter-Antiquariaat MEFFERDT & DE JONGE]
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        IOHANIS SCHR

      Impensis Johannis Gerlini, Bibliop, 1649. Testo latino. 3^edizione. Cm.18,7x15,2. Pg.(28), 516, 348, (58). Sobria legatura in piena pergamena rigida con titoli e fregi impressi in oro al dorso. Tagli spruzzati. Doppio frontespizio: il primo è riccamente decorato a piena pagina, con ritratto dell'Autore, scene di preparazioni farmaceutiche, vedute bucoliche e di animali e stemma allegorico in ovale con il motto "Ditabit servata Fides". In esso è riportata la dizione "Iohanis Schröderi M.D. Pharmacopoeia Medico - Chymica. Plurimis locis correcta, multisque novis Hosculiis adornata. Divulgata sub Censura Ampl. Collegij Medici Ulmensis. Sumptibus Johannis Gerlini Bibliopolae ibidem 1650". Il secondo frontespizio, che riporta la datazione 1649, presenta una marca tipografica in ovale con l'impresa editoriale ed è interessato da due piccole mende cartacee d'epoca, probabilmente a rimuovere antica notazione di proprietà. Alcuni cartigli e capilettera incisi. Bruniture diffuse. Il volume, dopo la dedicatoria, si apre con alcune odi apologetiche in onore dell'Autore, opera di Johannes Barcehausen, Petrus de Spina, Ludovico von Hörnigs, Petrus Lotichius, Joannes Sebastian Blosius, Anton Boxbarterus, Johannes Tilemannus, Georg Scrhöder, Johann Guilielmus Hochstatt, Johannes Loofherus Florimontanus, Antonius Itterus, Balthasar Stutenius, Joannes Pfautz. Il testo, su due colonne, è diviso in due parti, ciascuna con numerazione autonoma: la prima (pg.516) comprende i primi tre Libri della "Pharmacopoeia Medico - Chymica" ("De Isagoge", "De Officina", "De Mineralogia"), la seconda parte contiene i rimanenti ("De Phytologia", "Classis de Animalibus perfectioribus"). L'indice, oltreché in latino, è apposto anche in tedesco in caratteri gotici. Nato in Westfalia, Iohann Schröders (Sazurffeln, 1600 - 1664) dopo gli studi di medicina praticati a Rostock e a Copenhagen, divenne medico chirurgo nell'esercito svedese. Compì numerosi viaggi in Europa per poi stabilirsi a Francoforte sul Meno ove esercitò la professione medica. Compì approfonditi studi di farmacologia e di botanica, sia dal punto di vista storico che della ricerca. In particolare si dedicò alla ricerca dei rimedi in medicina, dividendoli in due tipi, alimentari e farmaceutici. "Dei primi fa una descrizione dettagliata nell'arte culinaria; distingue i secondi in medicamenti semplici e composti, tenendo conto della costituzione (odore, sapore, figura) della usurpazione (modo di somministrazione) e della signatura (modo di conoscerne le virtù). Prende in considerazione l'astrologia e la meteorologia prendendo spunti dai paracelsisti e galenisti. Particolare il metodo suggerito per raccogliere le erbe: ci fornisce tabelle, novene, orari per l'eradicazione e la conservazione; ricette e rimedi proposti sono a dir poco "fantasiosi" e ripropongono le antiche credenze popolari in materia di medicina" ( dal sito "abocamuseum"). A lui si ispirò in seguito il Boerhaave, ridimensionandone tuttavia l'influenza alchemica e astrologica. Il presente testo fu pubblicato in prima edizione nel 1641.

      [Bookseller: Studio Bibliografico Pera]
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        Geometria, à Renato Des Cartes Anno 1637 Gallicè edita; nunc autem cum notis Florimondi De Beaune, in curia Bloesensi consilliari regii, in linguam Latinam versa, & commentariis illustrata, operâ atque studio Francisci à Schooten...

