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Displayed below are some selected recent viaLibri matches for books published in 1844

        Histoire naturelle. Zoologie. Première classe

      1844. 1844, , in-4, (42)ff manuscrits, chagrin brun, dos lisse orné à froid, tranches dorées (étiquette Chézaud & Braulart au 55, rue de le Verrerie à Paris), 27 dessins originaux en vignettes, à la mine de plomb, à la plume et au lavis, représentant les animaux. Avec un tableau récapitulatif, en fin de volume, de la classification des animaux. Ce manuscrit constitue probablement le cours d'histoire naturelle, suivi par Aimée de Givenchy en classe de première, en 1844. Coins et coiffes usés

      [Bookseller: Librairie Alain Brieux]
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        A Narrative of a Visit to the Mauritius and South Africa.

      London: Hamilton, Adams and Co.; York: John L. Linney, 1844 - Octavo. Original dark green fine-diaper cloth, blind rules and gilt title to spine, covers decoratively panel-stamped in blind, yellow surface-paper endpapers, top edge untrimmed. Contemporary ownership inscription of one Thomas Robson dated 1844 and bookplate of George Harwood to the front pastedown. Bumped spine-ends and tips skilfully refurbished, inner hinges repaired, frontispiece a little foxed, pale browning along plate-margins, short closed tear to bottom edge of plate facing p. 107 and to stub of lightly spotted folding map. A very good copy. Etched frontispiece with tissue-guard, 15 similar plates, 28 wood-engravings to the text, 2 folding maps. First edition of the author's second book, uniform with his Narrative of a Visit to the Australian Colonies, published the previous year. Backhouse (1794-1869) came from a prominent Quaker family of botanists and horticulturists with roots in Darlington, where his grandfather, also James, made the family fortune by establishing a bank. He sailed for Australia in 1831, performing missionary and humanitarian duties as well as collecting plant and seed samples which he sent back to Hooker in Glasgow, staying until 1838. On the return journey he spent three months in Mauritius and arrived at Cape Town in 1838, spending the next year and a half "visiting almost every inhabited town and district, and, while assisting at religious meetings and missions, carefully noting every point of interest in the country and its inhabitants. THere is a good description of Kaffraria, and of the Basuto, Griqua, and Bechuana countries, and the account of the Cape Colony affords valuable information concerning the first part of the nineteenth century" (Mendelssohn). Backhouse's observations also display his "good knowledge of botany, and throughout the volume there are ample description of the flora of the country" (ibid.). Hooker himself "recognized the value of Backhouse's botanical observations, naming a myrtaceous shrub Backhousia in 1845" (ODNB). The ownership inscription in this copy, belonging to one Thomas Robson, dated 1844, contains a conceivable family association: the Robsons were another family of wealthy Darlington Quakers which frequently intermarried with the Backhouses; Backhouse's uncle by marriage, noted botanist Edward Robson (1763-1813), was a "major influence" on his studies, and Backhouse's son (another James) married one Mary Robson. Howgego II B5; Mendelssohn I p. 62; SABIB I p. 107. [Attributes: First Edition]

      [Bookseller: Peter Harrington. ABA member]
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        Journal de l'expédition des Portes de fer

      Paris, Impr. Royale, 1844, in-8, grand , (4), XVI, 329pp, (1bl.)f, carte et 40pl, Cartonnage à la bradel chamois, dos lisse orné d'une pièce de titre brune (cart. de l'ép.), 40 bois gravés d'après Raffet, Dauzats et Descamps, tirés avant la lettre et imprimés sur Chine. Chacune de ces pl. est protégée par une serpente avec la légende imprimée. Nombreuses vignettes in-texte, carte dépliante. PREMIER TIRAGE de ce livre important, qui retrace l'expédition du duc d'Orléans en Algérie en 1839. Il fut rédigé par l'écrivain Charles Nodier, à partir des notes prises par le jeune prince. Tiré à env. 1520 exemplaires, cet ouvrage était destiné aux membres de la famille royale, aux personnages de l'Etat, aux dignitaires de la Cour, et aux officiers, sous-officiers et soldats qui avaient pris part au voyage. Tous ces bénéficiaires reçurent leur exemplaire avec leur nom respectif imprimé sur le faux-titre: le notre fut offert au capitaine Tourbet. Exemplaire grand de marge, dans son cartonnage primitif: cet ouvrage a paru "sans couverture, dans un cartonnage papier chamois avec étiquette au dos" (Carteret). Qq. rousseurs et piqûres éparses. Cartonnage un peu lâche, et frotté avec un coin usé. Manque deux serpentes. Néanmoins bon exemplaire de ce remarquable ouvrage, rare et recherché

      [Bookseller: Librairie Alain Brieux]
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        Traité élémentaire de paléontologie ou histoire naturelle des animaux fossiles considérés dans leurs rapports zoologiques et géologiques.

