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Displayed below are some selected recent viaLibri matches for books published in 1531

        Tractatus de Beneficio, Perspicacissimi Iuris Utrius[que] Luminis

      1531. Selve, Jean de [d. 1529]. Tractatus de Beneficio: Perspicacissimi Iuris Utrius[que] Luminis ac Monarche D[omi]ni Joannis de Selva Tractat[us] de Beneficio: Lusummariis Ante Una[m]qua[m]q[ue] Questione[m] Acco[m]modatis: Copiosoq[ue] Repertorio Numeris Distincto: Quo que Quisq[ue] Scire Cupierit eide Occurrat Facilius. [Lyons: Jean David], 1531. 290, 18 ff. Octavo (7" x 4-1/2"). Recent calf, raised bands and lettering piece to spine, endpapers renewed, early hand-lettered title to foot of spine. Light rubbing to extremities. Title page with woodcut architectural border printed in red and black, woodcut decorated initials. Light toning to text, negligible foxing in places, recent repairs to a few leaves. Underlining to a few pages, interior otherwise clean. * Later edition. This notable canon-law treatise on ecclesiastical benefices and pensions was originally published in 1504. It went through at least editions into the seventeenth century. Baudrier, Bibliographie Lyonnaise V152, 290.

      [Bookseller: The Lawbook Exchange, Ltd.]
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        Eyn schön nützlich büchlin und underweisung der kunst des Messens, mit dem Zirkel, Richtscheidt oder Lineal. Zu nutz allen kunstliebhabern, fürnemlich den Malern, Bildhawern, Goldschmiden, Seidenstickern, Steynmetzen, Schreinern, auch allen andern, so sich der kunst des Messens (Perspectiva zu latein gnant) zugebrauchen lust haben

      Simmern: H. Rodler, 1531. 1st Edition . Hardcover. Very Good. Folio - over 12 - 15" tall. Folio, [45] leaves (without last blank leaf). With numerous half and full-page woodcuts in text; 11 woodcuts with the red lines delineating perspective; title in printed in red and black. Early ownership inscription of "A. Volpi" on title-page. Modern black morocco in a fine antique style. FIRST EDITION and a fine copy of this elaborately illustrated introduction to linear perspective, a cogent vernacular text which played a key role in disseminating Dürer's projection method throughout Germany. The work effectively turns Dürer's treatise into a model book. Notably, many of the geometrical diagrams (especially those with the red overprinting) owe something to Pelerin-the brilliant illustrations juxtapose complex floor and ceiling patterns, cul-de-sacs in densely built up medieval streets with background landscapes, and church interiors with complex patterns of columns and vaulted ceilings. Some of the designs (D iiiir) are so enthralled to pattern at the expense of architectural reality that they are very likely designs for intarsia, or anticipate the playful fantasies found in model books later in the century. Another design Giiii r shows proto-cubist human figures and heads found in Lautensack's 1564 Kunstebuchlein.In his preface, Rodler tells the reader that Dürer's Underweysung der Messung (1525) was too difficult for most people to understand, although he acknowledges the great merits of the work. Rodler and the Duke, therefore, drew upon both the Underweysung and Dürer's Vier Bücher von menschlicher Proportion (1528) in composing this shorter and more practical treatise, aiming to provide painters, sculptors, goldsmiths, embroiderers, masons and carpenters with a better understanding of the art of perspective. "This treatise, edited by Hieronymus Rodler, combined serious theoretical discussion and picture-book type practical example in a new way. The treatise is a revolt against specialist dogmatism, written in an easy vernacular and illustrated with a simple elegance and deftness that points towards the French school. Most of the full-page views were drawn from life in the grounds, halls and corridors of the castle and the title-page... presumably shows the workshop there, with a self-portrait of Duke Johann II at work" (Paul Breman apud Wiebenson, III-B-2).The dramatic one-point perspective illustrations, upon which the orthogonals are often overprinted in red, include depictions of a student's desk with a calculation sheet and counters; a shelf with bound volumes; a man playing a viola da gamba at a convivial gathering; and an artist at work in a room with a grid iron window which permits an easy transfer of the landscape seen through it on a drawing board. Four of the woodcuts are signed "H.H.", for Duke Johann's vernacular title "Herzog Hans von Hunsrück." (Another of these H.H. woodcuts was incorporated into Sebastian Münster's Cosmography, which mentions the Simmern press.) Stylistically, the illustrations are a mix of late Gothic and Renaissance styles, in the tradition of the Augsburg artists Max Wirsung and Hans Burgkmair. According to Joseph Meder's famous work Die Handzeichnung which quotes from Eyn schön nützlich büchlin several times, this is the first description of perspective, interior and exterior, calculated on the focus of two eyes. Also of great interest is the description in chapter three of the technique of pen-and-charcoal drawing. Published by Johann II of Pfalz Simmern at his private press in Simmern, the work is often attributed to the Duke's secretary Rodler, who authored the preface. It seems most likely that Duke Johann, a cultivated patron of the arts who studied woodcutting with Conrad Faber von Creuznach in about 1530, produced the illustrations not only for this volume, but also for the other eight titles published by the Simmern press. The cut on the title shows what has to be one of the earliest pr

      [Bookseller: Martayan Lan, Inc.]
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        [Fleuron]. Silii Italici...de bello punico libri septemdecim. Title [Fleuron]. Silii Italici...de bello punico libri septemdecim. Cum argumentis Hermanni Buschij, & scholijs in margine adiectis, quae vice vberis commentarij esse possunt

      Parisiis : Apud Simonem Colinaeum, 1531. Referenced by: Adams S1135. Referenced by: CLC S1260. Renouard, P. Simon de Colin, p. 185. Language; Latin. Physical description; 223 leaves ; 17 cm. Notes; Signatures: a-z, A-E(8 (E(8 blank). Printer's device on the title page. Colophon: Parisiis in aedibus Simonis Colinaei anno M. D. XXXI mense Novembri. Spaces with guide letters left for capitals. Errors in foliation 84, 206, 217 misnumb. 48, 260, and 227 respectively. Subjects; Punic War, 2d 218-201 B.C - Poetry. Other names; Busche, Hermann von dem, 1468-1534. Lacks final blank. Preliminary 2 and last leaf with MS inscriptions and pen trials; light, marginal staining. Contemporary limp vellum soiled and crimpled; a sound copy overall.