      Leyden: Jean Maire, 1649. First edition in Latin and first separate edition of Descartes's magnum opus (DSB), one of the key texts in the history of mathematics. It was originally published in French as the third part of the Discours de la Méthode; the French text was not issued separately until 1664. Descartes' "application of modern algebraic arithmetic to ancient geometry created the analytical geometry which was the basis of the post-Euclidean development of that science" (PMM). It "rendered possible the later achievements of seventeenth-century mathematical physics" (M. B. Hall, Nature and nature's laws (1970), p. 91). It was through this Latin translation that Newton and the other contemporary mathematicians acquired an understanding of Descartes's work. Descartes' interest in geometry was stimulated when, in 1631, Jacob Golius (1596-1667), a professor of mathematics and oriental languages at Leyden, sent Descartes a geometrical problem, that of 'Pappus on three or four lines'. It had originally been posed and solved shortly before the time of Euclid in a work called Five books concerning solid loci by Aristaeus, and was then studied by Apollonius and later by Pappus. But the solution was lost in the 17th century, and the problem became an important test case for Descartes. Claude Hardy, a contemporary at the time of its solution, later reported to Leibniz the difficulties that Descartes had met in solving it (it took him six weeks), which 'disabused him of the small opinion he had held of the analysis of the ancients'. The Pappus problem is a thread running through the entire work. Book One is entitled 'Problems the construction of which requires only straight lines and circles,' and it is in this opening book that Descartes details his geometrical analysis, that is, how geometrical problems are to be formulated algebraically. It begins with the geometrical interpretation of algebraic operations, which Descartes had already explored in the early period of his mathematical research. However, what we are presented in 1637 is a "gigantic innovation" both over Descartes' previous work and the work of his contemporaries (Guicciardini, p. 38). On the one hand, Descartes offers a geometrical interpretation of root extraction and thus treats five arithmetical operations. Crucially, he also uses a new exponential notation (e.g. x3), which replaces the traditional cossic notation of early modern algebra, and allows Descartes to tighten the connection between algebra and geometry. Descartes proceeds to describe how one is to give an algebraic interpretation of a geometrical problem: 'If, then, we wish to solve any problem, we first suppose the solution already effected, and give names to all the lines that seem needful for its construction, to those that are unknown as well as to those that are known. Then, making no distinction between unknown and unknown lines, we must unravel the difficulty in any way that shows most naturally the relations between these lines, until we find it possible to express a single quantity in two ways. This will constitute an equation, since the terms of one of these two expressions are together equal to the terms of the other.' Descartes applies his geometrical analysis to solve the four-line case of the Pappus problem, and shows how the analysis can be generalized to apply to the general, n-line version of the problem, which had not been solved by the ancients. Book Two, entitled 'On the Nature of Curved Lines,' commences with Descartes' famous distinction between 'geometric' and 'mechanical' curves. For Pappus, 'plane' curves were those constructible by ruler and compass, 'solid' curves were the conic sections, and 'linear' curves were the rest, such as the conchoids, the spiral, the quadratrix and the cissoid. The linear curves were also called 'mechanical' by the ancient Greeks because instruments were needed to construct them. Following Descartes, the supremacy of algebraic criteria became established: curves were defined by equations with integer degrees. Algebra thus brought to geometry the most natural hierarchies and principles of classification. This was extended by Newton to fractional and irrational exponents, and by Leibniz to 'variable' exponents (gradus indefinitus, or transcendental in modern terminology). Book Three, entitled 'The construction of solid, and higher than solid problems,' is devoted to the theory of equations and the geometrical construction of their roots. "The abundance and variety of results in this section is remarkable. A number of the interesting results presented are not altogether new, some being due to Girolamo Cardano, Thomas Harriot and Albert Girard. The exposition is, however, clear and systematic, and expressed for the first time in history in modern notation... These results were taken up and extended by Newton in Arithmetica universalis (1707), in lectures between 1673 and 1683... Descartes is also interested in the number of real roots, and asserts without justification that the maximum number of positive or negative roots of an equation is that of the alternances or permanences of the signs '+' and ' ' between consecutive coefficients. This is the celebrated 'rule of signs', which earned unfounded criticism for Descartes. Newton took up and extended the matter in the De limitibus aequationum, which concludes the Arithmetica universalis. The result was proved in the 18th century" (Landmark Writings, pp. 13-14). Book Three concludes with a discussion of the geometrical construction of roots of equations by means of intersecting curves, particularly cubic and quartic equations which Descartes treats using a circle and a parabola. The editor and translator of this edition, Frans van Schooten (1615-60), first saw the Géométrie at Leiden, as Descartes had come there to supervise the printing of the Discours. "After the death of his father in 1645, Schooten took over his academic duties. He also worked on a Latin translation of Descartes' Géométrie. Although Descartes was not completely satisfied with Schooten's version (1649), it found a broad and receptive audience by virtue of its more carefully executed figures and its full commentary. It was from Schooten's edition of the Géométrie that contemporary mathematicians lacking proficiency in French first learned Cartesian mathematics. In this mathematics they encountered a systematic presentation of the material, not the customary, more classificatory approach that essentially listed single propositions, for the most part in unconnected parallel. Further, in the Cartesian scheme the central position was occupied by algebra, which Descartes considered to be the only 'precise form of mathematics'." (DSB, under Schooten). Schooten included in the present edition the 'Notae breves' of Florimonde De Beaune (1601-52), a French jurist and amateur mathematician, which contains what became known as 'De Beaune's problem', the important problem of determining a curve from the properties of its tangent. De Beaune's notes evidently pleased Descartes, who wrote to him on 20 February 1639: "J'ai admiré que vous ayez pu reconnaître des choses que je n'y ai mises qu'obscurément comme en ce qui regarde la généralité de la méthode." F. Cajori, A History of Mathematics, p. 174 ("Of epoch-making importance"); DSB IV, pp. 55-58; I. Grattan-Guinness (ed.), Landmark Writings in Western Mathematics 1640-1940 (2005), Ch. 1; Guibert 27; N. Guicciardini, Isaac Newton on Mathematical Certainty and Method (2009); PMM 129 (for the 1637 edition); Roller & Goodman I p. 314. 4to (192 x 144 mm), pp [xii], 336 [2, errata], title printed in red and black and with woodcut printer's device, ornamental tailpiece at end, numerous diagrams in text (one or two leaves spotted, occasional contemporary annotation). Contemporary limp vellum (old repair to spine).

