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         Laurentii Vallae Elegantiarum Latinae linguae libri sex. Eiusdem de reciprocatione sui, et suus, libellus

      Antonium Gryphium, Lugduni 1566 - Naturali imperfezioni alla copertina, qualche macchia e alone all\'interno, vecchie tracce d\'appartenenza alla prima e ultima bianca L'opera comprende una lunga serie di passi tratti dai piu' celebri scrittori latini (Virgilio, Cicerone, Tito Livio), dai quali, si codificano canoni linguistici e stilistici della lingua latina. Questa opera costitui' una delle basi scientifiche del movimento umanista impegnato a riformare il latino cristiano sullo stile ciceroniano. 754 + (50) p. 125x85 mm p.perg. coeva con titolo manoscritto sul dorso

      [Bookseller: Libreria Antiquaria Giulio Cesare]
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         Confessio et expositio simplex orthodoxae fidei, & dogmatum Catholicorum synceræ religionis Christianæ, concorditer ab Ecclesiæ Christi ministris, qui sunt in Helvetia, Tiguri, Bernæ, Scaphusij, Sangalli, Curiæ Rhetorum & apud confÅ“deratos, Mylhusij item, & Biennæ, quibus adiunxerunt se & Genevensis Ecclesiæ ministri,... (bound with:) IDEM. Bekanntnuß deß waaren Gloubens, unnd einfalte erlüterung der rächten allgemeinen Leer und houptartickel der reinen Christlichen Religion, von den Dienern der kyrchen Christi in der Eydgnoschaft, die da sind zu Zürych, Bern, und Schaffhusen, in der Statt Sant Gallen, in der Statt Chur, unnd in den dryen Pündten, ouch zu Müllhusen und Byell,…

      Zurich: Christopher Froschauer, 1566. DEDICATION COPYTwo works in one volume, 4to (203x140 mm); [4], 48 leaves; [4], 68 ll. Old boards, some light browning, two small stamps on the blank margins of the first title-page, but a very fine copy.Rare first editions (first issues) of both Latin and German redactions of the so-called Second Helvetic Confession, Bullinger's crowning achievement, the most comprehensive and authoritative Reformed confession of faith. It not only became the international standard of belief for many of the Reformed churches and a key frame of reference for new doctrinal departures, but also remains part of the Reformed heritage today. The Confessionconsists of thirty chapters, which cover in natural order all the articles of faith and discipline which then challenged the attention of the Church (cf. A.C. Cochrane, Reformed Confessions of the Sixteenth Century, Louisville, KY 2003, pp. 220-223).The First Helvetic Confessionknown also as the Second Confession of Basel, was drawn up in that city in 1536 by Heinrich Bullinger and Leo Jud of Zürich, Kaspar Megander of Bern, Oswald Myconius and Simon Grynaeus of Basel, Martin Bucer and Wolfgang Capito of Strasbourg, with other representatives from Schaffhausen, St Gall, Mülhausen and Biel. The first draft was in Latin and the Zürich delegates objected to its Lutheran phraseology. Leo Jud's German translation was more or less accepted by all, and after Myconius and Grynaeus had modified the Latin form, both versions were agreed to and adopted on February 26, 1536.In time, however, the Swiss churches had found the First Helvetic Confession too short and still too Lutheran. Thus Bullinger started to compose what became the Second Helvetic Confession as a private exercise and an abiding testimony of the faith in which he had lived and in which he wished to die. He showed it to Peter Martyr, who fully consented to it, shortly before his death (Nov. 12, 1562). Two years later he elaborated it more fully during the raging of the pestilence, and added it to his will, which was to be delivered to the magistrate of Zurich after his death, which he then expected every day. But events in Germany gave it a public character. The pious Elector of the Palatinate, Frederick III, being threatened by the Lutherans with exclusion from the treaty of peace on account of his secession to the Reformed Church and publication of the Heidelberg Catechism(1563), requested Bullinger (1565) to prepare a clear and full exposition of the Reformed faith, that he might answer the charges of heresy and dissension so constantly brought against the same. Bullinger sent him a manuscript copy of his Confession. The Elector was so much pleased with it that he desired to have it translated and published in Latin and German before the meeting of the Imperial Diet, which was to assemble at Augsburg in 1566, to act on his alleged apostasy. But he made such a manly and noble defense of his faith before the Diet, that even his Lutheran opponents were filled with admiration for his piety, and thought no longer of impeaching him for heresy.In the meantime the Swiss felt the need of such a Confession as a closer bond of union. The First Helvetic Confession was deemed too short, and the Zurich Confession of 1545, the Zurich Consensus of 1549, and the Geneva Consensus of 1552 touched only the articles of the Lord's Supper and predestination. Conferences were held, and Théodore de Bèze came in person to Zurich to take part in the work. Bullinger freely consented to a few changes, and prepared also the German version. Geneva, Berne, Schaffhausen, Biel, the Grisons, St. Gall, and Mühlhausen expressed their agreement. Basle alone, which had its own Confession, declined for a long time, but ultimately acceded.The new Confession appeared at Zurich, March 12, 1566, in both languages, at public expense, and was forwarded to the Elector and to Philip of Hesse. Glarus, Basle, Appenzell, Neuchâtel (1568), France (at the Synod of La Rochelle, 1571), Poland (1571 and 1578), Hungary (at the Synod of Debreczin, 1567), and Scotland (1566) approved the Confession. A French translation appeared in 1566 in Geneva under the care of Bèze. Later it was translated not only into English, but also into Dutch, Magyar, Polish, Italian, Arabic, and Turkish (cf. W. Hildebrand & R. Zimmermann, Bedeutung und Geschichte des Zweiten Helvetischen Bekenntnisses, Zürich, 1938, pp. 58-60).Like most of the Confessions of the sixteenth century, the Helvetic Confession is expanded beyond the limits of a popular creed into a lengthy theological treatise. It is the matured fruit of the preceding symbolical labors of Bullinger and the Swiss Churches. It is in substance a restatement of the First Helvetic Confession, in the same order of topics, but with great improvements in matter and form. It is scriptural, wise and judicious, full and elaborate, yet simple and clear, uncompromising towards the errors of Rome, moderate in its dissent from the Lutheran dogmas. It proceeds on the conviction that the Reformed faith is in harmony with the true Catholic faith of all ages, especially the ancient Greek and Latin Church.Hence it is preceded by the Imperial edict of 380 (from the recognized Justinian code), which draws the line between orthodoxy and heresy, and excludes as heresies only the departures from the Apostolic and Nicene faith. It inserts also the brief Trinitarian creed ascribed to the Roman Pope Damasus (from the writings of Jerome), and referred to in said decree as a standard of orthodoxy. As in former Confessions, so also in this, Bullinger distinctly recognizes, in the spirit of Christian liberty and progress, the constant growth in the knowledge of the Word of God, and the consequent right of improvement in symbolical statements of the Christian faith.Upon the whole, the Second Helvetic Confession occupies the first rank among the Reformed Confessions. Already the great Swiss theologian and historian Karl Rudolf Hagenbach in his Kritische Geschichte der Entstehung und Schicksale der ersten Basler Confession (Basel, 1827, p. 86) wrote: "In ihrer ganzen Anlage und in der Durchführung einzelner Punkte, namentlich in praktischer Beziehung (in der Scheidung des Geistlichen and Weltlichen, u.s.w.) ist sie ein wahres dogmatisches Kunstwerk zu nennen". See also J. Staedtke, Die historische Bedeutung der 'Confessio Helvetica Posterior', in: "Vierhundert Jahre 'Confessio Helvetica Posterior' ", Bern, 1967, pp. 8-18.Heinrich Bullinger was Zwingli's successor as Antistes of the Zurich church. He has an influence throughout Europe because of his letters (of which are extant more than twelve thousand pieces), his personal ministrations to exiles, and his voluminous publications. He corresponded with leading French Protestants and had French and Italian exiles in his home from time to time. He corresponded with Protestants in Poland and Hungary. His works were widely read in the Netherlands. His influence was especially strong in England, no doubt owing to the many contacts with the English, including John Hooper, who lived in close connection with Bullinger from 1547 to 1549. Bullinger unavoidably built on the Zwinglian foundation, but he also went beyond Zwingli, adding his own genius and leaving a lasting legacy to the Reformed churches. His most distinctive doctrine was his theology of the covenant, which was closely connected with his view of the Christian community (cf. F. Büsser, Heinrich Bullinger, Zürich, 2004/5, passim; and T. Kirby, Heinrich Bullinger, 1504-1575: Life-Thought-Influence, in: "Zwingliana", 32, 2005, pp. 107-117).At the bottom of the title-page of the Latin edition is found the autograph dedication by Henrich Bullinger to Wilhelm Meyer von Knonau (d. 1570), who was the latter's pupil in the Zurich Academy (see the handwritten list of his pupils in the Zürich Staatsarchiv). Wilhelm's father Gerold (b. 1509) was Zwingli's step-son (in fact Anna Reinhart was married with Hans Mayer von Knonau and after his death in 1517 she married Zwingli in 1522 - see O. Farner, Anna Reinhard, die Gattin Huldrych Zwinglis, in: "Zwingliana" 3, 1916, pp. 203-204, 244). Gerold died as his step-father in the battle of Kappel (October 11, 1531). Wilhelm's mother Anna died in 1538 and it can be presumed that he then was supported by Heinrich Bullinger. In 1551 Wilhelm became a member of the Zurich Great Council as 'Achtzehner von der Constaffel' and in 1560 treasurer of the chapter of the Zürich Grossmünster as well as a member of the guild "Zum Schneggen' (cf. E. Usteri,Die Schildnerschaft zum Schneggen, Geschichte der Schilde seit 1559, Zürich 1969, p. 13; on the family see H. Schulthess, Das Junker- und Gerichtsherrengeschlecht der Meyer von Knonau, in "Kulturbilder aus Zürichs Vergangenheit", 1, Zürich, 1930, pp. 157-163).VD 16, B-9590 and B-9593; Index Aureliensis, 127.433 and 127.432; J. Staedtke, ed. Heinrich Bullinger Werke.Vol. I: Beschreibendes Verzeichnis der gedruckten Werke von Heinrich Bullinger, Zürich, 1972, nos. 433 and 465; M. Vischer, Bibliographie der Zürcher Druckschriften des 15. und 16. Jahrhunderts, Baden-Baden, 1991, C-768 and C-766; E. Koch, Die Textüberlieferung der Confessio Helvetica Posterior und ihre Vorgeschichte, in: "Vierhundert Jahre 'Confessio Helvetica Posterior' ", Bern, 1967, pp. 12-40; J. Staedtke, Bibliographie des Zweiten Helvetischen Bekenntnisses, in: "Vierhundert Jahre 'Confessio Helvetica Posterior' ", Bern, 1967, pp. 42, no.1; 45, no. 31.

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         Carta executoria de hidalgía in favour of Antonio Gutierres, and his sisters Maria, Catalina, Ana, Lucia, and Francisca Gutierres, of Cáceres (Estremadura).

