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Displayed below are some selected recent viaLibri matches for books published in 1849

        Plate 38 - Phaethornis Obscura

      London 1849 - John Gould (1804-1881) A selection from A Monograph of the Trochilidae, or Family of Hummingbirds First edition: London, 1849-61 (supplement printed 1880-87) Hand-colored lithographs with gum arabic metallic detail Paper size: 21 1/2” x 14 1/2” Condition: Very small areas of foxing throughout. John Gould was without question the most prolific ornithological artist of the 19th century, and the only one to rival John James Audubon in ambition and quality. The19th century was a time of intense fascination with discoveries in natural history, especially regarding knowledge of the wildlife of exotic lands. Gould shared the romantic enthusiasm of his time for such subjects, as well as the popular impulse to catalogue exotic wildlife. He combined his passion for natural history with outstanding scientific, artistic, and entrepreneurial talents. Drawing on these abilities, he embarked on a series of projects that would eventually make him the leading publisher of ornithological illustrations in Victorian Britain. Gould’s unparalleled career spanned five decades, and he produced a monumental series of books of birds throughout the world. From the time he took up taxidermy in his early teens, Gould was devoted to recording bird life, either as he observed it personally or as it was reported to him by other ornithologists. He procured the scientific information through extensive correspondence, travel, and field research. The preparatory drawings that he produced were passed on for completion to skilled illustrators, most notably his wife, Elizabeth, and Edward Lear. The plates which resulted from such partnerships were a splendid fusion of art and science, with a scope than remains unsurpassed. Stunning and at the same time highly accurate, Gould’s illustrations linked beauty to science, and science to beauty, in and an unprecedented manner. Of all his works, many of Gould’s best-known images come from this beautiful and comprehensive monograph on hummingbirds. One of his largest productions, the Hummingbirds was also the most painstaking, meticulously detailed project that the ornithologist attempted. In order to create accurate representations of the tiny, delicately beautiful birds, Gould invented a new method of coloring, using metallic pigments to reproduce the iridescence of their plumage. Most images also show at least one subject in flight to further accentuate the coloring of their feathers. The compositions generally show the birds in animated groupings of two or three, surrounded by foliage and landscapes. All of the hummingbirds are drawn to scale and are anatomically correct to the smallest detail, their brilliant coloring highlighted with gold and transparent luster. Most of the subjects in the book were taken from Gould’s personal collection of hummingbird specimens, a number of which he exhibited at the Zoological Gardens, Regent’s Park, during the Great Exhibition of 1851. Joining commerce with science, Gould also utilized the exhibition to display his method of metallic coloring (a shrewd move that worked to publicize his monograph). Gould’s exhibition was a major success, attracting more that 75,000 visitors and, very possibly, not a few of the 273 subscribers to A Monograph of the Trochilidae. These tiny, exuberantly colored birds captured the attention and affection of a vast number of European viewers. Gould’s Hummingbirds represents a splendid triumph of aesthetic sensitivity and scientific rigor.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
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        Plate 207 - Orthorhynchus exilis

      London 1849 - London, 1849. No Binding. Book Condition: Very Good. John Gould (1804-1881) A selection from A Monograph of the Trochilidae, or Family of Hummingbirds First edition: London, 1849-61 (supplement printed 1880-87) Hand-colored lithographs with gum arabic metallic detail Paper size: 21 ½’ x 14 ½’ Condition: Minute areas of foxing along some margins John Gould was without question the most prolific ornithological artist of the 19th century, and the only one to rival John James Audubon in ambition and quality. The19th century was a time of intense fascination with discoveries in natural history, especially regarding knowledge of the wildlife of exotic lands. Gould shared the romantic enthusiasm of his time for such subjects, as well as the popular impulse to catalogue exotic wildlife. He combined his passion for natural history with outstanding scientific, artistic, and entrepreneurial talents. Drawing on these abilities, he embarked on a series of projects that would eventually make him the leading publisher of ornithological illustrations in Victorian Britain. Gould’s unparalleled career spanned five decades, and he produced a monumental series of books of birds throughout the world. From the time he took up taxidermy in his early teens, Gould was devoted to recording bird life, either as he observed it personally or as it was reported to him by other ornithologists. He procured the scientific information through extensive correspondence, travel, and field research. The preparatory drawings that he produced were passed on for completion to skilled illustrators, most notably his wife, Elizabeth, and Edward Lear. The plates which resulted from such partnerships were a splendid fusion of art and science, with a scope than remains unsurpassed. Stunning and at the same time highly accurate, Gould’s illustrations linked beauty to science, and science to beauty, in and an unprecedented manner. Of all his works, many of Gould’s best-known images come from this beautiful and comprehensive monograph on hummingbirds. One of his largest productions, the Hummingbirds was also the most painstaking, meticulously detailed project that the ornithologist attempted. In order to create accurate representations of the tiny, delicately beautiful birds, Gould invented a new method of coloring, using metallic pigments to reproduce the iridescence of their plumage. Most images also show at least one subject in flight to further accentuate the coloring of their feathers. The compositions generally show the birds in animated groupings of two or three, surrounded by foliage and landscapes. All of the hummingbirds are drawn to scale and are anatomically correct to the smallest detail, their brilliant coloring highlighted with gold and transparent luster. Most of the subjects in the book were taken from Gould’s personal collection of hummingbird specimens, a number of which he exhibited at the Zoological Gardens, Regent’s Park, during the Great Exhibition of 1851. Joining commerce with science, Gould also utilized the exhibition to display his method of metallic coloring (a shrewd move that worked to publicize his monograph). Gould’s exhibition was a major success, attracting more that 75,000 visitors and, very possibly, not a few of the 273 subscribers to A Monograph of the Trochilidae. These tiny, exuberantly colored birds captured the attention and affection of a vast number of European viewers. Gould’s Hummingbirds represents a splendid triumph of aesthetic sensitivity and scientific rigor.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
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        Plate 120, Vol. III - Lophornis Regulus