      [Bookseller: MW Books Ltd.]
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        La decoratio[n] Dhumaine nature et aornement des dames. Co[m]pile et extraict des tres excelle[nts] docteurs et pl[us] expers medecins ta[n]t anciens q[ue] modernes…

      Lyon:: Claude Veycellier,, 1 March 1531. 8vo. 8vo (133 x 90 mm). 50, [6] leaves. Bâtarde type. Title in red and black within woodcut border printed from four blocks, woodcut initials. Bound ca. 1830 in crimson polished calf, covers with double gilt fillet surrounding two blind roll-tooled borders, smooth spine gilt with title lettered longitudinally within decorative cartouche, gilt edges, marbled endleaves, signed "Simier" at foot of spine. Notes in Latin in a contemporary French hand on final blank page. ***& & THE FIRST FRENCH BEAUTY MANUAL, second edition, first Lyonese edition. This collection of recipes for cosmetics, perfumes and herbal treatments relies on easily available foods or plants, many requiring no more than a stove, and occasionally an alambic for distillation. Most of the concoctions are cosmetic: how to dye hair blond or black, make one’s nipples firm and pretty, prevent a suntan, remove unwanted hair, warts, pimples, or freckles, whiten one’s te eth, sweeten one’s breath, brighten one’s complexion, smell like roses, clean up ragged fingernails, or abolish wrinkles. Several remedies address common medical complaints – a child’s cough, headaches, injuries occasioned by childbirth, and other gynecological issues (the latter written in Latin, to ensure that the readers consult a “clerc” or doctor). The second part is devoted to perfumes, powders, oils & soaps. A table at end provides for easy reference. Le Fournier, doctor and chemist, named regent of the Faculté de Médecine de Paris in 1518, apparently gathered his health & beauty remedies from oral tradition. His books would hardly have told him, for example, the secret skin cleansing recipe of Isabelle of Aragon (involving large quantities of goat’s milk and flour), or that a concentrate of 300 boiled snails blended with a laurel leaf, 3 spoons of olive oil and honey will produce a hair-thickening pomade; while a distillation of 12 fresh hen’s eggs, 12 ounces of ass’s milk & an ounce of cinnamon will “illuminate, purify, and so glorify a person’s face that she will look 15 years old."& & Claude Veycellier issued this edition five months after the first (recorded) edition, printed in Paris by Pierre Leber for Jean Longis & Jean Saint-Denis (18 October 1530). A second Paris edition, also from Leber’s press, is dated two days after Veycellier's. Both include three pages of medical remedies not included in the 1530 edition. The book jumped off the shelves: Veycellier reprinted the text in 1532, and seven further editions are recorded, most Lyonese and all but one printed in the 1530s and 40s. Nearly all survive in one to five copies, as to be expected given “the frequent use these Companions of the Toilet (like their relatives of the Kitchen) must have been subject to by their fair owners, probably lying open for reference close by during the concoction of the various mixtures…” (Picot, Fairfax Murray catalogue). & & We locate 4 other copies of this edition: the Lignerolles-Fairfax Murray copy, now at Princeton, a copy at the British Library (shelfmark 1174. d.1, mistakenly described as undated in the BMC catalogue and listed as a separate edition by Baudrier and Gültlingen, but examined and correctly described by Ferguson), a copy at the University of Minnesota, and a copy offered by Giraud-Badin in the 1990s. The admittedly incomplete Catalogue Collectif de France records no copies of either Veycellier edition in France. & & Dating from the Restoration or early July Monarchy, the binding on our copy may be the work of René Simier, or of his son Alphonse, who took over the firm ca. 1826. But, while decorated with one of the characteristic border rolls (“en molette”) from their shop, it is signed simply Simier, without the title “Relieur [or R.] du Roi” used by René Simier after his appointment in 1816 or 1817 as binder to Louis XVIII, and later by his son. The narrow backstrip may have made inclusion of the honorific impractical, but it is also possible that the binding was produced by the unrelated or distantly related binder Germain Simier, who capitalized on the name from the early 1830s, until he was forced by court order to identify himself properly (another borrower of the name, Jean Simier, was active later). & & Baudrier XII, 428; Gültlingen VI:107, no. 8; Fairfax Murray French 307; Brunet III, 932; BM/STC French p. 260 (misdescribed as undated, the oddly placed colophon having been overlooked by the cataloguer); Bechtel L-100=L-103 (perpetuating the “undated” ghost edition); Ferguson, Secrets, S. III, p. 16, no. 21, & Index no. 499; cf. Demerson, Livres populaires Mpvf 01-03, and Kelso, Doctrine for the Lady 492.& &

      [Bookseller: Musinsky Rare Books, Inc.]
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        La Resurrezione