      Dated at end: Granada, 12 August 1566. - Folio. Calligraphic manuscript of 48 leaves of strong vellum, ruled in red with double-line border in margins throughout (including the 7 otherwise blank leaves at the end). 36 lines to a page finely executed in a rounded gothic chancery hand. First initial painted in gold on a blue background; calligraphic opening initials and head-pieces throughout; flourishes and initials of the notary in tailend margins; at the end, signatures of Dr Ostos Pecayas, Lic. Juan Velasques, Dr Torres and various other officials; subsequent manuscript notarial entries confirming the authenticity of the document. With full-page illuminated frontispiece painting on verso of first leaf. Bound in contemporary limp vellum (repaired) with original flaps, toggles and ties intact. Royal confirmation of arms and nobility for the Gutierres family from Cáceres, Estremadura, and their descendants. The illuminated full-page painting is made up of three panels: the top left contains a fine miniature painting of the Annunciation (140 x 110mm), the top right bears the king’s name in bold gilt lettering ‘Don Phelipe’ on a blue speckled background interlined with red bars ornamented in white (140 x 95mm); the lower panel contains the family arms showing a lion rampant crossed with the heads of two hounds in gilt on a green shield within multi-coloured borders of orange, blue and red, flanked on each side by a floral –grotesque ornamental border in red, green, and blue, on a gilt background (170 x 203mm). A good example of Spanish baroque calligraphy and illumination in its original binding. Well preserved. A handsome document. [Attributes: Soft Cover]

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         Confessio et expositio simplex orthodoxae fidei, & dogmatum Catholicorum synceræ religionis Christianæ, concorditer ab Ecclesiæ Christi ministris, qui sunt in Helvetia, Tiguri, Bernæ, Scaphusij, Sangalli, Curiæ Rhetorum & apud confœderatos, Mylhusij item, & Biennæ, quibus adiunxerunt se & Genevensis Ecclesiæ ministri,... (bound with:) IDEM. Bekanntnuß deß waaren Gloubens, unnd einfalte erlüterung der rächten allgemeinen Leer und houptartickel der reinen Christlichen Religion, von den Dienern der kyrchen Christi in der Eydgnoschaft, die da sind zu Zürych, Bern, und Schaffhusen, in der Statt Sant Gallen, in der Statt Chur, unnd in den dryen Pündten, ouch zu Müllhusen und Byell,...

      DEDICATION COPYTwo works in one volume, 4to (203x140 mm); [4], 48 leaves; [4], 68 ll. Old boards, some light browning, two small stamps on the blank margins of the first title-page, but a very fine copy.Rare first editions (first issues) of both Latin and German redactions of the so-called Second Helvetic Confession, Bullinger's crowning achievement, the most comprehensive and authoritative Reformed confession of faith. It not only became the international standard of belief for many of the Reformed churches and a key frame of reference for new doctrinal departures, but also remains part of the Reformed heritage today. The Confessionconsists of thirty chapters, which cover in natural order all the articles of faith and discipline which then challenged the attention of the Church (cf. A.C. Cochrane, Reformed Confessions of the Sixteenth Century, Louisville, KY 2003, pp. 220-223).The First Helvetic Confessionknown also as the Second Confession of Basel, was drawn up in that city in 1536 by Heinrich Bullinger and Leo Jud of Zürich, Kaspar Megander of Bern, Oswald Myconius and Simon Grynaeus of Basel, Martin Bucer and Wolfgang Capito of Strasbourg, with other representatives from Schaffhausen, St Gall, Mülhausen and Biel. The first draft was in Latin and the Zürich delegates objected to its Lutheran phraseology. Leo Jud's German translation was more or less accepted by all, and after Myconius and Grynaeus had modified the Latin form, both versions were agreed to and adopted on February 26, 1536.In time, however, the Swiss churches had found the First Helvetic Confession too short and still too Lutheran. Thus Bullinger started to compose what became the Second Helvetic Confession as a private exercise and an abiding testimony of the faith in which he had lived and in which he wished to die. He showed it to Peter Martyr, who fully consented to it, shortly before his death (Nov. 12, 1562). Two years later he elaborated it more fully during the raging of the pestilence, and added it to his will, which was to be delivered to the magistrate of Zurich after his death, which he then expected every day. But events in Germany gave it a public character. The pious Elector of the Palatinate, Frederick III, being threatened by the Lutherans with exclusion from the treaty of peace on account of his secession to the Reformed Church and publication of the Heidelberg Catechism(1563), requested Bullinger (1565) to prepare a clear and full exposition of the Reformed faith, that he might answer the charges of heresy and dissension so constantly brought against the same. Bullinger sent him a manuscript copy of his Confession. The Elector was so much pleased with it that he desired to have it translated and published in Latin and German before the meeting of the Imperial Diet, which was to assemble at Augsburg in 1566, to act on his alleged apostasy. But he made such a manly and noble defense of his faith before the Diet, that even his Lutheran opponents were filled with admiration for his piety, and thought no longer of impeaching him for heresy.In the meantime the Swiss felt the need of such a Confession as a closer bond of union. The First Helvetic Confession was deemed too short, and the Zurich Confession of 1545, the Zurich Consensus of 1549, and the Geneva Consensus of 1552 touched only the articles of the Lord's Supper and predestination. Conferences were held, and Théodore de Bèze came in person to Zurich to take part in the work. Bullinger freely consented to a few changes, and prepared also the German version. Geneva, Berne, Schaffhausen, Biel, the Grisons, St. Gall, and Mühlhausen expressed their agreement. Basle alone, which had its own Confession, declined for a long time, but ultimately acceded.The new Confession appeared at Zurich, March 12, 1566, in both languages, at public expense, and was forwarded to the Elector and to Philip of Hesse. Glarus, Basle, Appenzell, Neuchâtel (1568), France (at the Synod of La Rochelle, 1571), Poland (1571 and 1578), Hungary (at the Synod of Debreczin, 1567), and Scotland (1566) approved the Confession. A French translation appeared in 1566 in Geneva under the care of Bèze. Later it was translated not only into English, but also into Dutch, Magyar, Polish, Italian, Arabic, and Turkish (cf. W. Hildebrand & R. Zimmermann, Bedeutung und Geschichte des Zweiten Helvetischen Bekenntnisses, Zürich, 1938, pp. 58-60).Like most of the Confessions of the sixteenth century, the Helvetic Confession is expanded beyond the limits of a popular creed into a lengthy theological treatise. It is the matured fruit of the preceding symbolical labors of Bullinger and the Swiss Churches. It is in substance a restatement of the First Helvetic Confession, in the same order of topics, but with great improvements in matter and form. It is scriptural, wise and judicious, full and elaborate, yet simple and clear, uncompromising towards the errors of Rome, moderate in its dissent from the Lutheran dogmas. It proceeds on the conviction that the Reformed faith is in harmony with the true Catholic faith of all ages, especially the ancient Greek and Latin Church.Hence it is preceded by the Imperial edict of 380 (from the recognized Justinian code), which draws the line between orthodoxy and heresy, and excludes as heresies only the departures from the Apostolic and Nicene faith. It inserts also the brief Trinitarian creed ascribed to the Roman Pope Damasus (from the writings of Jerome), and referred to in said decree as a standard of orthodoxy. As in former Confessions, so also in this, Bullinger distinctly recognizes, in the spirit of Christian liberty and progress, the constant growth in the knowledge of the Word of God, and the consequent right of improvement in symbolical statements of the Christian faith.Upon the whole, the Second Helvetic Confession occupies the first rank among the Reformed Confessions. Already the great Swiss theologian and historian Karl Rudolf Hagenbach in his Kritische Geschichte der Entstehung und Schicksale der ersten Basler Confession (Basel, 1827, p. 86) wrote: "In ihrer ganzen Anlage und in der Durchführung einzelner Punkte, namentlich in praktischer Beziehung (in der Scheidung des Geistlichen and Weltlichen, u.s.w.) ist sie ein wahres dogmatisches Kunstwerk zu nennen". See also J. Staedtke, Die historische Bedeutung der 'Confessio Helvetica Posterior', in: "Vierhundert Jahre 'Confessio Helvetica Posterior' ", Bern, 1967, pp. 8-18.Heinrich Bullinger was Zwingli's successor as Antistes of the Zurich church. He has an influence throughout Europe because of his letters (of which are extant more than twelve thousand pieces), his personal ministrations to exiles, and his voluminous publications. He corresponded with leading French Protestants and had French and Italian exiles in his home from time to time. He corresponded with Protestants in Poland and Hungary. His works were widely read in the Netherlands. His influence was especially strong in England, no doubt owing to the many contacts with the English, including John Hooper, who lived in close connection with Bullinger from 1547 to 1549. Bullinger unavoidably built on the Zwinglian foundation, but he also went beyond Zwingli, adding his own genius and leaving a lasting legacy to the Reformed churches. His most distinctive doctrine was his theology of the covenant, which was closely connected with his view of the Christian community (cf. F. Büsser, Heinrich Bullinger, Zürich, 2004/5, passim; and T. Kirby, Heinrich Bullinger, 1504-1575: Life-Thought-Influence, in: "Zwingliana", 32, 2005, pp. 107-117).At the bottom of the title-page of the Latin edition is found the autograph dedication by Henrich Bullinger to Wilhelm Meyer von Knonau (d. 1570), who was the latter's pupil in the Zurich Academy (see the handwritten list of his pupils in the Zürich Staatsarchiv). Wilhelm's father Gerold (b. 1509) was Zwingli's step-son (in fact Anna Reinhart was married with Hans Mayer von Knonau and after his death in 1517 she married Zwingli in 1522 - see O. Farner, Anna Reinhard, die Gattin Huldrych Zwinglis, in: "Zwingliana" 3, 1916, pp. 203-204, 244). Gerold died as his step-father in the battle of Kappel (October 11, 1531). Wilhelm's mother Anna died in 1538 and it can be presumed that he then was supported by Heinrich Bullinger. In 1551 Wilhelm became a member of the Zurich Great Council as 'Achtzehner von der Constaffel' and in 1560 treasurer of the chapter of the Zürich Grossmünster as well as a member of the guild "Zum Schneggen' (cf. E. Usteri,Die Schildnerschaft zum Schneggen, Geschichte der Schilde seit 1559, Zürich 1969, p. 13; on the family see H. Schulthess, Das Junker- und Gerichtsherrengeschlecht der Meyer von Knonau, in "Kulturbilder aus Zürichs Vergangenheit", 1, Zürich, 1930, pp. 157-163).VD 16, B-9590 and B-9593; Index Aureliensis, 127.433 and 127.432; J. Staedtke, ed. Heinrich Bullinger Werke.Vol. I: Beschreibendes Verzeichnis der gedruckten Werke von Heinrich Bullinger, Zürich, 1972, nos. 433 and 465; M. Vischer, Bibliographie der Zürcher Druckschriften des 15. und 16. Jahrhunderts, Baden-Baden, 1991, C-768 and C-766; E. Koch, Die Textüberlieferung der Confessio Helvetica Posterior und ihre Vorgeschichte, in: "Vierhundert Jahre 'Confessio Helvetica Posterior' ", Bern, 1967, pp. 12-40; J. Staedtke, Bibliographie des Zweiten Helvetischen Bekenntnisses, in: "Vierhundert Jahre 'Confessio Helvetica Posterior' ", Bern, 1967, pp. 42, no.1; 45, no. 31.

