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UNION TICKET. STATE OFFICERS. FOR JUDGE OF SUPREME COURT, FRANKLIN T. BACKUS. FOR SECRETARY OF STATE, WILSON S. KENNON. FOR ATTORNEY GENERAL, CHAUNCEY N. OLDS [.]
n.d. (1862), s.l. (Cincinnati / Hamilton County, Ohio) - Small broadside, 8.25" x 3". Caption title [as issued]. Illustration of an elephant head at top of the ticket. Uniformly tanned but in surprisingly fresh state. When was an Elephant first utilized in American politics? Surely the present Union Party ticket must be one of the earliest appearances of it, if not the first. Although undated, it was certainly printed in 1862 when the men listed here were candidates on the Ohio Union ticket; moreover, the canditate for Supreme Court Judge Franklin T. Backus ran only once (and was defeated by Rufus P. Ranney by a total of 6,963 votes). The Union State Convention assembled in Naughten Hall, August 21, 1862, with Benjamin Stanton as chairman (both temporary and permanent). The Union Party officially adopted resolutions that opposed all compromises with the Rebellion, and endorsed the administration of Governor Tod. Nominations: Supreme Court Judge, Franklin T. Backus; Secretary of State, W.S. Kennon, Attorney-General, Chauncey N. Olds; School Commissioner, William D. Henkle; Board of Public Works, John B. Gregory (SOURCE: A.E. Lee, History of the City of Columbus, Capital of Ohio, 1892, Vol. 2, p. 440). All appear on the present Union Ticket exactly as stated. If our dating is correct, the present Union Party Ticket may have appeared two years before the elephant was used as a political symbol in an 1864 pro-Lincoln "newspaper" (it was more like polical propaganda) entitled "Father Abraham" although it took nearly 10 years for the elephant to be codified as a Republican symbol. In 1874 Harper's Weeklycartoonist Thomas Nast drew a caricature of the Republican Party elephant being kicked into a pit by the Democratic Party donkey disguised as a lion. The cartoon was evidently prescient, as the Republicans lost control of the House a few weeks after publication. The Union Party was a Civil War era amalgam of Republicans, pro-War Democrats, and former anti-slavery Whigs. Concerning the present offering, we suggest the place of imprint as Cincinnati / Hamilton County, where Joseph P. Humphreys served as Hamilton County Auditor, and Frederick L. Emmert as Coroner. Literature: p. 440. G.H. Porter, Ohio Politics during the Civil War Period, PhD dissertation, Columbia Univ., 1911. Very good antiquarian condition
      [Bookseller: Michael Laird Rare Books LLC]
Last Found On: 2017-02-18           Check availability:      AbeBooks    

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