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Displayed below are some selected recent viaLibri matches for books published in 1945

        Rose Lourdin. Gravures originales de Maurice Barraud

      H. L. Mermod, Lausanne 1945 - Ouvrage de 48 pages, non reliées, non rognées et comprenant 7 gravures originales de Maurice Barraud, avec monogramme dans chaque composition, en hors-texte. Ce présent ouvrage, édité par H. L. Mermod, à Lausanne, a été achevé d'imprimer, sur les presses d'Albert Kündig, à Genève, le 30 juin 1945. Il a été tiré : 20 exemplaires sur Guarro Molivell, à la main, avec une suite des gravures signées sur chine, exemplaires numérotés de I à XX, ainsi que 100 exemplaires numérotés de 1 à 100. Les cuivres ont été barrés après le tirage. Notre exemplaire porte le numéro V, avec, dessous, l'initiale « M » apposée par Henry-Louis Mermod, écrits à la main et en rouge. C'est donc un des vingt exemplaires offrant une répétition des 7 gravures, toutes signées en dessous par Maurice Barraud (1889-1954). Couverture illustrée sur le 1er plat, rempliée. L'illustration de la couverture est répétée sur le frontispice, elle représente une main pointant vers le bas et tenant délicatement une rose. Composition en rouge. Rhodoïd translucide de protection. Etat : Très bon, avec quelques menus effets de l'ancienneté. Traces de papier collant sur les feuilles vierges solidaires de la couverture. 29 x 23.5 x 1 cm 285g. [Attributes: Soft Cover]

      [Bookseller: ABC - Art Brocante Cossonay]
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        Untitled I

      Johannesburg 1945 - Jabulani Ntuli (1898-1988) was a South African self taught artist, who sought to depict his surroundings and Zulu life. This piece is from his early career, when he was working as a gardener and domestic worker. With mountains in the background, Ntuli depicts a circular settlement of huts and a crowd of warriors. Small chip and tear at lower right corner. Pencil drawing with watercolor. Image measures 11" x 15".

      [Bookseller: Argosy Book Store, ABAA, ILAB]
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        Autograph letter signed

      Las Vegas, Nevada, 1945. Six pages on three sheets of unlined paper (measuring 8 by 10-1/2 inches), neat cursive on recto and verso, bound with single staple at upper corner. Text fresh and bright, faint creases at foldlines. ?'I DID NOT INVENT LOVE. IT WAS HERE WHEN I GOT HERE?": ORIGINAL SIX-PAGE 1945 AUTOGRAPH LETTER SIGNED BY GUTHRIE, WRITTEN TO INTIMATE FRIEND AND CORRESPONDENT CHARLOTTE STRAUSS. Original signed autograph letter, this six-page letter, entirely in Woody GuthrieÕs hand, signed by him and dated ?'12-21-45,?" was written from an isolated Nevada army base to longtime correspondent Charlotte Strauss, a young woman whose spirit ?'so alive and warm, so young and in naked lifeÉ made me feel a very deep love for you.?" Within weeks of this letter Guthrie had received his army discharge and was reunited with his wife Marjorie in New York. As Woody Guthrie faced each day on an isolated Nevada army base awaiting news of his discharge, visits to the camp post office offered some relief from army tedium and troubling bouts of confused thought that increasingly left him unnerved?'possibly early symptoms of the HuntingtonÕs chorea that ultimately ended his life. In this moving letter to one of his closest correspondents during that time, Charlotte Strauss, Guthrie refers to a previous letter?'his ?'Molasses Issue?"?'and confesses to deep anxiety about her response to that letterÕs news of his recent marriage. He confesses to fears of losing touch with this young woman ?'so in love with naked beauty, so alive and warm, so young, in naked life. You see, Charlotte, I have always loved love.?" Guthrie speaks gratefully of ?'what you have done for me, CharlotteÉ You made me recall my trips all back through my self, my people, all my funny ins and outs, my ups and downs. You have made me feel a very deep love for you, not as you fear, a blaze that flares up in me and then dies down low againÉ I did not invent love. It was here when I got here.?" Within weeks Guthrie was back home after his discharge, reunited with his wife Marjorie, but his correspondence with Strauss would continue. GuthrieÕs letter reads: ?'Page One Again [small lines sketched at each side] LVAAF 12-21-45 They called us into the Orderly Room last night and told us to watch the shipping board. Said a big list of names are about to come out. Said we might be on it. Said they hoped so anyhow. They said to be sure and drop around the office nice and early in the morning. They said if our name is not on the go home list, well, itÕs better luck next time. All of us have walked through this office several times. We had heard all of this before, but it never sounded so sure and so hot this time. We had read long sheets of names, read them down again, had not seen the sound of our name. We had gone a little blind and overlooked the list there a few inches away, tacked onto the same board, ?"Following EM report in mass for a detail to dutyÕ as mess hall workers, fire guards, prisoner chasers, area policers, butt can carriers, rakers and hoers, paper spearers, dust sweepers, rag slingers, mop washers, and as every earthly title and name except home goers. And so we walked out the door, went to movies, library, pool rooms, gyms, game rooms, out the gate to hit a date, down the line to ease the mind, or just off into the dark. We had come back this morning. They looked at us across the desks and said that the message carrier had not got down yet with the list. I met the Top Sarg over a coffee in the PX and he told me to be ready to rack and pack, to clear the Field, get my urinalisis [sic], library clear card, supply, laundry and all sorts of clearance signatures around at a dozen or two dozen offices. I told him that I had already got all of my signatures. He said he thought that my name was a cinch to be on the list. So you can see me pacing the gravel, waiting for the main office to send the list around. Two [page number] 12-21-Õ45 LVAAF I thought I would cook up some of my extra lard by walking up to the post office. It was a few minutes after ten. I met a young soldier coming my way reading some letters, asked him if the mail was worth going after this morning. He grinned and said, yes. And so I walked on up and stood my turn in a line as long as your wildest thought. Then when I took a look I saw that this big long line lead up to the stamp window, that my letter window only had one fellow in it. He was fishing out his change of address card. I asked the clerk in as polite a way if he could settle my worries as to whether or not the dayÕs mail could possibly have an envelope or so addressed to me. I called my name as plain as my strength would allow and he took a sad look over at me like he thought I was one of those men just born on earth with not enough vocal cords to get by on. Then he handed me your letter which was the only one for anybody by name of me, the same, I mean, like mine. I had it opened and was reading it on my way out and cot cursed out in a good many dialects. I bumped into honest people with Christmas bundles, and into the ones that did not get any, and walked around to several of the windows just by moving my feet along in the currents which I had hoped would wash me to the door. I finally got out, never knew how, but started your letter all over again outside in the lights of the day. You say you got 4 pages from me dated on the Tenth of December. Well by now you ought to have the 18 page one I issued to you on the 16 or 18 of December. I refer to this one, the 18 page number, as the ?"Molasses IssueÕ because you had said that you were more or less fond of molasses. I believe you used the term, ?"straightÕ. Three [page number] 12-21-Õ45 LVAAF This is why I took a good long deep breath and held it in before I really recommenced your letter. You see, I got mixed up somewhere, and was thinking that this would be your answer to the molasses one. And then when I saw you kicking your feet in your snow and reading a four pager on early Monday morning, I let my breath out again because I knew that no four pager could arouse enough fire from you for me to feel nervous about. You did say that the joy busted through you with a kind of a pain. I suppose you have just about caught my feelings here, and lots of other people. You know, it is this funny way it seems youÕve got to feel before your lines take on the drum beats of poems. These feelings give your words the swing and the sway, the hurt limp, the crawl and the jump, the slow walk that shows you your clearest feelings. And when you set down your own you are setting down a record and a history of mine, everybodyÕs. It is because you can write from almost an equal move of pain and joy that I feel so much like answering you with any old stick I can smoke up and char, any old rythmÕ [sic], any old story, or any subject. Lots of folks have jarred a couple of these kinds of letters out of me before, but you, I want you to know, are one out of several thousand. You make [me] feel like you understand these grounds around here, these deepest, maybe highest, emotions. Most of my letters are heavy on politics, theories of a lot of sorts, business of all kinds, but it feels very nice to get letters so in love with naked poetry, so in love with naked beauty, so alive and warm, so young, in naked life. You see, Charlotte, I have always loved love, no matter is a scientist is in love with his rocks, a drive in love with his truck, a woman Four [page number] 12-21-45 LVAAF in love with her family, a man in love with his dog, a kid his skates, or two people in love and know no reason why, a smoker in love with his pipe or cigarette, a girl in love with the leaves along her street, a soldier in love with a place he has never seen, two writers in love with old or new books, or you in love with your puzzle and me in love with my visions so wild, anybody anywhere in love with anything for any reason. It is this fresh exercise of love that keeps me and you new, and the only dead people or animals or bugs are the ones that see nothing to love. The business of how to control or regulate love I try to manage so as not to let any blind love cause me to lose time, but at the same time, when I do find some person like you, to spill my love out all around, it is my love for the works of people, their gifts and talents, and their inventions, their plans. I love my hills because the love of woman will cause me to run there, dig out ores, plastics, chemicals, make me haul and freight and carry, blast my furnaces and smoke up my stacks. Turn all of my wheels and springs and triggers, turn out the clothes, eats, paints, houses, books to tell all that can listen or read who she was that sparked my spark and how she fired my fires. Your poems or books, your novels, articles, will cause people to see your secret place so plain, so close, so true, so naked, theyÕll see their own feelings in you, and this will cause more wheels to turn, more stacks to smoke, more doors to open, more work, more homes to be made newer, cleaner and fresher. You must love in your own poetic particular way to exercise your talent the same as us who pull the cotton balls and sing, us that pick your little red berry, us that think and feel like you. The feeling is the goods on your shelf, and you must be able to know of each. Five [page number] 12-21-45 LVAAF You have got to be as brave and pay as deep, stoop and bend, lift your load of emotions, and carry your weight in worries and cares, your bucket full of doubt, your wagon of wondering, your sacks and racks of the hurts and the half hurts as any other worker that worries past your door. You must live and tell all who ask you how you did live, what you felt, the conflicts you fought against, the personal experiences you won out over. DonÕt take too long as layover in any other depot except your own. Hear your own hurts, ask your own question, listen to your own self tell its own answer. You are one that will always feel half way lost and you will always be trying to find your self. Really the job is impossible. It never gets done. No deep thinker would dare to yell or to say, or breathe too loud that he had found his own self. The closest to it you will come is to hear your own children. You stir up questions in your valley there a whole lot faster than your sky can settle them, so do I, every person does. But your job is to take your pen in hand and tell how your own universes look, feel, sound, smell, taste, to you. Your objects will run from atoms to Milky Ways, from shoe leather to the various blisses of human kisses, from any neighborhood meeting, story, party, your friends and your enemies and how they felt when they done as they done. You are cutting yourself out a hard horse to handle, but the best horse in the pastime when you get him to know you. And you will never climb one inch higher Charlotte till you believe in all of the other people, ?"That they do understand all that is in you when you give them a chanceÕ. Six [page number] 12-21-45 LVAAF You will say you feel in you a kind of a bitterness toward people enmasse, what you really feel is your most silly fear, the fear that they are one drop different from you. Sure, they act so, talk so, but just express your most complete vision to them, let them see you and hear you, and you will forever know that every human heart that beats was born and made and moulded and shaped to dwell on your highest plane, and it is our cheap profit worshippers that fail to teach all that all feel all alike, past creed, past color, past looks, past money, past power, on up past fear, on out over greed. We are held in this cheap talk darkness because it is the best we know. We have not had little twenty three year old Charlotte Strausses to stir up and bat down the cheap, the foney [sic], the shabby, and to command to ask, to show us how to meet and how to dwell on her upper grounds. This is what you have done for me, Charlotte. You have helped to prove to me that somewhere there is the radio and the television station called by your name. You made me recall my trips all back through my self, my people, all my funny ins and outs, my ups and my downs. You have made me feel a very deep love for you, not as you fear, a blaze that flares up in me and then dies down low again. I had to answer, had to hear, had to offer you all of this love, had to tell you to take all you need, and to return all you take. I had no sayso in the matter. The love across my desert says these words to all of your snows. Give. Take. I did not invent love. It was here when I got here. Woody.?" A highly desirable letter in about-fine condition.