      London 1849 - John Gould (1804-1881) A selection from A Monograph of the Trochilidae, or Family of Hummingbirds First edition: London, 1849-61 (supplement printed 1880-87) Hand-colored lithographs with gum arabic metallic detail Paper size: 21 1/2” x 14 1/2” Condition: very small areas of foxing throughout John Gould was without question the most prolific ornithological artist of the 19th century, and the only one to rival John James Audubon in ambition and quality. The19th century was a time of intense fascination with discoveries in natural history, especially regarding knowledge of the wildlife of exotic lands. Gould shared the romantic enthusiasm of his time for such subjects, as well as the popular impulse to catalogue exotic wildlife. He combined his passion for natural history with outstanding scientific, artistic, and entrepreneurial talents. Drawing on these abilities, he embarked on a series of projects that would eventually make him the leading publisher of ornithological illustrations in Victorian Britain. Gould’s unparalleled career spanned five decades, and he produced a monumental series of books of birds throughout the world. From the time he took up taxidermy in his early teens, Gould was devoted to recording bird life, either as he observed it personally or as it was reported to him by other ornithologists. He procured the scientific information through extensive correspondence, travel, and field research. The preparatory drawings that he produced were passed on for completion to skilled illustrators, most notably his wife, Elizabeth, and Edward Lear. The plates which resulted from such partnerships were a splendid fusion of art and science, with a scope than remains unsurpassed. Stunning and at the same time highly accurate, Gould’s illustrations linked beauty to science, and science to beauty, in and an unprecedented manner. Of all his works, many of Gould’s best-known images come from this beautiful and comprehensive monograph on hummingbirds. One of his largest productions, the Hummingbirds was also the most painstaking, meticulously detailed project that the ornithologist attempted. In order to create accurate representations of the tiny, delicately beautiful birds, Gould invented a new method of coloring, using metallic pigments to reproduce the iridescence of their plumage. Most images also show at least one subject in flight to further accentuate the coloring of their feathers. The compositions generally show the birds in animated groupings of two or three, surrounded by foliage and landscapes. All of the hummingbirds are drawn to scale and are anatomically correct to the smallest detail, their brilliant coloring highlighted with gold and transparent luster. Most of the subjects in the book were taken from Gould’s personal collection of hummingbird specimens, a number of which he exhibited at the Zoological Gardens, Regent’s Park, during the Great Exhibition of 1851. Joining commerce with science, Gould also utilized the exhibition to display his method of metallic coloring (a shrewd move that worked to publicize his monograph). Gould’s exhibition was a major success, attracting more that 75,000 visitors and, very possibly, not a few of the 273 subscribers to A Monograph of the Trochilidae. These tiny, exuberantly colored birds captured the attention and affection of a vast number of European viewers. Gould’s Hummingbirds represents a splendid triumph of aesthetic sensitivity and scientific rigor.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
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        Plate 2 - Grypus spixi

      London 1849 - John Gould (1804-1881). A selection from A Monograph of the Trochilidae, or Family of Hummingbirds First edition: London, 1849-61 (supplement printed 1880-87) Hand-colored lithographs with gum arabic metallic detail Paper size: 21 ½’ x 14 ½’ Condition: Some minute areas of foxing along some margins. John Gould was without question the most prolific ornithological artist of the 19th century, and the only one to rival John James Audubon in ambition and quality. The19th century was a time of intense fascination with discoveries in natural history, especially regarding knowledge of the wildlife of exotic lands. Gould shared the romantic enthusiasm of his time for such subjects, as well as the popular impulse to catalogue exotic wildlife. He combined his passion for natural history with outstanding scientific, artistic, and entrepreneurial talents. Drawing on these abilities, he embarked on a series of projects that would eventually make him the leading publisher of ornithological illustrations in Victorian Britain. Gould’s unparalleled career spanned five decades, and he produced a monumental series of books of birds throughout the world. From the time he took up taxidermy in his early teens, Gould was devoted to recording bird life, either as he observed it personally or as it was reported to him by other ornithologists. He procured the scientific information through extensive correspondence, travel, and field research. The preparatory drawings that he produced were passed on for completion to skilled illustrators, most notably his wife, Elizabeth, and Edward Lear. The plates which resulted from such partnerships were a splendid fusion of art and science, with a scope than remains unsurpassed. Stunning and at the same time highly accurate, Gould’s illustrations linked beauty to science, and science to beauty, in an unprecedented manner. Of all his works, many of Gould’s best-known images come from this beautiful and comprehensive monograph on hummingbirds. One of his largest productions, the Hummingbirds was also the most painstaking, meticulously detailed project that the ornithologist attempted. In order to create accurate representations of the tiny, delicately beautiful birds, Gould invented a new method of coloring, using metallic pigments to reproduce the iridescence of their plumage. Most images also show at least one subject in flight to further accentuate the coloring of their feathers. The compositions generally show the birds in animated groupings of two or three, surrounded by foliage and landscapes. All of the hummingbirds are drawn to scale and are anatomically correct to the smallest detail, their brilliant coloring highlighted with gold and transparent luster. Most of the subjects in the book were taken from Gould’s personal collection of hummingbird specimens, a number of which he exhibited at the Zoological Gardens, Regent’s Park, during the Great Exhibition of 1851. Joining commerce with science, Gould also utilized the exhibition to display his method of metallic coloring (a shrewd move that worked to publicize his monograph). Gould’s exhibition was a major success, attracting more that 75,000 visitors and, very possibly, not a few of the 273 subscribers to A Monograph of the Trochilidae. These tiny, exuberantly colored birds captured the attention and affection of a vast number of European viewers. Gould’s Hummingbirds represents a splendid triumph of aesthetic sensitivity and scientific rigor.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
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        Supplemental Plate 53 - Elvira Cupreiceps

      London 1849 - John Gould (1804-1881) A selection from A Monograph of the Trochilidae, or Family of Hummingbirds First edition: London, 1849-61 (supplement printed 1880-87) Hand-colored lithographs with gum arabic metallic detail Paper size: 21 1/2” x 14 1/2” Condition: very small areas of foxing throughout John Gould was without question the most prolific ornithological artist of the 19th century, and the only one to rival John James Audubon in ambition and quality. The19th century was a time of intense fascination with discoveries in natural history, especially regarding knowledge of the wildlife of exotic lands. Gould shared the romantic enthusiasm of his time for such subjects, as well as the popular impulse to catalogue exotic wildlife. He combined his passion for natural history with outstanding scientific, artistic, and entrepreneurial talents. Drawing on these abilities, he embarked on a series of projects that would eventually make him the leading publisher of ornithological illustrations in Victorian Britain. Gould’s unparalleled career spanned five decades, and he produced a monumental series of books of birds throughout the world. From the time he took up taxidermy in his early teens, Gould was devoted to recording bird life, either as he observed it personally or as it was reported to him by other ornithologists. He procured the scientific information through extensive correspondence, travel, and field research. The preparatory drawings that he produced were passed on for completion to skilled illustrators, most notably his wife, Elizabeth, and Edward Lear. The plates which resulted from such partnerships were a splendid fusion of art and science, with a scope than remains unsurpassed. Stunning and at the same time highly accurate, Gould’s illustrations linked beauty to science, and science to beauty, in and an unprecedented manner. Of all his works, many of Gould’s best-known images come from this beautiful and comprehensive monograph on hummingbirds. One of his largest productions, the Hummingbirds was also the most painstaking, meticulously detailed project that the ornithologist attempted. In order to create accurate representations of the tiny, delicately beautiful birds, Gould invented a new method of coloring, using metallic pigments to reproduce the iridescence of their plumage. Most images also show at least one subject in flight to further accentuate the coloring of their feathers. The compositions generally show the birds in animated groupings of two or three, surrounded by foliage and landscapes. All of the hummingbirds are drawn to scale and are anatomically correct to the smallest detail, their brilliant coloring highlighted with gold and transparent luster. Most of the subjects in the book were taken from Gould’s personal collection of hummingbird specimens, a number of which he exhibited at the Zoological Gardens, Regent’s Park, during the Great Exhibition of 1851. Joining commerce with science, Gould also utilized the exhibition to display his method of metallic coloring (a shrewd move that worked to publicize his monograph). Gould’s exhibition was a major success, attracting more that 75,000 visitors and, very possibly, not a few of the 273 subscribers to A Monograph of the Trochilidae. These tiny, exuberantly colored birds captured the attention and affection of a vast number of European viewers. Gould’s Hummingbirds represents a splendid triumph of aesthetic sensitivity and scientific rigor.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
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        Plate 19 - Phaethornis cephalus

