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Displayed below are some selected recent viaLibri matches for books published in 1867

        Signed by Author

      Nicaraguan poet (1867-1916), who initiated the Spanish-American literary movement known as Modernism, which flourished at the end of the 19th century. His real name was Felix Ruben Garcia Sarmiento.  First edition, published by Imprenta Pablo E. Coni & Sons, Buenos Aires, 1896, pages XVI and 176 are 16 x 11 cm, a copy signed with initials by the author, inscribed to his friend Lucio Berisso, dated in 1897. Bound in leather with golden ornaments, no original covers, in very good condition.

      [Bookseller: Tamino Autographs]
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        "Emelina" First Edition 1887

      Nicaraguan poet (1867-1916), who initiated the Spanish-American literary movement known as Modernism, which flourished at the end of the 19th century. His real name was Felix Ruben Garcia Sarmiento. First edition of his book "Emelina", written in collaboration with Eduardo Poirier, published by Imprenta y Litografía Universal, Chaigneau & Castro,  Valparaíso, Chile, 1887. Pages VIII and 204 in newsprint paper, no original covers, hard covers in blue leather with case. The rest of the book is in perfect condition. Front page signed and inscribed by Eduardo Poirier, trimmed at the top. See scans.

      [Bookseller: Tamino Autographs]
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        Signed by Author

      Nicaraguan poet (1867-1916), who initiated the Spanish-American literary movement known as Modernism, which flourished at the end of the 19th century. His real name was Felix Ruben Garcia Sarmiento. First edition of this book, signed by the author, Tipografia Revista de Archivos, Bibliotecas y Museos, Madrid, 1905. Page 174 is 18 x 24.5 cm, signed by author and inscribed to " Dr. Ernesto Bosch, homenaje de su casi-compatriota", and dated by him in Paris in 1905. Bound with hard covers, no original covers, in very good condition.

      [Bookseller: Tamino Autographs]
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        John Wisden's Cricketers' Almanack for 1867 - 1867 Original Wisden in Very Good Condition

      1867. As far as I am aware, this is the first 1867 in original covers to be offered on this site. The book itself is in excellent condition. The front and rear wrappers are very slightly darkened and with the odd mark as can be seen from the photographs. The wrappers are entirely complete without any chips or loss. There is a small closed tear to the front wrapper which has not resulted in any loss at all. Internally, the book is in fabulous condition for it's age. The pages are clean, original and unmarked. The book has had no restoration whatsoever. It is very rare to find a book of this age in entirely original condition with it's original wrappers. A super copy. We also have fabulous copies for 1864 and 1868 in original wrappers which we hope to list shortly.

      [Bookseller: Wisdenshop.com]
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        Two Manuscript Partial Letters Revealing the Hardships and Mercurial Nature of Gold Prospecting, as the Writer Partakes in the West Coast Gold Rush.

      Buller district [New Zealand] 1867 - Early New Zealand Gold Prospecting Manuscript Letters. 8vo. Two single leafs, each being two pages of a unique letter, each measuring approximately 11 x 18 cm. Both letters are lacking secondary leafs, some age-toning, otherwise in very good condition, and containing early primary source accounts of colonial New Zealand. The writer is unidentified, though his letters reveal some details which might aid in further research. Previous to this mining expedition, he had lived in Melbourne, either owning or working as an employee at a shop. He subsequently opened up his own shop in the Buller district [circa 1864-1866], which he sold at a loss, to try his hand for the second time at gold mining. He set out for gold with another man, presumably a brother, who he refers to simply as Joey and who had also worked in a merchant shop prior to digging for gold. He mentions "knocking about the Colonies" for 14 years, suggesting that he left Great Britain around 1853, but refers to himself as not old, suggesting that he may be in his mid-thirties or forties. Evidently, he was closely acquainted to James Ure Russell, a skilled sea captain and surveyor from Dunedin. [James Ure Russell was a Master Mariner, who in 1867 suffered a bankruptcy. Captain James Ure Russell is listed as a marine surveyor, the 1884 volume of Stone's commercial, Municipal and General Directory. of Dunedin and Suburbs.] He also mentions Mrs. Cowan as recently married, this possibly being Elizabeth Jane Cowan, née Qualtrough, who in 1866 married William Andrew Cowan an immigrant from Ireland who fought in the Waikato war. The couple lived at Pakuranga near Auckland until at least 1870 when their son, the famous writer James Cowan was born. They subsequently settled in Kihikihi. New Zealand's West Coast was the second-richest gold-bearing area of New Zealand after Otago. The West Coast Gold Rush was in full force from 1864 to 1867, creating population in an area which had previously been visited by only a scant few Europeans.

      [Bookseller: Voyager Press Rare Books & Manuscripts]
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        Civil War

      1867-1881. Interesting archive of four documents [1867-1881] relating to William See, evidently a slave freed during or shortly after the end of the Civil War and living in Texas. <br /><br />1. The earliest document dated January 1867, at Sterling, Texas is a lengthy manuscript document being an account for the purchase of supplies from July to September 1866, between <I>"William See, Freedman"</I> from I. H. Drennan and includes: whiskey, knives, shoes, blankets, sugar, flour, nails, an axe, boys shoes and assorted items. <br /><br />2. An autograph letter signed, four full pages, octavo, February 12, 1870, addressed to <I>"My dear cousin Cee"</I>, from Dinah Prescott in Washington, DC. She writes in very small part: <I>"I suppose luck has followed you as you are master of land... and prosper... you have not lost a bit of fondness for your relations... This is the first bit of silver I have seen since the war and I intend to get a piece of furniture with it... I must tell you of a misfortune in the family. On Christmas eve we had a visit from Aunt Bestsy's daughter Rose... she had been sick for a long while... after much suffering she died on the 2nd day of February and leaves me three helpless little children... give my love to Jane and the children and tell her not to let them forget us... "</I> <br /><br />3. An autograph letter signed, two pages, octavo, March 2, 1871, on House of Representatives letterhead, from C.G. George (?), possibly another relative, addressed to <I>"William See & Sis. He writes, mostly phonetically: ... "I will in forme you that (?) is daede and want you all to knact greive remembering save to all my peapel... I want to see the day come sure it will be hear when your cousins freedom is good as any man... "</I> <br /><br />4. Partly printed document, one page, 8" x 7", October 1, 1881, Calvert, Texas, being a receipt on "Fuller & Connaughton stationary for shovels, nails and baking powder sold to Wm. See, marked paid. <br /><br />An interesting insight into the lives of a Black family during the period immediately following the Civil War

      [Bookseller: University Archives]
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        Double Signed Photo

      Italian superstar conductor (1867-1957), and star German soprano (1888-1976) who specialized in the German repertoire. Beautiful double signed photo, 7.25 x 9.25 inches, in excellent condition - rare!

      [Bookseller: Tamino Autographs]
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        uvres de Gerbert, pape sous le nom de Sylvestre II, collationnées sur les manuscrits, précédées de sa biographie, suivies de notes critiques & historiques par A. Olléris.

      Clermont-Ferrand, F. Thibaud, Paris, Ch. Dumoulin, 1867, - in-4, [6]-CCV-606 pp., 6 pl. dépl., toile verte, couv. cons. (reliure postérieure).Cette édition des &#156;uvres de Gerbert est longtemps restée la plus complète et la plus fiable que l'on puisse trouver. Elle a été initiée par l'Académie des Sciences, Lettres et Arts de Clermond-Ferrand qui souhaitait couronner cette grande figure locale auvergnate, entrée dans l'histoire papale sous le nom de Sylvestre II. Humaniste avant la lettre, bon connaisseur de la culture orientale, il contribue à l'introduction des chiffres arabes en Occident et à la redécouverte de la pensée aristotélicienne. L'ouvrage est divisé en deux parties : la première est consacrée à sa vie, la seconde est constituée par l'ensemble de ses textes en latin, collationnés à partir des manuscrits originaux conservés dans différentes villes européennes. Sa coordination tout comme l'ensemble de l'appareil critique avait été confiée à Alexandre Olléris, doyen de la Faculté des Lettres de Clermont.