      Acquaforte e puntasecca, databile al periodo 1531/40, priva della firma dell?artista. Esemplare nel terzo stato di quattro descritto da Mistrali, prima dei ritocchi a bulino. Bellissima prova, impressa su carta vergata coeva con filigrana ?piccola corona? (Briquet 4674), con sottilissimi margini, in ottimo stato di conservazione. L?interesse per la grafica da parte del grandissimo artista inizia durante il suo viaggio a Roma del 1524 dove frequenta Marcantonio Raimondi e la sua bottega, apprendendo la tecnica del maestro bolognese e l?uso dell?acido. A Roma conosce anche Ugo da Carpi da cui apprende la tecnica del chiaroscuro, ideale per la traduzione a stampa dei disegni. Proprio nella capitale il Parmigianino incide San Pietro e San Giovanni guariscono gli infermi (Bartsch 7), suo celebre primo lavoro grafico all? acquaforte derivante da un disegno di Raffaello, che rimane l?unica opera prodotta prima del ritorno a Parma. Tutta la restante produzione grafica risale quindi al periodo successivo al 1531. La scelta dell?artista di dedicarsi personalmente ad una tecnica considerata minore e marginale nasce probabilmente dall?intuizione di poter riprodurre in più esemplari i suoi lavori che attraverso l?uso dell?acquaforte rimanevano molto vicini all?immediatezza del disegno, senza mostrare quella rigidità di traduzione propria dell?incisione al bulino. Il Mazzola si dedicò all?incisione in modo sporadico, per le difficoltà che incontrava nell?usare l?acido; per questo i suoi lavori presentano spesso difetti di morsura, che contraddistinguono gran parte dell?opera grafica di questo maestro sperimentatore, rendendo spesso controversa la catalogazione degli stati delle incisioni. Secondo Mistrali sono quattro gli stati di questa opera; il nostro esemplare presenta caratteristiche comuni a più stati descritti, confermando proprio per il discorso fatto in precedenza, la consueta differenza di impressioni tipica delle opere del Parmigianino, di difficilissima catalogazione. In precedenza la Resurrezione venne sottratta dal corpus delle opere del Parmigianino, mentre attualmente nessuno mette più in dubbio il fatto che il foglio sia una delle più affascinanti acqueforti dell?artista. L?opera è caratterizzata dalla vivacità data dall?armonioso movimento delle figure e dal gioco degli effetti luminosi, che risaltano la figura del Cristo. Questo effetto di chiaroscuro viene ottenuto dal Mazzola attraverso delle aggiunte con la puntasecca, visibili soprattutto nello sfondo. L?analisi stilistica sui disegni preparatori all?opera inducono gli studiosi a datarla alla fine del periodo romano, verso il 1527. Bibliografia: Bartsch 6, Mistrali 16. Parmigianino e il manierismo europeo pp. 330/331, 2.4.4; Parmigianino und sein Kreis, druckgraphik aus der Sammlung Baselitz, pp. 81/85, 24. Dimensioni 136x211.

      [Bookseller: Libreria Antiquarius]
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        In hoc volumine continentur ... Joan Serapionis Arabis: De simlpicibus medicinis opus praeclarum & ingens. - Averrois: De eisdem liber eximinus. - Rasis fili Zacheriae: De eisem opusculum perutile. - Incerti item autoris: De centaureolibellus hactenus Geleo inscriptus ... (Herausgegeben von) Otto Brunfels.

      Folio. 10 n.n. Bl., 397 (recte 399) S., 1 S. Druckermarke. Pergamentband der Zeit mit geprägtem Rückentitel. Adams I 13. - Durling 2524. - Wellcome I, 5936. - Muller 329,13. - VD16 Y 12. - Seltene Sammelausgabe von Texten arabischer Mediziner, Ibn Serapion, Yuhama - Averroes - Razi, Abu Bakr Muhammad ibn Zakariya. Von Otto Brunfels in Zusammenarbeit mit Gerhard Geldenhauer editierte Auswahl. Der Text von Serapion, hier in der lateinischen Fassung von Abraham ben Shem-tob und Simon Genuensis, erschien gedruckt erstmals 1525 in Lyon. Der Text von Averroes in der lateinischen Ausgabe von Jakob von Bonacosa wurde 1482 erstmals in Venedig gedruckt sowie die lateinische Fassung durch Gerardus Cremonensis des "Liber ad Almansorem" nach der Ausgabe Milano von 1481. Unser Exemplar mit dem Widmungsblatt von Brunfels an Bernhard zu Solms. - Vereinzelt etwas fleckig. Wenige handschriftliche Randnotizen des 16. Jahrhunderts. Mit handschriftlichen Besitzvermerken von "Jacob Holphy" und kleiner Besitzerstempel von L. Schönlein auf dem Titel.

      [Bookseller: Daniel Thierstein Buchantiquariat]
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        Der Fürtrefflich Griechisch geschicht schreiber Herodianus, den der Hochgelert Angelus Politianus inn das Latein, vnd Hieronymus Boner in nachuolgend Teütsch pracht,

      Augsburg, Heinrich Steiner 1531. 29 cm. (4), 70 Blatt mit großem Titelholzschnitt von J. Breu d. Ä. nach Burgkmair, 1 Titelholzschnitt von H. Weiditz d. J., 2 Holzschnitt-Vignetten und mehreren Holzschnitt-Initialen. Manuskript-Pergamentband - VD16 H 2503 - Adams H-391 - Worstbrock 195 - Goed. II, 319,6 - Erste deutsche Ausgabe. Der fast blattgroße Titelholzschnitt (Hollstein IV, 170) zeigt Antoninus und Gordianus. Die Initiale auf Blatt 36r ist von Hans Burgkmair (Butsche 34). Der neu eingebundene Manuskript-Pergamentband mit einer dreifarbig ausgemalten Initiale "A" ist aus einem Antiphonarblatt angefertigt. Schönes Exemplar, stellenweise leicht gebräunt und Knitterspuren, letztes Blatt im weißen Rand geringfügiger Papierverlust. -

      [Bookseller: Wenner Antiquariat]
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        L´Amoroso convivio di Dante, con la additione, et molti suoi notandi. Accuratamente revisto et emendato

      Fourth, and exceedingly rare, edition of Dante´s Convivio. 1531. Venice. Marchio Sessa. In 12vo (142 mm x 97 mm). 8 ff. + 112. Later, possibly 19th century, half calf, spine worn and with losses, needs rebinding. Clean and fresh, a few folios with underlining and marginalia, few foxing spots; a fine copy. Fourth edition, very rare. Dante (c.1265 ? 1321) is arguably Italy´s foremost poet; owner of the Divina Commedia ?Divina? (Boccaccio), he is often referred as il Sommo Poeta and regarded as a father of the Italian language. The Convivio (or Banquet) is an unfinished philosophical work of Aristotelian line of thought, divided in four treatises and dealing with a proposed harmonious coexistence of spiritual and temporal power. Provenance: contemporary manuscript inscription to a few folios; ex libris on front pastedown from Ch Fairfax Murray. Brunet II, 516.