      London 1849 - London, 1849. No Binding. Book Condition: Very Good. John Gould (1804-1881) A selection from A Monograph of the Trochilidae, or Family of Hummingbirds First edition: London, 1849-61 (supplement printed 1880-87) Hand-colored lithographs with gum arabic metallic detail Paper size: 21 ½’ x 14 ½’ Condition: Minute areas of foxing along some margins John Gould was without question the most prolific ornithological artist of the 19th century, and the only one to rival John James Audubon in ambition and quality. The19th century was a time of intense fascination with discoveries in natural history, especially regarding knowledge of the wildlife of exotic lands. Gould shared the romantic enthusiasm of his time for such subjects, as well as the popular impulse to catalogue exotic wildlife. He combined his passion for natural history with outstanding scientific, artistic, and entrepreneurial talents. Drawing on these abilities, he embarked on a series of projects that would eventually make him the leading publisher of ornithological illustrations in Victorian Britain. Gould’s unparalleled career spanned five decades, and he produced a monumental series of books of birds throughout the world. From the time he took up taxidermy in his early teens, Gould was devoted to recording bird life, either as he observed it personally or as it was reported to him by other ornithologists. He procured the scientific information through extensive correspondence, travel, and field research. The preparatory drawings that he produced were passed on for completion to skilled illustrators, most notably his wife, Elizabeth, and Edward Lear. The plates which resulted from such partnerships were a splendid fusion of art and science, with a scope than remains unsurpassed. Stunning and at the same time highly accurate, Gould’s illustrations linked beauty to science, and science to beauty, in and an unprecedented manner. Of all his works, many of Gould’s best-known images come from this beautiful and comprehensive monograph on hummingbirds. One of his largest productions, the Hummingbirds was also the most painstaking, meticulously detailed project that the ornithologist attempted. In order to create accurate representations of the tiny, delicately beautiful birds, Gould invented a new method of coloring, using metallic pigments to reproduce the iridescence of their plumage. Most images also show at least one subject in flight to further accentuate the coloring of their feathers. The compositions generally show the birds in animated groupings of two or three, surrounded by foliage and landscapes. All of the hummingbirds are drawn to scale and are anatomically correct to the smallest detail, their brilliant coloring highlighted with gold and transparent luster. Most of the subjects in the book were taken from Gould’s personal collection of hummingbird specimens, a number of which he exhibited at the Zoological Gardens, Regent’s Park, during the Great Exhibition of 1851. Joining commerce with science, Gould also utilized the exhibition to display his method of metallic coloring (a shrewd move that worked to publicize his monograph). Gould’s exhibition was a major success, attracting more that 75,000 visitors and, very possibly, not a few of the 273 subscribers to A Monograph of the Trochilidae. These tiny, exuberantly colored birds captured the attention and affection of a vast number of European viewers. Gould’s Hummingbirds represents a splendid triumph of aesthetic sensitivity and scientific rigor.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
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        Supplemental Plate 44 - Rhamphomicron Olivaceum, Lawr.

      London 1849 - John Gould (1804-1881) A selection from A Monograph of the Trochilidae, or Family of Hummingbirds First edition: London, 1849-61 (supplement printed 1880-87) Hand-colored lithographs with gum arabic metallic detail Paper size: 21 1/2” x 14 1/2” Condition: very small areas of foxing throughout John Gould was without question the most prolific ornithological artist of the 19th century, and the only one to rival John James Audubon in ambition and quality. The19th century was a time of intense fascination with discoveries in natural history, especially regarding knowledge of the wildlife of exotic lands. Gould shared the romantic enthusiasm of his time for such subjects, as well as the popular impulse to catalogue exotic wildlife. He combined his passion for natural history with outstanding scientific, artistic, and entrepreneurial talents. Drawing on these abilities, he embarked on a series of projects that would eventually make him the leading publisher of ornithological illustrations in Victorian Britain. Gould’s unparalleled career spanned five decades, and he produced a monumental series of books of birds throughout the world. From the time he took up taxidermy in his early teens, Gould was devoted to recording bird life, either as he observed it personally or as it was reported to him by other ornithologists. He procured the scientific information through extensive correspondence, travel, and field research. The preparatory drawings that he produced were passed on for completion to skilled illustrators, most notably his wife, Elizabeth, and Edward Lear. The plates which resulted from such partnerships were a splendid fusion of art and science, with a scope than remains unsurpassed. Stunning and at the same time highly accurate, Gould’s illustrations linked beauty to science, and science to beauty, in and an unprecedented manner. Of all his works, many of Gould’s best-known images come from this beautiful and comprehensive monograph on hummingbirds. One of his largest productions, the Hummingbirds was also the most painstaking, meticulously detailed project that the ornithologist attempted. In order to create accurate representations of the tiny, delicately beautiful birds, Gould invented a new method of coloring, using metallic pigments to reproduce the iridescence of their plumage. Most images also show at least one subject in flight to further accentuate the coloring of their feathers. The compositions generally show the birds in animated groupings of two or three, surrounded by foliage and landscapes. All of the hummingbirds are drawn to scale and are anatomically correct to the smallest detail, their brilliant coloring highlighted with gold and transparent luster. Most of the subjects in the book were taken from Gould’s personal collection of hummingbird specimens, a number of which he exhibited at the Zoological Gardens, Regent’s Park, during the Great Exhibition of 1851. Joining commerce with science, Gould also utilized the exhibition to display his method of metallic coloring (a shrewd move that worked to publicize his monograph). Gould’s exhibition was a major success, attracting more that 75,000 visitors and, very possibly, not a few of the 273 subscribers to A Monograph of the Trochilidae. These tiny, exuberantly colored birds captured the attention and affection of a vast number of European viewers. Gould’s Hummingbirds represents a splendid triumph of aesthetic sensitivity and scientific rigor. ***If you frame up this item with Arader Galleries you can take a 50% discount off the listed price of this work of art.***

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
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        Plate 280 - Eriocnemus aline