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         Summa doctrinae christianae. Per quaestiones luculenter conscripta, nunc demum recognita et locupletata, authore D. Petro Canisio Societatis Iesu Theologo, ut ex eius noua Prefatione constabit.

      Apud Maternum Cholinum, Coloniae 1566 - Kölner Ausgabe mit einem neuen Vorwort desselben Verfassers. Die Paginierung gibt die Blätteranzahl, nicht die Seitenanzahl an. Ab der Seite 100 wurde für einige Seiten versehentlich von 200 weitergezählt, die Kustoden bezeugen aber, dass dies lediglich ein Fehler in der Paginierung und nicht in der Bindung ist. Dem Buch angehängt ist ein Appendix ("De hominis lapsu et iustificatione secum"). Des Weiteren folgen zehn Blätter mit einem Index und den Errata - Angaben. Der Einband wurde aus einem Pergamentblatt angefertigt, das wahrscheinlich aus der Handschrift (mindestens zweifarbig) einer lateinischsprachigen Liedersammlung stammt (leider schwer zu erkennen). Mit Wasserschaden und einigen Zeichnungen und Notizen in alter Hand. Die letzten Seiten weisen einen kurzen, aber sauberen Einschnitt am oberen äußeren Rand auf. - 209 Seiten, 11 Blatt. Sehr schlechter Pergamenteinband der Zeit.

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         The Actis and Constitutiounis of the Realme of Scotland maid in Parliamentis haldin be . . . Kingis Iames the First, Secund, thrid, Feird, Fyft, and in tyme of Marie now Quene of Scottis [with acts of two other Parliaments]. S.T.C. 21876a, 21881, and 21883

      Edinburgh: [1] Robert Lekpreuik [2 and 3] Iohne Ros, 1566 & 1575. Modern panelled morocco, extra-gilt, marbled endpapers and pastedowns, title just trimmed, some staining, ex-Skene Library; the Taussig copy First edition variant issue of the first collected laws of Scotland, beginning with the statutes passed at the first parliament of James I in 1424 through 1566, the year of publication, preserving part of the original record otherwise lost

      [Bookseller: Meyer Boswell Books, Inc.]
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         Lexicon Graecolatinvm, ex variis authorum scriptis qui in hoc commentandi genere excelluerunt, ita decerptum, hacque enchiridii forma digestum, ut non poenitenda vocum accessione, opusculorumqve operi convenientium additione auctum illustratumque sit.

      Genf, Crispinus (Crespin), 1566. - Gr- 8°, circa 20 x 15 cm. 504 Bll., Titel mit ornamentaler Bordüre Leder d. 18. Jh. Seltene gegenüber früheren Fassungen umgearbeitete und erweiterte Ausgabe des griechisch-lateinischen Wörterbuches von Crespin, der als bedeutender Graezist und Philhellene hier auch ein griechisches Vorwort (als Joannes ho Krispinos) für die Studierenden der alten Sprachen voranstellt. Jean Crespin (1520-1572) war ursprünglich ein französischer Jurist, der jedoch nach Genf ins Exil gehen musste und dort eine sehr produktive Druckerei gründete. 1562 veröffentlichte er ein umfangreiches griechisches Wörterbuch, das von seinen Freunden Guillaume Budé, und Robert Constantin ediert wurde. Die vorliegende Fassung ist ein von ihm selbst bearbeitete grössere Taschenausgabe. Vorangestellt sind Hinweise zur Alphabet und der Aussprache, im Anhang finden sich mehrere Texte zur Grammatik und den verschiedenen Dialekten. "- Titel mit kleinen alten Vermerken, etwas gebräunt, kaum fleckig, witzige alte Federzeichnung zu Beginn, im oberen Beriech jedoch oft mit mattem Feuchtrand, Vorsätze gelöst, Einband berieben, insgesamt jedoch gut erhalten. [Attributes: Hard Cover]

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         Viertzig kurtze Predig, uber den gantzen Catechismum. Für die Haussväter, jr Gesinde zu lehren.

      - Nürnberg, Ulrich Neuber and Dietrich Gerlach, 1566. 4to. [151] lvs. Modern marbled paper-covered boards. VD 16 H 5448; Franz 21.6. Rare sixth and last German edition of Huberinus' forty catechism sermons. Huberinus was the first Protestant preacher in the county of Hohenlohe (Northern Württemberg) and one of the most important sixteenth century writers of Protestant devotional literature. He matriculated at the University of Wittenberg in 1522, resided in Augsburg from 1525 until 1544, and finally became preacher in Öhringen. Especially in Öhringen he had a decisive influence on the course of the Reformation. Huberinus also brought vigor to the campaign to reform family and marriage. He was a strong advocate of the patriarchal family and emphasized that the success of the Reformation depended upon the patriarch taking over the task of doctrinal instruction in his family. His forty catechism sermons, held in Öhringen and first published in 1550, have also been translated into Latin. - Two marginal repairs (one of them affecting a few letters) and last blank leaf missing. [Attributes: Hard Cover]

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         De Philippi Melanchthonis Ortv, Totivs Vitae Cvrricvlo et Morte, Implicata Rervm Memorabilivm Temporis Illivs Hominumque Mentione Atque Indicio, Cum Expositionis Serie Cohaerentium: Narratio Diligens Et Accvrata Ioachimi Camerarii Pabeperg. Lipsiae Cvm Privilegio.

      Lipsiae: Excudebat Ernestus Voegelin Constantiensis. Anno 1566. (Leipzig: Ernst Vögelin). - Lipsiae: Excudebat Ernestus Voegelin Constantiensis. Anno 1566. Leipzig: Ernst Vögelin, 1566. First edition of an important biography of the German philosopher and theologian of the Protestant Reformation Philipp Melanchthon (1497-1560), who worked closely with Martin Luther. It was written by Melanchthon's close friend Joachim Camerarius (1500-1574), a classical scholar who was able to consult a large amount of personal correspondence, which makes this work a valuable source. With some manuscript notes on page 1 and 44, slightly browned, and evidence of a bookplate or label removed to the front free end paper. A very good wide-margined copy bound by Bayntun (Riviere), Bath, England. The first edition of the Melanchthon biography of Joachim Camerarius in a very nice binding. "Stissimum" on page A2 of the introduction. Thought to be First printing second state. [20], 1-419pp, [1], 420-423pp, [18]pp. Fine speckled calf by Bayntun (Riviere) with blind decoration to the boards and spine. Morocco title label with gilt titles.   Condition Report Externally Spine – very good condition – blind decoration with gilt titles to morocco label. Joints – very good condition. Corners – very good condition – minor wear. Boards – very good condition – blind decoration in 18th century style. Page edges – very good condition. See above and photos. Internally Hinges – very good condition. Paste downs – very good condition. End papers – good condition – evidence of bookplate/label removal. Title – good condition. Pages – good condition – some writing to p1 and 44. Binding – very good condition. See photos Publisher: see above. Publication Date: 1566 Binding: Hardback [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Louis88Books]
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         1. Epistolai (graece). Epistolae. - 2. Epistolae, prorsus Apostolicae. Hieronymo Vairlenio Sylvio interprete, cum breviss. in easdem scholiis.

      Antwerpen, Christophorus Plantin, 1566. - 8°, circa 16,6 x 11 cm. 69 SS., 1 w. Bl. - 78 SS., 1 w. Bl., beide Titel mit Druckermarke Späterer Pergamenteinband unter Verwendung einer alten Handschrift "Voet, Plantin 1435 und 1436; Pettegree NB 16167-8; Hoffmann II, 533-534. Erste Plantin-Ausgaben der Briefe des Bischofs von Antiochia, der wohl im 2. Jahrhundert lebte, über dessen Lebensumstände jedoch nur sehr wenig überliefert ist. Von den zwölf hier erst griechisch und dann in lateinischer Übersetzung abgedruckten Episteln sind nach heutigem Forschungsstand höchstens sieben echt. - "Große Bedeutung besitzt Ignatius, weil er in seinen Briefen die besondere Stellung des Bischofs in der christlichen Gemeinde betont. Er ist deshalb ein wichtiger Gewährsmann für die Kirchen katholischer, altorientalischer, orthodoxer und anglikanischer Tradition, die übereinstimmend die Einsetzung des Bischofsamtes durch Christus selbst lehren. Es gibt freilich aus der Zeit nach Ignatius noch Texte, die sich so deuten lassen, dass die Diakone und Presbyter mit dem Bischof gleichberechtigt waren. In seinen Briefen warnt Ignatius vor Irrlehren, namentlich vor judaisierenden Tendenzen und vor dem Doketismus. Bedeutsam ist weiter, dass Ignatius als erster in der christlichen Literatur der Kirche das Adjektiv ?katholisch?, das heißt ?allumfassend? zuordnet. ?Wo Christus ist, dort ist die katholische Kirche.? (Brief an die Smyrnäer 8,2)" (Wikipedia). " "- Nur zu Beginn gebräunt, beide Titel mit alten Vermerken, einige Seiten mit handschriftlichen Kommentaren. Meist sauber, gut erhalten.

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Thomas Rezek]
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         Nicolai Copernici Torinensis De Revolutionibus Orbium Coelestium : Libri VI / V I : In Quibus Stellarum et Fixarum et Erraticarum Motus Ex Veteribus Atque Recentibus Observationibus Restituit Hic Autor : Praeterea Tabulas Expeditas Luculentasque Addidit

      Basileae 1566 / Modern Reprint, A Bound / Flex Cover / REPRINT - 448 pages. Softcover reprinted edition in very good condition, this book has card covers with cloth spine. Very slight wear to edges. Modern facsimile replica of the original text / original work or manuscript / book. Privately published. Archival reprint. This book is not old, however, there is no other publication date other than of the original text. Most likely produced for research purposes since the original text is fragile or very rare. Both book and text are clean and unmarked. Overall a very good copy of this scarce title. Excellent reading resource, research and study. A good book to enjoy and keep on hand. Or would make a great gift for the fan / reader in your life. This is NOT a mass market paperback, or mass produced book. As is, as found. TEXT IS ONLY IN LATIN. About the author, excerpt from wikipedia: Nicolaus Copernicus , February 19, 1473 to May 24, 1543 , was the first astronomer to formulate a comprehensive heliocentric cosmology, which displaced the Earth from the center of the universe. His epochal book, De revolutionibus orbium coelestium , On the Revolutions of the Celestial Spheres , , is often regarded as the starting point of modern astronomy and the defining epiphany that began the Scientific Revolution. Although Greek, Indian and Muslim savants had published heliocentric hypotheses centuries before Copernicus, his publication of a scientific theory of heliocentrism, demonstrating that the motions of celestial objects can be explained without putting the Earth at rest in the center of the universe, stimulated further scientific investigations and became a landmark in the history of modern science that is known as the Copernican Revolution. Among the great polymaths of the Renaissance, Copernicus was a mathematician, astronomer, physician, classical scholar, translator, artist, Catholic cleric, jurist, governor, military leader, diplomat and economist. Among his many responsibilities, astronomy figured as little more than an avocation yet it was in that field that he made his mark upon the world. ~ SCARCE EDITION ~ Modern Reprint. Facsimile Bound Reprint Edition, Clean and Unmarked Text. Limited edition of 100 copies. Size: Astrology / Astrological Guidebook / Astronomy [Attributes: Soft Cover]

      [Bookseller: GREAT PACIFIC BOOKS]
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         The Actis and Constitutiounis of the Realme of Scotland maid in Parliamentis haldin be . . . Kingis Iames the First, Secund, thrid, Feird, Fyft, and in tyme of Marie now Quene of Scottis [with acts of two other Parliaments]. S.T.C. 21876a, 21881, and 21883

      [1] Robert Lekpreuik [2 and 3] Iohne Ros 1566 & 1575, Edinburgh - Modern panelled morocco, extra-gilt, marbled endpapers and pastedowns, title just trimmed, some staining, ex-Skene Library; the Taussig copy First edition variant issue of the first collected laws of Scotland, beginning with the statutes passed at the first parliament of James I in 1424 through 1566, the year of publication, preserving part of the original record otherwise lost [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Meyer Boswell Books, Inc., member ABAA]
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         A REPLIE UNTO M. HARDINGES ANSWEARE: by perusinge whereof the discrete, and diligent reader may easily see, the weake, and vnstable groundes of the Romaine Religion, whiche of late hath beene accompted Catholique.