      [Bookseller: James Cummins Bookseller]
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        Je suis un prisonnier: Lettre authographe du Général Juin

      La Nouvelle Edition ND (ca 1945), Paris - Quarto. [2], 54, [3] loose leaves, as issued. Original half red cloth over decorative paper covered boards portfolio, with illustration pasted on front cover. Illustrated title page. Remarkable collection of 54 humorous cartoons by Georges Raynaud, a French prisoner of war, depicting scenes of his daily life in a German camp. The illustrated title page is listed as a plate in the Index pages. Includes in this work: a facsimile handwritten letter of General Juin to the author, a dedication page by Henri Rol-Tanguy, a leader of the French Resistance, two Index leaves, and the colophon. Covers sunned and slightly stained. Text and captions in French. Portfolio in overall good- to good, interior in good+ to very good condition. [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: ERIC CHAIM KLINE, BOOKSELLER (ABAA ILAB)]
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        A Proclamation

      Washington, D.C. May 8, 1945. Large three-colored broadside of Harry Truman's Proclamation declaring the surrender of Germany. Signed in ink by Harry Truman. Also included at the lower left is the original 1945 Christmas card from the President and Mrs. Truman and at lower right, the original red, white and blue ribbon. These were presented by the President as gifts for friends. Uncommon, especially with the original Christmas card and ribbon. Framed.On the day before Hitler's suicide, all German troops in Italy laid down their arms. On May 4th, German forces in Holland, Denmark and northwest Germany surrendered to British Field Marshall Montgomery. On the 6th, Donitz authorized General Alfred Jodl to 'conclude an armistice agreement' with General Eisenhower. The Germans wanted a separate peace with the allied troops in the West in order to continue their battle with the Russians in the East. Eisenhower would have none of it. He ordered the Germans to surrender unconditionally the next day. The Germans acquiesced, signing the surrender document on May 7th… The cessation of fighting took effect at 11:01 P.M. on May 8th" (Georges Blond).

      [Bookseller: Raptis Rare Books, ABAA/ ILAB ]
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        Autograph letter signed

