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Displayed below are some selected recent viaLibri matches for books published in 1552

        Instrumento della filosofia

      In Vinegia: Per Giovanmaria Bonelli, 1552 Both Instrumento della filosofia and La prima parte de la filosofia natural were published in 1551 in Rome. La seconda parte de la filosofia naturale was first published in 1564 in Rome. The first editions are exceedingly rare: OCLC notes only one copy of the first edition of Instrumento della filosofia, at Sachsiche Landesbibliothek in Dresden. Of the 1551-4 edition of La filosofia naturale, it lists four copies. The present editions are also rare. [Together with:] Piccolomini, Alessandro. La prima [La seconda] parte de la filosofia naturale…In Vinegi: per Giovanni Bonello, 1552-65. Small octavo. 187, [1 blank] leaves; [16], 431 pages. Woodcut title-page device on first title-page, smaller, different woodcut device on second title; historiated initial letters, woodcut geometrical and occasionally astronomical diagrams in text. Small octavo. Woodcut publisher's device on title-page, woodcut historiated initial letters. Bound together in contemporary limp vellum with author and title in manuscript on spine. Covers partially browned, with tears at head of spine. Some dampstaining at lower margin through the first several gatherings of the first work; the first work also contains contemporary marginal underscoring, and a few contemporary marginal notes. A good, appealing copy. Alessandro Piccolomini (15089-1579) was a Siena-born Italian humanist who translated some of the classics into Italian, including Ovid's Metamorphoses, part of Vergil's Aeneid, and Aristotle's Poetics and Rhetoric. While a student at the University of Padua, he helped found the Infiammati Academy, where he gave lectures in philosophy. Thomas in his Universal Pronouncing Dictionary of Biography (1872) calls him "the first who wrote on philosophy in the Italian language." We haven't been able to find corroboration for this in a more recent source, but these works clearly constitute some of the earliest philosophy written in Italian. In astronomy, Piccolomini is well known for his De la sfera del mondo (1559), the appendix (De la stele fisse) of which represents the first printed star atlas. He also wrote, at the behest of Cosimo de Medici, a proposal for reforming the calendar (1578). In 1574 Pope Gregory XIII appointed him titular bishop of Patras (Patrae).

      [Bookseller: Michael R. Thompson, Booksellers, ABAA/I]
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        Distillierbuch der rechten kunst/von Kreutern/Wursein/Blumen/Camen

      Franckfurdt am Mayn: Jetz und wider von newem, 1552. Hardcover. Fair. 302 x 195mm full page woodcut title showing two workers among distilling apparatus surrounded by trees and birds. Only edition to use the full page woodcuts from Brufels herbal. Early work on steam distilliation of essential oils from plants. Contemporary wooden binding repaired over the spine and onto half the back and front boards with leather, chipped rough and loose. Boards still attached but front is starting. One clasp complete, remnants of another. damp staining throughout along edges. Plates 137, 138, 139 and 150 are missing. 50 pages of handwritten notes in German covering the endpapers, the bottom of some plates, the edges of some text and the section beyond the full page printers device in the back.

      [Bookseller: Sam Melfi]
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        DE ARCHITECTURA LIBRI DECEM AD CAESAREM AUGUSTUM,

      Lugduni, apud Joan. Tornaesium, 1552.. omnibus omnium editionibus longe emendatiores, collatis veteribus exemplis. Accesserunt, Gulielmi Philandri Castilionii, civis Romani annotationes castigatiores, & plus tertia parte locupletiores. Adiecta est Epitome in omnes Georgii Agricolae de mensuris & ponderibus libros, eodem autoter, cum Graeco pariter & Latino indice lucupletissimo. First Jean de Tournes edition of Vitruvius, 1552, Latin text. 4to, aproximately 235 x 155 mm, 9¼ x 6¼ mm, printer's device of vipers on title page, a different De Tournes device on verso final page, 83 woodcut illustrations, 1 folding plate of an inscription, portrait of Philandrier the editor on final page of prelims, arabesque headpieces to the 10 books and historiated initials throughout, pages [16], 447, [57]- including index, bound in modern full blind panelled calf, raised bands, blind rules and gilt lettered morocco label to spine, all edges red, new endpapers. Small repair to inner edge of title page plus 2 ink names, pages lightly age-browned, tiny chip to fore-edge of 1 prelim page, small closed tear to 1 margin, repaired neatly, some early mostly neat ink marginal notes, some small corrections to text and a little neat underlining, a couple of small ink stains and smudges, text still easily legible, very light foxing to a few margins. A good tight copy. This edition published in Lyon by Jean de Tournes was the second edited by Guillaume Philandrier, the first was published in Strasbourg in 1550 as a 16mo. As the secretary to the bishop of Rodez the French humanist Philandrier, friend of Raberlais, had spent 10 years in Italy in Venice and Rome, many of them studying Vitruvius and in 1544 he published his illustrated annotations separately in Rome. Adams, Books Printed in Europe 1501-1600, Volume II, V908; Harvard, French 16th Century Books, Volume II, No. 550. MORE IMAGES ATTACHED TO THIS LISTING.