      [Bookseller: Librairie Historique F. Teissèdre]
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        West Coast Gold Rush Preceding the Great Migration

      Buller district [New Zealand], 1867. Two manuscript partial letters revealing the hardships and mercurial nature of gold prospecting, as the writer partakes in the West Coast Gold Rush. 8vo. Two single leafs, each being two pages of a unique letter, each measuring approximately 11 x 18 cm. Containing early primary source accounts of colonial New Zealand. The writer is unidentified, though his letters reveal some details which might aid in further research. Previous to this mining expedition, he had lived in Melbourne, either owning or working as an employee at a shop. He subsequently opened up his own shop in the Buller district [circa 1864-1866], which he sold at a loss, to try his hand for the second time at gold mining. He set out for gold with another man, presumably a brother, who he refers to simply as Joey and who had also worked in a merchant shop prior to digging for gold. He mentions "knocking about the Colonies" for 14 years, suggesting that he left Great Britain around 1853, but refers to himself as not old, suggesting that he may be in his mid-thirties or forties. Evidently, he was closely acquainted to James Ure Russell, a skilled sea captain and surveyor from Dunedin. [James Ure Russell was a Master Mariner, who in 1867 suffered a bankruptcy. Captain James Ure Russell is listed as a marine surveyor, the 1884 volume of Stone's commercial, Municipal and General Directory... of Dunedin and Suburbs.] He also mentions Mrs. Cowan as recently married, this possibly being Elizabeth Jane Cowan, née Qualtrough, who in 1866 married William Andrew Cowan an immigrant from Ireland who fought in the Waikato war. The couple lived at Pakuranga near Auckland until at least 1870 when their son, the famous writer James Cowan was born. They subsequently settled in Kihikihi. New Zealand's West Coast was the second-richest gold-bearing area of New Zealand after Otago. The West Coast Gold Rush was in full force from 1864 to 1867, creating population in an area which had previously been visited by only a scant few Europeans. The letters are written at "Buller" on 20 August 1867 and 30 December 1867, respectively. During the period 1853 to 1876, Buller District was administered as part of the short-lived Nelson Province. Trying to remain hopeful, the gold prospector is on his second venture (at least), this time in the Buller Gorge located in the northwest of the South Island, as he writes of the challenges and the rapidly changing trends of gold fever, first to his brother and sister in Melbourne. Having ventured out with a brother or friend named Joey, the two men excavated one shaft together, then worked separate spots not far apart, Joey trying proceeding "north of the Buller." The writer and Joey pushed on, digging for a year, according to the letter of December 1867, to no avail. Joey contemplated becoming a sea merchant on a Sydney-California route, while the writer yearned to return to the recipient of the second letter, Mima [Wilhemima?], possibly his wife, before making any firm decisions about future endeavours. The writer would have been panning for gold, as his adventure pre-dates the discovery of gold in quartz deposits in the region. In spite of his conclusion, "... the west coast is done... I must go make a fresh start in the world for this country is done...," in the hills east of Reefton and also at Lyell, in the Buller District, three years later in 1870, gold-bearing quartz lodes were discovered. Prior to this, only alluvial gold had been worked on the West Coast. This correspondence also pre-dates the Great Migration to New Zealand, which would begin four years later in 1871 and continue until 1885. The first wave of immigrants consisted of over 2700 labourers hired by the engineering firm of John Brogden and Sons to work on railway contracts. British civilians typically had reservations of making the move, owing to the bad reputation of New Zealand's climate, its dangerous 'natives' and the high costs and perils of the journey. To attract more immigrants from the United Kingdom, in 1873 the fare of £5 per adult was waived and the voyage was free. The London office promoted widely with public speakers as well as recruiters who spoke directly to booksellers, grocers, schoolteachers, and the like. By 1873 there were 53 New Zealand government immigration agents in England, 78 in Scotland, and 46 in Ireland. Excerpts from the letters: 20 August 1867. "... we are, and have been so unfortunate... hardly a week in one Place running about after Rushes and all to no Purpose..." "... we put up a store which we sold at a loss and we have been digging ever since... sunk one shaft 131 feet slabbed from Top to Bottom... we were over it 14 weeks... very hard times..." "I did not think it possible I should have such bad luck... since I left that shop in Melbourne... Joey is in a store at Fifty shillings per week Board and lodging, small wages for this Country but that is better than digging... where one gets gold, 20 goes without it... the west coast is done... " "... I might never see Victoria again after 14 years knocking about the Colonies to be worse off or as bad as the day I landed..." "There is a great many going to Carpentaria or Burk Town from here and if ever I raise Fifty Pounds I will soon be amonst the crowd, it is a new Country... this Country is done... the fact of the matter is the west coast is done." "... the least of a rush of any sort excites the people here, you would not believe how many hard up people are on this coast but we must live in hope yet." "Mrs. Cowan is married..." "James Ure Russell seemed very anxious about Andrew. I told him you could not afford to keep him... his address is Ure c/o Grocus Princes St Dunedin." "We are very unsettled, we don't know how long we may remain in one place, we are in good health." 20 December 1867. "I took to digging and which was the ruin of me... alas I have taken to it again, I have been Digging over a year & I have not got one ounce of gold. I have been very near a good rise but I might as well have been a mile away." "Joey has been as badly off as myself, he was out Prospecting north of the Buller but without success... had not one cent... went cutting firewood for a few days to make a Pound or two to take him to Hokiliki [Hokitika]... determined to leave the Digging he thinks he will ship for Sydney & from there to California if he can get a ship at Hokiliki." "I will soon be after him... but not before I see you again, if he gets a billit in Hokiliki at anything he will stop." "I will Rise and Shine yet..." End Excerpts. New Zealand's West Coast was the second-richest gold-bearing area of New Zealand after Otago. The West Coast Gold Rush was in full force from 1864 to 1867, creating population in an area which had previously been visited by only a scant few Europeans. Gold was found near the Taramakau River in 1864 by two Maori, Ihaia Tainui and Haimona Taukau. In 1865-66 gold was discovered at Okarito, Bruce Bay (the scene of the Hunt's Duffer gold rush), also around Charleston and along the Grey River. Miners became attracted to the West Coast following the prolific successes of the Central Otago Gold Rush and the Victoria Gold Rush, both having nearly finished yielding. By the end of 1864 there were an estimated 1800 prospectors on the West Coast, with many in the Hokitika area. The town of Hokitika was founded on gold mining in 1864, and by 1866 was the most populous settlement in all of New Zealand with over 25,000 inhabitants. In 1867 the rush began to decline, although gold mining continued on the Coast for some years. While many gold rush towns like Okarito, at one time the largest town on the Coast, and Charlestown, almost vanished when the miners moved on, in the three year period, principal towns were firmly established on the West coast. From 'Gold Mining', from An Encyclopaedia of New Zealand, edited by A. H. McLintock, originally published in 1966. : The Nelson Province constituted in 1853 under the New Zealand Constitution Act 1852 and covered the entire upper South Island, including all of the present-day Buller, Kaikoura, Marlborough, Nelson, Tasman as well as the Grey District north of the Grey River and the Hurunui District north of the Hurunui River. It was abolished, along with all other provinces, in 1876. The West Coast of Nelson Province was neglected and scarcely known for almost 20 years after the settlement of Tasman Bay. It first excited curiosity late in 1859 when small samples of alluvial gold were discovered in the Buller Gorge by a survey party under J. Rochfort. Vigorous exploratory activity followed in 1860 when provincial government parties were sent to find routeways, map the Buller coalfield, report on timber and mineral resources, and examine potential sites for settlement. A few miners from Golden Bay came by sea to the Buller in 1861 and won small quantities of gold from the river beaches, while in 1863 the open country in the central Grey Valley was taken up in three pastoral runs. The main inrush of the mining population took place in the extreme south of the province in July 1865 when diggers crossed from what were then the west Canterbury goldfields, spread up the Grey Valley and its numerous tributary creeks, and within 12 months were prospecting in the Inangahua Valley. In the spring of 1866 a large rush occurred to the terraces and beaches of the Buller coast plain. Three bustling mining camps, Charleston, Brighton, and Addisons, each of more than 1,000 people, sprang up within a few months. Charleston, with 1,800 people at the 1867 census, was then the second largest urban centre in Nelson Province. Until 1870 only alluvial gold had been worked on the West Coast but in that year gold-bearing quartz lodes were discovered in the hills east of Reefton and at Lyell. A steady flow of population set in to the Reefton district from the declining alluvial diggings and, despite great difficulties presented by the terrain and bush cover, machinery was established on the lodes by 1873. Quartz mining was a more stable basis for settlement than alluvial gold working.