      [Bookseller: SOPHIA RARE BOOKS]
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        The Alcoran of Mahomet, translated out of Arabique into French [.] and newly Englished, for the satisfaction of all that desire to look into the Turkish vanities.

      London, 1649. - Small 4to (175 x 135 cm). 18th century calf, rebacked and with new endpapers. First edition of the first English translation of the Quran. The translation is generally ascribed to the Scottish clergyman and translator Alxander Ross (ca. 1590-1654) because a small text included at the end bears his name. Ross did not know Arabic and based his translation entirely on the French translation of 1647 by the orientalist and diplomat Andr

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat INLIBRIS Gilhofer Nfg. GmbH]
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        CONFESSIONS DE SAINT AUGUSTIN

      Edition : PARIS, PIERRE LE PETIT - CAMUSAT, 1649 - Traduites en fran

      [Bookseller: Livres 113]
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        Jezus en de ziel. Een geestelycke spiegel voor 't gemoed. Bestaande uyt veertig aangename en stichtelycke sinne-beelden.Amsterdam, Pieter Arentsz., 1687. 8vo. With engraved frontispiece and 39 engraved emblems in text, all engraved by Jan Luyken. Contemporary vellum.

      - Klaversma & Hannema 960; Landwehr, Emblem and fable books 474; Praz, p. 406. Expanded third edition of one of the earliest and most popular spiritual emblem books by the well-known Dutch poet and engraver Jan Luyken (1649-1712), first published in 1678. Devoted to a Christian's love for Jesus, it contains 39 emblems accompanied by a motto, some Biblical quotations, and an explanation, or reflection. The present edition is enlarged with an extensive discussion on the "joys of the eternal fatherland". Luyken was inspired for the present emblem book by the engravings of Boetius van Bolswert for the famous emblem book Pia desideria by Herman Hugo (1588-1629).Only very slightly browned around the margins and a few tiny spots. Binding only slightly soiled. Overall in very good condition.

      [Bookseller: ASHER Rare Books]
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        The Great Exemplar of Sanctity and Holy Life

      

      [Bookseller: Maggs Bros. Ltd.]
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        IHS PROVINCIA MEDIOLANENSIS CUM CONFINIJS

      1649. La tavola è contenuta in un atlante in cui sono rappresentati gli insediamenti dei frati Cappuccini, intitolata: Corographica Descriptio Provinciarum et Conventuum Fratrum Minorum S. Francisci Capucinorum, stampata a Torino nel 1649.Bibliografia: Colombo-Rondanini-GRSD, tav. alle pp. 44-45.

      [Bookseller: Libreria Trippini Sergio]
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        Forma, qve se debe gvardar en el pararse, sentarse, hincar las rodillas, y inclinarse; asi en las missas solemnes, feriales, y rezadas: como tambien en las horas canonicas, en el coro; cforme al rito del ceremonial nuevo romano, mandado imprimir, con sus reglas por...Don Iuan de Palafox, y Mendoza.