      [Bookseller: Roger Middleton]
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        ARETAEI CAPPADOCIS Medici In Signis Ac Vetustissimi Libri Septem / RUFFI EPHESII Medici Clarissimi, De Corporis Humani Partium Appellationibus Libri Tres

      Venice: Giunta Press, 1552 ARETAEUS of Cappadocia (fl. ca A.D. 50). Libri septem - RUFUS of Ephesus (fl. 1st century A.D.) De corporis humani partium appellationbus libri tres. Both texts translated from Greek into Latin by Junius Paulus Crassus (ca 1500-75). Venice: Giunta Press, 1552. 4o (243 x 170 mm). 112 leaves. Roman and italic types. Printer's woodcut device on title-page and verso of last leaf, woodcut ornamental initials. (Waterstain at inner corner of upper margins.) Contemporary limp vellum (stained at top). Provenance: Princes of Liechtenstein (bookplate); Haskell F. Norman (bookplate, his sale part I, Christie's New York, 18 March, 1988, lot 16). FIRST EDITIONS. Born Cappadocia, an ancient name of a region in central Turkey, Aretaeus probably was schooled in Caesarea, after which he went to Alexandria and Rome. His writings on the causes, symptoms and cures of acute and chronic diseases are the only works of the Pneumatic school of physicians that survived. The Pneumatic School reflected Stoic influence and emphasized the physician's compassion for the patient. Aretaeus gave the first accurate account of diabetes, which he named, the first clear account of diphtheria, and the classic description of nodous leprosy. Like Aretaeus, Rufus was born in Turkey, in Ephesus. At the time Ephesus was an important medical center with a museum and an association of physicians. Rufus, who lived under the Emperor Trajan (98-117 C. E.) seems to have spent his entire active life in Ephesus, after he completed his medical studies, probably at Alexandria. Among Rufus' prolific writings was the earliest treatise on anatomical nomenclature- On the Names of the Parts of the Human Body. Rufus considered anatomy an important part of the study of medicine. He complained that he had to teach anatomy on the bodies of monkeys, even though he stated that "in ancient times anatomy was taught with more profit on the cadaver" (quoted by Prioreschi, A History of Medicine Volume III: Roman Medicine, 251). This is probably a reference to the earlier work of Herophilus of Alexandria who conducted human dissection. After Galen, who also taught human anatomy using apes, Rufus is considered the most significant Greek physician of the Roman Empire. Rufus made numerous contributions to anatomy and physiology, including an improved description of the eye, and the earliest description of the human liver as five-lobed (an error that would persist until Vesalius' time). NLM/Durling 256; Norman 62; Waller 458; Wellcome 392. VERY RARE!!! THIS IS THE ONLY COPY ON THE MARKET!! Photos available upon request.

      [Bookseller: Louis Caron]
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        Aphricae Tabula II

      Basel, 1552. unbound. very good. Map. Uncolored woodcut. Image measures 10" x 13.5". Fantastic early and very rare woodcut map of Northern Africa and the Mediterranean showing parts of Sicily, Tunisia and Libya. Features a dramatic scene describing the shipwreck of St. Paul the Apostle off the coast of Malta (Melita). A table at left provides a list of the cities in Latin. Professor Sebastian Munster (1488-1552) was a German cosmographer, humanist, theologian and scholar. This Ptolemaic map was published in Munster's seminal work "Cosmographia". Light scattered foxing and toning along original centerfold. Small tear to bottom edge and a few very small wormholes. Full original margins.