      [Bookseller: Hs Rare Books]
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        La decoratio[n] Dhumaine nature et aornement des dames. Co[m]pile et extraict des tres excelle[nts] docteurs et pl[us] expers medecins ta[n]t anciens q[ue] modernes…

      Claude Veycellier Lyon: Claude Veycellier, 1 March 1531. 8vo (133 x 90 mm). 50, [6] leaves. Bâtarde type. Title in red and black within woodcut border printed from four blocks, woodcut initials. Bound ca. 1830 in crimson polished calf, covers with double gilt fillet surrounding two blind roll-tooled borders, smooth spine gilt with title lettered longitudinally within decorative cartouche, gilt edges, marbled endleaves, signed "Simier" at foot of spine. Notes in Latin in a contemporary French hand on final blank page. *** THE FIRST FRENCH BEAUTY MANUAL, second edition, first Lyonese edition. This collection of recipes for cosmetics, perfumes and herbal treatments relies on easily available foods or plants, many requiring no more than a stove, and occasionally an alambic for distillation. Most of the concoctions are cosmetic: how to dye hair blond or black, make one’s nipples firm and pretty, prevent a suntan, remove unwanted hair, warts, pimples, or freckles, whiten one’s te eth, sweeten one’s breath, brighten one’s complexion, smell like roses, clean up ragged fingernails, or abolish wrinkles. Several remedies address common medical complaints – a child’s cough, headaches, injuries occasioned by childbirth, and other gynecological issues (the latter written in Latin, to ensure that the readers consult a “clerc” or doctor). The second part is devoted to perfumes, powders, oils & soaps. A table at end provides for easy reference. Le Fournier, doctor and chemist, named regent of the Faculté de Médecine de Paris in 1518, apparently gathered his health & beauty remedies from oral tradition. His books would hardly have told him, for example, the secret skin cleansing recipe of Isabelle of Aragon (involving large quantities of goat’s milk and flour), or that a concentrate of 300 boiled snails blended with a laurel leaf, 3 spoons of olive oil and honey will produce a hair-thickening pomade; while a distillation of 12 fresh hen’s eggs, 12 ounces of ass’s milk & an ounce of cinnamon will “illuminate, purify, and so glorify a person’s face that she will look 15 years old." Claude Veycellier issued this edition five months after the first (recorded) edition, printed in Paris by Pierre Leber for Jean Longis & Jean Saint-Denis (18 October 1530). A second Paris edition, also from Leber’s press, is dated two days after Veycellier's. Both include three pages of medical remedies not included in the 1530 edition. The book jumped off the shelves: Veycellier reprinted the text in 1532, and seven further editions are recorded, most Lyonese and all but one printed in the 1530s and 40s. Nearly all survive in one to five copies, as to be expected given “the frequent use these Companions of the Toilet (like their relatives of the Kitchen) must have been subject to by their fair owners, probably lying open for reference close by during the concoction of the various mixtures…” (Picot, Fairfax Murray catalogue). We locate 4 other copies of this edition: the Lignerolles-Fairfax Murray copy, now at Princeton, a copy at the British Library (shelfmark 1174. d.1, mistakenly described as undated in the BMC catalogue and listed as a separate edition by Baudrier and Gültlingen, but examined and correctly described by Ferguson), a copy at the University of Minnesota, and a copy offered by Giraud-Badin in the 1990s. The admittedly incomplete Catalogue Collectif de France records no copies of either Veycellier edition in France. Dating from the Restoration or early July Monarchy, the binding on our copy may be the work of René Simier, or of his son Alphonse, who took over the firm ca. 1826. But, while decorated with one of the characteristic border rolls (“en molette”) from their shop, it is signed simply Simier, without the title “Relieur [or R.] du Roi” used by René Simier after his appointment in 1816 or 1817 as binder to Louis XVIII, and later by his son. The narrow backstrip may have made inclusion of the honorific impractical, but it is also possible that the binding was produced by the unrelated or distantly related binder Germain Simier, who capitalized on the name from the early 1830s, until he was forced by court order to identify himself properly (another borrower of the name, Jean Simier, was active later). Baudrier XII, 428; Gültlingen VI:107, no. 8; Fairfax Murray French 307; Brunet III, 932; BM/STC French p. 260 (misdescribed as undated, the oddly placed colophon having been overlooked by the cataloguer); Bechtel L-100=L-103 (perpetuating the “undated” ghost edition); Ferguson, Secrets, S. III, p. 16, no. 21, & Index no. 499; cf. Demerson, Livres populaires Mpvf 01-03, and Kelso, Doctrine for the Lady 492.

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        De Romanis Piscibus libellus ad Ludouicum Borbonium Cardinalem amplissimum.