      Puebla de los Angeles: Por el Bachiller Iuan Blanco Alcaçar, 1649. Small 4to. [6] ff. (last a blank). Puebla was the second city in New Spain to obtain a printing press, issuing its first book in 1642, not 1640 as Medina claimed. The man responsible for the press's arrival was the same eminent figure mentioned on the title-page of this extremely rare volume: Don Juan de Palafox y Mendoza. Bishop, later viceroy, Palafox, was one of the most interesting and controversial figures to reside in Mexico during the 17th century. Born in Fitero, Navarre, Spain, in 1600, the illegitimate but recognized son of Jaime Palafox, the Marqués of Ariza, he rose in the service of the Church in Spain through his native talent and his father's connections. In 1640, the king appointed him the bishop of Puebla, Mexico, with special powers to serve concurrently as a visitador, or special investigator, specifically charging him with reforming the various religious orders (Jesuits, Franciscans, Dominicans, etc.) who seemed to defy and stymie the king's will at every turn, and who had grown to be more secular in behavior than was seemly, legal, customary, or acceptable.    The bishop's efforts as visitador met with dogged resistance, even from the viceroy, whom Palafox suspected of being a sympathizer with the Portuguese separatists (and whom he was to succeed). => The various orders initiated protracted legal opposition to everything Palafox attempted.    Notwithstanding the imposing odds against him, Palafox did have his share of unqualified accomplishments during his years in Mexico: He composed and saw into print the codification of the constitution of the Royal and Pontifical University of Mexico, established a school for girls, founded the famous Palafoxiana Library in Puebla with a donation of 6,000 volumes, and introduced printing in Puebla, Mexico's second largest city during the colonial period.    The printer of this rarity was Bachiller Juan Blanco de Alcaçar (or Alcazar), almost certainly the first printer to set up a press in Puebla de los Angeles. Like many of Mexico's printers of the late 16th and early 17th centuries, Juan de Alcazar (as he generally identified himself in documents) was well educated: He held a bachelor's degree from the Royal and Pontifical University of Mexico. He began his life as a printer in Mexico City in 1617 and there printed several major books, including Fray Martín de León's Manual [y] breve forma de administrar los santos sacramentos a los yndios (1617) and Diego Cisneros's Sitio, naturaleza y propriedades de la ciudad de México (1618). His name disappears from imprint lines of Mexican title-pages and colophons in 1637 to reappear on title-pages printed in Puebla at least as early as 1643; some attribute the "anonymously" printed pieces of 1642 to his press work and more than a few think he printed the even earlier, suppositious Arco triunfal of Mateo Salcedo. From the notarial archives of Puebla we know that he had moved his press to that city by December 1641, and that in January 1642, he had begun to hire apprentices (Pérez Salazar, Los impresores de Puebla en la época colonial [1987 edition], pp. 9?12). The bachiller's "in" ("enchufe" in Spanish) with Bishop Palafox was a strong one: His wife was the sister of Don Luis de Monzón, the Treasurer of the Puebla cathedral (Pérez Salazar, p. 16).    The work at hand, which Bishop Palafox ordered to be printed, explains changes in the newly adopted Ceremonial that affect when congregants sit, kneel, and genuflect. It was => an important work, affecting every communicant at every mass attended.    Searches of NUC Pre-1956, WorldCat, COPAC, CCPBE, BRUIN, and the OPACs of the national library of Spain and Mexico, located only three copies in U.S. libaries and two in Mexican institutions.    Apparently all institutional copies lack the final blank, present in this exemplar and bearing => contemporary manuscript poetry on both sides.         Not in Medina, Puebla; not in Palau; Gavito, Adiciones a La imprenta en la Puebla, 2. Nicolas Antonio,II, 116; Pinelo-Barcia, II, 859; Beristáin de Souza, II, 5. On Blanco de Alcazar, see: Francisco Pérez Salazar, Los impresores de Puebla en la época colonial. Mexican quarter calf binding of the second half of the present century. Small wormhole in upper inner margin, well removed from text. Manuscript additions as above on final blank; on one side, at end of verse, inked skull-and-crossbones devices. => An exceptional copy of a rare book.

      [Bookseller: Philadelphia Rare Books & Manuscripts Co]
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        L'astrologue français, predisant les evenemens singulier et universels des estats et empires du monde. Selon le changement des globes celestes en l'année presente astronomicque.

      Paris, Claude Morlot, 1649. ____ Très rare. "L'astrologue anonyme nous donne ses pronostications "tirées des plus grands Autheurs" (p. 7) et ajoute, à la dernière page : "Ce qui a esté déclaré par les Centuries de Nostradamus..." Benazra, Répertoire chronologique nostradamique 212. Petit bois gravé sur le titre. *****. In-4. Collation : 8 pp. Couverture ancienne en papier éponge bleu.

      [Bookseller: Hugues de Latude]
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        Les passions de l'ame.