      [Bookseller: Argosy Book Store]
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        Instrumento della filosofia

      In Vinegia: Per Giovanmaria Bonelli, 1552 Both Instrumento della filosofia and La prima parte de la filosofia natural were published in 1551 in Rome. La seconda parte de la filosofia naturale was first published in 1564 in Rome. The first editions are exceedingly rare: OCLC notes only one copy of the first edition of Instrumento della filosofia, at Sachsiche Landesbibliothek in Dresden. Of the 1551-4 edition of La filosofia naturale, it lists four copies. The present editions are also rare. [Together with:] Piccolomini, Alessandro. La prima [La seconda] parte de la filosofia naturale...In Vinegi: per Giovanni Bonello, 1552-65. Small octavo. 187, [1 blank] leaves; [16], 431 pages. Woodcut title-page device on first title-page, smaller, different woodcut device on second title; historiated initial letters, woodcut geometrical and occasionally astronomical diagrams in text. Small octavo. Woodcut publisher's device on title-page, woodcut historiated initial letters. Bound together in contemporary limp vellum with author and title in manuscript on spine. Covers partially browned, with tears at head of spine. Some dampstaining at lower margin through the first several gatherings of the first work; the first work also contains contemporary marginal underscoring, and a few contemporary marginal notes. A good, appealing copy. Alessandro Piccolomini (15089-1579) was a Siena-born Italian humanist who translated some of the classics into Italian, including Ovid's Metamorphoses, part of Vergil's Aeneid, and Aristotle's Poetics and Rhetoric. While a student at the University of Padua, he helped found the Infiammati Academy, where he gave lectures in philosophy. Thomas in his Universal Pronouncing Dictionary of Biography (1872) calls him "the first who wrote on philosophy in the Italian language." We haven't been able to find corroboration for this in a more recent source, but these works clearly constitute some of the earliest philosophy written in Italian. In astronomy, Piccolomini is well known for his De la sfera del mondo (1559), the appendix (De la stele fisse) of which represents the first printed star atlas. He also wrote, at the behest of Cosimo de Medici, a proposal for reforming the calendar (1578). In 1574 Pope Gregory XIII appointed him titular bishop of Patras (Patrae).

      [Bookseller: Michael R. Thompson, Booksellers, ABAA/I]
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        Notitia utraque cum Orientis tum Occidentis ultra Arcadii Honoriique Caesarum tempora... bound with Alberti Dureri pictoris et architexti praestantissimi de Urbibus, arcibus, castellisque... Two volumes bound into one

      Basel, Paris: Froben; Christiani Wecheli. 1552, 1535. Good. Two volumes bound into one, dated 1552 and 1535. Full limp vellum, tall quarto, 13 x 8.5 inches (33 x 23 cm). Notitia utraque: [108] leaves, collated complete. Copious woodcut illustrations throughout. Durer: [41] leaves, collated complete, with five folding plates, four double plates, and three regular plates. Unfortunately, one of the folding plates is only half there. An earlier folding plate has a one by one-half inch tear/hole, but it does not affect the engraved area. The volume is generally good, binding quite wrinkled and stained, mild ex-library with old library bookplate and withdrawn stamp to the verso of the front cover, perforated stamp to the Notitia title page and ink number stamp to the following page. Soil and waving to the vellum, with a circumscribed on the cover as well as a faded decorative motif; knife splice, mostly closed, to the rear panel with old script writing in Latin. Faint tidemark to the last three pages, flyleaves worn and with loss, rear pastedown shows wear and tears, occasional dampstain to margins, Notitia has old ink rules to margins, and very long repaired tear to page with plate 'Dux Phoenices.' FULL TITLES: Notitia utraque cum Orientis tum Occidentis ultra Arcadii Honoriique Caesarum tempora... Praecedit autem D. And. Alciati libellus, de magistratibus civilibus ac militaribus officiis... Cui succedit descriptio urbis Romae, quae sub titulo Pub. Victoris circumfertur: & altera urbis Constantinopolitanae incerto authore, nunquam antehac typis excusa ... Subiungitur notitiis vetustus liber de rebus bellicis ad Theodosium Aug. & filios ejus... ut videtur, scriptus, incerto autore; Item, ne quid de antiquo exemplari omitteretur, disputatio Adriani Aug. & Epicteti philosophi. // Alberti Dureri pictoris et architecti praestantissimi de vrbibus, arcibus, castellísque condendis, ac muniendis rationes aliquot, praesenti bellorum necessitati accommodatissimae : nunc recens è lingua Germanica in Latinam traductae. The first volume is an official listing of offices in the Roman empire, including illustrations of insignia and uniforms of the legions, illustrations of ancient scrolls and books in which these records were contained, maps, and depictions of cities and towns, coins and medallions, weapons of war and costumes./ Edited by Sigmund Gelen, with his preface to Andreas Vesalius ... The Durer volume is First ed. of Joachim Camrarius' Latin translation. The ill. are close copies of the 1527 Nuremberg German ed. RARE. Adams N354 and Adams D1056 respectively.