      Scott Field, Illinois, 1945. Six pages on three sheets of lined paper (measuring 8 by 10-1/2 inches), neat cursive on recto and verso, bound with single staple at upper corner. Text fresh and clean, faint creases at foldlines. ?YOUR LETTER ABOUT MY BOOK (BOUND FOR GLORY) GOT DOWN HERE TODAY? YOU HAVE TAKEN ME BACK OVER MY OLD TRACKS?: IMPORTANT 1945 AUTOGRAPH LETTER SIGNED BY GUTHRIE, THE FIRST IN HIS LONG AND OFTEN INTIMATE CORRESPONDENCE WITH CHARLOTTE STRAUSS, DISCUSSING BOUND FOR GLORY. Original signed autograph letter, this six-page letter written entirely in Woody Guthrie?s penciled cursive, twice signed by him and dated October 29th, 1945, is the first in his largely unpublicized and deeply meaningful correspondence with a woman named Charlotte Strauss. Here Guthrie talks of the 1200-page manuscript for Bound for Glory that was ?cut down to four hundred and forty eight pages,? and slyly confesses that ?I like to hear people talk about me and my works.? In 1946 Woody Guthrie was drafted into the army and was soon sent to Scott Field in Illinois where he often suffered deep loneliness offset only by writing extraordinarily rich and complex letters to his future wife Marjorie and, as he would later confess, ?love letters to other women? (Klein, 316). Among these was a long, passionate and largely unpublished correspondence with this letter?s recipient Charlotte Strauss. In this October letter, his first to Strauss, Guthrie tells her that ?your letter about my book (Bound for Glory) got down here today. Marjorie read it [the letter] at home and then mailed it on? Your letter gets me to feel just like my book made you feel? You have taken me back over my old tracks again and showed me twelve thousand more stories and places to write about? You won?t feel bad if I tell you plain that I like to hear people talk about me and my works.? Guthrie talks of submitting a 1200-page manuscript to his Bound for Glory publisher, which ?they cut down to four hundred and forty eight pages,? and asks for ?permission to publish all or any part of your letter??a request she seems to have resisted in their continuing and intimate correspondence. Guthrie?s letter reads as follows: ?Scott Field, Illinois, October 29th, 1945. Dear Charlotte Strauss, Your letter about my book ?(Bound for Glory)? got down here today. Marjorie read it at home and then mailed it on. I don?t know exactly where to start nor how. But have got to start somewhere. Your letter gets me to feel just like my book made you feel. You turned your whole self so free in your letter that you gave me that same old feeling I had as I took every one of the steps in the book. I sent E.P. Dutton, the Publisher, twelve hundred pages, over thirty chapters and they cut it all down to four hundred and forty eight pages. You have taken me back over my old tracks again and showed me twelve thousand more stories and places to write about. You pointed to things I thought were done and gone. You came pretty close to making me think of myself in bigger words than usual. You made me remember, reconsider and recall. You won?t feel bad if I tell you plain that I like to hear people talk about me and my works, I won?t hide the fact. You may have expected that I would brush light and walk easy across your pages, but I found myself walking slow and running deep. Two [page number] A letter like yours is a thing to hold in your eyesight and to feel good about, and it is because the Bowery flops and Skid Rows are full of such letters as yours, in word, in actions, down under and seldom seen, that causes me to hold some kind of a borderline stake claim not only where my feet took me but all along yonder where you settled yours. And your home grounds there see all of the ones that I moved over and across. You did your job in good shape. You saw. You saw because you heard. You heard because you smelled and tasted and listened to all of the feet walking by. You traveled in your way, the same as I did in mine. You must have had the desire for the gift of seeing. You may have traveled in body a good deal, or not much at all, this fades out, and your sight travels on. And your letter keeps traveling. You own that talent by which you make anybody?s world your own, and everybody?s life your life, this is the gift of insight and is not my property nor yours but sort of like the weather that blows over both places. It is a real good thing to get and to set down and read a letter where the writer is trying to use at least 90% of his or her strength in the words. This is what you have done. You used all of your energy. And I would walk considerable distance any day to look at any human using all of this energy at any job. Three [page number] I don?t know what to say to you. When I commenced to write I didn?t know what words to set down. But you will look at what you see here and you will fill in the dry mesas with the seeds of your own irrigating. You will know that I here return to you some kind of a fair swap of thoughts. Our thoughts are a lot like the workers all over the world fighting for a cleaner town and a closer Union. Or like the sun of this good Indian Summer all up and down the things that take root to grow anywhere up and down the banks of this big Mississippi River. I see the waters run and the towns of shacks and bricks float past me, and I wish for the day when IÕll get my discharge from the army. You say on page two, about kids, etc., ÔBefore maturity has had a chance to suppress these pure bright flamesÕ. But I never did believe that maturity does surpress [sic] those flames, except by mental circuses and tricks of your imagination, that is, to follow the dull or dim fields of your imagining. Lots of folks do this, but ÔmaturityÕ is the one and same flame as your childhood. Also would doubt this sentence, p. 4., Ôfor W.G. had the sanest, most sensible faculty for rationalization ever bequeathed to manÕ. You ought to have put it: ÔW.G. was still able to walk on both feet at same timeÕ. 4 [page number circled] It is funny, but you give me the feeling that you did not write this letter for W.G. only, as you tell me. You wrote it for the good and welfare of some person very near to you there, nearer at heart. Partly because of the fact that you feel this person to be in some funny, sad and curious part of life that you hate and fear. You hoped as you wrote this letter that this one person (or more) could see what you were driving at and soak up some of your good thoughts from reading (or by being spoken to in the same vein of) your letter. On your sixth page you say, ÔIt would remain forever glowing in your heart, just as the life of W.G. flames above the glimmer of we trivial mortalsÕ. I, for one, just canÕt suck this sentence in. No mortal is trivial. I never had a flame to jump up above anybody. If I did I would just play up a good rain song to smoke the flame down to everybodyÕs size. Besides it just isnÕt right to try to cause any one person to form the superstition that his light outshines everybody elses [sic]. There are thousands of shinier ones right there in your town of Bristol. It is this super flame notion that ÔBound For GloryÕ fights to kill. And for your letter so long this is about all that I picked out as excess. I got what you mentally meant here in these praises, but this was where got to praising so fast that you couldnÕt stop. These few patches never could be printed because I have already written Ôno goÕ on the margin and signed it W.G. But I would like to have your written permission to publish all or any part of your letter. 5 [page number circled] I hope that you are not thinking that I got the least bit cute or smart alecky in writing down the sentences, Charlotte, the ones I would have to leave out of my own mind and out of any published script. I hope you feel that I am right in taking note of these lines, and would like for you to tell me when you write, that you agree that said sentences ought to be marked out with an old pencil. Give my best wishes to everybody that you see. And to your self. Your friend. Pvt. W. Woody Guthrie. A. & N. 42234634, 3505th A.A.F.B.U., Squadron ÔLÓ Scott Field, Illinois. October 29th, 1945.[continuing on the verso] If me and my guitar are ever in your town we will look for your door. Woody Guthrie.Ó A highly desirable letter in about-fine condition.

      [Bookseller: James Cummins Bookseller ]
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        Anatomy for Artists (With 2 Separate Original Drawings by Reginald Marsh)

      New York: American Artists Group, 1945. The 1945 1st edition. THIS COPY INCLUDES 2 ORIGINAL INK DRAWINGS BY REGINALD MARSH (one on the front blank endpaper, the other on its verso), ONE A FULL-PAGE SKETCH OF A SULTRY WOMAN RIDING ON A CAROUSEL, THE OTHER A HALF-PAGE SKETCH OF A FEMALE ARTIST (PRESUMABLY PAINTER BARBARA ADRIAN [1931-2014]) AT AN EASEL PAINTING A CRUCIFIXION. INSCRRIBED "BARBARA ADRIAN--ART STUDENTS LEAGUE" AND SIGNED "REGINALD MARSH". The book is solid and VG- in its light-brown boards, with mild soiling to the panels, darkening along the spine and light wear at the spine ends. Lacking the dustjacket as well. Octavo, hundreds of anatomic illustrations thruout by Reginald Marsh himself. . Signed by Illustrator. First Edition. Cloth. Collectible; Very Good. Illus. by Reginald Marsh.