      [Bookseller: Voyager Press Rare Books & Manuscripts]
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        Rime di Francesco Petrarca.

      Firenze: Successori le Monnier,, 1867. Con L'Interpretazione di Giacomo Leopardi. Migliorata in varj luoghi la lezione del testo, e aggiuntovi nuove osservazioni per cura dell'editore. Sesta impressione. Octavo. Contemporary brown half morocco (175 x 110 mm), spine gilt in compartments with titles direct, marbled sides with gilt rule, red speckled edges. Title page stub-mounted, presumably a cancel incorporating fictive impression statement to encourage sales. Spine darkened, extremities rubbed, endpapers spotted, crack to rear hinge, front blank with small splits at the top and bottom margin, good condition. Florentine edition of Petrarch's poetry inscribed by American poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807-1883) to his daughter, "Edith Longfellow with her father's love. January 30. 1876" on the first blank. The text is peppered with her own pencil annotations, in English and Italian. One such comments on Petrarch's line "in sul mio primo giovenile errore" with her wistful "22 years old" (though Edith had in fact just turned 23 at the time of the inscription). The inscription commemorates an education in and enjoyment of Italian poetry shared between father and daughter. After the tragic death of wife and mother Fanny, who accidentally set herself on fire and died of her burns in 1861, Longfellow found himself unable to compose poetry and turned his energies to the ambitious translation of Dante's Divina Commedia. Longfellow was the first American to translate the work, which was published in 1867. Edith was seven years old when her mother died, and her father found connection with his daughter through teaching her to read Italian poetry with him. This was described in the Biographical Sketch of Mrs Richard Henry Dana (Edith Longfellow) read by Mrs Mary Isabella Gozzaldi before the Cambridge Historical Society on 24 October 1916: "Before her marriage Edith Longfellow read Dante in the original with her father. This she carried out conscientiously for at least two years, enjoying the association with her father in his work, and he presented to her a volume of Petrarch inscribed in memory of those readings" (Cambridge Historical Society Publications XI, 55). Edith's husband Richard Dana was the author of the memoir Two Years Before the Mast (1840). The rear endpaper has a notecard tipped in with five lines of Petrarch written out in an unidentified hand. Poignantly, the lines concern the death of Petrarch's Laura.

      [Bookseller: Peter Harrington]
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        CHEFS-D'OEUVRE TOME SECOND CINNA-POLYEUCTE

      AUX BUREAUX DE LA PUBLICATION, Paris 1867 - BIBLIOTHEQUE NATIONALE Francese Volume privo della coperta, nastro adesivo al dorso, pagine con bruniture del tempo, fioriture e gore, legatura lenta, frontespizio con strappi e mancanze ai bordi, macchia scura come di caffè al frontespizio ed alle successive 15 pagine

      [Bookseller: Biblioteca di Babele]
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        An Alphabet of Monograms Comprising Upwards of 500 Designs fr the use of Engravers, Enamelers, Die-Sinkers, Chasers, Carvers, Modelers, Embroiderers, Herald-Painters & co

      Published by Day & Son, London 1867 - , over 500 drawrings, some of which are in colour, 24 pages of drawings, illustrated table of contents, and illustrated title page First Edition , rebound with original covers, good condition , blue stamped cloth with gilt decoration on the front cover and spine with blindstamped borders on the front and rear covers , 28.5 x 18.5 cm Hardback ISBN: [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Keoghs Books]
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        L' illustrazione universale 1867 - 1868

      MILANO: Sonzogno editore, 1867 - 1868. IED. Rilegato. BUONO. 28 38. USATO

      [Bookseller: Controcorrente Group srl BibliotecadiBab]
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        ARGUMENT OF HON EDWARDS PIERREPONT TO THE JURY, ON THE TRIAL OF JOHN H SURRATT FOR THE MURDER OF PRESIDENT LINCOLN

      Washington, 1867. 122pp. Dbd. Original printed front wrapper, detached and chipped. Later institutional stamps on titlepage. Light tanning. Good. Official printing of the arguments and cross-examinations made by lawyer Edwards Pierrepont in the prosecution of John Surratt for the conspiracy to assassinate Abraham Lincoln. Surratt was the last person to be submitted to military tribunal in connection with the assassination, and had evaded capture until 1867 by fleeing to Canada, England, and Italy before finally being captured in Egypt. The case ended with a hung jury and Surratt was freed; Pierrepont went on to be appointed a United States Attorney, then Attorney General during the Grant administration. McDADE 606. MONAGHAN 889.

      [Bookseller: William Reese Company - Americana]
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        ARGUMENT OF HON. EDWARDS PIERREPONT TO THE JURY, ON THE TRIAL OF JOHN H. SURRATT FOR THE MURDER OF PRESIDENT LINCOLN.

      Washington. 1867. - 122pp. Dbd. Original printed front wrapper, detached and chipped. Later institutional stamps on titlepage. Light tanning. Good. Official printing of the arguments and cross-examinations made by lawyer Edwards Pierrepont in the prosecution of John Surratt for the conspiracy to assassinate Abraham Lincoln. Surratt was the last person to be submitted to military tribunal in connection with the assassination, and had evaded capture until 1867 by fleeing to Canada, England, and Italy before finally being captured in Egypt. The case ended with a hung jury and Surratt was freed; Pierrepont went on to be appointed a United States Attorney, then Attorney General during the Grant administration. McDADE 606. MONAGHAN 889.

      [Bookseller: William Reese Company - Americana]
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        Slave Songs of the United States. (The first published collection of American folk music; and the first published collection of African-American music of any kind.)

      A. Simpson & Company, New York 1867 - Bound in blue-green textured cloth-covered boards with blind stamped rules bordering the edges. The spine is brightly stamped in gilt, italic lettering and the publisher&#146;s initials at the bottom. With light fading to the top 2" of the front boards; wear, and puckering to the cloth on the front boards. Touch of wear and light fraying to the top and bottom of the spine ends, not affecting the two horizontal gilt rules at the top and bottom ends. Wear to the corners. Scattered foxing to the paste-downs and the front and rear endpapers. With the exception of a few marginal smudges, very clean and tight throughout. The printed music section is exceptionally clean and bright. With two pages of "Directions for Singing." Sections of the Unites States covered in this work: Part I: South-Eastern Slave States, including South Carolina, Georgia, and the Sea Islands. Part II: Northern Slave States, including Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, and North Carolina. Part III: Inland Slave States, including Tennessee, Arkansas, and the Mississippi River. Part IV: The Gulf States, including Florida and Louisiana: Miscellaneous. An attractive copy of a rather scarce book: The first published collection of American folk music. Slave Songs of the United States is a collection of African American music consisting of 136 songs. Published in 1867, it was the first, and most influential, collection of spirituals to be published. The collectors of the songs were Northern abolitionists William Francis Allen, Lucy McKim Garrison, and Charles Pickard Ware. It is a "milestone not just in African American music but in modern folk history." It is also the first published collection of African-American music of any kind. The making of the book is described by Samuel Charters, with an emphasis on the role of Lucy McKim Garrison. (Wikipedia) First Edition with matching dates on the title and copyright pages. [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Brainerd Phillipson Rare Books]
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        Imprimerie Librairie Relieure Alfred Mame et Fils a Tours. Notice et Spécimens.

