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A New Hampshire soldier, who personally met the President only a week before, reacts to Lincoln's assassination: "What a dark thing it was to have our President murdered I just saw him alive and that was all, in less than one week from the time I took him by the hand ..."
City Point, Virginia, April 18, 1865. 4.75" x 6.75". "Autograph Letter Signed, ""Walter Flanders,"" 4 pages, 4.75"" x 6.75"" on U.S. Christian Commission stationery, City Point, Virginia, April 18, 1865 to his wife concerning the winding down of the war following Lee's surrender and expressing his consternation over the assassination of Abraham Lincoln, having only met the President the week before. Expected mailing folds, else fine condition. Writing from City Point, Virginia soon after the surrender of Lee at Appomattox, Flanders, a soldier from New Hampshire reacts to the news of Lincoln's assassination: ""What a dark thing it was to have our President murdered I just saw him alive and that was all, in less than one week from the time I took him by the hand he was assas[s]inated. What a wretch that done it, but I believe they will not fare so well on Johnsons rule as they would with Lincoln. I hope he will go right on with old Abrahams plan not flinch a hair. Perhaps they will give up now they have always said they never would come under Lincoln and perhaps now they will give up."" Flanders also muses on when he might be discharged and comments on the recruitment of black soldiers: ""... I have heard several ways that the 9th Corps was going to be relieved and sent to Washington and then furlowed [sic] or paroled, till they see whether they are needed any more and if not discharge them. I dont know what they want of so many men and they are enlisting them for the regular service and giving them sixty days furlow and it wont be but a short time before they will have enough. They are enlisting blacks for that service and I think that is the way to do it. As soon as Johnston surrenders I shall look for an immediate reduction of the national forces. They have stopped all volunteering and drafting and have taken steps to reduce the navy."" Walter M. Flanders enlisted in the 18th New Hampshire Infantry in September 1864. For most of its existence the regiment worked on fortifications at City Point, Virginia. However in March 1865, the regiment helped in the capture of Fort Steadman, which it manned until Confederate forces evacuated Richmond and Petersburg. He was discharged on May 30, 1865. Following the war he lived in Warren, New Hampshire. (Civil War Database)"
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Last Found On: 2015-11-18           Check availability:      Biblio    

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