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Emma S. Doughten's European Trip, April 1901 - September 1902
This collection consists of two journals. The first journals' shows heavy cover wear. The front cover is detached and the back strip is missing. It appears that the first few pages of the journal are missing. Some additional pages are loose or detached. The second journal covers also show moderate cover wear. The back strip is partially detached and the binding is loose by intact, though some individual pages are fully detached from the binding. Both journals are mostly written in pen, though the first few pages of the first journal are written in pencil, and therefore is had to read in places. Additionally, there are some stains in both journals due to the paste and/or tape used to adhere the postcards.. Presented in two albums, the travels of an unaccompanied female on a European tour. In early 1901 Emma Doughten began her European Tour, traveling mostly by rail, she visited numerous countries, such as Spain, Germany, Austria, Switzerland, Italy, France, England and Scotland. Emma narrates every portion of her trip with exacting, detailed, entries of the sites she sees and the people she meets. From the extolling on the history of each art piece, cathedral, palace, or chateau she visited to her interactions with fellow travelers or the townsfolk she met. Often, she would spend pages writing all she learned while visiting the historic site of the day. Along with her written journal entries, in order to illustrate the numerous sites visited, are pasted-in postcards. From the view of the Louvre from across the Seine in Paris to the various small towns she visited in the high Alps in Switzerland. Starting her journey in Spain, she visited various locations, such as Ibiza and Gibraltar. Continuing on to Austria she visited Innsbruck and Vienna and saw such sites as the Hofburg Imperial Palace and the Tyrolean State Museum. A short train ride later she spent some time Germany visiting the various sights in Munich and Dresden. Making her way to Switzerland and she traveled on the Axenstrasse Highway, a picturesque road built along steep cliffs on the east side of the Lake Lucerne. The views along this throughway are spectacular as it weaves through the many rock fall galleries and tunnels along its route. From there Emma traveled on the Gotthard Railway, a Swiss trans-alpine railway that runs from northern Switzerland all the way to the country's boarder with Italy. The railroad takes its passengers through the Alps by means of the Gotthard Tunnel, making several stops along the way to the tourist towns that are scattered throughout the Alps. Along the way, Emma also saw the Rhonegletscher (otherwise known as the Rhone Glacier, located in the Swiss Alps and is the source of the Rhône River and one of the primary contributors to Lake Geneva), Le Pont Suspendu (a large suspension bridge which at its inauguration in 1834, it became, for a time, the longest suspension bridge in the world, as well as one of the first to use wireline cables instead of chains. It was destroyed in 1923 to make way for the Zaehringen bridge.), and Matterhorn (a mountain of the Alps, straddling the main watershed and border between Switzerland and Italy, it's a huge and near-symmetrical pyramidal peak and it is one of the highest summits in the Alps and Europe). Eventually making her way into Italy, Emma spent some time along Lake Maggiore; a long, thin, lake on the south side of the Alps that is noted for its picturesque surroundings of greenery-filled mountains, before traveling on to some of the more well-known Italian tourist destinations. Such as Milan, Florence, Sienna, Rome, Assisi, and Pompeii. One lesser known spot Emma visited was Bussana Vecchia, a ghost town in Liguria, Italy, that had been abandoned by its citizens due to an earthquake in 1887. From there she continued onto France, stopping in Paris and visiting all the classic sites: The Louvre, The Vendome Column, Notre Dame, The Arc de Triumph, Place Charles de Gaulle, and Saint-Jacques Tower. Leaving Paris, Emma visited almost too many French Chateaux to be named, though some highlights are the Chateau de Cheverny, the royal Château de Chambord, and the royal Château de Blois. Emma continued on through the coast of Brittany and Normandy visiting such sites as the Carnac stones (an exceptionally dense collection of megalithic sites around the village of Carnac in Brittany), and Mont-Saint-Michel (an island fort that houses several strategic fortifications since ancient times). Using the French port city of Calais, Emma traveled across the English Channel to the cliff top town of Dover. There she started her last leg of her journey, exploring the British Isles. Traveling north through England, she visited London, Canterbury, Oxford, and Salisbury. Additionally, she spent some time at Stonehenge, Shakespeare's birthplace and Land's End (found along the coast of Cornwall, it is the most westerly point of mainland England). From there she moved onto Scotland, where she spent time visiting various lochs and their nearby towns and castles. Such as Dunstaffnage Castle by Loch Etive, Stirling Castle near Stirling City, and Durham Castle in Durham. Additionally, she also spent some time in Edinburgh and Linlithgow. Here the journal rather abruptly ends, with no real conclusion or statement how Emma traveled home. Additionally, on the last 20 or so pages of the journal Emma has left several blank sections were she obviously meant to go back and paste in the postcards of the sites she was describing but never got around to it. However, placed in-between pages of the journal, there are two envelopes full of postcards from England and Scotland, that she most likely meant to use. Additionally, the beginning of her trip is also a bit of a mystery. The first journal's binding is damaged and it looks as though several pages at the beginning are missing. As Emma made a point of recording on the inside cover of both journals where she was when she started them and the date, one is able to confirm that she started in Gibraltar. Overall, these journals provide an amazing insight into the popular 'European Tour' at the very beginning of the 20th century. To view this collection, please click on the following link: https://goo.gl/photos/D3imq9fr2z6YSUuF8
      [Bookseller: Eclectibles ]
Last Found On: 2017-12-01           Check availability:      ABAA    

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