      Tours, Imprimerie Alfred Mame, 1867. In folio (cm. 39,5); legatura originale in tela rossa con impressioni a secco e titolo in oro al centro del piatto anteriore; pp. (6), 16 + 7 tavole fuori testo di cui una a doppia pagina + una carta " Spécimens des principales publications" + 56 tavole di "Spécimens" su carte differenti. Tagli dorati. Alfred Mame, 1811 - 1893, tipografo ed editore; ebbe per primo l'idea di raggruppare nella stessa casa editrice tutte le industrie legate alla realizzazione dei libri; stampa, rilegatura, vendite e spese di spedizione. Mame è stato uno dei principali proprietari di cartiere. Nel 1866 aveva 1500 dipendenti e nel 1863 stampò circa 6 milioni di libri. Axs

      [Bookseller: Libreria Bongiorno Paolo]
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        May-Day and Other Pieces

      Boston: Ticknor and Fields, 1867, 1867 Boston: Ticknor and Fields, 1867. First edition, first printing. Signed and inscribed by Emerson to his nephew J. Haven Emerson, dated "1 May 1867" (BAL lists three copies that have been seen inscribed on that date). Publisher's white linen "gift binding" with fern illustration gilt-stamped to front board and spine lettered in gilt, top edge gilt, dark brown-coated endpapers. A very good copy with some toning and light wear to extremities, some light soiling to boards, both hinges starting. From the library of Pulitzer Prize winning author Kenneth Silverman. May-Day and Other Pieces is one of two small volumes of poetry published by this Transcendentalist writer. Like much of Emerson's work, the poems in this work center around the beauty of the natural world. Notably, although Emerson's body of work in poetry is small, he remains one of the major figures who influenced American poetry throughout the nineteenth century. Chiefly a biographer, Professor Kenneth Silverman co-directed the American Civilization program at NYU, and won not only the Pulitzer but also the Bancroft Prize for his work The Life and Times of Cotton Mather. Other notable works of his include biographies of Edgar Allan Poe and Samuel F. B. Morse. A magician himself, he also profiled the life of Harry Houdini. . First Edition. Hard Cover. Very Good.

      [Bookseller: B & B Rare Books, Ltd., ABAA]
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        Capture of the Mexican Steamers Marques of Havana & Genl. Miramon Admiral Marin Comdg. at Anton Lizardo, on the night of the 6th of March 1860, by the U. S. Ship Saratoga with detachments from the U. S. Ships Savannah & Preble, on board of her tow boats the American Steamers Wave and Indianola, T. Turner, U. S. Navy Commanding

      Boston: J.H. Bufford's Lith, 1867. First edition. Good, edges chipped not affecting image or text, uneven toning, a few dampstains, shadow line, still a sharp image.. 15 1/2 x 19 1/5 image and text on 17 x 21 inch sheet. The Battle of Anton Lizardo, off Veracruz, played an important role in ending Mexico's Reform War by denying the rebel conservatives much needed weaponry, and thus leading to a liberal victory. The USS Saratoga, formerly of the Far East Squadron under Perry, now commanded by Thomas Turner, had been cruising in the Caribbean Sea and the Gulf of Mexico during the Reform War. The two Mexican steamers had defected from the Mexican Navy in support of conservative rebels, and had been declared a pirate by the ruling liberal government, thus allowing the U.S. ships to attack, capturing the General Miramon and running the Marques of Havana aground after hand to hand combat. The original sketch was by Lt. Pierce Crosby (1824-1899) who would go on to become a rear Admiral. It was transferred to stone by John Perry Newell (1831-1898) who was known for his popular prints of ships and town views in the late 1850s and had gotten his start, as many artists did, studying lithography with John H. Bufford's firm. "The significance of John Henry Bufford (1810-70) in the history of the graphic arts in America is threefold. He was a prolific and successful lithographic artist, a major printer and publisher of prints, and an employer, colleague, and teacher of sorts of a number of notable American artists, Winslow Homer among them, who found in his shop the barebones equivalent of a school of art. Bufford was among the earliest recruits to the new medium of lithography in America, in 1829 joining the Pendleton brothers, who pioneered the process in Boston. He remained a lithographer for the rest of his life, first as an artist and then as a printer and publisher. The length of his intimate association with both the art and the business of the medium was matched (and exceeded) by only one other person who could trace his roots to the founding years of be 1820s: Nathaniel Currier ( 1813-88)," David Tatham: "Henry Bufford American Lithographer" in Proceedings of the American Antiquarian Society. 86 (1): p.47. The image was printed after 1860 but before 1870, most likely in 1867 when Bufford was on his own after leaving off business with his sons (1866) but before joining them again (1868). Goodspeed's in 1933 called the print "Very rare. A copy listed in a New York auction catalogue of a few years ago was described as one of four known copies." They were most likely referring to the American Art Association auction, "American Prints," Apr. 7, 1926, specifically lot 158 which also served as the frontispiece,"Tradition that the stone was destroyed after four prints were made seems to be borne out by the fact that neither the History Section of the Navy Department, the Library of Congress nor the Naval History Society of New York has a copy." It also appeared at two Anderson Gallery Auctions, 1904 and 1907, which oddly enough, if they were all unique copies, would add to four. OCLC locates no copies, but there is one at the Mariners' Museum Library. AAS has a slightly smaller print of the Saratoga at anchor, after the battle, by the same artist, lithographer, and firm.

      [Bookseller: Kaaterskill Books, ABAA/ILAB]
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        Ninive et l'Assyrie.

      Paris: Imprimerie Imperiale -70-67 1867 - 3 volumes, folio (63 x 46 cm): (I) [a]2, A4, 1-276, (II) [a]2, 1-276, (III) [a]2, A4; (I) [iv], viii, 324 pp., (II) [iv], 323, [1 (blank)], (III) [iv], viii; (III) 87 plates including map, of which several coloured or tinted; tall set, complete with half titles. Light dust-stains and spotting to titles, occasional spotting, modern half calf gilt, a very handsome set. Only 200 copies printed. A remarkable record of the ruins of this area including the palace at Khorsabad. This monumental and splendid work was commissioned by the Emperor Napoleon III, from Place who was consul general. It is an Imperial work on the scale of the earlier Napoleonic publications. After Emile Botta's excavations at Khorsabad, the French largely neglected the site. British interest in Assyria was considerable and this led to the leaders of the Louvre to contact Place, at that time French Consul in Mosul, to resume excavations at the site. The British, particularly Rawlinson, were occupied with spectacular excavations at Kuyunjik, leaving Place to get on with his work largely unhindered by Anglo-French rivalries. Indeed Place and Rawlinson enjoyed a very good relationship, despite opposition from the British consul, Hormuzd Rassam. Place's finds were magnificent and would have overshadowed what Botta had already brought to the Louvre. They included reliefs, two gigantic bulls and other very large sculptures. He opened seventy-eight rooms at the palace and excavated more than 9000 square metres. However the transport of the discoveries was a disaster and nearly all were lost through shjipwreck and looting. [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Shapero Rare Books]
 20.   Check availability:     ZVAB     Link/Print  


        LI MONUMENTI PIU' CELEBRI DI ROMA ANTICA E MODERNA. Disegnati dal vero ed incisi dai migliori artisti.

      Roma, Datri, 1867. Album oblungo in-8 gr. (mm. 270x370), mz. tela (piccole manc., piatti abrasi) con una importante raccolta di 49 (su 67) tavole. Sono finissime vedute, incise su rame + una pianta (più volte ripieg.) con le “vestigie di Roma antica per servire gli annali della stessa città, compilati da Luigi Pompili Olivieri”. Le belle vedute dei principali monumenti romani sono introdotte da un pregevole frontespizio, pure inc. in rame, che raffigura la lupa che allatta Romolo e Remo. Cfr. ICCU. Tre tavole sono staccate, altrimenti esemplare ben conservato.