      London: In Fleetestreate, at the signe of the Blacke Oliphante, by Henry VVykes, Vicesimo Januarij. Anno, 1566. SECOND IMPRESSION January 1566, a variant of the edition dated 15 Jan. 1565 (STC 14606,5, see also ESTC S112275). Small folio, approximately 280 x 185 mm, 11 x 7½ inches, some decorated initials and large pictorial tailpieces, pages: [52], 212, 212-523, 526-641, [12], some misnumbering but all catch words correct, collation: ¶6, *6, ²¶6, ¶8, A4, B-Hhh6, Iii4 (-Iii4, blank), bound in modern mottled calf, raised bands with blind rules to spine with gilt lettered and ruled red morocco label, blind rules to edges of covers, edges pale red. Pale ink name and minor ink scribble in margin of title page, oval cancel library ink stamp on Y1 and Hhh4v, shallow band of pale damp staining to lower edge of Y2-Y5 and Dd2-Dd5, very pale damp staining to lower inner corner of Cc3-Cc4, Oo2-Oo5, Pp2-Pp5 and intermittently thereafter, very occasional small pale margin stain, small ink smudge to margin of A4, P2, Ll2, and Ll5, early manuscript notes to lower margin of D6, U1, Xx4v and Zz2v, brief early notes to margin of S3v and S4r, Ss5, and Fff5v, very slight chipping to fore-edge of Q2, blank margin corner of Ddd6 repaired, no loss of print, very small corner tip torn off Iii2 and Iii3, top margins of Iii1-Iii3 (last 2 leaves) damaged with some loss in up to 4 lines of text, expertly repaired with text completed in neat early old ink manuscript. This work reprints and replies to: "Harding, Thomas. An answere to Maister Juelles chalenge". John Jewel (Jewell) (1522 -1571) Bishop of Salisbury constituted himself the literary defender of the Elizabethan Settlement and in his Apologia Ecclesiae Anglicanae 1562 challenged all comers to prove the Roman Catholic case out of the Scriptures. He was eventually opposed by Thomas Harding, a formidable antagonist who published an Answer in 1564. Our work is Jewel's reply to this. See Wikipedia. MORE IMAGES ATTACHED TO THIS LISTING, ALL ZOOMABLE, FURTHER IMAGES ON REQUEST. POSTAGE AT COST.

      [Bookseller: Roger Middleton P.B.F.A.]
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         Poetae graeci principes heroici carminis, & alii nonnulli.

      Geneva: Henri Estienne, for Ulrich Fugger,, 1566. 2 volumes in one, folio (360 x 230 mm), complete with all three blanks 2c6, 3Z4 and terminal 3T4. Contemporary calf, spine gilt in compartments with monograms at centre, raised bands, sides framed in gilt with the gilt arms of Louis Henri de Loménie, comte de Brienne, stamped at centre, marbled paper pastedowns. Printer's device on title page, woodcut initials, with printed shoulder notes, ruled in red throughout. Some misbinding: the pagination is usually pp. 20, lxxii, 781 [1], lvii, 489; in this copy the prelims to the second volume are bound in immediately after those to the first; furthermore quires e and f are misbound, with f out of order and placed between e3 and e4; sigs. m3 and m4 bound in reverse order; and sigs. z2 and z7 in reverse order. Ownership inscription of A. Hartnoll dated 1869 at head of title. Spine skilfully restored at head and tail and at joints, front free endpaper renewed, the gilt worn in places, contents generally evenly toned, red rules somewhat faded, a very good copy of a handsome volume. First edition. "This is unquestionably Estienne's typographic masterpiece" (Schreiber). Estienne's edition of the Greek epic poets based on the collation of the ancient scholia and variants of all available manuscripts "created the basis of the modern vulgate of Homer" (Silver, Ronsard and the Hellenic Renaissance in France). The collection devotes much of its space to the work of Homer, but also includes the work of Hesiod, Theocritus, Callimachus, Aratus of Soli, Dionysius of Halicarnassus, and others. From the celebrated library of Louis Henri de Loménie (1635–1698), comte de Brienne, with his gilt arms on the covers. After his death his collection was dispersed by his son and sold by the London bookseller James Woodman in 1724.

      [Bookseller: Peter Harrington]
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         A REPLIE UNTO M. HARDINGES ANSWEARE: by perusinge whereof the discrete, and diligent reader may easily see, the weake, and vnstable groundes of the Romaine Religion, whiche of late hath beene accompted Catholique.

      London: In Fleetestreate, at the signe of the Blacke Oliphante, by Henry VVykes, Vicesimo Januarij. Anno, 1566.. SECOND IMPRESSION January 1566, a variant of the edition dated 15 Jan. 1565 (STC 14606,5, see also ESTC S112275). Small folio, approximately 280 x 185 mm, 11 x 7½ inches, some decorated initials and large pictorial tailpieces, pages: [52], 212, 212-523, 526-641, [12], some misnumbering but all catch words correct, collation: ¶6, *6, ²¶6, ¶8, A4, B-Hhh6, Iii4 (-Iii4, blank), bound in modern mottled calf, raised bands with blind rules to spine with gilt lettered and ruled red morocco label, blind rules to edges of covers, edges pale red. Pale ink name and minor ink scribble in margin of title page, oval cancel library ink stamp on Y1 and Hhh4v, shallow band of pale damp staining to lower edge of Y2-Y5 and Dd2-Dd5, very pale damp staining to lower inner corner of Cc3-Cc4, Oo2-Oo5, Pp2-Pp5 and intermittently thereafter, very occasional small pale margin stain, small ink smudge to margin of A4, P2, Ll2, and Ll5, early manuscript notes to lower margin of D6, U1, Xx4v and Zz2v, brief early notes to margin of S3v and S4r, Ss5, and Fff5v, very slight chipping to fore-edge of Q2, blank margin corner of Ddd6 repaired, no loss of print, very small corner tip torn off Iii2 and Iii3, top margins of Iii1-Iii3 (last 2 leaves) damaged with some loss in up to 4 lines of text, expertly repaired with text completed in neat early old ink manuscript. This work reprints and replies to: "Harding, Thomas. An answere to Maister Juelles chalenge". John Jewel (Jewell) (1522 1571) Bishop of Salisbury constituted himself the literary defender of the Elizabethan Settlement and in his Apologia Ecclesiae Anglicanae 1562 challenged all comers to prove the Roman Catholic case out of the Scriptures. He was eventually opposed by Thomas Harding, a formidable antagonist who published an Answer in 1564. Our work is Jewel's reply to this. See Wikipedia. MORE IMAGES ATTACHED TO THIS LISTING, ALL ZOOMABLE, FURTHER IMAGES ON REQUEST. POSTAGE AT COST.

      [Bookseller: Roger Middleton]
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         Poetae graeci principes heroici carminis, & alii nonnulli.

      Geneva: Henri Estienne, for Ulrich Fugger, 1566 - 2 volumes in one, folio (360 x 230 mm), complete with all three blanks 2c6, 3Z4 and terminal 3T4. Contemporary calf, spine gilt in compartments with monograms at centre, raised bands, sides framed in gilt with the gilt arms of Louis Henri de Loménie, comte de Brienne, stamped at centre, marbled paper pastedowns. Ownership inscription of A. Hartnoll dated 1869 at head of title. Spine skilfully restored at head and tail and at joints, front free endpaper renewed, the gilt worn in places, contents generally evenly toned, red rules somewhat faded, a very good copy of a handsome volume. Printer's device on title page, woodcut initials, with printed shoulder notes, ruled in red throughout. Some misbinding: the pagination is usually pp. 20, lxxii, 781 [1], lvii, 489; in this copy the prelims to the second volume are bound in immediately after those to the first; furthermore quires e and f are misbound, with f out of order and placed between e3 and e4; sigs. m3 and m4 bound in reverse order; and sigs. z2 and z7 in reverse order. First edition. "This is unquestionably Estienne's typographic masterpiece" (Schreiber). Estienne's edition of the Greek epic poets based on the collation of the ancient scholia and variants of all available manuscripts "created the basis of the modern vulgate of Homer" (Silver, Ronsard and the Hellenic Renaissance in France). The collection devotes much of its space to the work of Homer, but also includes the work of Hesiod, Theocritus, Callimachus, Aratus of Soli, Dionysius of Halicarnassus, and others. From the celebrated library of Louis Henri de Loménie (1635–1698), comte de Brienne, with his gilt arms on the covers. After his death his collection was dispersed by his son and sold by the London bookseller James Woodman in 1724. Adams, II, 1699; Brunet, IV, 757; Hoffmann, III, 233-34; Renouard, p. 126, no. 5; Schreiber, 160. [Attributes: First Edition]

      [Bookseller: Peter Harrington. ABA member]
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         Delle phrasi toscane lib. XII.Venezia, appresso Camillo e Francesco Franceschini, 1566.

      Venezia, appresso Camillo e Francesco Franceschini 1566 - Cm. 30, pp. (16) 883 (97). Marchio tip. al frontespizio, numerosi eleganti capilettera e belle testatine xil. Legatura ottimamente rimontata in mezza perg. antica con titoli al dorso e fogli d'incunabolo applicati ai piatti. Trascurabili e sporadiche macchiette. Bell'esemplare. Giovanni Stefano Montemerlo (1505-1572), letterato originario di Tortona, fu autore anche di una fortunata raccolta di rime. Questo autorevole vocabolario è diviso in dodici libri e riserva attenzione critica a centinaia di termini della lingua volgare; l'opera è fortemente influenzata dagli scritti di Pietro Aretino, scelto dall'A. come punto di riferimento non per motivi di adulazione ma per "una forma di opinione che gli scritti di lui fossero una miniera di buone voci" (Fontanini, Biblioteca, I, p. 73). Rara prima edizione. Cfr. Gamba, 2754 ("Il Montemerlo in questa sua opera, ch'è oggidì affatto trascurata, si serve di esempi tolti dall'Ariosto, dal Sannazaro, dal Bembo ed anche da Pietro Aretino"); Fontanini, Biblioteca, I, p. 73-74; Iccu. [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Studio Bibliografico Apuleio]
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         Repetitio L. imperialem, De prohibita feudi alienatione per Fridericum, longè doctissima and utilissima . cui accessit rerum and verborum toto hoc opere memorabilium index locupletissimus.Basileae, per Thomam Guarinum, 1566.