      Paris: chez Henry Le Gras, au troisième pilier de la grand' Salle du Palais, à L couronnée, 1649. First edition of Descartes's important psychological treatise, one of his most influential works, and the last work published before his death in the following year. This is a fine copy in an untouched contemporary binding. "Les passions de l'ame, which drew heavily on the then-unpublished Traité de l'homme, contains the application of Descartes's mechanistic physiology to the relationship between mind and body. Descartes made an essential distinction between the soul as the divinely-endowed seat of consciousness, will and rational thought, and the body as a machine or automaton subject to the laws of physics, and only indirectly controlled by the soul through the nerves. Using this dualistic model, he was able to make the important distinction between voluntary and involuntary actions, a distinction discussed further in the Traité. Descartes located the soul in the pineal gland, which thus served as the locus for interaction between soul and body; he had defined the pineal gland's function in the Traité, but Les passions de l'ame contains his first published account of it. The work also contains the first use of the word "reflex" in connection with the action of the nervous system" (Norman). "Cartesian dualism . . . gave great impetus to the development of psychology in its own right" (Hunter & Macalpine, Three Hundred Years of Psychiatry, p. 133). Cartesian theories had a great deal of influence on the way that mental pathologies were considered throughout the entire 17th century and during much of the 18th century, but the link between the pineal gland and psychiatric disorders was definitively highlighted in the 20th century, with the discovery of melatonin in 1958. The first edition of Passions of the Soul was apportioned between the Elseviers of Amsterdam and Henry le Gras of Paris. There is no priority between the two versions; they are equally rare. The origins of Passions of the Soul lie partly in Descartes's Meditations on First Philosophy (1641): in the Sixth Meditation he had sought to justify the way in which we are equipped to respond to the outside world by experiencing sensations, appetites, and passions. He argued that such perceptions provide guides for maneuvering our bodies through the world, and ultimately for preserving the mind-body union that constitutes the human being. But the main impetus for writing the Passions was his correspondence with Princess Elisabeth of Bohemia from 1643 to 1645. Elisabeth, almost twenty years younger than Descartes, was one of the great princesses of Europe, the daughter, granddaughter and great-granddaughter of kings. She was a person of remarkable intelligence and unusually well read at a time when women were generally denied the kind of education their brothers received. Elisabeth asked Descartes most searchingly about his dualistic theory qua theory; she also asked him for advice about her own physical and mental health (she was probably suffering depression owing to the misfortunes of her house both at home and abroad - the English King Charles I was her uncle). Her requests and Descartes' replies frequently bear on the relationship between the body and the mind. "The Passions of the Soul is the last of Descartes's works to be published in his lifetime. It is his fullest account of the interaction between soul and body, and his most significant contribution to moral philosophy. Not that he sets himself up as a moral philosopher: he says that his intention is to explain the passions purely as a natural philosopher (physicien), not, as Aristotle had done, from the point of view of rhetoric or moral philosophy. However, he does not confine himself to a purely descriptive approach: his theory opens up a prescriptive dimension. Thus, the first part of the text explains the nature of passion in general, the second describes the principal passions, and the third the further passions that derive from these; but each part ends with some definite recommendations concerning the attitudes or behavior we should adopt in the light of the foregoing explanations ... "Though he dismisses all earlier writings on the subject, Descartes's account of the passions shows continuities with that of earlier thinkers. Like Aristotle and Aquinas, for instance, he sees the passions as involving interaction between body and soul. But his theory does involve a radical break with other aspects of their accounts. Essentially, he argues that the soul is nothing other than the mind: it is not the support of the organic functions of life. These can be explained in purely mechanical terms. To show this, Descartes briefly describes the workings of the body in terms of its key organs and processes: digestion, the circulation of the blood via the veins into the heart and so to the rest of the body through the arteries; and the movement of the muscles by contraction and extension, in response to the action of the nerves, little filaments originating in the brain and responsible also for sensation. The source of all these processes is a kind of fire kept going in the heart by the blood supplied by the veins. This fire dilates or rarefies the blood, so causing it to flow to different parts of the body. But the most rarefied parts of the blood, what Descartes calls the animal spirits, flow into the brain and out again into the nerves and thence into the muscles, where they produce movement. The animal spirits are described as tiny and fast-moving bodies comparable to the particles of a flame (§§7-10). Their movement is closely related to sensation. Sensory stimuli, external or internal, set off movements in the nerves, which are transmitted to the brain. These can cause movements of the animal spirits, and hence of the muscles. Such motions can be accounted for purely mechanically ... "Descartes analyses the passions as perceptions in the soul of a bodily process. To that extent they are akin to sense-perceptions of external objects or internal perceptions of bodily states such as hunger and pain. In sense-perception the light of a torch and the clang of a bell arouse different movements in our nerves, which are then transmitted to the brain, so as to produce different sensations in the soul (note that the sensation, as such, occurs only in the soul; what occurs in the brain is a movement). But there is an element of confusion in the perception. We seem to see the light of the torch in the room, to hear the bell ring in the church tower. Likewise with our internal perceptions: we feel a dryness in our throat, a pain in our injured foot. But in each case, what we are in fact aware of is a sensation representing an external object or a bodily state (the pain we feel 'in' our foot is produced by the same mechanism as the pain an amputee feels 'in' the limb that has been removed). Again, as regards the passions, we feel anger or joy 'in' our soul, whereas we are in fact reacting to a physical process produced by a sense-perception (seeing behavior of which we disapprove or hearing the voice of someone we are fond of). "The passions, then, can be defined as 'perceptions, or sensations, or emotions of the soul that we refer (rapportons) particularly to the soul itself, and that are caused, sustained, and fortified by some movement of the spirits' (§27). 