      [Bookseller: Caliban Books ABAA-ILAB]
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        DE PHILOSOPHIA. Cum scholijs, & coniecturis Pauli Manutij.

      In-16 p. (mm. 158x98), 2 voll., p. pergam. antica, tit. oro su tassello al dorso (con manc.), 4 cc.nn.,147 cc.num.,9 cc.nn.; 3 cc.nn., 2-213 cc. (mal numer., le cc. da 150 a 157 e la c. 194 sono saltate),16 cc.nn.; con ancora aldina, in cornice decorata, silografata al frontesp. e in fine; testo in corsivo. L?opera è così composta: ?"Prima Pars", id est, Academicarum quaestionum editionis primae liber secundus, editionis secundae liber primus - De finibus bonorum & malorum, libri V - Tusculanarum quaestionum, libri V? - ?"Volumen Secundum", id est, De natura deorum, libri III. - De divinatione, libri II. - De fato, liber I. - De legibus, libri III. - De universitate, liber I. - Q. Ciceronis de petitione Consulatus ad Marcum fratrem, liber I.?. "Manca la seconda parte del primo vol." che contiene le ?Tuscolane? (titolo, cc. 148-251, 7 cc.nn.). Cfr. Renouard,154: ?.. voyez l?édition de 1546, dont celle-ci est une seconde réimpression? - Adams,C-1757. Solo prime 2 cc. del I vol. con alone, altrim. esemplare molto ben conservato.

      [Bookseller: Libreria Antiquaria Malavasi]
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        Aphricae Tabula II

      Basel, 1552. unbound. very good. Map. Uncolored woodcut. Image measures 10" x 13.5". Fantastic early and very rare woodcut map of Northern Africa and the Mediterranean showing parts of Sicily, Tunisia and Libya. Features a dramatic scene describing the shipwreck of St. Paul the Apostle off the coast of Malta (Melita). A table at left provides a list of the cities in Latin. Professor Sebastian Munster (1488-1552) was a German cosmographer, humanist, theologian and scholar. This Ptolemaic map was published in Munster's seminal work "Cosmographia". Light scattered foxing and toning along original centerfold. Small tear to bottom edge and a few very small wormholes. Full original margins.

      [Bookseller: Argosy Book Store ]
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        Le iscrittioni poste sotto le vere imagini de gli huomini famosi le quali a' como nel museo del giovio si veggiono. tradotte di latino in volgare da hippolito orio ferrarese. in fiorenza, appresso lorenzo torrentino, 1552 (1551 al colophon),

      Cm. 20,5, pp. (12) 245 (3). Frontespizio interamente figurato e bei capolettera istoriati. Leg. recente (primi '900?) in mezza pelle con punte, dorso a nervi con titoli in oro. Frontespizio un po' brunito e legg. sfrangiato al margine superiore, rade fioriture, peraltro esemplare piuttosto ben conservato. Opera preceduta da una descrizione del museo Giovio di Como, cui segue la raccolta di iscrizioni poste sotto le immagini degli uomini famosi ivi presenti. Non comune prima edizione del volgarizzamento.

      [Bookseller: Studio Bibliografico Benacense]
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        Della historia vinitiana... volgarmente scritta. libri xii. in vinegia, appresso gualtero scotto, 1552.