      [Bookseller: Appledore Books, ABAA]
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        Autograph letter signed

      Scott Field, Illinois, 1945. Six pages on three sheets of lined paper (measuring 8 by 10-1/2 inches), neat cursive on recto and verso, bound with single staple at upper corner. Text fresh and clean, faint creases at foldlines. ?'YOUR LETTER ABOUT MY BOOK (BOUND FOR GLORY) GOT DOWN HERE TODAYÉ YOU HAVE TAKEN ME BACK OVER MY OLD TRACKS?": IMPORTANT 1945 AUTOGRAPH LETTER SIGNED BY GUTHRIE, THE FIRST IN HIS LONG AND OFTEN INTIMATE CORRESPONDENCE WITH CHARLOTTE STRAUSS, DISCUSSING BOUND FOR GLORY. Original signed autograph letter, this six-page letter written entirely in Woody GuthrieÕs penciled cursive, twice signed by him and dated October 29th, 1945, is the first in his largely unpublicized and deeply meaningful correspondence with a woman named Charlotte Strauss. Here Guthrie talks of the 1200-page manuscript for Bound for Glory that was ?'cut down to four hundred and forty eight pages,?" and slyly confesses that ?'I like to hear people talk about me and my works.?" In 1946 Woody Guthrie was drafted into the army and was soon sent to Scott Field in Illinois where he often suffered deep loneliness offset only by writing extraordinarily rich and complex letters to his future wife Marjorie and, as he would later confess, ?'love letters to other women?" (Klein, 316). Among these was a long, passionate and largely unpublished correspondence with this letterÕs recipient Charlotte Strauss. In this October letter, his first to Strauss, Guthrie tells her that ?'your letter about my book (Bound for Glory) got down here today. Marjorie read it [the letter] at home and then mailed it onÉ Your letter gets me to feel just like my book made you feelÉ You have taken me back over my old tracks again and showed me twelve thousand more stories and places to write aboutÉ You wonÕt feel bad if I tell you plain that I like to hear people talk about me and my works.?" Guthrie talks of submitting a 1200-page manuscript to his Bound for Glory publisher, which ?'they cut down to four hundred and forty eight pages,?" and asks for ?'permission to publish all or any part of your letter?"?'a request she seems to have resisted in their continuing and intimate correspondence. GuthrieÕs letter reads as follows: ?'Scott Field, Illinois, October 29th, 1945. Dear Charlotte Strauss, Your letter about my book ?"(Bound for Glory)Õ got down here today. Marjorie read it at home and then mailed it on. I donÕt know exactly where to start nor how. But have got to start somewhere. Your letter gets me to feel just like my book made you feel. You turned your whole self so free in your letter that you gave me that same old feeling I had as I took every one of the steps in the book. I sent E.P. Dutton, the Publisher, twelve hundred pages, over thirty chapters and they cut it all down to four hundred and forty eight pages. You have taken me back over my old tracks again and showed me twelve thousand more stories and places to write about. You pointed to things I thought were done and gone. You came pretty close to making me think of myself in bigger words than usual. You made me remember, reconsider and recall. You wonÕt feel bad if I tell you plain that I like to hear people talk about me and my works, I wonÕt hide the fact. You may have expected that I would brush light and walk easy across your pages, but I found myself walking slow and running deep. Two [page number] A letter like yours is a thing to hold in your eyesight and to feel good about, and it is because the Bowery flops and Skid Rows are full of such letters as yours, in word, in actions, down under and seldom seen, that causes me to hold some kind of a borderline stake claim not only where my feet took me but all along yonder where you settled yours. And your home grounds there see all of the ones that I moved over and across. You did your job in good shape. You saw. You saw because you heard. You heard because you smelled and tasted and listened to all of the feet walking by. You traveled in your way, the same as I did in mine. You must have had the desire for the gift of seeing. You may have traveled in body a good deal, or not much at all, this fades out, and your sight travels on. And your letter keeps traveling. You own that talent by which you make anybodyÕs world your own, and everybodyÕs life your life, this is the gift of insight and is not my property nor yours but sort of like the weather that blows over both places. It is a real good thing to get and to set down and read a letter where the writer is trying to use at least 90% of his or her strength in the words. This is what you have done. You used all of your energy. And I would walk considerable distance any day to look at any human using all of this energy at any job. Three [page number] I donÕt know what to say to you. When I commenced to write I didnÕt know what words to set down. But you will look at what you see here and you will fill in the dry mesas with the seeds of your own irrigating. You will know that I here return to you some kind of a fair swap of thoughts. Our thoughts are a lot like the workers all over the world fighting for a cleaner town and a closer Union. Or like the sun of this good Indian Summer all up and down the things that take root to grow anywhere up and down the banks of this big Mississippi River. I see the waters run and the towns of shacks and bricks float past me, and I wish for the day when IÕll get my discharge from the army. You say on page two, about kids, etc., ?"Before maturity has had a chance to suppress these pure bright flamesÕ. But I never did believe that maturity does surpress [sic] those flames, except by mental circuses and tricks of your imagination, that is, to follow the dull or dim fields of your imagining. Lots of folks do this, but ?"maturityÕ is the one and same flame as your childhood. Also would doubt this sentence, p. 4., ?"for W.G. had the sanest, most sensible faculty for rationalization ever bequeathed to manÕ. You ought to have put it: ?"W.G. was still able to walk on both feet at same timeÕ. 4 [page number circled] It is funny, but you give me the feeling that you did not write this letter for W.G. only, as you tell me. You wrote it for the good and welfare of some person very near to you there, nearer at heart. Partly because of the fact that you feel this person to be in some funny, sad and curious part of life that you hate and fear. You hoped as you wrote this letter that this one person (or more) could see what you were driving at and soak up some of your good thoughts from reading (or by being spoken to in the same vein of) your letter. On your sixth page you say, ?"It would remain forever glowing in your heart, just as the life of W.G. flames above the glimmer of we trivial mortalsÕ. I, for one, just canÕt suck this sentence in. No mortal is trivial. I never had a flame to jump up above anybody. If I did I would just play up a good rain song to smoke the flame down to everybodyÕs size. Besides it just isnÕt right to try to cause any one person to form the superstition that his light outshines everybody elses [sic]. There are thousands of shinier ones right there in your town of Bristol. It is this super flame notion that ?"Bound For GloryÕ fights to kill. And for your letter so long this is about all that I picked out as excess. I got what you mentally meant here in these praises, but this was where got to praising so fast that you couldnÕt stop. These few patches never could be printed because I have already written ?"no goÕ on the margin and signed it W.G. But I would like to have your written permission to publish all or any part of your letter. 5 [page number circled] I hope that you are not thinking that I got the least bit cute or smart alecky in writing down the sentences, Charlotte, the ones I would have to leave out of my own mind and out of any published script. I hope you feel that I am right in taking note of these lines, and would like for you to tell me when you write, that you agree that said sentences ought to be marked out with an old pencil. Give my best wishes to everybody that you see. And to your self. Your friend. Pvt. W. Woody Guthrie. A. & N. 42234634, 3505th A.A.F.B.U., Squadron ?"L?" Scott Field, Illinois. October 29th, 1945.[continuing on the verso] If me and my guitar are ever in your town we will look for your door. Woody Guthrie.?" A highly desirable letter in about-fine condition.

      [Bookseller: James Cummins Bookseller]
 8.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  


        Cannery Row

      New York: The Viking Press, 1945 First edition, first issue. Publisher's buff yellow cloth (subsequently issued in canary yellow cloth), lettered in dark blue; in the original pictorial dust jacket designed by Arthur Hawkins, Jr., with an illustration of Cannery Row by Hawkins to the front panel, titled in yellow. Book with front hinge a bit tender at title page, else fine; unclipped dust jacket, with some wear and rubbing to the extremities, a hint of toning to the spine, minor nicks to the spine ends, short closed tear to the front panel. Overall, a very good and pleasing copy. Cannery Row is a Depression-era novel set in Monterey, California. The plot takes place on a grungy street with "the gathered and scattered, tin and iron and rust and splintered wood, chipped pavement and weedy lots, junk heaps, sardine canneries of corrugated iron, honky tonks, restaurants and whore houses, and little crowded groceries, and laboratories and flophouses." The actual street in Monterey has since been renamed "Cannery Row" in honor of this iconic novel. The plot features an unlikely cast of characters, including a marine biologist, a grocer, a restaurateur, and a group of local vagabonds. Cannery Row is exemplar of Steinbeck's talent for making even the most unsavory characters relatable and endearing; Mack and his group of homeless squatters are described as "gentlemen and philosophers united by a common dislike of a steady job and a mutual feeling for the pleasures of living according to their lights." Much of the inspiration for this novel and its 1954 sequel Sweet Thursday were drawn from the author's own life; Steinbeck was born in Monterey County, grew up knowing fishermen and other laborers, and was close friends with a marine biologist, Ed Ricketts, who worked on the real Cannery Row.. 1st Edition. Hard Cover. Very Good/Dust Jacket Included.