      Genève, 1844/45, tre volumi in-8vo mezza pelle con ang. rinforzati, pp. XVII-368 con 18 tav. lit. + XII-401 con 20 tav. lit. e XI-470 con 15 tav. lit.

      [Bookseller: Libreria Piani già' Naturalistica snc]
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        Elemens de pathologie chirurgicale.

      Paris: Bailliere, 1844. 1st edition. Nelaton, Auguste (1807-73). Elemens de pathologie chirurgicale. 5 vols., 8vo. Signatures 3 & 4 in vol. 3 transposed. Text illustrations. Paris: Bailliere, 1844-59. 217 x 130 mm. Half calf, gilt c. 1859, rubbed, some vols. All volumes need rebacking. A little dampstaining & foxing, 2 or 3 minor tears, but good. First Edition. Garrison-Morton 5597. "Nelaton was the originator of many important surgical advances and procedures. He is to be given credit for having introduced into general surgical practice the method of controlling primary and secondary hemorrhage by tying both ends of the severed artery . . . He reported his successful use of coagulating injecting fluids in treating aneurysms of the pelvic arteries and the marked value of enterostomy in cases of intestinal obstruction . . . He devised the soft rubber catheter and the porcelain-tipped probe"(Leonardo). Nelaton's contributions to orthopedics, to plastic surgery and to ophthalmology are also contained in his magnum opus. Orr 877. Zeis 605. Heirs of Hippocrates 1697. Waller 6830.

      [Bookseller: Jeremy Norman's Historyofscience.com ]
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        Gedichte von Wilhelm Waiblinger

      Hamburg, Heubel, 1844. 293 Seiten 16°, gebunden Erstausgabe in dunkelgrünem Pappeinband mit Goldprägung, Rücken an den Gelenken angerissen, Bindung hinten gelockert, Buchblock in sich jedoch fest. Marmorschnitte. Seiten stockfleckig und an den Außenrändern gebräunt. Besitzer-Namensaufkleber im vorderen Innendeckel sowie handschriftlicher Namenseintrag auf dem Vorblatt. Versand D: 5,00 EUR Belletristik

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Cordes]
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        Description raisonnée d'une Jolie Collection de Livres (Nouveaux Mélanges tirés d'une petite Bibliothèque)…précédée d'une Introduction par M. G. Duplessis. De la Vie de M. Ch. Nodier, par M. Francis Wey et d'une Notice Bibliographique sur ses Ouvrages

      2 p.l., 36, 492 pp. 8vo, cont. marbled boards (sympathetically rebacked by Trevor Lloyd), spine gilt, orig. blue morocco lettering piece on spine. Paris: J. Techener, 1844.First edition of this description of one of the most celebrated French collections of the Romantic period. This is Nodier's account of his collection in its final state. He was obviously considering retirement and wanted to realize his main asset. For this purpose, he had again prepared extensive investigations of the books to be sold as Nouveau Mélanges, a part of which he had published in the Bulletin du Bibliophile; death overtook him on 27 January, 1844, by which time his entire text had been set up in proof. 1254 entries.This copy lacks, as is quite often the case, Nodier's note on Duvergier's "Invention de l'Imprimerie" (3 pp.), the "Introduction" (7 pp.), "Notice bibliographique" (24 pp.), and the "Table & Prix" (28 pp.).Very good copy. Bookplate of Eric Speeckaert.

      [Bookseller: Jonathan A. Hill, Bookseller, Inc. ]
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        Un Autre Monde Transformations, visions, incarnations, ascensions, locomotions, explorations, pérégrinations, excursions, stations, cosmogonies, fantasmagories, rêveries, folâtreries, facéties, lubies, métamorphoses

      H. Fournier, 1844. demi-veau bleu glacé à coins, dos lisse orné à la rocaille, tête or, tranches jaspées, couverture Édition originale du texte de Taxile Delord et premier tirage des illustrations de Grandville. Pâles rousseurs, mais bon exemplaire cependant, comportant - ce qui est très rare - ses extraordinaires couvertures illustrées. Fragiles, elles sont ici remontées et doublées.