      Cm. 21,5, cc. (14) 179 (1). Marchio tipografico al frontespizio (ripetuto al colophon) e bei capolettera istoriati. Solida legatura ottocentesca in mezza pergamena con punte, dorso lisci con ricchi fregi in oro e titoli su doppi tasselli bicolore. Una macchietta al margine delle prima carte. Una firma di possesso manoscritta al frontespizio ed alcune interesanti e nitide glosse coeve al testo. Esemplare complessivamente ben conservato. Prima edizione in lingua italiana voltata dall'originale latino dell'anno precedente che era stato impresso da Aldo Manuzio. Cfr. Gamba (130).

      [Bookseller: Studio Bibliografico Benacense]
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        Prodigiorum liber, ab Urbe condita usque ad Augustum Caesarem, cuius tantum extabat Fragmentum, nunc demum Historiarum beneficio, per Conradum Lycosthenem Rubeaquensem, integritati suae restitutus. Polydori Vergilij Urbinatis de Prodigijs libri III. Joachimi Camerarij Peberg. de Ostentis II.

      Basel, ex Officina Ioannis Oporini, 1552, Mense Martio. 8vo. Later solid, crackled full calf with the contemporary vellum title-label on back. Title-page gently mounted and a bit shaved at top. Contemporary handwritten copy of colophon on bottom of title-page. Some leaves with a bit of brownspotting and minor soiling, but a solid and overall clean and fine copy. In all 84 woodcut illustrations (incl. that on t-p.), depicting various abnormal animals and humans, landscapes, the heavens, destroyed cities, weather- and nature- phenomena, dissections of animals, harvest etc. (20), 327, (12) pp.. Scarce first separate and first illustrated edition of Obsequens' curious work on omens and supernatural events that took place in Rome between 249 and 12 B.C., mainly based on Livius (Livy); also containing Vergil's de Prodigiis and Camerari's de Ostentis. Obsequens is said to have flourished in the middle of the 4th century A.D. and is known for having written this work, which was first printed, unillustrated, by Aldus as an appendix to Pline's epistles in 1508. It was later printed by Estienne, "mais il est plus complet dans la présente édition." (Brunet IV:149). This edition was reprinted in Lyon the following year. Adams II:16. Brunet IV:147

      [Bookseller: Lynge & Søn A/S]
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        De ortu et interitu libri duo, Iochimo Periono interprete: per Nicolaum Grouchium correcti & emendati. [Generatione et corruptione].