      [Bookseller: Libreria Malavasi sas]
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        THE PRAYERS OF THE DAY OF ATONEMENT VOL I (OF 2)

      Bombay : Bene-Israel Improvement Society(1867). 1st Edition. Period boards, lacking front board. 8vo. Volume 1 of 2 ; 21 cm. In Marathi with English Title Page. The very first publication of the Yom Kippur Seder in Marathi. Translated from the Hebrew into Marathi by Joseph Ezekiel Rajpuker. "Rajpuker (1834-1905) (was a) scholar of the Bene Israel community in Bombay. After studying at the Free Assembly School, he became a teacher in the David Sassoon Benevolent Institution, Bombay, in 1856 and after five years its headmaster, a post which he occupied for 40 years. In 1871 he was appointed Hebrew examiner at the University of Bombay, which elected him a fellow in 1879. A master of Hebrew as well as of Marathi, the vernacular of Bombay, he translated over 20 works of the Hebrew liturgy and many English works of Jewish interest into Marathi. His translations of Hebrew liturgical works include the Daily Prayer Book (1889, 1924) , the mahzor, piyyutim, and selihot. In 1887 he published Kuttonet Yosef - a handbook of Hebrew abbreviations, a Hebrew grammar in Marathi, a Hebrew primer for children, and prayers for various occasions. " (Jewish Virtual Library, 2016) SUBJECT(S) : Judaism -- Liturgy. Yom Kippur. OCLC lists just 6 copies worldwide. None in New York, None in Europe, None in India. Original Price "1 ¼ Rupee" is printed on English title page. Period Inscription on title page. Some wear to pages throughout, and minor foxing, but the text is very readable. Overall good+ condition. (SEF-55-11)

      [Bookseller: Dan Wyman Books]
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        The History of Scotland

      Blackwood, Edinburgh 1867 - 7 vols (including index). Contemporary full calf boards and later spines. Burn damage to one board. Neat gilt stamps on front boards A fine and handsome set of this scarce work [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Anah Dunsheath RareBooks ABA ANZAAB ILAB]
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        Sämmtliche Werke. In chronologischer Reihenfolge von G. Hartenstein. Mit 3 lithographischen Tafeln. 8 Bde.

      Leipzig Voss u 1868 1867 - Ca. 4700 S. HLdr. m. Rverg. u. 2 RSch. (minimal berieben u. bestoßen, Ldr. mit zarten Abschabungen). Goed. V, 2, 1, 3. - "Kants ganzen Entwicklungsgang bringt besser zur Anschauung die neue, zweite Hartensteinsche Ausgabe." (Goed.) - Die erste Ausgabe von Hartenstein erschien 1838-39, die jedoch noch nicht in chronologischer Reihenfolge aufgebaut war. - Papierbedingt teils minimal gebräunt, Vorsätze leicht, sonst teils minimal stockfleckig, nur in Bd. 8 wenige Bleistift-Anstreichungen (gut radierbar), Exlibris verso Deckel, NaV. [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Daniel Osthoff]
 24.   Check availability:     ZVAB     Link/Print  


        1.Juvenalis Satiren,3 Bändchen - übersetzt von Dr.Werner Hertzberg u.Dr.W.S.Teuffel. 2.Persius Flaccus: Satiren .Einleitung,Übersetzung,Erklärung von Dr.W.S.Teuffel. 3.Die Gedichte von Catullus,i.d.Versmaßen der Urschrift übersetzt v.Hertzberg/Teuffel., - Römische Dichter in neuen metrischen Übersetzungen, hgg.von C.N.v.Osiander u.G.Schwab.

      Stuttgart, Verlag der J. B. Metzler\'schen Buchhandlung 1867. 1844. 1862. \"Pappband der Zeit mit montiertem / handbeschriebenem Rüxjwbachild, marmoriertem Dreiseitenschnitt; ( 13,50 x 11 cm), 346 S. (mit Einleitung u.ausführlichen Anmerkungen) / 199 (Vorwort) / 152 (Anmerkungen) Seiten, fast durchgängig braunfleckig ; Kanten u.Ecken berieben und leicht beschabt; Exemplar aus dem Bestand des Altphilologen Prof. Günthner (kleiner Namenszug auf dem Vorsatz) Keine Stempel, fester Einband.\" in deutscher Sprache Versandkostenfreie Lieferung

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat am Flughafen]
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        Corso completo di diritto civile italiano comparato.

      Napoli -Milano, De Pascale - Vallardi, 1867. 12 volumi In-8, pp. LXXIII, 1, 292; XIV, 270, 4; X, 286, 4; 449, 7; XI, 420; XIX, 288; VIII, 252; 445; IX, 362; 446; 503; 274; legatura in tela con titolo in oro al dorso.

      [Bookseller: Libreria Antiquaria Baduel]
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        (das ist: Charles Lutwidge Dodgson) Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland.

      London (MacMillan), 1867. 9. Tsd. 5 Bl., 192 S. mit Frontispiz und forty-two illustrations by John Tenniel. OLn mit goldgeprägtem Rückentitel, Deckelfiletten und Goldschnitt sowie zwei goldgeprägten Deckelvignetten. Rücken unter Verwendung des alten Bezugs erneuert, etwas fleckig, Block gebrochen, dadurch Bindung und einzelne Lagen gelockert, stellenweise etwas finger- und braunfleckig, interessante Widmung der Zeit auf Vortitel. Insgesamt gutes Ex. Seltene frühe Ausgabe. – Vgl. PMM 354. – Die kongeniale Umsetzung der skurrilen Abenteuer durch Tenniels Illustrationen machen das Gesamtwerk zu einem Meilenstein in der Kinderliteratur. Versand D: 6,00 EUR

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Bebuquin]
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        Autograph Letter Signed

      NJ: np, 1867. HISTORICALLY IMPORTANT LETTER BY GENERAL GRANT DEMONSTRATING HIS COMMITMENT TO PROTECTING THE FREED SLAVES AND THEIR RIGHT TO VOTE. In early May, 1867, "a vicious race riot in Memphis resulted in forty-eight blacks killed, seventy injured, and five black women raped in three days. On May 12, Major General George Stoneman reported to Grant from Memphis that the unrest was touched off when white policemen arrested two 'boisterous' black men and hauled them to the station house, whereupon black bystanders wounded a police office with a pistol shot. In retaliation, police gathered a mob of white citizens, some outfitted in Confederate uniforms, and 'proceeded to shoot, beat, and threaten'" every black person they met. "The next day, these white vigilantes set ablaze black schools, churches, and homes, one black witness alleging that white arsonists chanted calls for a 'white man's government' as they spread mayhem. 'Thank heaven the white race are once more rulers of Memphis,' the Memphis Avalanche editorialized with satisfaction."Grant empaneled a body to probe the Memphis riots," concluding that the civil authorities permitted the atrocities and that "the only protection afforded black citizens came from a small body of federal troops." Grant, as Lieutenant General, empowered the military to hold the civil authorities responsible until there was "satisfactory evidence that justice will be done."It was with this in mind - that the local authorities in Memphis could not be trusted to protect the black people - that Grant approached the 1867 election for Tennessee governor, slated for August 1. In February 1867, the Tennessee legislature passed a law granting newly freed black men the right to vote, a full three years before the Fifteenth Amendment was passed nationally, and the 1867 election for governor would be one of the first elections in the South where blacks would be allowed to vote.On July 22, 1867 - a week before the election - Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton sent a telegraph to Grant, reporting "Despatches have just been received from General Thomas strongly indicating that there is danger of a formidable and bloody riot at Memphis on the first of August, the day of election arising from an organization to prevent negroes voting and the determination of the colored men to vote... In my judgement the emergency is one demanding the most prompt efficient and discreet action on the part of the military authorities of the government, and that the national peace may depend on the manner in which it is treated."Grant responded with this letter from July 23 to General George Henry Thomas (received by Thomas as a telegram):July 23rd 1867 Maj. Gen. G.H. Thomas, Louisville Ky.Go to Memphis in person and remain there until after election. Let it be felt that where the Military is law must prevail and the guilty be punished. Do not wait for a riot to take place but use the Military vigorously to prevent one commencing.[signed] U.S. Grant GeneralGrant's plan to send the military worked and the election proceeded without any major violent incidents.As president, Grant continued his support of black suffrage. His "main mission was to settle unfinished business from the war by preserving the Union and safeguarding free slaves" and he reported to Congress that the "adoption of the 15th Amendment [giving black men the right to vote]... constitutes the most important event that has occurred, since the nation came into life."Sources: Ron Chernow, Grant; The Papers of Ulysses S. Grant Vol. 17.Note: As was standard for letters to be sent by telegram, "Cipher" is written at the top and "Copied" (in another hand) at the bottom. Grant wrote the letter and then handed it off to be coded and then sent ("copied") as a telegram.Long Branch, NJ: 1867. One 7.5x9.5 sheet of lined "Stetson House" letterhead. Beautifully framed (archivally and with museum glass) with an early photograph of Grant. Framed size: approx. 19x16 inches. Old tape stain to top of letterhead, otherwise fine with Grant's handwriting strong.A MAGNIFICENT PEICE OF HISTORY UNDERSCORING ONE OF THE MOST IMPORTANT ASPECTS OF GRANT'S LEGACY. Very Good.