      London 1849 - John Gould (1804-1881). A selection from A Monograph of the Trochilidae, or Family of Hummingbirds First edition: London, 1849-61 (supplement printed 1880-87) Hand-colored lithographs with gum arabic metallic detail Paper size: 21 ½’ x 14 ½’ Condition: Some minute areas of foxing along some margins. John Gould was without question the most prolific ornithological artist of the 19th century, and the only one to rival John James Audubon in ambition and quality. The19th century was a time of intense fascination with discoveries in natural history, especially regarding knowledge of the wildlife of exotic lands. Gould shared the romantic enthusiasm of his time for such subjects, as well as the popular impulse to catalogue exotic wildlife. He combined his passion for natural history with outstanding scientific, artistic, and entrepreneurial talents. Drawing on these abilities, he embarked on a series of projects that would eventually make him the leading publisher of ornithological illustrations in Victorian Britain. Gould’s unparalleled career spanned five decades, and he produced a monumental series of books of birds throughout the world. From the time he took up taxidermy in his early teens, Gould was devoted to recording bird life, either as he observed it personally or as it was reported to him by other ornithologists. He procured the scientific information through extensive correspondence, travel, and field research. The preparatory drawings that he produced were passed on for completion to skilled illustrators, most notably his wife, Elizabeth, and Edward Lear. The plates which resulted from such partnerships were a splendid fusion of art and science, with a scope than remains unsurpassed. Stunning and at the same time highly accurate, Gould’s illustrations linked beauty to science, and science to beauty, in an unprecedented manner. Of all his works, many of Gould’s best-known images come from this beautiful and comprehensive monograph on hummingbirds. One of his largest productions, the Hummingbirds was also the most painstaking, meticulously detailed project that the ornithologist attempted. In order to create accurate representations of the tiny, delicately beautiful birds, Gould invented a new method of coloring, using metallic pigments to reproduce the iridescence of their plumage. Most images also show at least one subject in flight to further accentuate the coloring of their feathers. The compositions generally show the birds in animated groupings of two or three, surrounded by foliage and landscapes. All of the hummingbirds are drawn to scale and are anatomically correct to the smallest detail, their brilliant coloring highlighted with gold and transparent luster. Most of the subjects in the book were taken from Gould’s personal collection of hummingbird specimens, a number of which he exhibited at the Zoological Gardens, Regent’s Park, during the Great Exhibition of 1851. Joining commerce with science, Gould also utilized the exhibition to display his method of metallic coloring (a shrewd move that worked to publicize his monograph). Gould’s exhibition was a major success, attracting more that 75,000 visitors and, very possibly, not a few of the 273 subscribers to A Monograph of the Trochilidae. These tiny, exuberantly colored birds captured the attention and affection of a vast number of European viewers. Gould’s Hummingbirds represents a splendid triumph of aesthetic sensitivity and scientific rigor. ***If you frame up this item with Arader Galleries you can take a 50% discount off the listed price of this work of art.***

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
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        COLECCION DE CANONES DE LA IGLESIA ESPAÑOLA.

      - Publicada en latín a espensas de nuestros reyes por. Traducida al castellano con notas e ilustraciones por Juan Tejada y Ramiro. Madrid, Imprenta de José Mª Alonso, 1849-1855, 22x31, 5 volúmenes: LI-742+ 1045 + 853+805+758 págs. Impreso a 2 columnas en latín y castellano. Encuadernados en holandesa lomo piel de época, tomo IV con polilla en esquina blanca de primeras hojas y de tapa anterior y de dos hojas. Contratapa de tomo I y borde lomera t V con desprefecto. Interior bien con papel limpio sin manchas ni óxido. (51819).

      [Bookseller: Librería J. Cintas]
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        MARDI and a Voyage Thither

      New York Harper & Brothers 1849 - 2 volumes. First edition. 8vo, publishers original blind-stamped purple cloth, with elaborate blind-stamped decorative tooling on covers and spine, lettering and Harper’s logo in gilt to the spine panel. Housed in a pleasing dark green morocco solander case, the volumes each with their own chemise. xii, 365; xii, 387 pp., 8 pp. ads. An unusually fine copy and a very handsome pair, beautifully preserved. The cloth is bright and clean and essentially without fading, some of the typical offsetting to the pastedown and free-fly. RARE FIRST EDITION IN ORIGINAL CLOTH IN UNUSUALLY WELL PRESERVED CONDITION. THE BOOK IS EXCEPTIONALLY SCARCE IN THE PURPLE CLOTH IN FINE CONDITION AS IS THIS COPY. After a tiring 18 month whaling voyage in the south seas, Melville jumped ship and with his companion, Richard Tobias Greene, lived in the islands for several months. While there he was captured by but escaped from island natives. He served on an Australian trader, worked as a field laborer and enlisted on the frigate U.S.S. United States. His experiences are the basis for the Swiftian adventures of Taji and his companion Jarl in Mardi. This is one of Melville’s best written stories. [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Buddenbrooks, Inc. ABAA]
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        PRINTED "VALLEY NOTE" CURRENCY IN DENOMINATION OF $2.00, WITH PRINTED HEADING: "G.S.L. CITY, JAN, 20, 1849"].

      [Salt Lake City. 1849]. - Small printed paper slip, measuring about 2 x 3 3/4 inches. Overall condition is excellent. No serial number. Blanks not filled in, unsigned and unstamped. This small piece of paper money printed by the Mormon Church in Salt Lake City is an example of the earliest recorded printing done in Utah. Called a "Valley Note" by Alvin E. Rust, this form of paper currency was printed in several denominations, using a font of script type of the style used for calling cards. McMurtrie quotes a passage from a manuscript history of Brigham Young which describes the interesting circumstances under which this paper money was printed: "They had gold dust, but many refused to take it, as there was a waste in weighing it for exchange. To meet this want, we employed brother John Kay to coin the dust, but upon trial he broke all the crucibles and could not proceed. I then offered the gold dust back to the people, but they did not want it. I then told them we would issue paper till the gold dust could be coined. The Municipal Council agreed to have such a currency, and appointed myself and President Heber C. Kimball and bishop N.K. Whitney to issue it. The first bill, for one dollar, was issued on the first of this month [January 1849]. The bills were signed by Brigham Young, Heber C. Kimball, & Thomas Bullock, clerk." The copy in hand is not signed, stamped, or filled out. "It is definite enough that the first use of the press by the Mormon settlers was in January, 1849, for the production of paper currency. Furthermore, it is gratifyingly definite that the first printer was Brigham H. Young, with the perhaps unskilled aid of Thomas Bullock. Brigham H. Young at that time was a young man of about 25, the nephew of Brigham Young the governor and leader" - McMurtrie. Very rare. According to Rust, only 204 valley notes in the two-dollar denomination were issued without a serial number, "rare in unsigned condition." McMURTRIE, THE BEGINNINGS OF PRINTING IN UTAH, pp.13-20. Rust, MORMON AND UTAH COIN AND CURRENCY, pp.60-65. STREETER SALE 2285 (five pieces of currency). STREETER, AMERICANA BEGINNINGS 69 (ref). SAUNDERS, DESERET IMPRINTS 3.