      [Bookseller: Librairie Pierre Saunier]
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        Description raisonnée d'une Jolie Collection de Livres (Nouveaux Mélanges tirés d'une petite Bibliothèque)?précédée d'une Introduction par M. G. Duplessis. De la Vie de M. Ch. Nodier, par M. Francis Wey et d'une Notice Bibliographique sur ses Ouvrages

      - 2 p.l., 36, 492 pp. 8vo, cont. marbled boards (sympathetically rebacked by Trevor Lloyd), spine gilt, orig. blue morocco lettering piece on spine. Paris: J. Techener, 1844. First edition of this description of one of the most celebrated French collections of the Romantic period. This is Nodier's account of his collection in its final state. He was obviously considering retirement and wanted to realize his main asset. For this purpose, he had again prepared extensive investigations of the books to be sold as Nouveau Mélanges, a part of which he had published in the Bulletin du Bibliophile; death overtook him on 27 January, 1844, by which time his entire text had been set up in proof. 1254 entries. This copy lacks, as is quite often the case, Nodier's note on Duvergier's "Invention de l'Imprimerie" (3 pp.), the "Introduction" (7 pp.), "Notice bibliographique" (24 pp.), and the "Table & Prix" (28 pp.). Very good copy. Bookplate of Eric Speeckaert. [Attributes: First Edition; Soft Cover]

      [Bookseller: Jonathan A. Hill, Bookseller Inc.]
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        Emigration to the tropical world, for the melioration of all classes of people of all nations.

      Published at the Concordium Ham Common Surrey. And sold by J. Watson. J. Cleave. Hetherington. London 1844 - 8vo., 24pp., the paper a little browned, last leaf with some foxing and minor staining, sympathetically bound in old-style quarter calf gilt. First edition: rare. Goldsmiths 34014. Menger p.240. Stammhammer III, p.107. Sargent (Utopian Literature>), p.23, Lewis (Utopian Literature in Penn. State Libraries>), p.59. COPAC finds copies only at BL + Goldsmiths + Glasgow + LSE. Not in Kress, Black or Williams. A curiosity of 19th century utopian literature published shortly after the collapse of the London Phalanx> and Doherty, Young and Tailor's failed attempt to persuade Parliament to finance a comparative experiment testing the Owenite, Etzlerian, and Phalansterian plans. John Etzler had impressed the Fourierist Hugh Doherty with his work, published in 1841, entitled The New World: or mechanical system to perform the labours of man and beast>, which itself was a sequel to his earlier (1836) The Paradise within the reach of all men, without labour, by powers of nature and machinery>. He had exciting and imaginative ideas about self-sustaining communities harnessing nature to provide what he called 're-acting power' through use of the sun, waves, wind and tides. Etzler also proposed a revolution in the technique of living with apartment blocks, central heating, elevators and air-conditioning. With his partner Stollmeyer, Etzler's inventive energies were directed into an extraordinary portfolio of mechanical projects to improve everything from farm machinery to printing and ship navigation. His was to be a technological utopia. With the collapse of the London Phalanx>, and the failure of [Arthur] Young's Fourierist colony near Dijon, Etzler was led to propose yet another scheme: the colonisation of Venezuela. This was outlined in Emigration to the Tropical World for the Melioration of All Classes of People of All Nations>, published by the Concordium Press at Ham Common. Among Etzler's supporters was James Elmzlie Duncan, the publisher of The Sun Beam>, whose verdict was that Etzler was 'the greatest man ever of this enterprising and wonder-working age'. In Emigration to the Tropical World>, the author reviews the advantages of the West Indies, Guiana, Honduras, Africa, Asia and Australia as possible emigration destinations for stressed Europeans. He finally proposes the formation of a Tropical Emigration Society and here sets out its objects and rules of engagement. It would take up the offer of land in Venezuela which would be made ready for settlement by a pioneer corps. The Society would pay for doctors and teachers to work in the community and a library would be provided. A portion of the land so settled would be owned by the Society as communal land, but Society shareholders would also be allocated their own personal plots. The rules of the Society are set out in some detail. Etzler's conclusion is a long and exuberantly enthusiastic portrait of the perfect opportunities in the Venezuelan community for everyone who joins the Society. There would be plenty of leisure time for everybody for 'amusement and instruction', with books, lectures, 'music and social songs; dances and plays of fancy and exercise; scientific amusements and instructions', and much more. Land would be cultivated by machines: living apartments would be saturated with insecticides; and the buildings would be lit by gas-light and there would be air-conditioning. But all this was subordinate to what are called the 'higher objects of the society' which, among other liberal ideas, guaranteed 'the non-interference with any opinion or private independence and domestic concern'. [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: John Drury Rare Books ABA ILAB]
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        Histoire des villes de France Avec une introduction générale pour chaque province