'Perceptions' in the general sense of thoughts rather than volitions, but not the kind of perception involved in evident knowledge; 'sensations' in that they reach the soul by the same path as sense-perceptions; 'emotions' in that, more than any other kind of thought, they are liable to agitate and disturb the soul (§28). Descartes emphasizes the involvement of the animal spirits in order to distinguish passion as such from acts of will, which we also experience as in the soul, but rightly, because they do originate within it (§29). "The mediating agency between body and soul is identified by Descartes as a part of the brain called the pineal gland. Though undoubtedly erroneous, Descartes's ascription of this function to the gland is a brilliant piece of reasoning. He notes that the other parts of the brain are all doubled, as are our sense-organs; so that we need one single part, like the gland, in which the two-fold impressions received from our sense-organs can be fused into one (§§30-3). "Descartes is now in a position to reconstruct the whole process of passion. It begins in sensation: to use his example, an animal appears in our field of vision. Light reflected from its body affects our optic nerve, producing two images, one for each eye, on the inner surface of the brain. The surrounding spirits transmit these to the pineal gland, which blends them into a single image. The gland transmits this to the soul, and we see the animal ... "Having explained the general mechanism of the passions, Descartes proceeds, in the second part of the text, to explain how the specific passions are generated. He identifies six basic passions, classified in respect of the various ways in which objects of sense-perception can harm or benefit us: wonderment, love, hate, desire, joy, sadness. This taxonomy differs markedly from two influential earlier schemes, those of the Stoics and of Aquinas. Along with each basic passion, he identifies its major derivatives (§§51-69). He then goes through the basic passions again, defining them in more detail and describing the particular physical processes that accompany each one (§§70-111). Next, he reviews the external manifestations of these passions: movements of the eyes, facial expression, changes of colour, trembling, lethargy, fainting, laughter, tears, groans, and sighs (§§112-35). (His discussion of facial expressions is generally held to have inspired seventeenth-century art theorists' attempts to codify the expression of the passions in painting.) In the third part, he discusses the derivative passions in detail, along the same lines as the principal ones" (Moriarty (tr.), The Passions of the Soul and Other Late Philosophical Writings, pp. xviii-xxiv).   "The final essential thread in this account of emotions is the Cartesian theory of conditioning ... 'Our soul and our body are so linked that, if we have once joined some bodily action with a certain thought, one of them does not occur subsequently without the other also occurring. We see this, for example, in those who have taken some medicine with great revulsion when they were ill, and cannot afterwards eat or drink anything that has a similar taste without immediately feeling the same revulsion. Likewise, they cannot think of their revulsion from medicines without the same taste returning in their thought.' This innate connection between specific thoughts or feelings and bodily states tends to continue indefinitely unless changed by new connections that displace them. However, the primitive connections can also be expanded to include novel relations between mental states and bodily states, even in the case of stimuli that have no natural connection with the feelings they trigger. Descartes had noticed that animals can be conditioned to respond to novel stimuli, long before Pavlov studied the same phenomenon in the twentieth century and gave his name to it. 'This is so certain that if you whipped a dog five or six times to the sound of a violin, I believe that it would begin to howl and run away when it hears that music again'. Evidently, the same kind of conditioning works in the case of human beings. 'If people have at some time in the past enjoyed dancing while a certain tune was being played, then the desire to dance will return to them as soon as they hear a similar tune again. On the contrary, if others have never heard the music for a galliard without falling into some misfortune, they would infallibly become sad as soon as they heard it again' ... "Descartes' book on human emotions was published in Amsterdam and Paris, toward the end of November 1649. He had drafted a large part of it during the winter of 1645-46 and had sent it to Elisabeth. Elisabeth's reply included suggestions for improvement that, almost out of character, were accepted by the author. Even with additions and corrections, however, this still amounted to only about two-thirds of the final text. Descartes made a clean copy of the revised text and sent it to Chanut [the French ambassador to Sweden], with permission to show it to Queen Christina. At about the same time, he had a request from an unidentified correspondent who had met him on his trip to Paris, had heard about the essay on the passions, and had apparently offered to assist the author in getting the final version into print. Descartes explained that his reluctance to release the manuscript had nothing to do with an unwillingness to serve his reading public. He wanted to keep the essay confidential as long as possible, partly because it had been composed originally 'only to be read by a princess whose mind is so above the norm that she easily understands what seems most difficult to our doctors'. However, Descartes relented and promised 'to revise this writing on the passions, to add what I think is necessary to make it more intelligible. After that, I shall send it to you and you may do what you wish with it.' "In the spring of 1649, Descartes also sent a copy of the revised manuscript to Clerselier in Paris [Claude Clerselier met Descartes in Paris in 1644 and published the French edition of the Meditations in 1647]. Clerselier advised him that it was too difficult for ordinary readers. This prompted a further revision and plans for the addition of most of the material that was published as Part III of the book. When he wrote to Clerselier, in April 1649, he probably still had done little more than think about the additions that remained to be written: 'As regards the Treatise on the Passions, I do not expect it to be printed until I have arrived in Sweden. For I neglected to revise it and to add the things that you thought were missing, which would have increased its size by a third. It will contain three parts, of which the first will be about the passions in general and, as required, the nature of the soul, etc.; the second part will be about the six primitive passions, and the third part about all the others.' Descartes seems to have been procrastinating at this stage, and to have been concerned primarily with a decision about going to Sweden