      [Bookseller: William Reese Company - Americana]
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        The historie of travaile into Virginia Britannia; expressing the cosmographie and comodities of the country, together with the manners and customes of the people.

      Hakluyt Society London 1849 - First edition. 8vo., viii, xxvi, 203pp., folding map, 5 plates, 1 facsimile, original blue cloth gilt, ex-libris Manchester University with bookplate ("withdrawn" stamp), a very good copy. Hakluyt Society first series, 6. [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Shapero Rare Books]
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        The Historie of Travaile into Virginia Britannia; expressing the Cosmographie and Comodities of the Country, together with the Manners and Customes of the People. Gathered and observed as well by those who went first thither as collected by William Strachey, Gent., the first Secretary of the Colony.

      Printed for the Hakluyt Society, London 1849 - viii, xxxvi, 203 pp. 8vo. Cloth. Illus. with 5 plates,1 facsimile, and 1 folding map. Hakluyt Society, First series: No. 6. From British Library, Sloane MS 1622. "The author, of whom almost nothing is certainly known, was evidently a person of some importance in Virginia during the period of which he writes,--- from 1610 to 1612. Book I., pp. 23 to 133, is almost wholly occupied with a description of the Indians of Virginia, their customs and peculiarities. It was written probably some years before Captain John Smith?s General History of Virginia, and is more especially remarkable as having afforded Mr. Deane and Mr. Niel the data to charge the name of Pocahontas with infamy. The following passage will scarcely be considered sufficient evidence to convict the Indian maiden: ?Their younger women goe not shadowed amongst their owne companie, until they be nigh eleaven, or tuelve returnes of the leafe old, nor are they very much ashamed thereof, and therefore would the before remembered Pochahontas, a well featured, but wanton yong girle, Powhatuns daughter, sometymes resorting to our port, of the age then of eleven or twelve yeares, get the boys forth with her into the markett place, and make them wheele falling on their hands turning up their heeles upwards, whome she would followe and wheele so her self, naked as she was, all the fort over, but being once twelve yeares, they put on a kind of seme-cinctum lethern apron before their bellies, and are very shamefact to be scene bare.? On the modern interpretation of the word wanton, rests almost all the weight of the arguments against Pochahontas? chastity. A word used two centuries ago, like ?wench,? ?quean,? and many other terms, since degraded by use to reproach, is here in the sense of saucy, hoydenish, reckless, and other kindred terms indicating boldness and want of propriety. Like other native girls she was incapable of viewing her nudity with shame, because her youth forbid the association of sexual indulgence, or even desire, with it," (Field, Indian Bibliography, p. 383). Sabin 92664. Field 1514. Pilling 3764. Howes S1053. Spine a bit sunned, wear to head of spine, small institutional bookplate to front pastedown; endpapers at hinges ragged and re-glued, else a very good unopened (uncut) copy. Map about fine. [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Kaaterskill Books, ABAA/ILAB]
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        Vanity Fair. 1st UK, mixed state, original cloth

      Bradbury & Evans, 1849, - THACKERAY, William Makepeace. Vanity Fair : A Novel without a Hero. With Illustrations on Steel and Wood by the Author. London : Bradbury & Evans, 1849. First Edition, mixed State (with engraved title-page date of 1849, "Mr. Pitt" on page 453, but without the woodcut of the Marquis de Steyne on page 336). Pp [i]-xvi,[1]-624,[1]-[8](ads),frontis + engraved title-page, + 38 plates. 8vo, blue pressed cloth, gilt lettering to spine. Both inner hinges cracked, rear outer hinge cracked, wear to spine ends, corners bumped, some light stains to cloth, offsetting from plates to opposite pages, brown spotting to frontis + engraved title-page, previous owner's name to endpaper and title page, else a very good copy internally, needs to be rebacked. In original cloth. with original end-papers. 1,000.00 [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: John W. Doull, Bookseller (A.B.A.C.)]
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        Anatomie comparee: receuil de planches de myologie dessinees par G. Cuvier ou executees sous les yeux par Laurillard et Mercier.

      . Paris, Dusacq, 1849-1856. In two volumes. Elephant folio (58.0 x 42.0 cm). 336 lithographed plates with descriptive text and three handwritten tables at the end of each volume. Volume I: Title, pp. vi ("Note preliminaire"), 168 (90 individually numbered, and 39 double-sized and double numbered) plates, 23 explanatory text leaves; Volume II: 168 plates (112 individually numbered, and 28 double-sized and double numbered,) 30 explanatory text leaves. Uniform contemporary green half calf over green pebbled boards. Spines with five raised bands, gilt ornaments and title. Marbled endpapers. Top edges gilt.* Monumental and very rare work on the myology, osteology and anatomy of vertebrates, starting with "l'Homme Negre" (12 plates), followed by, for instance, Orang-Outang (5), Magot (13), Papion (17), Coaita (8), Sajou (2), Maki (4), Ours (13), Chien (12), Hyene (14), Lionne (13), Panthere (13), Guepard (1), Kanguroo (21), Marmotte (5), Castor (10), Porc (5), Lapin (5), Agouti (6), Orycterope (3), Ornithorynque (6), Elephant (26), Hippopotame (7), Cochon (9), Tapir (4), Ane (10), etc., etc. Copies of this posthumously published atlas are extremely rare. The Bibliotheque Nationale in Paris only possesses an incomplete copy. Most of the elaborately drawn plates are by Cuvier; the remaining are by Laurillard, his pupil. In the preface we read that it was Cuvier's opinion that myology had been greatly neglected in comparative research. It had been Cuvier's aim to publish a large work on comparative anatomy. Cuvier had great difficulty finding a publisher, as none were willing to produce this costly and sumptuously illustrated atlas. In 1840 however, a special grant was given by the state to make publication possible. It was published in livraisons over a period of 7 years. Because the work is very uncommon it is likely that it was only published in a small edition. DSB: "Seeking to produce one great Anatomie comparee, he spent his life gathering some 13000 items for the museum's public gallery and collecting drawings and documents; 336 plates made according to his drawings and those of Laurillard appeared between 1849 and 1856, with the title Anatomie comparee, Recueil de planches de Myologie". All plates are beautifully executed and the work as offered is in very good condition. Nissen indicates that plates 309, 310, 324 and 325 and the explanatory text to plates 336-340 have never been published; which is consistent with our copy, but also consistent with other copies. Bindings slightly rubbed and somewhat soiled, corners a bit bumped, but despite several signs of use and wear generally still in a good and sound condition. Title page, plates 21, 109, 198, 220, and the explanation sheet to plate 169 with a library stamp in the lower margin. Plate 243 and its explanation leaf with a small (less than one square cm) piece of text (a few letters) and paper loss due to adhesion, last plate strongly age-toned, otherwise only slightly toned in places and occasionally very weakly thumbed, but these are minor flaws and it is definitely, in all, a good, complete copy. There are very few copies available in libraries worldwide and there has been no more than one auction record in the last 50 years. DSB III, p. 524: Nissen ZBI, 1005..