      Basileae, per Thomam Guarinum 1566 - Cm. 16,5, pp. (24) 880 (32). Marchio tip. a frontespizio e colophon, alcuni graziosi capilettera xilografici. Legatura coeva in piena perg. molle con titoli ms. al dorso e al taglio di piedi. Abile resuaro del piatto anteriore. Sporadiche fioriture, alone limitato alle carte finali. Esemplare nel complesso ben conservato. Bartolomeo Camerario (1497-1564), giureconsulto originario di Benevento (soprannominato Bartolomeo Temerario per il carattere irrequieto), insegnò diritto civile e feudale all'Università di Napoli tra il 1524 ed il 1526. Nel 1529 ricoprì la carica di Presidente della Camera Sommaria e successivamente quella di Conservatore del Real Patrimonio in Italia con lo scopo di controllare le finanze italiane. Nel 1548 fu sospeso dall'incarico e giudicato colpevole di vari crimini, quindi fuggì in Francia dove si dedicò alla stesura di alcuni scritti teologici perlopiù rivolti contro Calvino. Ritornò a Roma solo nel 1556 quando Paolo IV lo nominò Commissario Generale dell'Esercito ed in seguito Amministratore dell'Annona. Nel 1558 fu nuovamente accusato di malversazione e arrestato. Questa importante repetitio di diritto feudale fu più volte ristampata anche fuori dai confini italiani. Cfr. Iccu; non in Adams e Sapori. [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Studio Bibliografico Apuleio]
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         Germanicarum rerum quatuor celebriores vetustioresque chronographi, earum descriptionem ab orbe conditio usque ad tempora Henrici IIII, imperatoris. deducentes. longe emendatius quam antea impressi.

      Frankfurt, Corvin, Feyerabend und Gall Erben, 1566. - Folio, circa 32 x 21 cm. 10, 224 (recte 222) num., 10 Bll., mit grossem Titelholzschnitt und Druckermarke am Schluss Blindgeprägtes Schweinsleder d. Zt. mit figürlichen Mittelplatten und grünen Bindbändern VD 16, S 2277. Adams G 488; ADB XXX, 582. Erste Sammelausgabe der vier wichtigsten mittelalterlichen Chroniken, herausgegeben von dem Juristen Simon Schard: Johannes Turpinus de vita Caroli Magni et Rolandi - Rhegino Abbas Prumiensis Diocesis Treviren. - Sigebertus Gemblacensis eiusque continuator Robertus de Monte. - Lambertus Schaffnaburgensis, alias Hirsfeldensis dictus. - Reich geprägter Einband, vorne mit Iustita, hinten mit Lucretia. - Wenig gebräunt und kaum fleckig, nur die letzten Blätterwasserrandig. Einband berieben, etwas wellig, Bänder ausgefranst, am Rücken eine kleine Platzstelle. Insgesamt mit berücksichtigten Gebrauchsspuren, aber immer noch recht dekorativ. "-.

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Thomas Rezek]
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         Anthologia diaforon epigrammaton Florilegium diversorum epigrammatum veteru in septem libros diversrum

      4to (250 x 155mm. )[4], 539 (=545, pp.283-288 bis), [35]pp., device on title-page, later Dutch vellum over pasteboard, yapp edges [Geneva]: E. Estienne, H. Fuggeri typographus,

      [Bookseller: Maggs Bros. Ltd.]
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         Examen

      Georg Rab. Folio. Four parts in one volume. (I:) (12, including one blank), 172, (6) leaves; (II:) (6), 220, (8) leaves; (III:) (8), 176, (8) leaves; (IV:) (12), 130, (8) leaves. Text printed in two columns. Title printed in red and black with a woodcut vignette by Jost Ammann (repeated twice) and with the printer's device on the title-page of Part II. Contemporary blind stamped calf, back with five raised bands, back panel with three small repairs (at the place of the clasps and part of the joint), clasps missing, old entries of ownership on the front fly-leaf, a few contemporary marginal annotations and underlining, otherwise a superb and genuine copy.RARE FIRST GERMAN EDITION. This evaluation and rebuttal of the decrees of the Council of Trent was originally published in Latin in four volumes between 1566 and 1573. The work had ten more editions until the end of the century, and numerous reprints later, the last, dating from 1861 (Berlin). The work had greater impact, greater readership, and brought Chemnitz greater fame than anything else he produced in his life."The preparation of the Examen absorbed Chemnitz' leisure for the next nine years. By the end of March 1565 he had worked out the first part sufficiently to send it to a colleague in Frankfurt/M., Martin Ritter, with the request to find a publisher. On Christmas Eve of that year Chemnitz was still reading proof and finding "manifold and most horrible errors'. The following spring the first part came out, dedicated to Duke Albert Frederick [of Prussia], the youthful son of Duke Albert the Elder. The second part followed in the same year, dedicated to Margrave John of Brandenburg-Cüstrin, after Chemnitz's friend, Duke Julius of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel, has refused the honor because of the military commitment of his father. The reigning Duke Henry, to the Roman Catholic party. In 1573 both the third part, dedicated to Elector John George of Brandenburg and the fourth and final part, dedicated to Duke Henry Julius of Brandenburg-Wolfenbüttel, the son of Duke Julius, who now reigned as a Lutheran in his deceased father's domains, came out. Part One is prefaced with a Narratio de Synodo Nicena versibus exposita... composed by Matthias Berg, headmaster of St. Catharine's School in Brunswick. The first part discusses the teachings about traditions, original sin, concupiscence, the word "sin', the conception of the Blessed Virgin Mary, the works of unbelievers, free will, justification by faith, and good works. The second part discusses the sacraments in general, Baptism, confirmation, the sacrament of the Eucharist, Communion under both appearances, the mass, penance, contrition, confession, satisfaction, extreme unction, the sacrament of orders and matrimony. The third part covers issues of virginity, priestly celibacy, purgatory, and the invocation of the saints. The fourth part continues the third, with sections on the relics of the saints, images, indulgences, fasting, the distinction of foods, and the feasts of the calendar" (A.C. Piepkorn, Martin Chemnitz Views on Trent: The Genesis and the Genius of the "Examen Concilii Tridentini', in: "Concordia Theological Monthly", XXXVII/1, 1966, p.19)"Two years after the Council of Trent between 1565 and 1573 Chemnitz began to release an examination of its decrees, an examination which Arthur Olsen [cf. Martin Chemnitz and the Council of Trent, in: "Dialog", 2, 1963, pp. 60-67] has dubbed, "the most thorough and influential Protestant response ever made to Trent'. Preus [op. cit. below] lauds it "one of the greatest theological masterpieces ever produced in Lutheranism'. One cannot deny its significance for its day. It saw twenty-five editions and underwent translation into German by Georg Nigrinus in 1576, English in 1582 and French. And while Calvin may have been the first to respond, it was Chemnitz's work that consumed Catholic apologists for decades" (J.R.A. Merrick, "Sola scriptura' and the "regula fidei': the Reformation scripture principle and early oral tradition in Martin Chemnitz's "Examination of the Council of Trent', in: "Scottish Journal of Theology", 63/3, 2010, pp. 264).The translator, Georg Nigrinus (Schwartz, 1530-1602), Lutheran theologian,was born in Battenberg (Hassia), studied at Kassel and Marburg, became a school rector and pastor in Gießen and later amoderator (Superintendent) in Alsfeld. He excelled as prolific translator (e.g. of Innocent Gentillet's Anti-Macchiavell, 1580) and was polemically active on the side of Fischart against Johannes Nas and wrote also several anti-Calvinistic tracts (cf. A.F.C. Vilmar, Georg Nigrinus, in: "Zeitschrift des Vereins für Hessische Geschichte und Landeskunde, 3, (1843) pp. 814-817 and H. de Boor e R. Newald, Geschichte der deutschen Literatur, Berlin, 1967, V, p. 120).If Martin Luther is considered the greatest theologian of the Lutheran Church, then Martin Chemnitz is without a doubt our second greatest Lutheran Father. Chemnitz is certainly deserving of the title "the Second Martin", and was the primary bulwark of orthodox Lutheran theology in the latter part of the sixteenth century. Born in Treuenbrietzen in Brandenburg to Paul and Euphemia Chemnitz, was the last of three children. His father was a successful merchant, who died when Martin was eleven: thereafter, the family suffered from financial difficulties. When he was old enough, Martin matriculated in Magdeburg. Upon completion of the course work, he became a weaver's apprentice. He helped his family with its clothing business for the next few years. When he was 20, he resumed his education at the University of Frankfurt (Oder). He remained in school until his finances were exhausted; he then took a teaching job in the town of Wriezen, supplementing his income by collecting the local sales tax on fish. His time at Frankfurt gave him the basic tools to continue his education on his own, researching areas in which he was interested and applying his naturally inquisitive mind to problems that others had worried over in the past. In 1545 Chemnitz accompanied his cousin Georg Sabinus to school in Wittenberg. Because Chemnitz lacked sufficient academic preparation, Melanchthon recommended that he studied the scientific branches of the liberal arts (which made him a life-long expert in astrology). Because of Luther's death and political events, Chemnitz transferred to the University of Königsberg. He there graduated in the first class with a Master of Arts degree (1548). However, a plague soon infested the town, so he left quickly for Saalfeld. When he judged it safe, Chemnitz returned to Königsberg in 1550, where he was employed by Albert, Duke of Prussia, as the court librarian. In return for caring for the library and teaching a few courses as a tutor, he had unrestricted access to what was then considered one of the finest libraries in Europe. Chemnitz moved back to Wittenberg in 1553 as a guest of Melanchthon. In January 1554 he joined the Wittenberg University faculty. He lectured on Melanchthon's Loci Communes, from which lectures he compiled his own Loci Theologici, a system of theology. He was ordained to the ministry on November 25, 1554 by Johannes Bugenhagen, and became co-adjutor of Joachim Mörlin, who was ecclesiastical superintendent for the duchy of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel. When Mörlin resigned in 1567, Chemnitz became his successor; he held the post for the rest of his life. Through his leadership, Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel was brought firmly into Lutheranism. There he helped his prince, Duke Julius of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel, establish the University of Helmstedt (1575–76). With Jakob Andreae, David Chytraeus, Nicholas Selnecker, Andrew Musculus and others, Chemnitz took part in a centrist movement that brought agreement among German Lutherans in the writing and publication of the Formula of Concord (1577), of which Chemnitz is one of the primary authors. He was instrumental in the publication of the definitive Book of Concord in 1580, the doctrinal standard of the Lutheran Church. The learning of Chemnitz was something colossal, but it had no tinge of pedantry. His judgment was of the highest order. His modesty and simplicity, his clearness of thought, and his luminous style, his firmness in principle, and his gentleness in tone, the richness of his learning and the vigor of his thinking, have revealed themselves in such measure in his Loci, his Books on the Two Natures of our Lord, and On the True Presence, in his Examen of the Council of Trent, his Defence of the Formula of Concord, and his Harmony of the Gospels, as to render each a classic in its kind, and to mark their author as the greatest theologian of his time (cf. J.A. Preus, The Second Martin: The Life and Theology of Martin Chemnitz, St. Louis, MO, 1994, passim; T. Kaufmann, Martin Chemnitz, 1522-1586, in: "Melanchthon in seinen Schülern", H. Scheible, ed., Wiesbaden, 1997, pp. 183-253).VD 16, C-2175; Index Aureliensis 136.222; R. Mumm, Die Polemik des Martin Chemnitz gegen das Konzil von Trient, (Naumburg a.S., 1905), p. 91; K. Schottenloher, Bibliographie zur deutschen Geschichte im Zeitalter der Glaubensspaltung, 1517-1585, (Stuttgart 1956-1966), no. 43218e. .

