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A JOURNAL OF VOYAGES AND TRAVELS IN THE INTERIOR OF NORTH AMERICA, BETWEEN THE 47TH AND 58TH DEGREES OF NORTH LATITUDE, EXTENDING FROM MONTREAL NEARLY TO THE PACIFIC OCEAN, A DISTANCE OF ABOUT 5,000 MILES, INCLUDING AN ACCOUNT OF THE PRINCIPAL OCCURRENCES, DURING A RESIDENCE OF NINETEEN YEARS, IN DIFFERENT PARTS OF THE COUNTRY. TO WHICH ARE ADDED, A CONCISE DESCRIPTION OF THE FACE OF THE COUNTRY, ITS INHABITANTS, THEIR MANNERS, CUSTOMS, LAWS, RELIGION, ETC. AND CONSIDERABLE SPECIMENS OF THE TWO LANGUAGES, MOST EXTENSIVELY SPOKEN; TOGETHER WITH AN ACCOUNT OF THE PRINCIPAL ANIMALS, TO BE FOUND IN THE FORESTS AND PRAIRIES OF THIS EXTENSIVE REGION
Andover: Printed by Flagg & Gould, 1820. FIRST EDITION. This vivid account of life as a fur trader in Canada is an important source of information on the North American frontier and the Native Americans who lived there. Daniel Williams Harmon (1778-1843) was a New Englander who went to Canada in 1800 to follow the booming fur trade, and his endeavors took him westward from Montreal all the way to the Pacific. As ANB observes, it is "an intensely personal memoir of his encounters with the elements, the natives, friends, and ultimately his own inner self. The abiding appeal of these encounters derives from their extraordinary nature. The native broths of buffalo dung and cariboo dung must have shocked the 'civilized' palate of New Englanders. So too the claim that the seventy souls at Fort Alexandria (near Fort Pelly, Saskatchewan) devoured 450 pounds of meat a day." Harmon is largely approving of the native cultures he encounters, praising the generosity and hospitality they extend to him, but he is disturbed by the casual acceptance of murder and the treatment of women. He takes a native woman as a companion, originally intending to leave her with her own people when he returned to "civilization," but in an affecting passage near the end of the journal, he explains his decision to take her back the the States with him, their relationship having been "cemented by a long and mutual performance of kind offices, but, also, by a more sacred consideration." Following the journal itself are sections describing the Indian tribes on the East and West sides of the Rocky Mountains, vocaulary lists for the two most widely spoken Indian languages, and a brief discussion of the principal fauna in the region.. 210 x 125 mm. (8 1/4 x 5"). 432 pp.Edited by Daniel Haskell. FIRST EDITION. Contemporary tree sheep, smooth spine, red morocco label. In a brown cloth chemise and matching morocco-backed slipcase. With frontispiece portrait and folding map depicting the interior of North America. Rear pastedown with errata slip laid on. Howes H-205; Sabin 30404; Wagner-Camp 17; Streeter 3692; Field 656. A little worming to tail end of spine, front board with three patches of lost patina from insect activity, but the binding otherwise sound and attractive; the text somewhat foxed due to paper quality, map with one-inch split along one fold, otherwise A FINE COPY with few signs of use. This vivid account of life as a fur trader in Canada is an important source of information on the North American frontier and the Native Americans who lived there. Daniel Williams Harmon (1778-1843) was a New Englander who went to Canada in 1800 to follow the booming fur trade, and his endeavors took him westward from Montreal all the way to the Pacific. As ANB observes, it is "an intensely personal memoir of his encounters with the elements, the natives, friends, and ultimately his own inner self. The abiding appeal of these encounters derives from their extraordinary nature. The native broths of buffalo dung and cariboo dung must have shocked the 'civilized' palate of New Englanders. So too the claim that the seventy souls at Fort Alexandria (near Fort Pelly, Saskatchewan) devoured 450 pounds of meat a day." Harmon is largely approving of the native cultures he encounters, praising the generosity and hospitality they extend to him, but he is disturbed by the casual acceptance of murder and the treatment of women. He takes a native woman as a companion, originally intending to leave her with her own people when he returned to "civilization," but in an affecting passage near the end of the journal, he explains his decision to take her back the the States with him, their relationship having been "cemented by a long and mutual performance of kind offices, but, also, by a more sacred consideration." Following the journal itself are sections describing the Indian tribes on the East and West sides of the Rocky Mountains, vocaulary lists for the two most widely spoken Indian languages, and a brief discussion of the principal fauna in the region.
      [Bookseller: Phillip J. Pirages Fine Books and Mediev]
Last Found On: 2017-06-25           Check availability:      Biblio    

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