      [Bookseller: Dieter Schierenberg BV]
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        Les Confessions d'un révolutionnaire pour servir à l'histoire de la Révolution de février.

      au bureau du journal La Voix du Peuple 1849 - PROUDHON Pierre-Joseph. Les Confessions d'un révolutionnaire pour servir à l'histoire de la Révolution de février. Paris, au bureau du journal La Voix du Peuple, 1849, in-8 demi-chagrin cerise, dos à nerfs, titre doré, 106 pages, 1ff. de table, texte sur deux colonnes, couv. jaunes conservées et restaurées ; la première est contre-collée sur le faux-titre. E.O. des Confessions écrites à la prison de Sainte-Pélagie. Bel exemplaire. [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: LIBRAIRIE ANCIENNE Séverine HERVELIN]
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        RHYMES OF TRAVEL, BALLADS AND POEMS

      George P. Putnam 1849 - We fit archival quality clear acrylic covers for additional protection whenever possible. ; 12mo 7" - 7½" tall; 1st publ 1849. Bound in dark brown full contemporary leather binding not noted in BAL. Spine has six compartments with 5 raised ridges. Marbled endpapers. Paste down eps have scraping where apparently some sort of plates have been removed. Slight foxing to end papers while text is generally quite clean. Tissue covered engraved frontis. Gilt on spine is dulled. Front hinge has leather crack extending about 1.5" from bottom. A sound and solid copy of this scarce early work drawn from his travels throughout Middle East and Europe. Text block edges are red. One copy noted in Library of Congress. This established his reputation as a poet.TAYLOR, Bayard, author, born in Kennett Square, Chester County, Pennsylvania, 11 January. 1825; died in Berlin, Germany, 19 December, 1878. He was the son of Joseph and Rebecca (Way) Taylor, and was of Quaker and South German descent. His first American ancestor, Robert Taylor, was a rich Quaker, who came over with Penn in 1681, and whose eldest son inherited land that now includes "Cedar-croft, " the poet's recent estate. His grandfather married a Lutheran of pure German blood, and was excommunicated by the Quakers. The poet's mother, although a Lutheran, was attached to the Quaker doctrines, and the Quaker speech and manners prevailed in her household. Bayard was named after James A. Bayard, of Delaware, and his first book bore on its title-page, through a mistake of Griswold, its editor, the name of "James Bayard Taylor. " After reaching his majority he always signed his name Bayard Taylor. His boyhood was passed near Kennett on a farm. He learned to read at four, began to write early, and from his twelfth year wrote "poems, novels, historical essays, but chiefly poem so" At the age of fourteen he studied Latin and French, and Spanish not long afterward. In 1837 the family removed to West Chester. There, and at Unionville, the youth had five years of high-school training. His first printed poem was contributed in 1841 to the "Saturday Evening Post, " Philadelphia. In 1842 he was apprenticed to a printer of West Chester. His contributions to the "Post" led to a friendship with Rufus W. Griswold, who was then connected with that paper and was also editor of " Graham's Magazine. " Griswold advised him concerning the publication of "Ximena, and other Poems" (Philadelphia, 1844) , which was dedicated to his adviser and sold by subscription. By this time he found a trade distasteful, and, to gratify his desire for travel and study in Europe, he bought his time of his employer. The "Post" and the " United States Gazette" each agreed to pay him fifty dollars in advance for twelve foreign letters. Graham bought some of his poems, and with one hundred and forty dollars thus collected he sailed for Liverpool, 1 July, 1844. Horace Greeley gave him a conditional order for letters to the "' Tribune, " of which he afterward wrote eighteen from Germany. His experiences abroad are well' condensed in his own language: "After landing in Liverpool, I spent three weeks in a walk through Scotland and the north of England, and then travelled through Belgium and up the Rhine to Heidelberg, where I arrived in September, 1844. The winter of 1844-'5 1 spent in Frankfort-on-the-Main, and by May I was so good a German that I was often not suspected of being a foreigner. I started off again on foot, a knapsack on my back, and visited the Brocken, Leipsic, Dresden, Prague, Vienna, Salzburg, and Munich, returning to Frankfort in July. A further walk over the Alps and through northern Italy took me to Florence, where I spent four months learning Italian. Thence I wandered, still on foot, to Rome and Civita Vecchia, where I bought a ticket as deck-passenger to Marseilles, and then tramped on to Paris through the cold winter rains. I arrived there in February, 1846, and returned to America after a stay of three months i [Attributes: First Edition; Signed Copy; Soft Cover]

      [Bookseller: poor man's books (mrbooks)]
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        Cervantes, as printed in, The Pictorial National Library, a Monthly Miscellany of the Useful and Entertaining in Science, Art and Literature, November 1849 Issue.

      William Simonds Boston 1849 - First Edition. Tall octavo, original printed and illustrated wrappers, no. 5, volume III, seperate issue for November 1849. Contains Horatio Alger's third published work, a biography of the author Cervantes. This essay follows a poem and another essay on chivalry both published earlier in the same year by this short lived magazine. Also prints an obituary for Edgar Allan Poe who died in 1849. Very scarce Alger item. Very Good plus issue. [Attributes: First Edition; Soft Cover]

      [Bookseller: Babylon Revisited Rare Books]
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        Shirley. A Tale [Three Volumes]

      Smith, Elder and Co, 1849. First Edition. Hardcover. Very Good. London: Smith, Elder & Co, 1849: First Edition. Three volumes bound in original brown cloth and spine to gilt; with 16 pages of ads at rear of Volume I dated October, 1849, and three pages of ads at rear of Volume III. In Very Good condition. Shelf lean to bindings, sunning and rubbing to cloth. Wear at spine ends and corners. Spine of Volume I shows a vertical split at bottom of rear gutter, and two horizontal splits to foot of spine cloth which appear to have been repaired. Hinges at front tender, pages show light signs of age. A wonderful set, rare in original bindings.

      [Bookseller: Burnside Rare Books]
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        Mémoire géographique, historique et scientifique sur l’Inde, antérieurement au milieu du XIe siècle de l’Ere chrétienne, d’après les Ecrivains Arabes, Persans et Chinois, par M. Reinaud.