      [Bookseller: Libreria Govi Alberto]
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         Commentarius brevis rerum in orbe gestarum, ab anno salutis M. D. usque in annum M. D. LXXIIII. ex optimis quibusque scriptoribus congestus. Nunc vero recens ab anno M. D. LXX. auctus, & ad annum M. D. LXXXVI. opera & studio Michaelis ab Isselt perductus. Cum indice copiosissimo. Köln, G. Calenius u. I. Quentel Erben 1586. 8°. 48 Bll., 1199 S., blindgepr. Schweinsldrbd. d. Zt. über Holzdeckeln mit Rollen- u. Plattenstempel.

      - STC German Books 844 - Adams 2102 - Sabin 93884 - diese Ausg. nicht im VD 16.- Seltene Ausgabe mit der von Michael von Isselt besorgten Fortsetzung der erstmals 1566 erschienene Weltchronik des 16. Jahrhunderts aus der Feder des Kartäusermönchs L. Surius (1522-1578). Aus katholischer Sicht gerichtete Darstellung im Gegensatz zu protestantischen Werken, vor allem des Sleidanus.- "Contains references to Columbus and Vespuccius, and pp. 509-515 relate to Mexico and Florida" (Sabin).- Titel mit hs. Besitzvermerk, etw. gebräunt od. braunfleckig, Ebd. etw. berieben, Schließen fehlen.

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Johannes Müller]
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         Spiegel der waren Rhetoric: usz Marco Tulio Cicerone und andern geteütscht. Mit iren glidern cluger reden, Sandtbrieffen und Formen mencher Contract seltzam reguliertes Teütsch und nutzbar Exempliert. Neüwlich getruckt. Straßburg, J. Knobloch u. P Götze 1517. Fol. 6 nn., 153 num. Bl., 1 w. Bl. mit großem Titelholzschnitt, Holzdeckelbd. d. Zt. mit Schweinsldr.-Rücken.

      - VD 16, R 2341 - Benzing 1566 (= Schmidt 136) - Stobbe 1, 160 - Stintzing-L. I/1, 84 - Kaspers 178 - Goedeke I, 444.5 - Nickisch, Briefsteller 14.- Fünfte (4. rechtmäßige) Ausgabe (sehr selten, fehlt in der Brit. Library u. bei Adams.- Das Original druckte der Autor 1493 in Freiburg selbst.- Keine eigentliche Übersetzung Ciceros (dennoch die erste Übertragung eines Textes von Cicero ins Deutsche), sondern ein gerichtliches Formularbuch, das auf diesem u. auf anderen antiken Autoren beruht. "Besteht aus drei Teilen. Vom ersten Teil zur Theorie der Rhetorik sagt der Verfasser, daß er sie aus Ciceros Rhetorik zusammengestellt und 'uß latein zu Tütsch geleitet' habe. Anschließend wird die Abfassung von Urkunden und Briefen behandelt mit einer Musterbriefsammlung. Im 3. Kapitel werden Kontrakte u. a. Rechtsgeschäfte erläutert. Weitgehend berücksichtigt wird bereits das römische Recht" (Kaspers). - "Zwar für die Praxis bestimmt, aber zugleich eine theoret. Belehrung" (Stintzing-L.). Einer der frühesten Briefsteller überhaupt in deutscher Sprache.- Tls. etw. fleckig u. mit kl. Randläsuren, Ebd. leicht verzogen, berieben u. bestoßen, Rücken gering aufgeplatzt, Schließbänder fehlen, insges. gutes, sehr breitrandiges Exemplar.

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Johannes Müller]
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         [title-page in Greek, transliterated as] Aristainetou epistolai erotikai. tinà ton palaion heroon epitaphia. E bibliotheca C.V. Ioan. Sambuci.

      Antuerpiae: Ex officina Christophori Plantini, 1566. 4to (20.5 cm; 8"). 95, [1 (blank)] pp. Editio princeps of this late fifth / early sixth century collection of love/erotic letters. Both Voet and Brunet attribute them to Aristaenetus because the first is addressed by him to Philokalos; it is entirely possible, however, that the array are from different authors. Brunet says, "Ce lettres sur les aventures amoureuses racontees quelquefois d'une maniere assez libre."    The text was edited from a manuscript in his personal collection by János Zsámboki (a.k.a., Johannes Sambucus), the Hungarian humanist scholar (1531–84) whose library formed the basis for the manuscript collection of the Austrian National Library.    Printed at the Plantin Press entirely in Greek (except for the imprint information), using Greek type commissioned from Robert Granjon, this bears one of the variant Plantin printer's devices on the title-page. It was printed with guide letters, although none have been supplied in manuscript by a scribe.    Evidence of readership: Scattered marginalia in Greek and Latin, sometimes correcting a word in text or expanding on same; other times citing a page in a different book.    Provenance: From the library of American collector Albert A. Howard (sans indicia).         Voet 593; Graesse, Trésor de Livres Rares, I, 204; Brunet, I, 448; Schweiger, I, 44; Index Aurel. 107.600; Adams A1692. Surprisingly not in Legrand, Bibliographie Hellenique. Disbound; now in modern wrappers. A very nice, clean copy with occasional light age-toning.

      [Bookseller: Philadelphia Rare Books & Manuscripts Co]
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         Omnia, quae hucusque ad manus nostras pervenerunt, latina opera quorum aliqua nunc primum in lucem prodeunt, reliqua verò multo quàm antea castigatiora

      Joannes Bogardus, Leuven 1566 - Later but old paneled calf, worn, rebacked, library marks to base of spine, small perforated stamp to title, library bookplate inside front cover, old catalog entry on endpaper, scattered notes in an early hand, small contemporary drawing of a book on the title, browning and soiling at page edges early on and at the end, small tear to last page not touching text, scattered staining, heavier to a few pages early on; clean overall and still about very good. An early issue of the 1st collected Latin edition of the complete works, first published in 1565 and appearing in a few states with either Bogardus or Petrus Zangrius as the publisher. Lacking the portrait (which may have appeared in a small number of copies) as usual. In a clamshell box. (6), 136 leaves. Front and rear blanks intact.Contains Utopia, History of Richard the Third, and other works. Printed in columns. Brunet III 1892 (stating that Utopia does not appear). Size: Folio. Quantity Available: 1. Shipped Weight: Under 1 kilo. Category: Literature & Literary; Philosophy. Inventory No: 046451. [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Pazzo Books (ABAA-ILAB)]
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         Emblemata, at D. Arnoldum Cobelium. Eiusdem Aenigmatum Libellus ad D. Arnoldum Rosenbergum

      Antwerp: Christophe Plantin, 1566. 8vo (167 x 111 mm). 58 woodcut emblems by Gerard Janssen van Kampen and Arnaud Nicolai after Geffroy Ballain and Pieter Huys. Contemporary limp vellum. Upper hinge cracked; some mostly marginal dampstaining. Provenance: purchased from Goodspeed's Book Shop, 1959. Second edition of this celebrated emblem book by the Dutch physician and classicist Hadrianus Junius (Adriaan de Jonge). It contains a letter to Sambucus, and the emblems have some iconography in common with those invented by Johannes Sambucus and Alciatus. This edition does not have the elaborate borders of the first, which had been published the previous year. Adams J-445; Landwehr, Low Countries 400; Praz, 17th-Century Imagery II, p. 385. From the Collection of Arthur & Charlotte Vershbow.

      [Bookseller: Riverrun Books & Manuscripts]
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         Orientalische Erzählungen. Doppeltitel von Marcus Behmer.

      Vier Bände. Zus. 1566 S., HLdrbde. (die Rücken minim. verblaßt). Sonst tadelloses Exemlar im Leinenschuber. Sarkowski 1725. * Dieses Exemplar in signierten Meistereinbänden von Roland Meuter: Halbfranzbände mit nachtblauem Maroquinleder, die Rücken mit Stempel- und Bogensatzdekor handvergoldet, die Kopfschnitte ebenfalls handvergoldet u. mit gepunztem Dekor. Jeder Band wurde mit einem anderen handoleographierten Papier überzogen, die Kapitale in passenden Farben von Hand gestochen.

      [Bookseller: Matthias Loidl]
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         Examinis Concilii Tridentini [...] opus integrum, quatuor partes [...]. 4 Teile in einem Band.

      Fol. Mit 4 (wiederh.) Holzschn.-Titelvignetten von Jost Amman sowie einigen Holzschn.-Vignetten u. -Initialen. Zus. ca. 930 S., Pgmt. d. Zt. m. durchzogenen Bünden u. handschriftl. Rückentitel. Spätere Ausgabe von Chemnitz' erstmals 1566-1573 erschienenem Hauptwerk, in dem er die Beschlüsse des Konzils von Trient einer sorgfältigen und für alle Zeiten epochemachenden Kritik unterzog (ADB IV, 117). - Einband etw. berieben, bestoßen u. fleckig. Vorsatzbl. m. altem Besitz- u. Schenkungsvermerk. Hinteres Vorsatzbl. m. umfangreicher, alter Anmerkung nach Matthias Hoë von Hoënegg. Etw. gebräunt, stockfleckig bzw. wasserrandig. - VD16, C 2173 IA 136.266 Adams C 1442.

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Wolfgang Friebes]
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         Auszug, ettlicher Zeitungen, was sich zum Anfang, des yetzigen Turckenkriegs, an ettlichen orten, inn Ungern, verloffen und zugetragen, mit sampt Eroberung der Veste und Schols

      One of three slightly differing issues printed by Zimmermann, with woodcut of fighting cavalry on title. Quite interesting news from June 1566: Arshan, Pasha of Ofen, a drinker and opium-smoker, had opened the siege of Palota. The imprint describes his escape after having been fooled by 400 peasants´ cars simulating an Imperial army. Suleyman the Magnificent had Arslan strangled in Harsany, in August 3. After Palota the Imperial forces regained Vessprim which had been held by the Turks since 1546. Simultaneously, Zrinyi defeated Sandshak Mohammed of Tirbala, his son and whole army causing Suleyman´s revenge and the siege of Szigeth. The Augsburg issues also contain an appendix of the re-ocuppation of Totis on July 21. Gollner, 1143, variant issue. Apponyi, Hungarica, 400.

      [Bookseller: HS Rare Books]
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         DE LA BONTE ET MAUVAISTIE DES FEMMES.