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        Le ceremonial françois. Tome premier contenant les ceremonies observés en France aux Sacres & Couronnemens de Roys, & Reynes, & de quelques anciens Ducs de Normandie, d'Aquitaine, & de Bretagne: Comme aussi à leurs Entrées solennelles: Et à celles d'aucuns Dauphins, Gouverneurs de Provinces, & autres Seigneurs, dans diverses Villes du Royaume. Tome second contenant les ceremonies observées en France aux Mariages & Festins: Naissances, & Baptesmes: Maioritez de Roys: Estats Generaux et Particuliers: Assemblées des Notables: Licts de Iustice: Hommages, Sermens de Fidelité: Receptions & Entreueuës: Sermens pour l'observations des Traitez: Processions & Te Deum. Recueilly par Theodore Godefroy, Conseiller du Roy en ses Conseils. Et mis en lumiere par Denys Godefroy, Advocat en Parlement, & Historiographe du Roy.

      chez Sebastien Cramoisy et Gabriel Cramoisy, 1649. Due voll. in-folio, pp. (25) 1024 (3) + pp. (15) 1048 (7). Segnatura: a4 e6 i4 A-6N6 6O2 + a6 e6 A-6Q6 6R6. Leg. settecentesca p. pelle con tit. oro e cornice tip. oro impressi su tass. bordeaux appl. al ds., num. del tomo in oro entro cornice tip. oro impressi entro scomparti al ds., fregi gigliati impressi in oro entro scomparti al ds., nervi, tagli a spruzzo rossi, tit. r/n al frontespizio, marca tip. splendidamente incisa con putti che sostengono medaglioni raffiguranti immagini tratte dai Dieci Comandamenti, testatine e capilettera xil. abitati, finalini xil. Spellature ai piatti e al ds., bruniture diffuse, macchie n.t. Vol. 1: minime mancanze al piede inf. del ds. e al piatto post., macchia di cera a p. 65 con copertura del testo, macchie ai margini inf. delle pp. 293-295, annotazioni di mano antica a margine, mancanza al taglio intermedio di p. 476, p. 745 e pp. 846-851 numerate due volte ma con testo regolare, mancano le pp. 749-750 e 844-850 ma il testo procede regolarmente, alone di umidità alla parte interna delle pp. 800-820 e da p. 840 fino a fine opera, strappo al taglio inf. delle pp. 917-918 con interessamento del testo, strappo al taglio inf. delle pp. 935-936 e al taglio sup. delle pp. 999-1000 senza interessamento del testo; Vol. 2: minime mancanze al ds., lavoro di tarlo al margine inf. delle pp. 303-304 senza perdita di testo, p. 357 e pp. 807-810 numerate due volte ma con testo regolare, mancano le pp. 803-806 ma il testo procede regolarmente, le pp. 836-837 sono numerate come pp. 834-835 ma il testo procede regolarmente. L'opera doveva essere in tre volumi, come risulta dall'Advertissement au lecteur nel vol. 1, ma il vol. 3 rimase manoscritto, cfr. NUC pre-1956, CCIII, p. 150. Si tratta della 2a edizione di uno scritto definito come testo base sulla sacralità monarchica francese. La 1a edizione apparve nel 1619 in un vol. in-4°, mentre il vol. 3 - che trattava il tema del ricevimento dei cavalieri ai tornei e ai funerali - non vide mai la luce. Saffroy, Bibliographie généalogique, héraldique et nobiliaire de la France: des origines à nos jours, imprimés et manuscrits, I, 15103 la definisce "Édition beaucoup plus complète que la précedente". Un'edizione simile a quella presente è stata battuta in asta da Druout in tempi non troppo recenti. ICCU segnala la presenza di questa edizione in 6 biblioteche italiane: Biblioteca nazionale centrale di Firenze, Biblioteca Trivulziana - Archivio storico civico di Milano, Biblioteca Palatina di Parma, Biblioteca nazionale centrale Vittorio Emanuele II di Roma, Biblioteca Reale di Torino e Biblioteca nazionale universitaria di Torino. Available on request description in English / La description des livres en français est à disposition sur demande / Se envían descripciones de libros a pedida.