      [Bookseller: B & B Rare Books, Ltd., ABAA]
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        Carl Rungius, Big Game Painter: Fifty Years with Brush and Rifle

      West Hartford, VT: The Countryman Press, 1945. First edition. No. 18 of 160 copies, signed by the author and the artist Carl Rungius. Original etched frontispiece of a moose, signed by the artist in pencil. Illustrated with photographs, and with color and black and white reproductions of Rungius's work. 1 vols. 4to (12-1/2 x 9-3/4 inches). Original grey and brown cloth, gilt device on upper cover, t.e.g., others uncut. Spine slightly faded, else a fine copy in a red quarter morocco slipcase with inner chemise (publisher's card slipcase not present). One of 160 Copies, with an Original Etching An excellent exposition of the celebrated artist's work, with rich biographical detail and fine reproductions.

      [Bookseller: James Cummins Bookseller]
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        Completa y veridica historia de Picasso y el cubismo

      Chiantore, 1945, Hardcover, Book Condition: Fair, Dust Jacket Condition: No Jacket, 1st Editionspanish text with an italian translation insert. the original boards are worn and torn. internally the book is clean and complete with 59 tipped in plates including a photo of picasso take in 1935. there are other printed images that are not tipped in. the binding is strong and there is a previous owner's signature and date Quantity Available: 1. Inventory No: 77ev.

      [Bookseller: Chapter 1 Books]
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        Sherwood Anderson: I Racconti son uomini... Alberto Arduini: Dame al Macao. PRIMA edizione. Libero Bigiaretti: Incendi a Paleo. PRIMA edizione. Giorgio de Chirico: 1918 - 1925. Ricordi di Roma. PRIMA edizione. Jules Laforgue: Le miracle de roses. Aldo Palazzeschi: Nell'Aria di Parigi. PRIMA edizione.

      Rara raccolta completa con cofanetto originale della prima ed unica serie stampata a Roma dalla "Editrice di cultura moderna" nel 1945. Tiratura complessiva di 1050 copie numerate. La collana è curata da Guglielmo Santangelo e Orfeo Tamburi. Le copertine e le illustrazioni sono di Orfeo Tamburi. 6 volumetti in 24mo (cm. 11); copertine originali illustrate: ogni volume è di circa 150 / 180 pagine. Axs

      [Bookseller: Libreria Bongiorno Paolo]
 12.   Check availability:     maremagnum.com     Link/Print  


        LE JALUX ESTRÉMADURIEN

      - CERVANTES, Miguel de.- LE JALUX ESTRÉMADURIEN des nouvelles exemplaires de. Édition illustrée d?eaux-fortes et d?ornements typographiques par André Lambert. Préface de Paul Guinard. Presentation des éditions espagnoles et anglaise par A. R. Moñino et Walter Starkie. Valencia, Editorial Castalia. Valencia del Cid. 1945. 2 vols. Folio, holandesa bradel moderna, con los papeles de Velez Celemín. Estuche. Texto francés y castellano. Ilustrado con los aguafuertes de Lámbert, en total 11 a toda plana y 26 pequeñas ilustraciones en texto. Tirada limitada a 150 ejemplares, ejemplar que contiene: el primer estado de un aguafuerte firmado por el artista, los grabados definitivos en texto, una suite de las viñetas en tirada aparte, y un croquis en dibujo original del artista.  [Attributes: Signed Copy; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: ArteyGrafía. com / Elena Gallego]
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        Pride and Prejudice

      New York: Doubleday Doran 1945, 1945. Classic romance novel. DELUXE LIMITED ISSUE of the First Robert Ball Illustrated Edition. Quarto, pp.380. With colour plates and in-text illustrations. Number 325 of 1000 copies SIGNED BY THE ARTIST. Elegantly hand-bound in half blue calf, extra gilt with twin scarlet title labels, top edge gilt, marbled endpapers, publisher's original cloth bound in at rear. A beautifully bound copy of a desirable edition. Pride and Prejudice is one of the world's most popular novels..

      [Bookseller: Adrian Harrington Rare Books]
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        Portrait photograph of the young Truman Capote

      N.p. [Alabama?], 1945. Color gelatin print. Full-length frontal view of the author, relaxed and smiling in a pinstriped suit with bow tie. 8-1/2 x 7 inches. Matted in the original folder, and INSCRIBED on the matted in ink: "For Seabon and Addie / With Love from / Truman" Slight soiling to folder. To His Aunt and uncle When Capote's mother and father divorced, four-year-old Truman was send to Monroeville, Alabama to live with his mother's siblings, Seabon and Addie Faulk, where he made friends with his neighbor, Harper Lee. A fine association.

      [Bookseller: James Cummins Bookseller]
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        What Is Life?

      Cambridge: at the University Press,, 1945. The Physical Aspect of the Living Cell. Based on Lectures delivered under the auspices of the Institute at Trinity College, Dublin, in February 1943. Octavo. Original green cloth, titles to spine gilt. 4 plates and illustrations in the text. Contemporary gift inscription to front free endpaper. Extremities rubbed, bottom corner of front board a little bumped, light spotting to edges of text block. An excellent copy. Second edition. Inscribed by Samuel Beckett to his uncle Gerald Beckett on the front free endpaper: "For Gerald, from Sam, June 1946". A wonderful association, connecting Beckett to the creator of that most Beckettian of paradoxes, of a cat in a box, alive and dead at the same time.

      [Bookseller: Peter Harrington]
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        Return to Life through Contrology

      New York: J. J. Augustin,, 1945. Quarto. Original cream cloth, front cover lettered in brown. With the dust jacket. Illustrated throughout. Some nicks, chips and tears to jacket, some staining to jacket flaps. Front pastedown with the stamp of the New York "Pilates Studios". First edition, first printing of Pilates's first book. Presentation copy from the author, exuberantly inscribed on the the half-title: "To Leo C. Freima (?) - Everlasting "Youth" to you and yours through "Contrology", sincerely Joe, 1948"; and with an additional note in the author's hand, adding "all" to the line "Photographs of Joseph H. Pilates at sixty" (title page verso). With a fascinating clutch of ephemera: 5 studio photographs of Pilates performing various exercises are pasted in at the end of the book; loosely inserted: original post card showing the Pilates studio at 939 Eighth Avenue, New York; Pilates studios business card; printed flyer for the studio; 4-page folded A4 advertisement for his "Commando Exercise"; A4 "report" (dated 20 February 1948) into the violation of chiropractic practices; magazine article on Pilates. A marvellous archive of rare material relating to one of the gurus of modern "keep fit".

      [Bookseller: Peter Harrington]
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        Sparkling Cyanide

      London: for The Crime Club by Collins,, 1945. Octavo. Original red boards, titles to spine in black. With the dust jacket. A fine copy in the bright, unclipped jacket, with lightly rubbed extremities. First UK edition, first impression. Originally published in the US in the same year under the title Remembered Death.

