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THE GOLDEN FLEECE DIVIDED INTO THREE PARTS, UNDER WHICH ARE DISCOVERED THE ERRORS OF RELIGION, THE VICES AND DECAYES OF THE KINGDOME, AND LASTLY THE WAYES TO GET WEALTH, AND TO RESTORE TRADING SO MUCH COMPLAYNED OF. TRANSPORTED FROM CAMBRIOLL COLCHOS, OUT OF THE SOUTHERMOST PART OF THE ILAND [sic], COMMONLY CALLED THE NEWFOUNDLAND
London: Printed for Francis Williams, 1626.. [28],149,[1],105,[1],96pp. Folding map in facsimile. Small quarto. Contemporary speckled calf, stamped and ruled in blind, gilt morocco label, raised bands. Bookplate on front pastedown, some ink notes on front endpapers. Worm hole in lower outer margin throughout, most pronounced in first twenty-five leaves. Early manuscript marginalia (in English and Latin) and underscoring. A very good copy. This copy bears the bookplate of Thomas Hay (1710-87), eighth Earl of Kinnoull. Hay was a classical scholar, a member of Parliament, and in 1746 was made a lord of trade and plantations. "He took a prominent part in the efforts to improve the condition of Nova Scotia" - DNB. The anonymous author, William Vaughan (1575 or 1577-1641), was a Welsh poet and colonial promoter who saw Newfoundland, with its rich fisheries, as a source of revenue for England and of employment for its people. This work, in the form of a literary fantasy, is meant to extol the riches and gains to be had in Newfoundland. "Cambrioll," mentioned in the title here, was the name Vaughan gave to his settlement on the island. Vaughan actually spent time in Newfoundland from 1622 to 1624, an experience which greatly adds to the accuracy of this promotional work; and despite the fantastical nature of the text, much early information on Newfoundland is to be gleaned here. "This work is one of the earliest contributions to English literature from America, and was intended to advertise Vaughan's colony. It is a queer fantasy in prose and verse, in which a succession of historical characters present complaints against the evils of the age in the Court of Apollo, and finally find the Golden Fleece in Newfoundland" - Baer. The text contains brief references to Lord Baltimore (a partner in Vaughan's Newfoundland enterprise) and Captaine Wynne, hence the Maryland interest. Vaughan also criticizes the social use of tobacco, bringing his work to the attention of Arents. The map of Newfoundland, here present in expert facsimile, was drawn by John Mason for Vaughan's exceedingly rare CAMBRENSIUM CAROLEIA, published in 1625. According to the Church catalogue, quoting Rich, the Mason map is not always found with THE GOLDEN FLEECE - as in the Toronto Public Library copy, which is in a similar contemporary binding but lacks the map. A significant early and interesting New World promotional, with a Maryland association. EUROPEAN AMERICANA 626/143. LANDE S2269. TPL 6302. BAER MARYLAND 12. ARENTS 161A. CHURCH 409. BELL V36. JCB (3)II:204. SABIN 98693. STC 24609. DNB XX, pp.183-85 (Vaughan); IX, pp.275-76 (Hay). Mason map: BURDEN 216. KERSHAW, p.86. WORLD ENCOMPASSED 216.
      [Bookseller: William Reese Company - Americana]
Last Found On: 2014-10-02           Check availability:      Biblio    

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