      Paris: Lean Dallier, 1566. Exceedingly scarce second edition. (First published in 1564). 8vo, 76, (1) page. Bound in contemporary full limp vellum, handwritten title on the spine, previous owner's name on top of the title page, dated 1580, 20th May. Binding a bit discoloured. Very light dampstain to top of last 15 pages, otherwise a fine copy. Printed in Roman lettering with italic side notes. BM STC, Fr. Supplement"p. 53. Adams (lists editions of 1571, 1586), Not in Gay; Brunet III, p. 1407; Tchemerzine or Hull, Chaste, Silent & Obedient. Kanner, The Women of England, p. 176; OCLC lists just the 1586 edition (at Rutgers). A country gentleman, born in 1540, Marconville was a prolific writer of popular philosophical works. In this obscure work, he discusses female virtues and vices and their consequences for man, with the aid of examples drawn from history. This is one of the few works that provide an accurate picture of the attitude of men towards women during the French Renaissance. ."Jean de Marconville's paradox On the Goodness and Badness of Women, 1564, devotes a whole chapter to the 'Excellence of women and their ingenious inventions'. He starts out by praising life in a community, the invention of letters, the creation of law and the invention of the clock. He isolates the invention of letters as the most important one because it allowed the preservation of ideas: things that happened a thousand years ago are present to us'. He asks: but who was the inventor of such great benefit to humankind? Was it the philosophers and wise men of times past?'. Marconville singles out Carmenta, also known as Nicostraté, as the inventor of letters and writing. Ceres receives credit for the invention of law and 'without [law] no household, no cities, republics or communities nor the world itself' could exists at all. Isis invented agriculture, Pallas invented spinning and making cloth. Marconville ponders the 'singularité' excellence or peerlessness, of 'their great minds' and claim that 'celestial favours' were more 'excellently granted' to women than to men." (Warner, The Ideas of Man and Woman in Renaissance France)." Marconville published several treatises on the subject of women and marriage, the present being both the most famous and the rarest.

      [Bookseller: Second Life Books Inc]
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         Caroli Sigonii De antiquo iure Provinciarum Libri duo. Nunc primum in lucem editi. Index auctorum et rerum memorabilium. Venetijs ex officina Iordani Ziletti 1568 pp. (10) + 198 + (15). UNITO A Caroli Sigonii De lege curiata magistratuum ac imperatorum ac iure eorum liber. Venetijs ex officina Iordani Ziletti 1569 pp. (6) + 108 + (4). UNITO A Nicolai Gruchii et Caroli Sigonii De binis comitijs et lege curiata contrariae inter se disputationes. In quibus Ciceronis Livij Caesaris Gellij altorumque multorum loca obscurissima declarantur. Bononiae typis Alexandri Benatij 1566 pp. 68

      - Insignificanti forellini di tarlo estinto a una cerniera e al margine del frontespizio della prima opera, qualche leggerissima gora d\'acqua marginale a poche pagine Bella marca tipografica capilettera ornati n.d. p. 3 opere in 1 tomo 200x147 mm p.perg. floscia coeva con titolo manoscritto sul dorso (sbiadito)

      [Bookseller: Libreria Antiquaria Giulio Cesare]
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         Warhafftiger Bericht von den Landen,

      auch geistlichem vnd weltlichem Regiment, des Mechtigen Könige in Ethiopien : den wir Priester Johan nennen, wie solches durch die Kron Portugal mit besondern vleis erfündiget worden. beschrieben durch Herrn Franciscum Aluares, so derhalben sechs Jahr lang an gedachts Priester Johans Hoffe verharren müssen ; aus der Portugallischen vnd Italianischen Sprache in das Deutsche gebracht, vnd zuuorn nie im Druck ausgangen. Gedruckt zü Eisslebẽ : Durch M. Joachim Heller, 1566. Folio, bound in ornately tooled modern calf with brass clasps; all edges stained red; pp [x], 444 [i.e. 436]; title with a couple of closed tears and repairs at edges; pale damp stain at upper outer corner of approximately first and last 40 leaves; illustrated with the important woodcut diagram of the Southern Cross constellation; plan of the Church of Golgotha; plan of the Church of Saint Salvator; plan of the Church of Our Lady; plan of the Church of St. Emanuel; elevations of the Church of St. Emanuel; plan of the Church of St. George; map of Africa from the Mediterranean to the Tropic of Capricorn; decorative initials and tail-pieces. The first edition in German of this important Renaissance travel work. Father Francisco Alvares' account of the Portuguese embassy to Ethiopia between 1520 and 1527 remained the most detailed and reliable source of information on that region of Africa for over a century. Part of Alvares' work was originally published in Portuguese, in Lisbon in 1540, as Verdadera informaçam das terras do Preste Ioam; the first separate French edition, Historiale description de l'Ethiopie ...,  was published in Antwerp in 1558. Significantly, the German edition (like the French edition of 1558) also contains copies of letters from Helena, Queen of Abyssinia, to Manuel I of Portugal; Negus David II of Ethiopia to King John I of Portugal; and from the Italian explorer, Andrea Corsali, to his Florentine patron, Giuliano de Medici. The inclusion of the two letters of Andrea Corsali is due to the fact that the explorer had spent the last period of his life in Ethiopia. In 1514-1515 he had travelled on board a Portuguese merchant ship on a voyage that made its way around Africa, across the Indian Ocean to Goa, then on to Cochin and the East Indies. Corsali was the first Westerner to identify the Southern Cross, and his description and illustration of this constellation (reproduced on page 6 in the present work), which he had carefully observed while crossing the Indian Ocean, were originally published in his Lettera (Florence, 1516). The letter is dated January 6, 1515 and was sent to his patron, Giuliano de Medici, from Cochin in India. Only three known copies of the 1516 edition survive; a second edition was printed in 1517, also an extreme rarity. The cruciform analogy used by Corsali to describe the constellation was adopted by navigators very early on, and by the early seventeenth century the terminology had become fixed in the various languages of the European maritime powers. Corsali was the first European to identify the island of New Guinea, and the first letter also contains references to this discovery. Corsali also postulates the existence of a continent to the south of New Guinea, a highly significant early allusion to Terra Australis. The second of Corsali's two letters, dated September 18, 1517, was sent to the Medicis from the Red Sea. Along with the 1558 French edition of Alvares, the German edition of 1566 remains the most realistically obtainable of the earliest editions to include Corsali's Lettera and diagram of the Southern Cross. No copy recorded in Australian collections

      [Bookseller: Douglas Stewart Fine Books]
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         Joannis Mesuae damasceni de re medica libri tres Jacobo Sylvio interpret

      Lugduni |(Lyon): apud Guliel. Rovillium, 1566. Fine. apud Guliel. Rovillium, Lugduni (Lyon) 1566, in-8 (16,7x11,5cm), (14) 364 pp., relié. - The first edition of these three treaties Mesue commented by Sylvius appeared in Paris in 1542 into a Christian Weschel Vol. in Folio. Edition went through several editions in 1544 and 1548. Brunet III, 1675. Vellum Full time flexible flap with traces of laces. Lack some of the top flap. Abu Zakariya Yahya Ibn Masuyah said Jean Mesue, Christian physician born in Khuz near Nineveh in 776 and died in Baghdad in 855, where he practiced and practiced medicine, and was the personal physician of the Caliph Harun al-Rashid. Besides the prominent role he played in Arabic medicine, reflecting number of Greek texts, his book of aphorisms (medical axioms) had considerable success in the West, some of which are still in use today. He also wrote the first treatise on diet based on boards properties of Gallien, analyzing the effects of boards on the body 140. Furthermore Arab medicine began to influence in a significant way in Europe in the fifteenth century, as the Arab had commented and translated many Greek texts, including some great academies such as Montpellier and Paris, it is here that we find our commentator, a great physician of his time, Jacobus Sylvius or Jacques Dubois (1478-1554), who officiated in Paris and Montpellier, driven from Paris because he was not MD and wore too much shading his fame (they came from all over Europe to consult). Arabs are especially fathers pharmacopoeia and it is precisely the interest of this edition, meeting of two great doctors on issues Remedies centuries apart. Sylvius rénuni in this work the three greatest works of Mesue the question: Cyril medicamenta purgentia and De singularis medicamentis purgantibus. As for the book III, it is the Antidotarium the great work Mesue. --- Please note that the translation in english is done automatically, we apologize if the formulas are inaccurate. Contact us for any information! - [FRENCH VERSION FOLLOWS] La première édition de ces trois traités de Mésué commentés par Sylvius parut en 1542 à Paris chez Christian Weschel en un volume in-folio. L'édition connut plusieurs éditions en 1544 et 1548. (Brunet III, 1675) Reliure en plein vélin d'époque souple à rabats avec traces de lacets. Manque une partie du rabat supérieur. Abu Zakariya Yahya Ibn Masuyah dit Jean Mésué, médecin chrétien né à Khuz prés de Ninive en 776 et mort à Bagdad en 855 où il exerça et pratiqua la médecine, fut le médecin personnel du khalife Haroun El Rachid. En dehors du rôle prééminent qu'il joua dans la médecine arabe, traduisant nombre de textes grecs, son livre des aphorismes (des axiomes médicaux) eut un succès considérable en occident, dont certains ont encore cours aujourd'hui. Il rédigea également le premier traité de diététique reposant sur les propriétés des aliments de Gallien, analysant les effets de 140 aliments sur le corps. Par ailleurs la médecine arabe commença à influencer d'une manière importante l'Europe au XVème siècle, car les Arabes avaient commenté et traduit nombre de textes grecs, et notamment certaines grandes académies telles que Montpellier et Paris. C'est ici que nous retrouvons notre commentateur, un grand médecin de son temps, Jacobus Sylvius ou Jacques Dubois (1478-1554), qui officia à Paris, puis à Montpellier, chassé de Paris car il n'était point Docteur en médecine et portait trop d'ombrage par sa renommée (on venait de toute l'Europe pour le consulter). Les Arabes sont surtout les pères de la pharmacopée et c'est précisément l'intérêt de cette édition, rencontre de deux grands médecins sur des questions de remèdes à plusieurs siècles d'intervalle. Sylvius a réuni dans cet ouvrage les trois plus grands ouvrages de Mésué sur la question : Methodus medicamenta purgentia et De singularis medicamentis purgantibus. Quant au livre III, il s'agit de l'Antidotarium, le grand ouvrage de Mésué.

      [Bookseller: Librairie Le Feu Follet]
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         Het leven vanden heylighen Franciscus Xaverius die den eersten vande Societeyt Jesu het H. Evangelie in Indien ende Japonien heeft ghepredickt. Antwerp, Cornelis Woons, 1646. 8vo. Contemporary vellum.

      De Backer & Sommervogel VIII, col. 141 (no. 7); Hesselink, "333 years of Dutch publication on Japan: 1566-1899", in: Arisaka (ed.): Nihou yogakushi no kenkyo (studies in de geschiedenis van de westerse wetenschappen in Japan vol 9 (Osaka, Sogensha, 1989); III-B,10; not in Alt-Japan-Katalog; Cordier, Japonica. Rare first edition of the Dutch translation by the Jesuit Father Franciscus de Smidt from Antwerp of Torsellini's classic biography of Francis Xavier (1506-1552), originally published in 1594, enlarged and corrected by the author in 1596, and published in numerous Latin editions plus translations into Spanish, Italian, French, German, English and Dutch.Torsellini brought together an enormous number of anecdotes about Xavier that had never been published before, and gives considerable detail about his travels in India, the East Indies, China and Japan from 1541 to his death in 1552, and his founding of the Society of Jesus with Loyola and the Jesuit mission in Japan. Torsellini (1544-1599), who also edited Xavier's letters, uncritically accepts the stories that had been passed on by word of mouth for the forty-two years since Xavier's death, greatly expanding the number and nature of his miracles, showing him expelling devils, stilling tempests, raising four people from the dead, etc., but he was probably the last biographer to troll new sources of information until modern times.Good copy.