      [Bookseller: The Manhattan Rare Book Company]
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        1867 Arabic Bible - Mark Twain Association Copy (See Description)

      - Arabic language bible gifted to the passengers of the SS Quaker City in Sept 1867. The 1867 SS Quaker City Excursion to the Holy Land was famed by Mark Twain who filed travel reports for various publications and later (1869) published 'The Innocents Abroad'. In Sept 1867 the Quaker City with 71 passengers arrived in Beirut, Syria and visit to American Mission Press was scheduled. At the visit each of the passengers (not all passengers attended) received a Mission Press Printing of the Arabic New Testament. Translation was completed in 1860 (NT) and 1865 (OT) by Cornelius Van Allen Van Dycke. Each Bible had English language dedication page pasted in rear of book (Arabic reading starts from the rear) that read: Presented by the American Mission to Name of passenger (J.H. Bond) Handwritten in Arabic passenger by the steamer Quaker Coity Berut, Syria, September 1867 handwritten ink on lower left. [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Cross and Crown Rare Books]
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        Le Livre de cuisine par Jules Gouffé. Comprenant la cuisine de ménage et la grande cuisine. Avec 25 planches imprimées en chromo-lithographie et 161 vignettes sur bois dessinées d&#146;après nature par E. Ronjat.

      Librairie de L. Hachette et Cie (Imprimerie Générale de Ch. Lahure) 1867 - In-4 (27 x 18 cm), demi-chagrin rouge, dos à quatre nerfs, caissons de filets à froid, monogramme couronné doré en pied du dos et à froid sur le premier plat, plats de toile chagrinée rouge, tranches mouchetées (reliure d&#146;époque). Edition originale, illustrée de 25 planches hors-texte en couleurs et de vignettes gravées sur bois dans le texte, d&#146;après E. Ronjat. (traces sur les plats voir photos, quelques frottements et défauts d&#146;usage, frontispice en partie détaché, quelques rousseurs sur les planches couleurs, quelques feuillets mal alignés). [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: H. PICARD ET FILS, depuis 1902]
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        Imprimerie Librairie Relieure Alfred Mame et Fils a Tours. Notice et Spécimens.

      - Tours, Imprimerie Alfred Mame, 1867. In folio (cm. 39,5); legatura originale in tela rossa con impressioni a secco e titolo in oro al centro del piatto anteriore; pp. (6), 16 + 7 tavole fuori testo di cui una a doppia pagina + una carta ? Spécimens des principales publications? + 56 tavole di ?Spécimens? su carte differenti. Tagli dorati. Alfred Mame, 1811 - 1893, tipografo ed editore; ebbe per primo l?idea di raggruppare nella stessa casa editrice tutte le industrie legate alla realizzazione dei libri; stampa, rilegatura, vendite e spese di spedizione. Mame è stato uno dei principali proprietari di cartiere. Nel 1866 aveva 1500 dipendenti e nel 1863 stampò circa 6 milioni di libri. Axs

      [Bookseller: LIBRERIA PAOLO BONGIORNO]
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        May-Day and Other Pieces

      Boston: Ticknor and Fields, 1867 - Boston: Ticknor and Fields, 1867. First edition, first printing. Signed and inscribed by Emerson to his nephew J. Haven Emerson, dated "1 May 1867" (BAL lists three copies that have been seen inscribed on that date). Publisher's white linen "gift binding" with fern illustration gilt-stamped to front board and spine lettered in gilt, top edge gilt, dark brown-coated endpapers. A very good copy with some toning and light wear to extremities, some light soiling to boards, both hinges starting. From the library of Pulitzer Prize winning author Kenneth Silverman. May-Day and Other Pieces is one of two small volumes of poetry published by this Transcendentalist writer. Like much of Emerson's work, the poems in this work center around the beauty of the natural world. Notably, although Emerson's body of work in poetry is small, he remains one of the major figures who influenced American poetry throughout the nineteenth century. Chiefly a biographer, Professor Kenneth Silverman co-directed the American Civilization program at NYU, and won not only the Pulitzer but also the Bancroft Prize for his work The Life and Times of Cotton Mather. Other notable works of his include biographies of Edgar Allan Poe and Samuel F. B. Morse. A magician himself, he also profiled the life of Harry Houdini. [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: B & B Rare Books, Ltd., ABAA]
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        Under Two Flags

      Philadelphia: J. B. Lippincott, 1867. First Edition. Cloth. Very good. 1st American edition, 1st binding in charcoal cloth with 1867 date on the title page, and 8 pages of ads at the end listing Beatrice Boville as "in press" and with Dickens' novels listed only up to Great Expectations. Light wear, a very good copy, rather scarce, and the London edition (also 1867) has been a rarity for 100 years.

      [Bookseller: Biblioctopus]
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        The Chromolithograph: A Journal of Art, Literature, Decoration, and the Accomplishments Illustrated with Chromolithographs

      London: The Chromolithograph (Zorn & Co.), 1867-1869. Weekly issues from Nov. 23, 1867 to Mar. 20, 1869, excluding Feb. 22 to Jun. 27 when no issues produced. Hardcover. Very good. 2 vols. bound in one; iv, 378; 354 p. 29 cm. 150 mounted lithographs and chromolithographs. Some b&w drawings within the text. Half leather with marbled paper boards. Respined with original spine laid on top. Hinges repaired internally. Some offsetting from plates. P. 240 in first volume stuck to the plate opposite. Lacks last issue of March 27, 1869. A short-lived periodical by a short-lived publisher. Zorn & Co. have only one other known publication, The Floral Decoration of Churches at Christmas by W. G. and G. A. Audsley. An interesting variety of articles on artistic themes including exhibition reviews, artist bios, and illustrated lessons. Also articles on matrimony, witchcraft, and a few other non-artistic topics. The Audsleys contributed articles on Illumination. 2 p. index at front.

      [Bookseller: Attic Books]
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        Lett&apos;s Diary or Bills Due Book, and Almanack, for 1867, completed in Manuscript.

      Letts, Son , & Co. 1867 Printed text preceding and following the diary pages, one day per page. Original dark blue-black cloth, affected by damp cloth lifting, otherwise sound.This diary was used by Osman Latrobe of 45, later 7, Clarges Street, Piccadilly, London, primarily to record, in detail, experiments and trials with various improvements to his yacht, the &apos;Ross Winans&apos; and another named the &apos;Walter T. Winans&apos;. Latrobe, 1835-1915, had been a Confederate captain under General Lee in in the American Civil War, but soon after defeat in 1865 removed to London. In Britain he turned his attention to various improvements to ships. He witnessed the applications for patents by Thomas Winans of Baltimore and Louisa Winans of Clarges Street in 1866 for an improved steam engine and also couplings for propellor shafts, and in 1868 for an improved condenser. In this diary, Latrobe records the experiments, particularly with propellor blades, on nearly all pages up to 23rd August when the yacht is in dock. At the beginning of the diary, Latrobe provides a &apos;Synopsis of Communications&apos; by telegraph to W.T. Winans concerning the trials. Latrobe was son of a railway engineer & lawyer, distinguishing himself in the Civil War. At the battle of Fredericksburg he &apos;enjoyed the sight of hundreds of dead Yankees. Saw much of the work I had done in the way of severed limbs, decapitated bodies, and mutilated remains of all kinds, doing my soul good. Would that the whole northern army was such and I had my hand in it.&apos; He ended the war as lieutenant colonel. Although he was &apos;prominent&apos; in society at Baltimore after the war, he clearly came to England within a year or so - and married in 1871 in London. He was back in Baltimore in 1884 & Mrs Osman Latrobe is referenced as a &apos;prominent society woman&apos; in newspaper reports of 1888. Ross Winans, 1796–1877,) one of the earliest US multi-millionaires - was an inventor and designer of steam locomotives and father of Thomas and William - both engineers.