      [Bookseller: Peter Harrington]
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        Stuart Little

      1945. first edition. A Realistic Fantasy About A Talking Mouse"WHITE, E.B. Stuart Little. Pictures by Garth Williams. New York & London: Harper & Brothers, 1945. First edition (stated on copyright page with 10-5 and I-U). Octavo (8 x 5 1/4 inches; 202 x 134 mm.). viii, 131, [1 blank] pp. Five full-page line drawings (including frontispiece) and numerous line-drawings in the text.Publishers gray linen over boards, front cover and spine pictorially decorated in orange and green, pictorial endpapers printed in green. A fine copy in the original first issue color pictorial dust jacket (with $2.00 on front flap). Jacket spine very slightly darkened, minimal wear at top of spine, a few short edge tears, otherwise excellent.E[lwyn] B[rooks] White (1899-1985) first book for children. Stuart Little is a 1945 children's novel widely recognized as a classic in children's literature. Stuart Little was illustrated by the subsequently award-winning artist Garth Williams, also his first work for children. It is a realistic fantasy about a talking mouse, Stuart Little, born to human parents in New York City.Garth Montgomery Williams (1912-1996) was an American artist who came to prominence in the American postwar era as an illustrator of children's books. Many of the books he illustrated have become classics of American children's literature. In Stuart Little, Charlotte’s Web, and in the Little House series of books of Laura Ingalls Wilder, Williams's drawings have become inseparable from how we think of those stories. In that respect... Williams's work belongs in the same class as Sir John Tenniel’s drawings for Alice in Wonderland, or Ernest Shepard’s illustrations for Winnie the Pooh.Hall, A13

      [Bookseller: David Brass Rare Books, Inc. ]
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        51 Count LOT 1945 - 1949 ‘The Conjurors’ Magazine’ [Magic Interest] [WWII Interest]

      New York, NY & Maplewood, NJ: Conjurors' Press Inc., 1945 - 1949. 1st Edition. Trade Paperback Trade Paperback. Good. (Magazines) GIBSON, Walter B; O'DELL, Dell; OURSLER, Fulton; CHRISTOPHER, Milbourne; ZOLOTOW, Maurice; EASLEY, Bert; VERNON, Dai; ROXO, Rudy; SIMMS, Warren E.; OVETTE, Joseph; LEWIS, Eric C.; FETSCH, Hen; DESFOR, Irving; ET AL. 51 Count LOT of ‘The Conjurors’ Magazine’. New York, NY & Maplewood, NJ: Conjurors' Press Inc., 1945 â€?" 1949. First Edition. Issues measure 11 x 8.5 in. All in original illustrated and colored wraps, staple binding. Illustrated throughout. Vol. 4, No. 12 through Vol. 5, No.7 feature cover art by Ed Mishell. Each issue contains: industry news; step-by-step instructions for a wide variety of illusions and tricks â€?" professional and novice level; articles on popular magicians; and historical studies of magic. The WWII-era and post-war issues hint at the impact of the war on the magic community with articles on magicians in the USO, caricatures using the “sawing a woman in half” trick on the enemy, and more! All issues have sustained general edge wear and rubbing; few exhibit small closed tears to edges. Lot in Very Good condition overall. The Conjurors' Magazine was a Magic Periodical put out by Walter B. Gibson which ran from February 1945 until September 1949. This lot contains a NEARLY COMPLETE SET of the magazine’s run, lacking only the first 4 issues. Lot contents: 1945: June (Vol. 1, No. 5), “The ‘Defense’ of Mentalism”; July (Vol. 1, No. 6), Theodore Hardeen Memorial Issue; August (Vol. 1, No. 7), The Great La Follette’s “Flight of the Mandarin”; September (Vol. 1, No. 8), “The Charlier Pass”; October (Vol. 1, No. 9), “Richard Cardini”; November (Vol. 1, No. 10), “Deland’s Greatest Creation”; December (Vol. 1, No. 11), “Hardin’s Mysteries and Explanations” 1946: January (Vol. 1, No. 12), “Navy Overseas Unit Adds First Coast Guard Magician”; March (Vol. 2, No. 1), “Mexican Turn-Over”; April (Vol. 2, No. 2), “Magic Tambourines”; May (Vol. 2, No. 3), “Find the Jack”; June (Vol. 2, No. 4), “Cigarette Sleights”; July (Vol. 2, No. 5), “Flower Lota”; August (Vol. 2, No. 6), “SOLDIERS IN GREASE PAINT â€?" USO MAGICIANS!”; September (Vol. 2, No. 7), “Pent-A-Maid Illusion”; October (Vol. 2, No. 8), “El Satin’s Own Opening”; November (Vol. 2, No. 9), “Teen-Age Magic”; December (Vol. 2, No. 10), “Four Masterpieces of Magic” 1947: January (Vol. 2, No. 11), Eric C. Lewis’ “My Invisible Pass”; February (Vol. 2, No. 12), “Great Gawd Budd”; March (Vol. 3, No. 1), “RIDDLE IN RED AND YELLOW â€?" A STORY ABOUT CHUNG LING SOO”; April (Vol. 3, No. 2), “Ellison Collection Unearthed”; May (Vol. 3, No. 3), “Magic on the March!”; June (Vol. 3, No. 4), “Magicians Guild Banquet-Show”; July (Vol. 3, No. 5), “IBM Convention News and Photos”; August (Vol. 3, No. 6); “P.C.A.M. Convention News”; September (Vol. 3, No. 7), “The Pillar of Fire â€?" Illusion of Okito”; October (Vol. 3, No. 8), “The Invisible Flight â€?" Illustion of Okito”; November (Vol. 3, No. 9), “Tips on Home Made Tricks”; December (Vol. 3, No. 10), “The Phantom Fowls â€?" Illusion of Okito” 1948: January (Vol. 3, No. 11), “You Do Have to be Crazy”; February (Vol. 3, No. 12), “My Friend, ‘The Great Raymond’”; March (Vol. 4, No. 1), “You’ve Got to Use ‘Dynamite’”; April (Vol. 4, No. 2), “THE DANGERS OF HYPNOTISM”; May (Vol. 4, No. 3), “The Last Man to See Houdini Alive”; June (Vol. 4, No. 4), “A Coin Deception”; July (Vol. 4, No. 5), “I.B.M. and S.A.M. Convention Number”; August (Vol. 4, No. 6), “Figurementation”; September (Vol. 4, No. 7), “Mandrake â€?" A Profile in Print”; October (Vol. 4, No. 8), “Abbott’s 15th Annual Get-Together”; November (Vol. 4, No. 9), “SEANCE RENDEZVOUS SNUBBED BY HOUDINI”; December (Vol. 4, No. 10), “Egyptian Hall and Its Mysteries” 1949: January (Vol. 4, No. 11), “’Sanoj’ Cut and Restored Rope”; February (Vol. 4, No. 12), “Journeys into Aladdinland”; March (Vol. 5, No. 1), “Gabbatha”; April (Vol. 5, No. 2), “Col Ling Soo”; May (Vol. 5, No. 3), “Jinxiana”; June (Vol. 5, No. 4), “Let’s Dummy Up”; July (Vol. 5, No. 5), “Peter Warlock Reporting”; August (Vol. 5, No. 6), “Was Erdnase Abdul Aziz Kahn?”; September (Vol. 5, No. 7), “Stage Hypnotism”

      [Bookseller: Yeomans in the Fork]
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        Collected Poems of Robert Frost 1939

      New York: Henry Holt and Company, 1945. Later printing. Frontispiece portrait. 436 pp. 1 vols. 8vo. Original beige cloth. Minor soiling, small stain on upper cover. Inscribed by the author: "To Bob Scheel/ from/ Robert Frost/ Kenyon Oct 6 1946." For this edition Frost wrote a preface, "The Figure a Poem Makes," an essay which is surely his best-known prose composition.

      [Bookseller: James Cummins Bookseller]
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        Collection of letters sent to Mrs. M. Baudouy of 49 West 85th Street NYC by Eleanor Roosevelt

      Washington, D.C.: The White House, 1945. With envelopes. 8 TLS from Eleanor Roosevelt with a copy of a TLS from the Under Secretary of State Sumner Welles. Some signed by Grace Tully for FDR or Edith Helm for Eleanor.