      [Bookseller: ASHER Rare Books (Since 1830)]
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         Scylla en Charybdis; behelzende een project, ter verbetering der zeegaten en het vaarwater van Texel, en aanwinning van eenige duizend morgen land.Amsterdam, Johannes Allart, Laurens Brandligt, 1780. 8vo. With 4 folding engraved maps and 1 folding engraved plate. Contemporary mottled calf, richly gold-tooled spine.

      - Bierens de Haan 558; Kemper 1566; STCN 160106095. First and only edition of a work on navigation around the Dutch island Texel, written by the sea merchant Laurens Brandligt. Due to alluviation the stream velocity in the waters around Texel had decreased. Brandligt suggests several ways to improve the navigability of these waters, which was important since Dutch warships often took refuge in them. Brandligt also tries to promote Den Helder as a new harbour for both war and merchant ships, stressing the poor accessibility of Amsterdam. Small tear in first free endleaf, restored, title-page slightly browned. Binding rubbed along the extremities, spine damaged at the top and front hinge partly cracked. Overall in good condition.

      [Bookseller: ASHER Rare Books]
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         Madonna del Silenzio

      1566 - Bulino, 1566, firmato in lastra, sotto la panca a sinistra Philippus Sericus fecit, e datata MDLXVI, a destra della didascalia. Da un soggetto di Michelangelo Buonarroti. Splendida prova, impressa su carta vergata coeva cn filigrana "pellegrino nel cerchio con stella" rifilata alla linea marginale, in ottimo stato di conservazione. Il soggetto dell’incisione è tratto dal disegno a sanguigna di Michelangelo della Collezione Duke of Portland di Londra, incluso tra le opere eseguite intorno al 1540 per Vittoria Colonna. La prima traduzione a bulino del disegno è di Giulio Bonasone, e reca la data 1561. Questa incisione rappresenta la seconda delle due versioni del tema che Philippe Soye incise per Antonio Lafrery. La prima, molto diversa nella raffigurazione e posa di tutte le figure, e nei dettagli architettonici, è datata 1565. Questa seconda versione è molto più vicina all’opera del Bonasone. La scena raffigura Maria, seduta, con le gambe accavallate, e il Bambino che dorme sdraiato sulla panca con la testolina appoggiata sulla gamba di lei. La Vergine, con la mano destra, tiene aperto un libro sulle cui pagine sono riportati i versetti biblici relativi alla beatitudine di Maria. Più indietro, a destra, coprendosi la bocca con la mano, è S. Giuseppe, di cui nelle Sacre Scritture non è mai riportata la parola. Sulla sinistra, è raffigurato l’arcangelo Gabriele, con l’indice rivolto verso l’alto, rimandando probabilmente al concetto espresso nella didascalia: DORMIENTE PUERO IESU DIVINA MENS VIGILA ovvero Mentre il bambino dorme, la mente divina vigila. L’incisione reca la dedica a Galesio Reguardi, vescovo di Bagnoregio "datario di Pio IV, Papa". Engraving, 1566, signed Philippus Sericus fecit lower left, with the address of Antonio Lafrery and the date MDLXVI lower left. After a drawing by Michelangelo. A very good impression, printed on contemporary laid paper with "pilgrim in a cirlce with star" watermark, trimmed to the platemark, good condition. The subject for these print is from a sanguine drawing by Michelangelo in the Duke of Portland’s Collection in London, included among the works executed around 1540 for Vittoria Colonna. The first print made of this design is Giulio Bonasone’s, which is dated 1561. Philippe Soye engraved two versions of this theme, both published by Antonio Lafrery. The first one, dated 1565 with major changes in the apparence of all the figures. This engraving represents the second version, dated 1566, and close to Bonasone’s print. The scene depicts Mary sitting with his legs crossed, and the Christ Child asleep on her lap. The Virgin, with his right hand, holding open a book whose pages are the Biblical verses related to the Beatitude of Mary. Further back, St John the Baptist raising his figure to his lips, On the left, depicts the archangel Gabriel, with the index finger pointing up, probably referring to the concept expressed in the latin caption: DORMIENTE PUERO IESU DIVINA MENS VIGILA (While the Child sleeps, the Divine Mind supervises). Bartsch, XV.128.66; Catelli Isola, Fortuna di Michelangelo nell’incisione, p. 60 n. 25; Marigliani – Biguzzi, La Collezione Sacra della Bottega di Antonio Lafrery, p. 45 n. 5; Massari, Iulio Bonasone, p. 97 n. 127. Dimensioni 308 440mm [Attributes: Signed Copy]

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         Tunisi & Goletta

      Roma 1566 - Rara carta geografica raffigurante la città di Tunisi con l’antica Goletta e le coste settentrionali del Nord Africa, con le rovine di Cartagine. Esemplare nel secondo stato, stampato a Roma dall’editore Giovanni Orlandi nel 1602. La carta è priva del titolo, ma reca una estesa legenda, con la data e la firma dell’autore: "Benigni Lettori, per rappresentarui piu particulari della Città di / Tunesi, holla tenuta alquanto piu larga di quello che importa la / pianta di essa Città secondo la mesura, ò scala delli miglia, laquale / solamente ui seruirà à sapere le distantie da un luogho all'altro: / Piu altra i monti che sono alla sinestra dello stagno per la loro asprez= / za no[n] si possono cultiuare, le Colline alla destra sono tutti fruttifere, / lo stagno non è nauigabile se no[n] per lo canale. La Torre appresso la Go= / letta è per la difesa de' pozzi da quali si ha l'acqua per uso della Città: / Le Mura che abbracciano i borghi sono di altezza di tre braccia, / et debolossime, et solo fatte per reparar all'improuiso assalto de gli / Arabi; Bardo, Mescia, et Restabia sono serragli del Re: jl Borgo / Rabat è habitato da Soldati Christiani: jl Borgo Nifet da gli Arabi: / jl Mercator del bestiame si fa nella piazza appresso la Meschita: / La Piazza de' Christiani è alli Magazeni: il porto appresso le ruine / di Cartagine è quasi ripieno, et no si usa piu: / Venetijs ex æneis formis Bolognini Zalterij / Anno . M . D . LXVI". Bell’esemplare, in coloritura antica, applicato su antico supporto di collezione, con piccoli margini, minime abrasioni, per il resto perfetto stato di conservazione. Rare map showing the city of Tunis with the old Goletta and the northern coasts of North Africa, with the ruins of Carthage. A very rare example of the third state, printed in Rome by Giovanni Orlandi in 1602. The original edition by Zaltieri is printed in Venice; thi is one of the few plates that was printed by both of the leading publishers town of Italy. Fine example, in ancient colouring, laid down on a collection cardboard, with small margins, minimum abrasion, otherwise perfect condition. Tooley 558. Dimensioni 390 270mm

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        Tochai, fortezza nei confini di Transilvania et Ongheria.

      Venezia 1566 - Carta topografica raffigurante l’assedio di Tokaj. Firmata da Domenico Zenoi, è parte della celebre raccolta di cartografia urbana che questi pubblica, insieme a Paolo Forlani, nel 1567 con il titolo "Il primo libro delle citta, et fortezze principali del mondo". L’opera è di incredibile rarità e non ebbe una grande fortuna editoriale. Forse perché le lastre furono acquisite dall’editore Bolognino Zaltieri, che le utilizza per la raccolta di cartografia urbana realizzata da Giulio Ballino, denominata "De’ disegni delle più illustri città e fortezze del mondo", edita sempre a Venezia solo due anni dopo, nel 1569. Giulio Ballino era un avvocato veneziano che frequentava la casa dei Manunzio già verso il 1530, dedicandosi in gioventù allo studio dei classici. Il libro "De’ disegni delle più illustri città, et fortezze del mondo", stampato da Bolognino Zaltieri, è costituito da cinquanta vedute ed una carta geografica. L’opera rappresenta il primo tentativo, nell’ambito dell’editoria italiana, della realizzazione di un testo/atlante delle principali fortezze e città del mondo. A differenza dei suoi predecessori, dei quali utilizza spesso i rami e le iconografie, egli concepisce un’opera unitaria corredata di testi e di indice, della quale, per la prima volta, si è ha conoscenza dell’esatto numero di tavole che la compongono. Sicuramente ispirata all’opera del Du Pinet Plantz, "Pourtraitz et descriptions de plusieurs ville set forteresses.", la raccolta del Ballino è molto probabilmente solo una parte del progetto iniziale, molto più ampio. Egli probabilmente intendeva pubblicare un’edizione in latino, sperando di lanciare la sua opera a livello europeo, ma si arrese davanti alla pubblicazione del primo libro del "Civitates Orbis Terrarum" di Georg Braun & Fransz Hogenberg, che in qualche modo bruciò parecchie delle iniziative editoriali sull’iconografia urbana. Le carte della raccolta sono datate tra il 1566 ed il 1568; secondo un recente studio di Albert Ganado (1993), trentadue di queste risultano essere ristampe dei rami di Paolo Forlani e di Domenico Zenoi, per la prima volta apparsi ne "Il primo libro delle città, et fortezze principali del mondo del Forlani" (1567); questo cospicuo gruppo di tavole è inserito nella raccolta con alcuni ritocchi nelle lastre, che vengono modificate. Altre furono per la prima volta pubblicate da Ferrando Bertelli nel Disegni di alcune più illustri città di fortezze del mondo con aggiunte di alcune isole principali, datato 1568. Il resto delle tavole sono di anonimi incisori di cui l’autore si servì per la sua opera, probabilmente anche per ritoccare le lastre di cui era già in possesso. Alcuni esemplari di questa rara opera recano il frontespizio allegorico inciso da Nicolò Nelli, famoso incisore e calcografo veneziano della seconda metà del ‘500; altri esemplari viceversa hanno un frontespizio non inciso. Entrambe le versioni sono edite dallo Zaltieri nel 1569. Difficile stabilire quale sia la prima stesura e quale quella successiva, la sola differenza è infatti notabile nel testo al verso delle carte, che può variare nella dimensione dei caratteri. Altra differenza che alcune carte sono numerate al verso, mentre le stesse, esaminate in altri esemplari, sono prive di questo numero di pagina. Per semplice deduzione logica possiamo affermare che gli esemplari privi del numero siano antecedenti, teoria tuttavia non del tutto surrogata dall’esame di più esemplari dell’opera. Acquaforte e bulino, con pieni margini, in perfetto stato di conservazione. CMap showing the siege of Tokaj, signed by Domenico Zenoi. The map was first published in the incredible rare Paolo Forlani’s town book ""Il primo libro delle citta, et fortezze principali del mondo", published in 1567 with a partnership of Domenico Zenoi. The plates then comes in the hand of the publisher Bolognino Zaltieri and published in the De’ disegni delle più illustri città e fortezze del mondo", by Giulio Ballino, in 1569. Giulio Ballino was a [Attributes: Signed Copy]

      [Bookseller: Libreria Antiquarius]
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