      Furne, Perrotin & Fournier 1844 - Paris, Furne, Perrotin & Fournier, 1844-48 6 volumes in-4 (27,2cm x 18,6cm) de (4)-XXIV-688, (4)-720, (4)-628, (4)-624, (4)-828 & (4)-820pp. 24 bandeaux, lettrine & cul-de-lampe. 6 vignettes de titre, 6 en-têtes, 6 in-texte & 86 hors-texte à pleine page. 133 armoiries de villes en couleurs dont celle de Paris à pleine page. Une carte dépliante des provinces de France en couleurs. Demi chagrin vert, dos à nerfs, caissons décorés d'un triple encadrement doré, titre & tomaison frappés or, tranches jaspées. (Reliure d'époque) Bel ensemble, reliure en bel état malgré les do passés; intérieur frais avec rares rousseurs éparses. [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: LIBRAIRIE EPPE FRÈRES]
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        Grand Concert Vocal et Instrumental, qui sera termine par Bolero Espagnol. Dansé par M. et Mme. Theodore. Partie vocale: M. Bertaut, Mmes. Chevalier, Pratz-Pouzols. Partie instrumentale: MM. Bernardin et Weber. Chef d\'Orchestre M. T. Eisfeld; sous-chef M. Tingry. - Salle Vivienne.

      Paris, 8. 10. 1844. Plakat mit typographischem Text auf gelbem Papier. Blattgr.: 86 x 61,5 cm.Versand D: 5,00 EUR

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Uwe Turszynski]
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        African Quadrilles Selected from the Most Admired Negro Melodies and Arranged for the Piano Forte

      F. Riley, New York 1844 - Disbound, engraved sheet music with some edge and corner wear along with toning here and there on all pages. The number "25" written at top of front wrap indicates page number in the bound volume. Number 27, 29 and 31 show up inside. Square, securely bound, in quite nice shape. G+ to VG-. This is the first set of Scherpf's African Quadrilles and features the following songs: Going Ober De Mountain, Boatman's Dance, Dandy Jim, Old Dan Tucker, and It Will Nebber Do To Gib It Up So. These arrangements were of African-American melodies and are among the earliest examples of African-American music in America. ; Set 1; 4to 11" - 13" tall; 7 pages [Attributes: First Edition]

      [Bookseller: The Ridge Books]
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        Complete Angler, The