      [Bookseller: Jarndyce Rare Books]
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        NEW SOUTH WALES NATIONAL DIRECTORY for 1867-68. Including Sydney, Bathurst, Maitland, Newcastle, Goulburn, Forbes, Armidale Tamworth, Grafton, Murrurundi, Muswellbrook, Singleton, Mudge, etc.

      Sydney, Walter Jameson Meyer, [1866], 1867. 8vo, approximately, 215 x 140 mm, 8½ x 5½ inches, large folding map, pages: xvi pages of adverts, 1 advert is a large folding plate, [1], 1-640 followed by 63 pages of adverts, first and last advert page pasted down on pastedowns, losing first advertisment, original publisher's navy blue cloth, gilt title to spine, blind decoration to covers. Binding slightly rubbed, folding map has some neat repairs to blank side, no loss of image (the map paper is delicate and needs care when opening), otherwise a very good copy. See: National Library of Australia's Bib ID 1720838. MORE IMAGES ATTACHED TO THIS LISTING, ALL ZOOMABLE, FURTHER IMAGES ON REQUEST. POSTAGE AT COST.

      [Bookseller: Roger Middleton P.B.F.A.]
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        NOTICE ET SPÃ&#137;CIMENS.,

      Tours, 1867. - 10 1/2 x 15 1/2. Sixteen-page history + 7 engravings (one double) by Pannemaker of this publisher's printshop, bindery, and bookshop. Followed by 53 pages of plates, many with tissue guards, showing their principal publications. Publisher's red morocco-grained cloth gilt, all edges gilt. Occasional foxing, corners & spine have wear, upper corner bumped, otherwise very good. Sumptuous illustrated folios --including the first publication of Dorà 's Bible illustrations--to tiny books of prayers printed in gold were painstakingly produced. Mame employed about 1000 persons, for whom he established profit sharing. A third of the employees' share was distributed every year; the balance constituted a pension fund for those of 20 years' service. Bigmore & Wyman estimated that 60,000 francs a year were devoted to the fund. Prepared for the Exposition of 1867, these specimens are beautifully printed on a variety of fine papers various techniques of illustration [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Veatchs Arts of the Book, ABAA]
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        ISRAELITISCHES GEBETBUCH FÜR DIE HUSLICHE ANDACHT

      Baltimore : Wm. Volmner,(1867). 1st edition. Original publisher's binding, 12mo, 264, 11 pages ; 19 cm. In German. Wachs 153, Deinard 247, Singerman 2019. Goldman 54: "After publishing [Avodat Yisrael] for his congregation in 1864, Szold issued [Higayon lev]. This supplement for domestic worship contains prayers and other materials for private and family use, including: a Haggadah; prayers for women and children; private devotional prayers for various occasions; abbreviated daily, Sabbath and festival liturgies; selections from Pirkei Avot/Ethics of the Fathers; hymns; an essay on the Jewish calendar; the Decalogue with annotations; and other religious literature. A later edition was edited by Marcus Jastrow, who introduced many changes. " SUBJECT (S) : Jewish calendar. OCLC lists only 4 copies worldwide (Towson, HUC, Gratz, NLI) , none in New York. Scarce and important. Original boards somewhat worn, hinge repaired, bookplate, solid about Good+ condition.

      [Bookseller: Dan Wyman Books]
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        Reisen und jagden in Nord Ost Afrika 1864 1865

      First edition. 2 vols. Frontispieces (one coloured), 3 coloured plates, 4 maps (one coloured folding) & one double-page plate. 8vo. Original cloth, extremities rubbed, some occasional spotting, library stamps on title pages, in modern quarter morocco bookform box, spine gilt. [4], 284; Berlin,

      [Bookseller: Maggs Bros. Ltd.]
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        Constitution and By-Laws of the Mohawk Base Ball Club, of the City of Brooklyn, N.Y.

      New York: W. A. Clayton, Printer and Bookbinder, 105 Maiden Lane, 1867. Very Good. Presumed first edition. 16mo. Stitched sheets. [4], 12pp. Small errata slip laid in, correcting an omission to the fourth part of Article II, Section Four of the Constitution. Old tidelines along right margin, extending partly into the text, but all legible. Officers and committee members for the year 1867 are listed on an early page, and include A.C. Davis, President, E.W. Crittenden, First Vice President, Wm. Shipman, Second Vice President, and A.C. Smith, Third Vice President.The small pamphlet is accompanied by a manuscript letter, creased from folding, measuring 8.75" x 11" and composed of approximately 120 words, from C. W. Fancher of Wyckoff, N.J. dated in 1946. Fancher offers for sale a sepia picture of the Brooklyn Dodgers Base Ball Club and certificate of membership in the National Association of Base Ball Players dated Dec. 13, 1865 (not present here) to a Mrs. Blair, presumably Mrs. Natalie Knowlton Blair (1887-1951), a well-known collector of Americana. In addition he states: "I also have the little book of rules that goes with the picture," and on the verso he has sketched a pencil drawing of the title page, with an accompanying note, "The little book is in splendid condition and worth more than I ask for the picture."The constitution and by-laws laid out for the club included a list of fines for various offenses by club members, including "for rude, ungentlemanly, or discourteous language, manners or conduct at any meeting, game or reception of the Club, not more than one ($1.00) dollar for each offence." The designated "Nines" were to be prepared to play the games for which they were selected, and to be on time or face a fine. The team uniform was described as "a blue cap with the letter 'M' within a white star on top, a white jacket, and blue pants with white cord." The game of baseball increased in popularity in the 1850s, though it continued to be an 'amateur' sport for the next few years. According to Harold Seymour's Baseball: The Early Years, [NY: 1960], p.24: "Unquestionably, baseball was spreading rapidly in the New York area. In 1856 'Porter's Spirit of the Times' said that every available green plot within ten miles of the city was being used as a playing field. Brooklyn, already the 'city of churches,' was fast becoming the 'city of baseball clubs'... ." In 1867, the 10th Annual Convention of the National Association of Base Ball Players was held in Clinton, New York. Among the list of attendees were the Hon. A.C. Davis and A.C. Smith, of the Mohawk, Brooklyn.An article published in the Brooklyn Daily Eagle in March 1917 gives some particulars on the history of the Mohawk Base Ball Club: "On the Mohawk Club the late William C. Hudson, formerly of The Brooklyn Eagle, alternately played shortstop and pitched.... Left to right: Abe Silleck, first base; Sam Delisser, shortstop; A. Steiner, left field; Jacob Steiner, right field; Eugene, captain; Kelly, pitcher; Wash Weeks, catcher; William Forker, second base; Chauncey Ryder, center field. F. O'Connor, third base.... In 1867 ... O'Connor [State Senator Eugene F. O'Connor] became captain of the Mohawk Club of Brooklyn, which made the famous first 'shut-out' on the Fourth of July, in that year, in a game with the Earnests of Riverhead. L. I., the score being 62 to 0, in nine innings. Not an error was made in this game." That article included an interview with O'Connor where he reminisced about the club saying: "We played baseball in those days for the glory of it. None of us got a dollar for our services. We even bought our own uniforms and combined to buy our bats and balls. In the good old days we were up at daybreak practicing the game out at our grounds on Carroll Park, or on Fifth Avenue, before we had our breakfast or before going to business. Our team never lost a day from work, playing on Saturdays and holidays only, and we averaged about twelve match games a season. The Mohawks were no mean club and contested with such crack teams as the Atlantics, the Mutuals, the Athletics and the Eckfords." Hudson, Silleck, Steiner, O'Connor and Forker all are listed in this pamphlet as members of the Mohawk Base Ball Club. The pamphlet's printer W.A. Clayton appears as both the treasurer and a member of the finance committee for the club.Rare. Not in Grobani. Guide to Baseball Literature. Not in Smith Baseball: A Comprehensive Bibliography. OCLC records no copies. No copies at auction.