      Paris, Imprimerie Nationale, 1849 - In-4°, de 399 p. & 1 Carte dépliante. Demi-basane noir, à 5 nerfs, plat moucheté noir, pièce de titre doré. « On joint le Compte rendue du livre rédigé par L.A. Sédillot fils (1808-1875): «Rapport sur l’Ouvrage de M. Reinaud, intitulé Mémoire géographique.etc ». Tiré à part paru dans le «Bulletin de la Société de géographie». Déc.1851 (1er partie). Une page de faux-titre écrit à l’encre du 19e, ainsi que les deux dernières pages ou il est établi un index général, et à l’avant dernière page, un ordre des matières, on retrouve de nombreuses annotations au crayon en marge des textes, des additions bibliographiques, de dates, lorsqu’elles sont erronées, de corrections et omissions de l’auteur. Introduction p. 1 à 38. I- Faits Géographiques & Historiques ; Section I : Depuis l’origine jusqu’à l’invasion d’Alexandre le Grand. Section II / Depuis l’invasion d’Alexandre le Grand jusqu’à l’arrivée des Arabes dans la vallée de l’Indus. Section III: -Depuis l’arrivée des Arabes dans la vallée de l’Indus, jusqu’au milieu du XIe siècle de l’ère chrétienne. Deuxième partie : Doctrines scientifiques des Indiens, et leur introduction chez les Arabes et les peuples de l’Occident. Additions & Corrections (en date du 1er Novembre 1848) [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: CollectionOrientales]
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        Monograph on Fossil Reptilia of the London Clay: Part I - Chelonia, Supplement & Part II - Crocodilia, Ophidia; In 1 Vol.;

      London for the Palaeontographical Society -50 1849 - (Includes 2-page, 2-plate supplement by Owen). HARDBACK, quarter-cloth with cloth-covered boards, pages: viii, 76; 77-79, 1-68, all edges speckled, plates: i-xxviii; xxviiia-xxviiib; xxix-xvi, (one folding), text-figs.: 1-6; 7-10, 210mm x 274mm, (8.25" x 10.75"), ex-academic library, with plate on front end-paper, stamp on title-pages, gilt embossed and ink nos. on grubby spine, head, tail and corners rubbed, covers worn and rubbed, some light spotting, small tear in front free end-paper, small part of top corner of first page of the supplement missing (not affecting text), otherwise a very fine copy. Pal. Soc. Nos. 2, 6, 44. 1.5Kg. This is a heavy item and will incur additional postage, eg. shipping costs to an address in Europe, outside the UK, would be around £10.00.

      [Bookseller: Baldwin's Scientific Books]
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        PLANO DE MADRID.

      - Entelado. Bien conservado en una carterita en tela actual con tejuelo original pegado sobre la cubierta. 111x84. Madrid, 1849. LIBROS ANTIGUOS

      [Bookseller: Librería Anticuaria Galgo]
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        Die Einheitsbestrebungen in der wissenschaftlichen Medicin

      Berlin, Druck und Verlag von G. Reimer, 1849. - (1. Aufl.), 8° (22x14), VI S., 1 Bl., 48 S., OKart (Brosch), minimal angestaubt, sauber und gepflegt, [Attributes: Soft Cover]

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat an der Stiftskirche]
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        PRINTED "VALLEY NOTE" CURRENCY IN DENOMINATION OF $2.00, SIGNED BY BRIGHAM YOUNG WITH PRINTED HEADING: "G.S.L. CITY, JAN, 20, 1849"].

      [Salt Lake City. 1849]. - Small printed paper slip, about 2 x 3 3/4 inches. Overall condition is excellent. Blindstamped with the official seal of the Twelve Apostles, and signed in manuscript by Brigham Young, Thomas Bullock, and Heber C. Kimball. N.K Whitney is named as payee in manuscript. No serial number. This small piece of paper money printed by the Mormon Church in Salt Lake City is an example of the earliest recorded printing done in Utah. Called a "Valley Note" by Alvin E. Rust, this form of paper currency was printed in several denominations using a font of script type of the style used for calling cards. McMurtrie quotes a passage from a manuscript history of Brigham Young which describes the interesting circumstances under which this paper money was printed: "They had gold dust, but many refused to take it, as there was a waste in weighing it for exchange. To meet this want, we employed brother John Kay to coin the dust, but upon trial he broke all the crucibles and could not proceed. I then offered the gold dust back to the people, but they did not want it. I then told them we would issue paper till the gold dust could be coined. The Municipal Council agreed to have such a currency, and appointed myself and President Heber C. Kimball and bishop N.K. Whitney to issue it. The first bill, for one dollar, was issued on the first of this month [January 1849]. The bills were signed by Brigham Young, Heber C. Kimball, & Thomas Bullock, clerk." ".It is definite enough that the first use of the press by the Mormon settlers was in January, 1849, for the production of paper currency. Furthermore, it is gratifyingly definite that the first printer was Brigham H. Young, with the perhaps unskilled aid of Thomas Bullock. Brigham H. Young at that time was a young man of about 25, the nephew of Brigham Young the governor and leader" - McMurtrie. Very rare. According to Rust, only 204 valley notes in the two-dollar denomination were issued without a serial number. McMURTRIE, THE BEGINNINGS OF PRINTING IN UTAH, pp.13-20. Rust, MORMON AND UTAH COIN AND CURRENCY, pp.60-65. STREETER SALE 2285 (five pieces of currency). STREETER, AMERICANA BEGINNINGS 69 (ref). SAUNDERS, DESERET IMPRINTS 3.

      [Bookseller: William Reese Company - Americana]
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        Shirley. A Tale

      London: Smith, Elder and Co.,, 1849. By Currer Bell, Author of "Jane Eyre." In Three Volumes. 3 vols, Post octavo. Rebound in burgundy quarter morocco, titles to spines gilt, marbled paper boards, tissue guards before and after contents. Housed in a brown cloth drop-down box. Complete with 16pp. publisher's catalogue dated October 1849 at end of vol. I; without half-titles as issued. Pages rather tanned and with some minor nibbling at the tips of a few leaves, overall a good copy. First edition. Her second published novel, completed in the same year as the deaths of her brother and two sisters, set during the Luddite Riots at the beginning of the 19th century. The character of Shirley Keeldar is partly based on Emily Brontë.

      [Bookseller: Peter Harrington]
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        Das Königliche Hoftheater zu Dresden., Herausgegeben von Gottfried Semper, Professor der Baukunst an der Academie zu Dresden. Nebst einem Anhang: Prolog zu Eröffnung des neuen Schauspielhauses zu Dresden. In Bezug auf den vom Professor Hübner gemalten Hauptvorhang gedichtet von Theodor Hell.