      [Bookseller: James Cummins Bookseller ]
 22.   Check availability:     ABAA     Link/Print  


        ALBUN BIOGRAFICO TAURINO

      Ediciones Larrisal, Madrid 1945 - Conjunto de 100 fotografías con retratos de toreros y textos de Curro Meloja Encuadernación en cartoné

      [Bookseller: Librería Anticuaria Toledo]
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        Naked City

      New York: Essential Books,, 1945. Octavo. Finely bound by the Chelsea Bindery in grey morocco, titles to spine and front board in silver, wraparound black morocco of New York's skyline, twin rule to turn-ins silver, black endpapers with the original bound in, silver edges. Illustrated with black and white photographs throughout. A fine copy. First edition, first printing. Weegee's first book. Arthur (Weegee) Fellig is one of the centuries most eccentric artists, famously he would appear at crime scenes before the police. He achieved this by the simple device of spending night after night in the tougher sections of New York listening to the radio traffic on a police radio he had at some time "liberated". Famous as a sensationalist in his day, time has treated him more kindly and the hard eye with which he shaped his pictures gave them qualities like no others.

      [Bookseller: Peter Harrington]
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        Gigi cerca il suo berretto.

      (Milano), Mondadori [1945].. 4°. 4 nn.Bll. mit teils aufklappbaren Bild-Elementen. Farbig ill. Orig.-Pappbd. (gebräunt und leicht fleckig, HDeckel mit Klebeschild)., fester Einband. Band 7 der Originalausgabe. - Insgesamt waren 10 Werke geplant, erschienen sind jedoch nur 7. - Bruno Munari (1907-1998) entwickelte auf der Basis von Kunst eine Methode zur Förderung jeglicher Kreativität. Seine Gebrauchsgegenstände, Spiel- und Buchobjekte, seine Multiples und kunsthandwerklichen Einzelstücke haben im 20. Jahrhundert Design-Geschichte gemacht. Seine Objekte überraschen stets durch ihre Mischung aus Raffinesse und Einfachheit. - Ränder etwas gebräunt, leicht fleckig. Bankverbindung in Deutschland vorhanden.

      [Bookseller: Buch + Kunst + hommagerie Sabine Koitka]
 25.   Check availability:     ZVAB     Link/Print  


        Identity documents and ephemera of Sgt Gerald McDowell, U S A F as prisoner of war in Stammlager XVII B [Stalag 17B], Krems, Austria, 1943-1945

      [Krems, Austria, 1945. 4to and smaller. Some toning, overall very good. STALAG 17B Identity documents and ephemera of American Air Force tail gunner Sgt. Gerald McDowell (1923-2002). McDowell and the flight crew of the B17 nicknamed Hell's Belle survived being shot down over Germany in 1943 and were interned at Stalag 17B in Austria. At the war's end, the camp guards marched American prisoners west to meet the U.S. Armored Division at Braunau and avoid the Soviet troops occupying eastern Austria. McDowell wrote a memoir of his war experiences, A Tail Gunner's Tale (1991). Stalag 17 gained notoriety from the 1953 Hollywood film of the same name staring William Holden. Comprising: 1. Camp identification document for Gerald McDowell, no. 100478, with two photographs (side and profile, with chalk board identity number). Old fold (splt repaired on verso). With corresponding stamped metal badge. Illustrated at p. 114 of his book 2. [Broadside:] Kgf.-M.-Stammlager XVII B. Teillager der Luftwaffe. Lagerführung. Gneixendorf, June 11th 1944. Warning ! 1.) Any P.o.W. touching or crossing warning wire during day-time will be fired upon immediately. [...] Stencil printed, signed in ink by "E-" above stencil legend: Hauptmann and 1st Lageroffizier. Old folds. Tipped onto card. Illustrated at p. 90 of his book. Of extreme rarity. 3. BATCH, D.B. [Pencil portrait of Gerald McDowell] Signed and dated lower right, D.B. Batch, P.O.W., 13/1/45, Krems, Austria. 9 x 6 inches. Tipped onto card. Framed. 4. Recipes for "D-Bar Spread", "Chocolate Cream Pudding", "Gallop", and other P.O.W. dishes, using D-Bars, C-Rations, "Jerry" sugar, etc. 5 small cards, closely written on versos of typed prisoner ID fiches (4 x 2 inches). Tipped onto card. Toned. [with:] 5. PHELPER, Ben H. Kriegie Memories [title from cover]. Photographs and handwritten text. [64] pp. [Aurora, Illinois: Printed by Barker printing Co., 1946]. Blue leather grained cloth, upper cover titled in gilt. OCLC: 85169189 (4 copies). Inscribed by the author on the first blank, "Jerry: May you always be free and happy. Good luck, Ben". Rare privately printed account of experiences inside Stalag 17B, by "Luftgangster No. 113204," with photographs of camp life and of the march towards liberation in May 1945. With a dozen annotations by McDowell, usually in red ink, indicating himself or other fellow inmates in the photographs, including a picture in the "Cardboard Playhouse" of McDowell in a dress, captioned in the text "a glamour shot of one of our boy actors ... Some of the lads sure did look good when they made up as a girl." Presentation copy of an astonishing illustrated narrative 6. MCDOWELL, Gerald. E. A Tail Gunner's Tale. [Vantage Press, 1991]. Review copy, as new.

      [Bookseller: James Cummins Bookseller]
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        Folge von 6 Leinwänden, unbetitelt. Je Leinwand ca. 96 x 70 cm.,

      - Die Leinwände zeitbedingt minimal gebräunt und teilweise mit leichten Lagerspuren (leichte Reibespuren, minimale Kratzer). - Te Laake war ein deutscher Künstler, der sich im Bereich der Malerei Kinetik und Skulptur betätigte. Er studierte von 1945 -1950 an der Hochschule für Bildende Künste, Berlin bei Karl Schmidt-Rottluff. Nach seinem Studium arbeitete er als freischaffender Künstler in Düsseldorf und auf Schloss Reinhartshausen. Neben der Tafelmalerei arbeitete er seit 1957 an kinetischen Objekten, bewegten Bildern und Skulputuren mit Uhrwerken. Ausserdem befasste er sich mit Themen der angewandten Kunst; so gestaltete er neben Uhren auch Sammlerporzellane. NUR Abholung im Laden, KEIN VERSAND ! A36./Auflage Sprache: de Gewicht in Gramm: 15000 [Attributes: First Edition; Signed Copy; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Buchhaus Stern-Verlag GmbH & Co. KG]
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        Carnegie Hall Program, SIGNED BY IGOR STRAVINSKY, of the New York Philharmonic, under the direction of Igor Stravinsky in an All-Stravinsky program

      New York: Alfred Scott Publisher, 1945. First Edition. 1 vols. 10-1/2 x 7 inches. Original self-wrappers, in fine condition. Carnegie Hall Stravinsky Program, Signed by the Composer Boldly signed by Stravinsky on the front cover under his photograph. It was at this concert that Stravinsky's Symphony in Three Movements, dedicated to the Philharmonic, was first performed.

      [Bookseller: James Cummins Bookseller]
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        Framed Signed Vintage Photograph

      1945 - Superb 5.25 x 3.5-inch black-and-white photo of the adoring couple gazing into each others' eyes -- no place, no date, circa 1945. Signed in full by both actors in the lower margin. Float-mounted in a window, matted in off-white, and set in a silver frame measuring 10 x 8 inches. Fine condition. [Attributes: Signed Copy]

      [Bookseller: Argosy Book Store, ABAA, ILAB]
 29.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  


        Oesterreichische Nachrichten. 1. Jahrgang, Juni bis Dezember 1945 (5 Hefte) / 2. Jahrgang, Januar bis August 1946 (7 Hefte). Organ der Frei-oesterreichischen Bewegung in der Schweiz.