      Basiliae (Basel), Froben, August 1531. Small 8vo. Very nice later (ab. 1700) full brown morocco, probably Italian, with gilt borders to boards, back richly gilt. Old library-label to lower back, scratch to front-board, white chalk-like staining to back-board. Internally a bit of brownspotting, but overall good condition. Contemporary marginal notes to three pp. Woodcut printer's device to t-p. and last leaf, a few woodcut initials. 144, (6) pp., 1 f. w. printer's device. With the ex-libris of Jeffrey Norton.. Very rare Froben-edition of the first work by the Renaissance-historian Paolo Giovio. All early editions of this work are very rare.Giovio was a gifted philosopher, medic and historian. He was born in 1483 in Come (Lombard) and was as controversial a person as he was an author. He died in 1552 in Florence, and this particular edition is thus printed in his lifetime. Three other editions appeared in his lifetime, all printed in Rome, in 1524, 1527, 1528, but the 1531-edition is the only one by as prominent a printer as Froben.Giovio was very strategic and succeeded in connecting himself with the Medici-family, especially Giulio Medici, who was later elected Pope (Clement VIII); when he became Pope, Giovio was assigned chambers in the Vatican and in 1528 he was announced Bishop of Nocera. Giovio wrote historical and biographical works and essays; these works are said not to be taken as authorities, but in their entirety and with proper reservation they do have real value, especially because he gives a rich and lively picture of Italy in his own time. He gives indispensable accounts of the manners and lives of the people of Renaissance Italy. As a writer and clergy he played quite a big role in Renaissance Italy.This his first work is a rarity and plays a special part in his body of writing, as it is neither historical nor biographical. It deals with the types of fish that Romans eat and tells how to prepare them, it is thus of great importance to anyone interested in the lives and customs of the time, and it is sometimes counted among the earliest of cook books. It also provides names of the fish and details of where they can be found, and where the best of each species is most easily found, making it of real value to the ichthyologist; this work is also said to contain the first reference in history to American fish. The work was translated into Italian in 1560, eight years after the death of Giovio.Not in Simon. BMC (NH) only mentions the 1561 edition and the 1560 translation. Wood p. 359: "a very early treatise on Roman ichthyology" ("the rare" 1524 first edition)

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        [Eucherius:] Lucubrationes aliquot non minus piae quam eruditae, cura ac beneficio Ioannis Alexandri Brassicani iu- resulti recens editae, quarum haec est summa, : In Genesim Commentariorum Libri III; In Libros Regum Commentariorum Libri IIII; Formularum Spritalium Liber I...; Quaestiones in Vetus & Novum Testamentum; Nominum Hebraicorum ac aliorum...; Epistola Paraenetica ad Velerianum cognatum suum De conteptu mudi, Cum Scholiis D. Erasmi Roterodami. [Radulphus:] In mysticum illum Moysi Leuiticum libri XX. post quingentos & amplius quaque scripti sunt annos, iam nunc primum publico donati. ...

      Basel, Froben, 1531 + Coloniae, Petrus Quentell, 1536. Folio. Bound together in a beautiful contemporary full calf binding over wooden boards. Blindstamped ornamental frames to boards. Five raised bands to spine. Remains of brass clasps to boards. Brass at corners of boards and brass strips to bottom edges of boards. A tear through the letter at the lower capital, no loss. Some scrathing of leather, mostly to back board and upper part of spine. The titles of the two works written in contemporary hand to the outer edge. The strong vellum cords, which go through the the wooden boards can be seen on the inside of the wooden boards, which also have some initials in red and blue paint, possibly from a painted leaf that has rubbed off? First title-page a bit dusty, otherwise very nice, clean, and crisp throughout. [Eucherius:] Froben printer's device to title-page, to final leaf of the first part, to the half-title of the second part (Episcopi Commentariorum in libros Regum ad Veranium & Salonium) and to the last leaf of that part. Beautiful large woodcut initial at beginning of each new work. (8), 194, (2); 310, (2) pp.[Radulphus:] Woodcut device to title-page. Numerous beautiful woodcut, allegorical initials, both large and smaller, throughout. (4 - title, dedications), (14 - index), (6), 314 pp.. First editions of both works, being the first edition of the works ["Several Studies"] of St. Eucharius, most of them printed for the first time here, as well as the first edition of Rodulfus Tortarius' (or Radulphus Flaviacensis) commentaries of Leviticus (the third of the Books of Moses), written in Latin, in 20 books. Saint Eucherius, bishop of Lyon, (ca. 380 - ca. 449) was a high-born and high-ranking ecclesiastic in the Christian Church of Gaul. He is remembered for his letters advocating extreme self-abnegation. Henry Wace ranked him "except perhaps St. Irenaeus the most distinguished occupant of that see"."St. Eucherius Bishop of Lyons, theologian, born in the latter half of the fourth century; died about 449. On the death of his wife he withdrew to the monastery of Lérins, where his sons, Veranius and Salonius, lived, and soon afterward to the neighbouring island of Lerona (now Sainte-Marguerite), where he devoted his time to study and mortification. Desirous of joining the anchorites in the deserts of the East, he consulted John Cassian, who, in reply, sent him some of his "Collationes", describing the daily lives of the hermits of the Thebaid. It was at this time that Eucherius wrote his beautiful letter "De laude Eremi" to St. Hilary of Arles (c. 428). Though imitating the virtues of the Egyptian solitaries, he kept in touch with men renowned for learning and piety, e.g. Cassian, St. Hilary of Arles, St. Honoratus, later Bishop of Marseilles, and Valerian, to whom he wrote his "Epistola parænetica de contemptu mundi". The fame of Eucherius was soon so widespread in southeastern Gaul, that he was chosen Bishop of Lyons. This was probably in 434; it is certain, at least that he attended the First Council of Orange (441) as Metropolitan of Lyons, and that he retained this dignity until his death. In addition to the above-mentioned letters, Eucherius wrote "Formularium spiritualis intelligentiæ ad Veranium", and "Institutiones ad Salonium", besides many homilies. His works have been published both separately and among the writings of the Fathers." (Catholic Encyclopedia). His "Epistola paraenetica ad Valerianum cognatum, de contemptu mundi ("Epistle of exhortation to his kinsman Valerian, On the contempt of the world") is an expression of the despair for the present and future of the world in its last throes shared by many educated men of Late Antiquity, with hope for a world to come. Erasmus thought so highly of its Latin style that he edited and published it at Basel in 1520. His commentaries on the work are also included here. His "Liber formularum spiritalis intelligentiae", which is addressed to his son Veranius is a defence of the lawfulness of reading an allegorical sense in Scripture, bringing to bear the metaphors in Psalms and such phrases as "the hand of God" The term anagoge [in Greek] is employed for the application of Scripture to the heavenly Jerusalem to come, and there are other examples of what would become classic Medieval hermeneutics.Rodulfus Tortarius (also known as Raoul of Tourtier, Raoul de La Tourte, Radulphus Flaviacensis) (c.1063 - c.1122) was a French Benedictine monk of the Abbey of Fleury-sur-Loire, and a poet writing in Latin. He is known both for his style of writing, his biblical commentaries and religious works, and his literary and comic tales. His commentary on "Leviticus" is considered important and influential. The first edition of the work as rare