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        De incredilibus. - Tollius, Cornelius (Hrsg.): PALAEPHATI DE INCREDILIBVS [graece et latine]. CORNELIVS TOLIVS in Latinum sermonem vertit, & NOTIS illustravit. [Druckermarke "Minerva", Rahir "M. 17"]

      Amsterdam Elzevier 1649 - [Der griechische Verfassername und Titel, sowie die folgenden lateinischen Zeilen in Rot gedruckt: "INCREDILIBVS", "AMSTELODAMI," und "MDCXLIX.".] 1 (weißes) Blatt, 18 Blätter (incl. typographischem Titel), 253 Seiten, 4 Blätter (Index), 2 (weiße) Blätter. Mit fünf durchgezogenen Pergamentbändern gehefteter Pergamentband der Zeit mit handschriftlichem Rückentitel. (13,3 x 8,3 cm, bzw. 12,7 x 7,4 cm; Buchblock: 2,2 cm) 12°. Bérard S. 86 ("Nous ne connaissons qu'une seule édition de ce livre, imprimé chez les Elzévirs. Elle est belle, et le texte grec est sur-tout fort bien imprimé. Liminaires, 18 feuillets; texte; 253 pages, tables et errata, 9 pages. Valeur ordinaire."). Pieters 114 auf S. 260. Willems 1089. Minzloff S. 162. Winterthur 772. Vergl. Brunet V, 1733. Goldsmid III, 10. Rahir 1101. Berghman 1565. Socoloff I A 430. Copinger 3463. Broman 308. Costabili 2122. Leuchtenberg 1195. Drouot (1946) 220. Lengertz 541. Thulins 148, 345. Kraus 136 ("Only Elzevier edition of this collection of Greek legends by the writer Palaephatus (3rd century B. C.), very popular in Latin translation. The Greek and Latin texts are on facing pages."). Phiebig 225 [Konvolut, diese Ausgabe darin enthalten, wohl EHC 12.1649.Pal.01]. Thulins 325, 82. EHC 12.1649.Pal.00 + 01[= Phiebig 225]. Weddigen 085. Ebert 15645. Schweiger I, 221. Graesse V, 103. Von Tollius unterzeichnete, gedruckte Widmung für die Honoratioren des Herzogtums Geldern, sowie der Grafschaft Zutphen auf Blatt 2 und den folgenden. Der Pergamentband etwas angeschmutzt, am Rücken stärker. Allseitiger, blauer Sprenkelschnitt. Innen recht sauber. Griechisch-lateinische Parellelausgabe. Neben der Druckermarke und den Schmuckinitialen mit den folgenden fleurons und Vignetten verziert: auf Blatt 10 verso die große Vignette mit den Buchstaben "EID", Rahir 107. Auf Blatt 11 verso die Vignette Rahir 96. Auf Seite 253 Rahir 90, auf dem ersten Indexblatt verso Rahir 85, Rahir 107 noch einmal auf dem letzten bedruckten Blatt recto. Auf dem vorderen Innendeckel das Exlibris Weddigens und seine handschriftlichen bibliographischen Anmerkungen. * Bitte fordern Sie bei Interesse unsere umfangreichen Anmerkungen an. * * Versand mit/ shipping with Deutsche Post oder/ or DHL. - Ask for more pics ! * 2100 gr.

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        Jurisprudentia ecclesiastica seu consistorialis rerum & quaestionum in serenissimi ac potentissimi pricipis electoris Saxon.

      Leipzig, Köhler für Kühne 1649 - 3 Teile in 1 Band. Folio. Gestochener Titel, 22 nn. Bl., 253; 652; 232 S., 64 nn. Bl. Pergament der Zeit, (Einband fleckig). Erste Ausgabe. - ADB IV, 17; Stintzing/L. II, 88ff. - Carpzov (1595-1660) gilt als der wichtigsten Gestalter eines eigenständigen deutschen Rechtssystems. "Die Jurisprudentia ecclesiastica ist das erste vollständige System des protestantischen Kirchenrechts." (Stintzing/L.) - Der gestochene Titel lautet: Opus definitionum ecclesiasticarum seu consistorialium. - Durchgehend gebräunt, einige Unterstreichungen von alter Hand. [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

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