      Frei-oesterreichische Bewegung in der Schweiz [FÖB], Zürich, 1945 - Zürich, Frei-oesterreichische Bewegung in der Schweiz [FÖB] 1945-1946. 4°. Bis auf die erste Nummer vollständige Serie, 12 Hefte, von 13 erschienenen, etliche mit teilweise entferntem Adressaten (Britschgi & Pinkus - mit dem gleichfalls der KP angehörigen Melchior Britschgi hatte Theo Pinkus zeitweise zusammengearbeitet, hier noch Froschaugasse 18). Redaktion Willi (Wilhelm) Frank, später Irene Sessler, Georg Rechnitz. Breycha-Vauthier 38; Halfmann 351 und ÖNB Datenbank nur bis 1946 Nr. 3; nicht in DEA, Maas u.a. Beiträge von Anneliese Fritz (Eulau, später Russische Stunde in Wien, hier: Oesterreich und die Juden, auch über Marcel Pellich), Willi Frank, später Mathematiker in Salzburg, Karl Paryla, Ernst Fischer, über Viktor Matejkas Rede in Zürich im Juni 1946, Auszug seines Karl-Kraus-Beitrags im 'Plan', Ferdinand Bruckner, Hans Weigel (u.a. über das Dachaulied 1938 von Jura Soyfer), Karl Schiffer, L. Ajchenrand (übersetzt von Sessler), Ilse Benedikt über drei Monate in Wien (November 1945), Maria Schanda, Franz Stoessl u.a. - Titel jeweils mit kleinem schweizer Archivstempel. Sprache: deu [Attributes: First Edition]

      [Bookseller: Georg Fritsch Antiquariat]
 30.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  


        "Seclusion"

      New York: Frank Lowe, 1945. Number 35 of 250 copies. Aquatint etching, hand colored, signed by the artist in pencil. 1 vols. 18-3/4 x 14 inches, on a larger sheet. Faint toning. Fine. One of the fine sporting prints published by Frank Lowe, continuing the series of prints published by the Derrydale Press from 1937 to 1942.

      [Bookseller: James Cummins Bookseller]
 31.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  


        Autograph Letter, signed ("Dylan Thomas")

      Magoda, New Quay, Cardiganshire, Wales, 1945. One half page, on octavo sheet. Horizontal fold for mailing, marginal tear (with signs of old repair, but no loss) touching one word, otherwise very good. Folding cloth case. To G.F. Hench (?), Esq., addressed as "Dear Sir." Thomas grants publication permissions for one of his great war poems, as well as a notable poem about the lead up to war: "Yes, you certainly have my permission to use to [sic] my two poems - 'Among Those Killed in the Dawn Raid' and 'The Hand That Signed' - for your anthology 'Poems for Europe.' The first poem was first printed in Life & Letters Today, but will be included in a new books of poems of mine Dent are to publish this year some time: so I don't know which you give acknowledgement to - Dent or L&L. Yours sincerely, Dylan Thomas." The forthcoming collection he alludes to would be published as DEATHS & ENTRANCES, but it appears that the anthology to which this relates did not come to fruition, at least under the title given.

      [Bookseller: James Cummins Bookseller ]
 32.   Check availability:     ABAA     Link/Print  


        El Salmon y Su Pesca en España [Including:] Rios Salmoneros de España [And:] Indicaciones para la Pesca Deportiva en Nuestros Principales Rios Salmoneroso

      Madrid: Direccion General del Turismo, 1945. Illustrated with 13 color plates of flies, 31 colored plans of rivers, and numerous photographs and line illustrations in text. 378, [4] pp. 1 vols. 4to. Burgundy cloth titled in gilt. Tear to cloth along top three inches of front joint, very good. Substantial and well-illustrated volume on salmon fishing in Spain, collecting the 1930 work by Marzales and reports on fishing conditions. Uncommon.

      [Bookseller: James Cummins Bookseller]
 33.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  


        El Capitán Veneno. Con Un Estudio Preliminar De Mauel De Montoliu. Ilustraciones De José M. Mallol Suzo. Iniciales y Finales De Capítulo Por Teodoro Miciano.

      Asociación De Bibliófilos De Barcelona, Barcelona 1945 - 152pp. y 9 láminas. Todo en muy buen papel de hilo. Perfecta estampación de Oliva de Vilanova a dos tintas. Edición de 100 ejemplares no venal. Ejemplar excelente en rama guardado en caja editorial con la lomera en pergamino. Size: 32 x 25,5 Cm. [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: BALAGUÉ LLIBRERÍA ANTIQUÀRIA]
 34.   Check availability:     IberLibro     Link/Print  


        The Pursuit of Love

      Hamish Hamilton, 1945, Hardcover, Book Condition: Very Good, Dust Jacket Condition: Good, 1st Editionthe solid blue first issue original jacket is worn and has small closed tears and fraying. the jacket is not price clipped. there are old tape residue marks beneath the jacket and there are light shadows of these at the front and rear bottom of the jacket. the book has no inscriptions and is well bound if a little cocked. Quantity Available: 1. Shipped Weight: Under 500 grams. Inventory No: 73ej.

      [Bookseller: Chapter 1 Books]
 35.   Check availability:     Bookzangle     Link/Print  


        Hiroshima Japan August 5th, 1945. Moto-Machi Military Reservation. Photographs taken 1 day before A-Bomb and on August 8th after the A-Bomb was Dropped

      [Japan] 1945 - An 12" X 11" photograph album with 49 photographs of various sizes taken on August 5th and on August 8th 1945, 3 days after the Hiroshima bombing in Japan. The first 37 photographs dated August 5th, 1945 range in size from small to very large and according to the hand written black pen notations were taken at the Moto-Machi Military Reservation, Horse Racing Track, Temples and in downtown Hiroshima. The last 12 photographs were dated August 8th "3-days after the attack". These photos show destruction and a few dead civilians. The note written in black pen on the last photo page states, "Photos taken by Yamahata Confiscated in Tokyo by U.S. Occupation Forces October 45." On August 6th, at 8:45am the American B-29 bomber "Enola Gay" dropped it bomb on Hiroshima killing approximately 70,000 people.

      [Bookseller: Americana Books ABAA]
 36.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  


        Hiroshima Japan August 5th, 1945 Moto-Machi Military Reservation Photographs taken 1 day before A-Bomb and on August 8th after the A-Bomb was Dropped

      [Japan], 1945. Photograph Album. Good. An 12" X 11" photograph album with 49 photographs of various sizes taken on August 5th and on August 8th 1945, 3 days after the Hiroshima bombing in Japan. The first 37 photographs dated August 5th, 1945 range in size from small to very large and according to the hand written black pen notations were taken at the Moto-Machi Military Reservation, Horse Racing Track, Temples and in downtown Hiroshima. The last 12 photographs were dated August 8th "3-days after the attack". These photos show destruction and a few dead civilians. The note written in black pen on the last photo page states, "Photos taken by Yamahata Confiscated in Tokyo by U.S. Occupation Forces October 45." On August 6th, at 8:45am the American B-29 bomber "Enola Gay" dropped it bomb on Hiroshima killing approximately 70,000 people.

      [Bookseller: Americana Books ABAA]
 37.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  


        Fototipia con firma autografa del musicista Pietro Mascagni (Livorno, 1863 - 1945).

      Fotografia a stampa su cartoncino rigido, in formato cm.22,7x15,7, con ritratto a mezzobusto e la dicitura "S.E. Pietro Mascagni - Accademico d'Italia". Al margine in basso, con data Genova, 4 gennaio 1934, è apposta la dedica autografa "All'egregio Prof.Fossati Gino, P.Mascagni". Firma ben chiara.

      [Bookseller: Studio Bibliografico Pera]
 38.   Check availability:     maremagnum.com     Link/Print  


        "St. Vedast / from Gutter Lane / 31-5-45 / Drawn in a devil of a wind": Original pencil rendering of this blitzed London church and surrounding buildings, including St. Paul's in the background, captioned and dated

      London, 1945. 13-1/2 x 10 inches. . . The name (in another hand) "H.A. Trier" printed in lower right corner. A very fine on-the-spot rendering of this London church

      [Bookseller: James Cummins Bookseller]
 39.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  

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