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        De Amatoriis Affectionibus Liber. Iano Cornario Zuiccauiensi interprete. [Peri Erotikon Pathematon].

      Basel, in Officina Frobeniana (Per Hieronymum Frobenium, & Nicolaum Episcopium), 1531. Small 8vo. Bound in a lovely, charming early 19th century red half calf with gilt title and lines to spine and lovely gold and red ornamented "romantic" paper over boards. A bit of wear to spine. Internally a very fine and clean copy. Title-page slightly soiled, and a vague marginal dampstain throughout, on most leaves barely visible. Froben printer's device to title-page, and in a larger version to verso of last leaf. Four large woodcut initials. 76, (44) pp.. The extremely scarce first printing, of both the original Greek text and the translation into Latin, of Parthenius's only surviving work, the historiographically, mythographically, and literarily hugely important "Erotica Pathemeta" (or "Sorrows of Love"), which constitutes the only prose work by a Hellenistic poet to survive in its entirety and one of the few extant works of its genre, i.e the mythological or paradoxographical handbook, preserved from any period. The "Erotica Pathemata" constitutes the only surviving work by the famous Greek poet Parthenius of Nicea (fl. 1st century BC, Rome), the Greek teacher of Virgil, and the favourite author of Hadrian and Tiberius, who is now often referred to as "the last of the Alexandrians".Parthenius was Born in Nicaea in Asia Minor, He was captured in the third Mithradatic war and taken to Italy, where he became the Roman poet Virgil's teacher in Greek. He is considered a main influence on the "Neoteroi" - the group of "modernist poets" led primarily by Callimachus, and he played an important role in spreading a taste for "Callimachean" poetry in Rome.In his time, Parthenius was primarily famous as a poet, but unfortunately none of his poetic works have survived, and only some small fragments have been preserved. What we have in their place is the prose treatise "Erotica Pathemata", which has survived in merely one manuscript, probably written in the mid 9th-century. In 1531 Froben printed the editio princeps of both the original Greek text and the Latin version of it, and only in 1675 did it appear again. The Froben editio princeps is of great scarcity.The "Erotica Pathemata" is a little prose treatise consisting of thirty-six love stories, all with tragic or sentimental endings. The work was dedicated to Cornelius Gallus, and was, Parthenius explains, meant as "a storehouse from which to draw material"."The very concatenation of poetry and prose is interesting, and perhaps important. It could be that the "Erotika Pathemata" were first collected by Parthenius for his own use as a poet. But the collection of prose anecdote by a poet also locates Parthenius in the same tradition as Callimachus ...; Nicander ... ; and Euphorion of Chalcis ... . Parthenius' is in fact the only prose work by a Hellenistic poet to survive entire. It proclaims its purpose as utilitarian, and begins with an epistolary introduction in which Parthenius offers his work to the poet Gallus as potential raw material for hexameter and elegiac poetry. This detail is of some importance for literary history. The loss of the poetry - not only of Parthenius, but also of his friends in Rome, of Gallus, Cinna, and the other "neoteroi" - is admittedly grievous; but the treatise, and particularly the implications of the dedication, offers some insight of their own into literary production in Rome in the middle of the first century BC. It is a period about which we should like to be better informed, the age of the supposed epyllion, of nascent elegy, and of experimentation with new Greek genres. The dedication suggests, on the one hand, intriguing possibilities for the sort of narrative poetry, both hexameter and elegiac, which Parthenius might have expected Gallus and his friends to write; and on the other the text can be read (and may also have been intended to be read) for pleasure as a prose work in itself. Thus regarded, it raises questions about the hellenistic historiography in which the stories were embedded, about the diverse kinds of mythography written in the hellenistic period and the two-way relationship between mythography and poetry; about the types of stories it contains, the manner in which they were generated, the structure they exhibit, the messages about social life which are encoded within them. And not the least intriguing question concerns its relationship to the Greek novel, a genre which seems to have been gaining momentum in the first century BC, and other sorts of prose fiction. Stylistically too, the work should be of interest to historians of Greek prose. It is preserved by a lucky accident in a single manuscript, possibly because its Atticism pleased the Byzantines' ear as much as it appealed to their penchant for story-telling, and it is one of the very few surviving works of Greek prose from the middle of the first century BC. Indeed it is one of few extant works of its genre, the mythographical or paradoxographical handbook, preserved from any period." (Lightfoot, Parthenius of Nicea. The Poetical Fragments of the "Erotika Pathemata". Edited with introduction and commentaries. 1999, pp. 2-3). As such, the "Erotica Pathemata", along with its author, apart from being of pivotal importance to the study of the ancient novel (the earliest examples of which date from exactly this perioed), Greek prose, and the Greek language ("Parthenius' Greek is of no little interest in view of the dearth of surviving material which is comparable in genre and date" - Lightfoot, p. 283), also plays a central role in Hellenistic literature and is of decisive character to the development of Roman prose and poetry in the 1st century BC. "It was Parthenius who taught me Greek -Yes, a freed prisoner-of-war, whose giftWas perfect elegiacs, faultless poems.He gathered brief love-stories, so that GallusCould turn them into song. Parthenius sleepsWatched over by sea-deities, by Glaucus,Panopea, Melicertes - Ino's son -Beside a river graved in celandine." (Virgil - see Lightfoot, p. (97))

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        Syphilis, sive morbus gallicus.