      London: D. Bogue, 1844. A Wonderful Example of The Guild of Women Binders GUILD OF WOMEN BINDERS. WALTON, Izaac. & COTTON, Charles. The Complete Angler, or the Contemplative Man's Recreation of Izaak Walton and Charles Cotton. Edited by John Major. London: D. Bogue, 1844. Fourth edition. Presentation inscription on half-title "... an early copy/from the editor" " (John Major). Small octavo (6 5/8 x 4 1/4 inches; 168 x 108 mm.). lx, 418, [1, imprint], [1, blank] pp. Twelve steel-engraved plates (most with original tissue-guards) and seventy-four wood engravings in the text. Some very minor occasional foxing and some very slight darkening to the plate borders. A fine 'Art Noveau' binding, ca. 1900 by The Guild of Women Binders (stamp-signed in gilt on front free end-paper). Full dark green morocco, covers and spine decoratively tooled in gilt and inlaid with twenty-seven fish in maroon calf and seven 'water-lilies' inlaid in tan calf. Smooth spine, lettered in gilt, gilt ruled board edges. Brown morocco doublures elaborately tooled in gilt in a floral 'art noveau' design, vellum end-leaves with gilt dots in corners. The bare minimum of fading to the spine. A very fine example with the triangular blue calf bookplate of Arthur Howard Thompson on verso of front free end-paper. The Guild of Women-Binders was an organization founded to promote and distribute the work of women bookbinders at the turn of the 20th century. It was founded by Frank (Francis) Karslake in 1898, and disbanded in 1904. It helped sell bindings produced by women binders already practicing, and instituted training programs to teach other women. Frank Karslake was a London bookseller, and a founder and financial backer of the Hampstead Bindery. At the 1897 Victorian Era Exhibition at Earl's Court, he encountered several bindings by women, including Annie S. Macdonald, on display, and his interest was piqued. Soon after, he invited several women binders to exhibit their work in his London shop; this "Exhibition of Artistic Bookbinding by Women," which ran from November 1897 to February 1898, garnered a substantial amount of interest from the public, and convinced him that promoting women's bookbindings could be a profitable venture, if perhaps partially for the novelty. Whatever his motivations, Karslake soon began acting as an agent to women binders already practicing, such as Annie MacDonald and Edith and Florence de Rheims. By May 1898, the Guild of Women Binders was open as a business venture, headquartered at Karslake's bookstore at 61 Charing Cross Road. Karslake "saw that more money could be made by teaching to bind than by only binding and selling books. He maintained that women were well-suited to be bookbinders, due to their "inborn reverence for the beautiful" and their deftness of hand. He focused on both promoting the work of women already engaged in bookbinding, and training additional women to create bindings. Every member of the Guild received training in hand-bookbinding, and were offered employment after they completed this training. Members and associates of the Guild of Women Binders carved out a niche for themselves at the end of the 19th century by producing fine, artistic bindings by hand in an era when bookbinding was becoming increasingly mechanized. As part of its training efforts, the Guild set up a workshop, headed by Karslake's daughter Constance, near the Hampstead Bindery in 1899. The Guild accepted for training only women with an art school background, likely limiting them to a small pool of middle-class women; by 1903, they had an estimated 25-30 students. In keeping with the artistic styles of the time, many of the bindings featured Art Nouveau patterns, with sweeping lines and elegantly curved shapes. Karslake's advertising claimed that each binding was decorated with a unique pattern, though several patterns seem to have been variations of others. Ultimately, the Guild was not a successful business venture, possibly due to Karslake's inexperience in the professional bookbinding world (despite his associations with several binding operations, he had never worked as a binder himself). Karslake had tried to grow the Guild too far and too fast, taking on more students than teachers, and expecting too much out of his teaching staff. Some professional bookbinders suspected that the bindings were too sophisticated to have been produced by women, especially recently trained ones; a few even accused Karslake of passing off the work of the Hampstead Bindery as Guild work. Potential buyers began to mistrust Karslake and the guild's products (with some justification, as Karslake and his workshops had little knowledge of sound bookbinding techniques such as those practiced by other Arts and Crafts binders of the time), and many bindings went unsold. The Guild was shuttered in 1904, leaving Karslake bankrupt and many of the women who had worked with him tainted by the controversy (though some did go on to continue independent careers as bookbinders). An (incomplete) list of women binders associated with the Guild: Annie S. Macdonald; Ella Bailey; Constance Karslake; Olive Karslake; Edith de Rheims; Florence de Rheims; Helen Schofield; Mrs. Frances Knight; Lilian Overton; Hélène Cox; Mary Downing; Muriel Driffield; Gertrude Giles; Dorothy Holmes; Ethel Slater; H. W. Sym; Gertrude Stiles, and Gwladys Edwards. Art Nouveau is an international style of art, architecture and applied art, especially the decorative arts, that was most popular between 1890 and 1910. A reaction to the academic art of the 19th century, it was inspired by natural forms and structures, particularly the curved lines of plants and flowers.

      [Bookseller: David Brass Rare Books, Inc.]
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        The Beauties of the Bosphorus.