      Braunschweig, Verlag Friedrich Vieweg und Sohn, 1849 - Mit 12 Kupfertafeln., 20 Seiten + 12 ganzseitige Tafeln., Inhalt: I.: Vorbericht. II.: Allgemeines über die Einrichtung des Dresdner Theaters. III. Erklärung der Kupfertafeln. Tafel I: Generalplan. Tafel II: Ansicht des Theaters, von der Seite des Königl. Schlosses, also von Süden aus betrachtet. Tafel III: Innere Ansicht des Theatersaales, von dem Amphitheater aus betrachtet. Tafel IV: Grundrisse der unteren Räume und des Parterre. Tafel V.: Grundpläne des zweiten, dritten und vierten Ranges. Tafel VI.: Vordere Ansicht (Rundbau) und Querdurchschnitt. Tafel VII.: Hintere Ansicht und Längendurchschnitt. Tafel VIII.: Details und Logen. Tafel IX.: Details zur Vorhalle zur Königlichen Loge. Tafel X.: Plafond des Saales und der Treppenhäuser. Tafel XI.: Details des Foyer. Tafel XII.: Quer- und Längendurchschnitt der Maschinen. Einband berieben und fleckig, Buchrücken restauriert, Papier altersbedingt gilb und teils stockfleckig. Insgesamt gutes und seltenes Exemplar. Sprache: de Gewicht in Gramm: 12000 Folio. blaue goldgeprägte Leinwand.,

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat an der Nikolaikirche]
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        Lateinos

      London; William Edward Painter 1849 - Hardcover, brown cloth blind-stamped boards with gilt decoration and titles, 8vo, 9 by 5¾ inches, xxvi, 296pp, plus 2pp reviews of the earlier edition of this work at rear. Second edition, which includes the text of the Rev. G. Stanley Faber's reply to Rabett's original issue of this title, along with Rabett's refutation of this reply. From the title page - "Lateinos, (from Lateinus,) is the mark, or the name of the beast, having seven heads and ten horns: it being the name of a man: and containing the number of his name: (.), i.e. 666. Rev. xiii. 1, 2, 11, 16, 17, 18. In fact, Leteinos is the proper apellative, "mark, or the name" of the latin kingdoms, pagan and papal, which are the special subjects of the seven heads and ten horns of the apocalyptic beast, in St John's vision, and is, therefore, the solution of St. John's enigma." Rabett's original work of 1835 drew a response from a Rev. Gaorge Stanley Faber, which is included in this second edition as chapter XII, along with the Rev. Rabett's (slightly hissy) refutation of same. A bit of a spat in the arcane theology section, it would seem. Pages clean and quite bright, some browning to edges but unfoxed. Ink owner's name to front free endpaper. Binding solid but cloth showing at both hinges, spine faded and boards faded at edges. There is what looks like a document pocket on the verso of the front board, but there is no insert, and we can see no reference in the contents to what may have been included. Fascinating or laughable, depending on your point of view. Very Good [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: The Dartmoor Bookshop]
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        The California and Oregon Trail.

      George P. Putnam, New York 1849 - First edition, first printing. Octavo, original cloth. This is the scarce first issue in cloth, with ad leaf preceding the frontispiece. Publisher's catalogue in the rear and binding with PARKMAN set in sans-serif type on the spine. A good copy with the crown and foot of the spine showing wear and wear to the bottom boards. Contemporary inscription on the front free endpage. Housed in a custom quarter morocco case. The California and Oregon Trail is the gripping account of Francis Parkman's journey west across North America in 1846. After crossing the Allegheny Mountains by coach and continuing by boat and wagon to Westport, Missouri, he set out with three companions on a horseback journey that would ultimately take him over two thousand miles. His detailed description of the journey, set against the vast majesty of the Great Plains, has emerged through the generations as a classic narrative of one man's exploration of the American Wilderness. [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Raptis Rare Books, ABAA/ ILAB]
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        Expedition to discover the sources of the White Nile, in the years 1840, 1841, from the German by Charles William O'Reilly.

      Bentley London 1849 - First English edition. 2 volumes, 8vo., ix, 354; vi, 346pp., folding plate, folding map, modern red half morocco gilt, traces of old stamps to title and plate versos, a very good copy. Provenance: Humphrey Winterton (book label). Werne took part in the second European exploratory mission to discover the source of the White Nile, which penetrated as far as Gondokoro. Reputed to have been utilised by Burton, Spek, and Baker. [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Shapero Rare Books]
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        THE CALIFORNIA AND OREGON TRAIL: BEING SKETCHES OF PRAIRIE AND ROCKY MOUNTAIN LIFE

      New York: George P. Putnam, 1849., 1849. First edition. Second printing. Includes the terminal advertisement pages numbered 1 through 6 and 8, worn type at the edges of pp. 436 and 437. One of 500 copies. There were 1,000 copies of the first printing published a month earlier in 1849. 8vo. Original bluish gray blind stamped cloth, titles stamped in gold gilt on the spine, 448 (7) pp., frontis., pictorial half-title. One of the classic overland narratives. Field 1177 says "Mr. Parkman had all the genuine love of adventure of a frontiersman, the taste for the picturesque and romantic of an artist, and the skill in narration of an accomplished raconteur. It is not too high praise of his work to say, that his pictures of savage life are not excelled by the narratives which had their birth in the personal experience of Washington Irving, or the imagination of Fenimore Cooper." Rittenhouse 450 says "Although generally considered to be only an Oregon Trail item, the last part of this work describes a journey by Parkman down the Arkansas River and along the SFT in 1846, during which he met U.S. military units marching west." Former owner's inked name and date (1851), lightly foxed throughout, rebound with original spine laid-down, with light cosmetic restoration to the spine ends and corners, else a very good copy. A most serviceable copy. GRAFF 3201. HOWES P97. FIELD 1177. RITTENHOUSE 450. RADER 2608. WAGNER/CAMP 170 1b. COWAN p. 474. FLAKE 3277. MINTZ 359. STREETER SALE 1815. HOLLIDAY SALE 853.

      [Bookseller: BUCKINGHAM BOOKS]
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        Expedition to Discover the Sources of the White Nile in the Years 1840, 1841

      Richard Bentley, London 1849 - vi + 346 + ix + 354pp. 2 volumes bound as one in red boards with titles and stamped decoration to spine in gilt. Blind stamped decoration to both boards. Mild shelf wear to edges; corners bumped. Lower 6cm of backstrip missing; head of spine chipped with missing portion (approx 5 x 3cm) i.e part of title. Page edges all bright gilt. Slight cracking at front and rear internal hinges, binding firm throughout. Mark from removal of bookplate to front pastedown. Damp staining to rear endpapers and top edge of final pages (341 onwards). Text clean with occasional marginalia. Illustrated with line drawings. Additional photographs on request. 8vo - over 7¾" - 9¾" tall [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Oxfam St Albans Books]
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        THE CALIFORNIA AND OREGON TRAIL

      George P. Putnam, New York 1849 - Second printing with ads 1-6 & 8 bound at the rear and worn type pgs. 436-437. A Good + copy in the original cloth with some chipping and tears along the spine and the rear hinge broken and repaired, but not very cleanly. Internal contents are clean and bright with trivial spots of foxing here and there. Parkman's most famous work, based on a 2-month excursion through western states on a part of the Oregon Trail, including his experiences hunting buffalo with the Sioux Indians. A classic of western-Americana literature. Housed in a custom slipcase with chemise. Good +. [Attributes: First Edition]

      [Bookseller: Whitmore Rare Books, ABAA, ILAB]
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