      Roma, Apud Antonium Bladum Asulanum (on colophon), 1531, mense Septembri. 4to. Sown, uncut and unbound. Title-page and a few other leaves with a bit of minor brownspotting; overall a very nice and well-preserved copy of this beautifully printed, extremely scarce work. Two quires with loose leaves. Floriated large initial at beginning. [32] ff. (being title-page, 29 ff. text, 1 f. errata, 1 f. blank).. The exceedingly scarce second edition (the "Rome text") of "[t]he most famous of all medical poems" (Garrison & Morton), the poem which gave to the disease syphilis its name, being the most important edition of the work, the first complete edition (with the two lines of the first book printed for the first time - not found in any other contemporary editions of the work), the only authoritative version of the text to appear contemporarily, and by far the rarest edition - with only four known copies at the time of the official bibliography (Baumgartner and Fulton, 1935) (whereas the first edition from the year before, 1530, was known in 30 copies) - our copy also with the final blank leaf (H4), "not preserved in any copy examined" (Baumgartner & Fulton, p. 38)."The edition published at Rome (no. 2) in the following year is a finer piece of printing, AND IT IS EVIDENTLY A MUCH RARER WORK SINCE ONLY FOUR COPIES HAVE BEEN TRACED, WHILE AT LEAST 30 COPIES OF THE VERONA EDITION (i.e. the first edition) ARE KNOWN." (Baumgartner & Fulton, p. 37). Apart from the work itself being of the greatest impact on the history of medicine, giving to Syphilis its name and epitomizing contemporary knowledge of the illness, and the author being one of the most renowned physicians of the Renaissance, being compared in scope and excellence to Leonardo da Vinci, the present work in the present second edition has yet another feature, apart from its utmost scarcity, which contributes to its excellence; it is printed by the excellent Italian printer Antonio Blado, whose works are scarce and very sought after."Textually, as well as typographically, this is the most important edition of Fracastoro's poem, since, unlike those which follow, it bears evidence of having been supervised by Fracastoro himself, the two lines which had been omitted from Bk. I of the Verona edition being here included (verses 1 and 2 on leaf C2b) in exactly the form in which they were written on the vellum copy of the 1530 edition mentioned above (see end of note)... Among his other achievements in typography Antonio Blado can claim the distinction of having issued the most beautiful edition of Fracastoro's poem of any of the sixteenth century. The format is larger than that of the Verona edition and the fount of large italic type seems particularly well suited to Fracastoro's even lined verses. As with the other editions of this period the capitals are in Roman throughout; the ornamental capital (Q) at the beginning of Bk. I is particularly well executed. Bks II and II have spaces at the beginning for an illuminated initial.THE BOOKS OF ANTONIO BLADO ARE APPARENTLY AS RARE AS THEY ARE EXCELLENT, AND THEY HAVE LONG BEEN SOUGHT AFTER BY ITALIAN COLLECTORS. Blado was born in 1490 at Asloa in northern Italy. In 1515 Blado settled in Rome where he remained until his death in 1567. He was a bold and original printer, who, as Fumagelli points out, almost invariably undertook new things, never reprinting classics, and only occasionally , as in the case of Fracastoro's poem, reprinting the work of a contemporary. In 1532 he issued the first edition of Machiavelli's "Il Principe", and in 1549 he became official printer to the Papal See..." (Baumgartner & Fulton, p. 39)."Girolamo Fracastoro (1484-1553), a Veronese of thick-set, hirsute appearance and jovial mien, who practiced in the Lago di Garda region, was at once a physician, poet, physicist, geologist, astronomer, and pathologist, and shares with Leonardo da Vinci the honour of being the first geologist to see fossil remains in the true light (1530). He was also the first scientist to refer to the magnetic poles of the earth (1543). His medical fame rests upon that most celebrated of medical poems, "Syphilis sive Moribus Gallicus (Venice, 1530), which sums up the contemporary dietetic and therapeutic knowledge of the time, recognizes a venereal cause, and gave the disease its present name..." (Garrison, History of Medicine, p. 233).The magnificent medical poem is about the main character, a young shepherd called "Syphilis", who induces the people to forsake the Sun God, who in return bestows upon man a new, horrible plague, which Fracastoro names after the shepherd. "It epitomized contemporary knowledge of syphilis, gave to it its present name, and recognized a venereal cause. Fracastorius refers to mercury as a remedy." (Garrison and Morton).The work must be described as seminal, and its great influence and importance has continued throughout centuries. As stated in the bibliography by Baumgartner and Fulton, which is devoted exclusively to the poem, "[t]he full extent of the influence exerted by a work which has received such wide recognition cannot be adequately estimated without searching bibliographical analysis", and thus they have traced 100 editions of Fracastoro's Syphilis-poem, including translations into six languages. 18 of these appeared in the 16th century, but it is curious to see, how the work continues to resurface up until the 20th century. Almost 200 years after the work originally appeared, Italy witnessed a great revival of Fracastoro and his poem, and the first Italian translation appeared in 1731, with a preface by the great Enlightenment philosopher Giambattista Vico, and by 1739 five Italian editions had appeared. Another revival of the work took place as late as the 20th century, with four new English translations appearing between 1928 and 1935."Le poème de Fracastor sur la Syphilis restera toujours un chef-d'oeuvre, parce que le pinceau est large, l'imagination hardie, la versification harmonieuse, et que le poète agrandit son sujet ingrat en remontant aux cases celestas, en montant la main des Dieux s'appersantissant pour punir la terre; la fiction, surtout, qu'il a imagine pour retrace la découverte du mercure, est un tableau digne des plus grands maîtres." (Achille Chéreau, Le Parnasse medical francais, 1874, p. xv). Baumgartner & Fulton, A Bibliography of the Poem of Syphilis sive Moribus Gallicus by Girolamo Fracastoro of Verona: no. 2 (our copy follows exactly the collation given here - and also has the final blank leaf mentioned but not found in any of the examined copies).Garrison and Morton: 2364. "There is every reason to believe that the first edition of 1530 was personally supervised by Fracastoro as it was passing through the press. The printer, however, omitted two verses in the first book, which have been inserted in manuscript, apparently by Fracastoro himself, in the copy on vellum now preserved in the Bibliothèque Nationale. As these two lines are included in the Rome edition of the following year, it is likely that Fracastoro also supervised this, the second edition, and that this should be regarded as the authoritative text, since there is no evidence of textual changes in seven subsequent editions during his life."