      Lutetiae [Paris], ex officina Michaelis Vascosani [Michel de Vascosan], 1552. 4to. Recent stiff paper binding w. cords showing at spine. A nice and charming copy. 72 pp.. First edition of Joachim Perion's famous Latin Ciceronian translation of Aristotle's hugely important work "On Generation and Corruption", also known in Latin as "De generatione et corruptione". The translation is corrected and revised by Montaigne's tutor, Nicolas de Grouchy, and it is probably this humanistic Renaissance version of Aristotle's work that Montaigne has studied. The French Renaissance scholar, philosopher and translator, Joachim Périon (1499-1559) counts as one of the most eminent of Renaissance Aristotelians and one of the major actors in the development of Aristotelian thought; together with names such as George of Trebizond, Lefèvre d'Etaples, Pomponazzi, Zabarella etc., Périon was one of the most influential Aristotelians of the Renaissance. The great Aristotelians of the era differed much from each other in their Aristotelianism, though, and not all agreed that Périon's novel attempt to find a Ciceronian equivalent for everything that Aristotle had said was the right way to go about the Aristotelian texts; as Copenhaver and Schmitt put it "Some disparaties among disciples of the Stagirite reflected strong commitments by contemporaries or near contemporaries to incompatible mathods - Pomponazzi and Périon, for example, who were only a generation apart; Périon meant his Ciceronian translations of Aristotle to displace the crabbed Latin that Pomponazzi found indispensible." (Renaissance Philosophy, 2002, p. 61).The sixteenth century of Europe with its Renaissance humanism faced a time of scholarly change that revolutionized all most all aspects of learning, not least that of philosophy. Many historians throughout the years have argued that with the emergence of the Renaissance and especially Renaissance humanism, Aristotelian philosophy became less and less important; this frequently quoted conception must be said to rest on a misunderstanding, however. It is, on the contrary, a fact that for the grand humanists of the late 15th and 16th centuries the revival of learning was by no means in opposition to the continued teachings of the works of Aristotle. On the contrary, due to the recent appreciation of the knowledge of Greek and the invention of printing, works were being translated and printed like never before, which meant that the greatest of the humanists, many of whom did not themselves know Greek, could be acquainted with the Greek texts of Aristotle. It is at the peak of this humanism that we find the many important translations in different styles of the works of Aristotle. "In the sixteenth century, more than fifty scholars from various parts of Europe produced nearly 200 Latin translations of over forty texts ascribed to Aristotle. The most productive of the fifteent-century translators were the Byzantines George of Trebizond and Johannes Argyropulos, who each completed ten texts, but in the sixteenth century the Frenchman Joachim Périon challenges even the prolific William of Moerbeke by turning more than twenty works into Ciceronian Latin... Variations in translation served variations of audience, and the audience changed with time as it was educated by new accomplishments in translation." (The Cambridge History of Renaissance Philosophy, p. 77). In fact, Périon stands in the midst of the decades that produces the first humanist Latin translations of Greek texts in print, and with his opposition to the classical Latin medieval translations and outspoken Ciceronian style, he is one of the most radically humanist translators of the Aristotelian texts. Périon's style is eminently exemplified in the translation of the title which he has chosen for the present work, the elegant and stylish "De ortu et interitu" instead of the more clumsy but perfectly correct "De generatione et corruptione".Nicolas de Grouchy (1510-1572), who later got into a feud with Périon, served as the corrector and reviser of the present translation of Aristotle's important treatise on substantial change, in which he introduces his four causes and four elements and thus his atomic theory. De Grouchy was the controversial private tutor to the young Montaigne at the Collège du Guyenne, and his corrections are of great importance, especially because he did not fully approve of Périon's strictly Cicerionian approach to the translations of Aristotle

      [Bookseller: Lynge & Søn A/S]
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        Instrumento della filosofia

      Per Giovanmaria Bonelli In Vinegia: Per Giovanmaria Bonelli, 1552 Both Instrumento della filosofia and La prima parte de la filosofia natural were published in 1551 in Rome. La seconda parte de la filosofia naturale was first published in 1564 in Rome. The first editions are exceedingly rare: OCLC notes only one copy of the first edition of Instrumento della filosofia, at Sachsiche Landesbibliothek in Dresden. Of the 1551-4 edition of La filosofia naturale, it lists four copies. The present editions are also rare. [Together with:] Piccolomini, Alessandro. La prima [La seconda] parte de la filosofia naturale?In Vinegi: per Giovanni Bonello, 1552-65. Small octavo. 187, [1 blank] leaves; [16], 431 pages. Woodcut title-page device on first title-page, smaller, different woodcut device on second title; historiated initial letters, woodcut geometrical and occasionally astronomical diagrams in text. Small octavo. Woodcut publisher's device on title-page, woodcut historiated initial letters. Bound together in contemporary limp vellum with author and title in manuscript on spine. Covers partially browned, with tears at head of spine. Some dampstaining at lower margin through the first several gatherings of the first work; the first work also contains contemporary marginal underscoring, and a few contemporary marginal notes. A good, appealing copy. Alessandro Piccolomini (15089-1579) was a Siena-born Italian humanist who translated some of the classics into Italian, including Ovid's Metamorphoses, part of Vergil's Aeneid, and Aristotle's Poetics and Rhetoric. While a student at the University of Padua, he helped found the Infiammati Academy, where he gave lectures in philosophy. Thomas in his Universal Pronouncing Dictionary of Biography (1872) calls him "the first who wrote on philosophy in the Italian language." We haven't been able to find corroboration for this in a more recent source, but these works clearly constitute some of the earliest philosophy written in Italian. In astronomy, Piccolomini is well known for his De la sfera del mondo (1559), the appendix (De la stele fisse) of which represents the first printed star atlas. He also wrote, at the behest of Cosimo de Medici, a proposal for reforming the calendar (1578). In 1574 Pope Gregory XIII appointed him titular bishop of Patras (Patrae).

      [Bookseller: Michael R. Thompson, Booksellers, ABAA/I]
 14.   Check availability:     ABAA     Link/Print  

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