      [Bookseller: Between the Covers- Rare Books, Inc. ABA]
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        Narrative of the Overland Expedition of the Messrs Jardine,

      1867 - From Rockhampton to Cape York, Northern Queensland.First edition. Photographic frontispiece, lithograph plate & a folding map. 8vo. Modern full calf, gilt, a little foxed. xii, 88pp. Brisbane, The Ingleton copy. The official account of one of the great Australian overland expeditions. In 1863, John Jardine was appointed Government Representative of a new settlement at Somerset at the tip of Cape York. His sons, Frank and Alexander, were entrusted with the task of transporting the necessary cattle for the settlement from Rockhampton. Setting out in 1864, their 1200 mile journey became the most important of all the Cape York expeditions. It took 10 months, much of which was spent being harassed by aggressive Aborigines, who pursued them over hundreds of miles. This culminated in a pitched battle on the Mitchell River. Despite the loss of 200 head of cattle, their achievement is undeniable. Wantrup, 185; Ferguson, 7747; Ingleton, 483. [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Maggs Bros. Ltd ABA, ILAB, PBFA, BA]
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        Constitution and By-Laws of the Mohawk Base Ball Club, of the City of Brooklyn, N.Y.

      W. A. Clayton, Printer and Bookbinder, 105 Maiden Lane, New York 1867 - Presumed first edition. 16mo. Stitched sheets. [4], 12pp. Small errata slip laid in, correcting an omission to the fourth part of Article II, Section Four of the Constitution. Old tidelines along right margin, extending partly into the text, but all legible. Officers and committee members for the year 1867 are listed on an early page, and include A.C. Davis, President, E.W. Crittenden, First Vice President, Wm. Shipman, Second Vice President, and A.C. Smith, Third Vice President.The small pamphlet is accompanied by a manuscript letter, creased from folding, measuring 8.75" x 11" and composed of approximately 120 words, from C. W. Fancher of Wyckoff, N.J. dated in 1946. Fancher offers for sale a sepia picture of the Brooklyn Dodgers Base Ball Club and certificate of membership in the National Association of Base Ball Players dated Dec. 13, 1865 (not present here) to a Mrs. Blair, presumably Mrs. Natalie Knowlton Blair (1887-1951), a well-known collector of Americana. In addition he states: "I also have the little book of rules that goes with the picture," and on the verso he has sketched a pencil drawing of the title page, with an accompanying note, "The little book is in splendid condition and worth more than I ask for the picture."The constitution and by-laws laid out for the club included a list of fines for various offenses by club members, including "for rude, ungentlemanly, or discourteous language, manners or conduct at any meeting, game or reception of the Club, not more than one ($1.00) dollar for each offence." The designated "Nines" were to be prepared to play the games for which they were selected, and to be on time or face a fine. The team uniform was described as "a blue cap with the letter 'M' within a white star on top, a white jacket, and blue pants with white cord." The game of baseball increased in popularity in the 1850s, though it continued to be an 'amateur' sport for the next few years. According to Harold Seymour's Baseball: The Early Years, [NY: 1960], p.24: "Unquestionably, baseball was spreading rapidly in the New York area. In 1856 'Porter's Spirit of the Times' said that every available green plot within ten miles of the city was being used as a playing field. Brooklyn, already the 'city of churches,' was fast becoming the 'city of baseball clubs'. ." In 1867, the 10th Annual Convention of the National Association of Base Ball Players was held in Clinton, New York. Among the list of attendees were the Hon. A.C. Davis and A.C. Smith, of the Mohawk, Brooklyn.An article published in the Brooklyn Daily Eagle in March 1917 gives some particulars on the history of the Mohawk Base Ball Club: "On the Mohawk Club the late William C. Hudson, formerly of The Brooklyn Eagle, alternately played shortstop and pitched. Left to right: Abe Silleck, first base; Sam Delisser, shortstop; A. Steiner, left field; Jacob Steiner, right field; Eugene, captain; Kelly, pitcher; Wash Weeks, catcher; William Forker, second base; Chauncey Ryder, center field. F. O'Connor, third base. In 1867 . O'Connor [State Senator Eugene F. O'Connor] became captain of the Mohawk Club of Brooklyn, which made the famous first 'shut-out' on the Fourth of July, in that year, in a game with the Earnests of Riverhead. L. I., the score being 62 to 0, in nine innings. Not an error was made in this game." That article included an interview with O'Connor where he reminisced about the club saying: "We played baseball in those days for the glory of it. None of us got a dollar for our services. We even bought our own uniforms and combined to buy our bats and balls. In the good old days we were up at daybreak practicing the game out at our grounds on Carroll Park, or on Fifth Avenue, before we had our breakfast or before going to business. Our team never lost a day from work, playing on Saturdays and holidays only, and we averaged about twelve match games a season. The Mohawks were no mean club and contested with such crack teams as the Atlantics, the Mutu [Attributes: First Edition]

      [Bookseller: Between the Covers-Rare Books, Inc. ABAA]
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        Charles G. "Chinese" Gordon

      June 18, 1867. Written from Gravesend, June 19, 1867 reads in part, "My dear Gerald, many thanks for your kind letter which I have left so long unanswered . . . There is little going on the forts are still at stand. The Corps dinner was fairly attended but with many Indian Officers whom we do not know much. Stanton has just come back for six months from Egypt. I am glad indeed to hear the details of the family in whom I take a daily interest. It is much more important than the . . . brilliant campaign than one looks at the ultimate result which wisdom . . . say was the only . . . of importance a campaign is . . . in 10 years. The nurture and treatment of a child will affect generations and in that great day we shall see how my . . . and the subject which have taken up mans time and how immensely important in these matters which he has despised and ridiculed and was interesting besides being important pursuit talking o children how much more is when they are your own, you can tell. When once the . . . are cleared away how inutility superior does everything amounted with the human soul appear to any earthly scheme. God saw the exact circumstances to every event from the beginning it was clear to him in Eden when he spoke to Adam promising . . . He made Adam in the flesh that at a certain time one who was in Adam's . . . there must strike a spear into his side at Calvary and every event was equally clear to him. He saw you and me and your family and chose us in full knowledge of all our unbelief and . . . to live. It was worthy in us that led him to choose us but it was His sovereign will. Looking at the smallest and the greatest events of the world as the Country through which the line of Rail is running its tunnels, its gloomy events, its low lands it's pretty events its uplands and . . . . its great events looking at the starting . . . he beginning and the truancies then and of the world. We see something of the . . . of those events which is often . . . . in our power to respect or alter . . . We could not do the least-thing but yet we try and try and think over what we might have done little thinking that since it was fast it was ordained from the beginning to come to pass . . . A true sense of the immortality of the world events together with the knowledge that God hears prayer (and has in his wonderful wisdom . . . it would be made) gives great peace (it is he who gives the wish to pray not ourselves or the devil). Wonderful are his ways and past finding out how pleasant it is to feel that his spirit in such of us John IV. 15 Verse that he will never leave us till we reach the Haven of rest. Kind regards to Mrs. Graham and all the dear little Children . . C. Gordon." Graham served in the Russian War of 1854-1856, and was awarded the Victoria Cross for gallantry during the Crimean War. He also took part in the China War of 1860. In 1869, he was promoted to colonel, and in 1877, he was made assistant-director of works for barracks at the War Office, a post he held until being promoted to major-general in the early 1880s, when he went to serve in Egypt and the Sudan (where he was a friend of Gordon's). Graham was knighted and made a lieutenant general for distinguished service in the field.

      [Bookseller: University Archives ]
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