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        In hoc volumine continentur ... Joan Serapionis Arabis: De simlpicibus medicinis opus praeclarum & ingens. - Averrois: De eisdem liber eximinus. - Rasis fili Zacheriae: De eisem opusculum perutile. - Incerti item autoris: De centaureolibellus hactenus Geleo inscriptus ... (Herausgegeben von) Otto Brunfels.

      Folio. 10 n.n. Bl., 397 (recte 399) S., 1 S. Druckermarke. Pergamentband der Zeit mit geprägtem Rückentitel. Adams I 13. - Durling 2524. - Wellcome I, 5936. - Muller 329,13. - VD16 Y 12. - Seltene Sammelausgabe von Texten arabischer Mediziner, Ibn Serapion, Yúhama - Averroës - Razi, Abu Bakr Muhammad ibn Zakariya. Von Otto Brunfels in Zusammenarbeit mit Gerhard Geldenhauer editierte Auswahl. Der Text von Serapion, hier in der lateinischen Fassung von Abraham ben Shem-tob und Simon Genuensis, erschien gedruckt erstmals 1525 in Lyon. Der Text von Averroës in der lateinischen Ausgabe von Jakob von Bonacosa wurde 1482 erstmals in Venedig gedruckt sowie die lateinische Fassung durch Gerardus Cremonensis des "Liber ad Almansorem" nach der Ausgabe Milano von 1481. Unser Exemplar mit dem Widmungsblatt von Brunfels an Bernhard zu Solms. - Vereinzelt etwas fleckig. Wenige handschriftliche Randnotizen des 16. Jahrhunderts. Mit handschriftlichen Besitzvermerken von "Jacob Holphÿ" und kleiner Besitzerstempel von L. Schönlein auf dem Titel.

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        Coelum philosophorum seu De secretis naturae liber. Denuo reuisus & castigatus.[Fribourg: 1525].

      First edition, extremely rare, of this work which served as "a standard authority on the preparation and use of distillates for nearly a century" (DSB). OCLC locates just one copy in America and three in Europe (of which one is incomplete).<br/><br/> Ulstad emphasized the medical efficacy of chemical distillates, thus departing somewhat from conventional medical pharmacology and preparing the way, in part, for the more intimate connections between chemistry and medicine effected by his contemporary Paracelsus and the latter's disciples in the second half of the sixteenth century.<br/><br/> "Ulstad's work was based mainly on the writings attributed to Ramon Lull, Albertus Magnus, Arnald of Villanova, and John of Rupescissa. He was most clearly indebted to John of Rupescissa's doctrine of the fifth essence, namely, the substance that can be extracted from all mundane bodies by ordinary chemical methods and that is the chemically active principle of each body... He maintained that the fifth essence, although not incorruptible, was less corruptible than the four elements and owed its medical value to its ability to regulate the bodily humors and thereby preserve the human body from decay.<br/><br/> "Despite his use of alchemical terminology, Ulstad clearly dissociated himself from the enigmatic aspects of the alchemical tradition in offering his concise and rational account of the preparation of distilled remedies. Concerned with culling from the mediaeval alchemical corpus those techniques and ideas of practical utility, he ensured that they were made available to as large an audience as possible, including all apothecaries, surgeons, and medical doctors. The lucidity of his technical directions was a major reason for the influence exerted by Ulstad. His discussion of apparatus and manipulative procedures afforded the sixteenth-century investigator an accurate summary of the best distilling theory then available. Of particular importance is Ulstad's description and woodcut of a distilling column with vertical water-cooled coils that, although not original with him, contributed to the decline of the less efficient and uncontrollable air-cooling methods commonly employed. He also clearly presented a rudimentary dephlegmation technique based on the introduction of oil-soaked sponges into the still head to retain the phlegm and obtain better fractionation. Ulstad's recipes for the extraction of the fifth essence dealt with a wide variety of sources, including gold, spices, herbs, fruits, flowers, precious stones, and metals, and he specified the particular ailments most responsive to each essence" (DSB XIII, 534-5).<br/><br/> Duveen (p. 591) gives the incorrect imprint: Strassburg: Johann Grüninger, 1531 from the title bound with it (Geber's Philosophi ac alchimistae). The Neville Historical Chemical Library has the third edition (1528) but not this first (and they incorrectly mention that the first edition was printed in Strassburg). OCLC lists copies at Madison Wisconsin, Sheffield, Oxford (incomplete), and the Museum of Natural History, Paris. We have been unable to locate any copy in auction records.. Small folio (275 x 185 mm), ff 57 [A-I6 K3, final blank lacking], rebound in contemporary limp vellum, several leaves with small professional repairs to the upper and lower corners [no text loss], fine and clean throughout, illustrated with numerous wood cuts, place and date of publication from end of "Epilogus" on K2v

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