      London: George Virtue,, [c.1844]. Illustrated in a series of views of Constantinople and its environs, from original drawings by W. H. Bartlett; [and] BEATTIE, William, The Danube: Its History, Scenery, and Typography. Splendidly illustrated, from sketches taken on the spot, by Abresch, and drawn by W. H. Bartlett. Together 2 works bound in 1, large quarto (263 x 202 mm). Near-contemporary red morocco bound for George Rutland, titles and decoration to spine gilt in compartments, ornamental frames to covers gilt, edges and turn-ins gilt, marbled endpapers. With portrait frontispieces and engraved vignette title pages with tissue-guards and 168 engraved plates. Binder's stamp to front pastedown. Minor rubbing to extremities, foxing to prelims and endmatter; an excellent copy. Expanded edition of The Beauties of the Bosphorus with an appendix containing an additional six plates. Both works were originally published serially; The Beauties of the Bosphorus in 1838, The Danube between 1842 and 1844. "In 1835 Pardoe accompanied her father to Constantinople, and at the time it was felt that no woman apart from Lady Mary Wortley Montagu had acquired so intimate a knowledge of Turkey" (ODNB). The Beauties of the Bosphorus was published to capitalise on the great success of the author's City of the Sultan (1837) and to provide a text for Bartlett's engravings, which were among the earliest of his Eastern series to appear, and demonstrated "his skill in architectural drawing, and … an ability to handle more open landscape work" (Hunnisett, Steel-Engraved Book Illustration in England, p. 114). William Bartlett spent most of the 1830s travelling across Europe, the Middle East and North America providing illustrations for travel books, most of which were published by Virtue. Five of the plates are by John Cousen, including "The Column of Theodosius", which "well indicates the variations in tone he was able to achieve" (ibid., p. 96). In 1835 and 1836 William Beattie (1793–1875), "travelled in Switzerland and the land of the Waldenses ... during this period he published several poems and descriptive and historical works, some being illustrated by his friend W. H. Bartlett" (ODNB). George Rutland was an antiquarian bookseller based in Newcastle-On-Tyne active throughout the mid 19th-century. He was described in the Newcastle-on-Tyne Town Council Meeting Minutes of 3 June 1863 as "one of the most extensive second-hand book dealers in the North of England".

      [Bookseller: Peter Harrington]
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        The Beauties of the Bosphorus. Illustrated in a series of views of Constantinople and its environs, from original drawings by W. H. Bartlett; [and] BEATTIE, William, The Danube: Its History, Scenery, and Typography. Splendidly illustrated, from sketches taken on the spot, by Abresch, and drawn by W. H. Bartlett.

      London: George Virtue, [c.1844] - Together 2 works bound in 1, large quarto (263 x 202 mm). Near-contemporary red morocco bound for George Rutland, titles and decoration to spine gilt in compartments, ornamental frames to covers gilt, edges and turn-ins gilt, marbled endpapers. Binder's stamp to front pastedown. Minor rubbing to extremities, foxing to prelims and endmatter; an excellent copy. With portrait frontispieces and engraved vignette title pages with tissue-guards and 168 engraved plates. Expanded edition of The Beauties of the Bosphorus with an appendix containing an additional six plates. Both works were originally published serially; The Beauties of the Bosphorus in 1838, The Danube between 1842 and 1844. "In 1835 Pardoe accompanied her father to Constantinople, and at the time it was felt that no woman apart from Lady Mary Wortley Montagu had acquired so intimate a knowledge of Turkey" (ODNB). The Beauties of the Bosphorus was published to capitalise on the great success of the author's City of the Sultan (1837) and to provide a text for Bartlett's engravings, which were among the earliest of his Eastern series to appear, and demonstrated "his skill in architectural drawing, and an ability to handle more open landscape work" (Hunnisett, Steel-Engraved Book Illustration in England, p. 114). William Bartlett spent most of the 1830s travelling across Europe, the Middle East and North America providing illustrations for travel books, most of which were published by Virtue. Five of the plates are by John Cousen, including "The Column of Theodosius", which "well indicates the variations in tone he was able to achieve" (ibid., p. 96). In 1835 and 1836 William Beattie (1793–1875), "travelled in Switzerland and the land of the Waldenses . during this period he published several poems and descriptive and historical works, some being illustrated by his friend W. H. Bartlett" (ODNB). George Rutland was an antiquarian bookseller based in Newcastle-On-Tyne active throughout the mid 19th-century. He was described in the Newcastle-on-Tyne Town Council Meeting Minutes of 3 June 1863 as "one of the most extensive second-hand book dealers in the North of England". Atabey 922; Blackmer 1254. [Attributes: First Edition]

      [Bookseller: Peter Harrington. ABA member]
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        A detailed estimate and specification for an 'elegant new chariot' to be supplied to Timothy Hutton, of Clifton Castle, Yorkshire, together with related correspondence, dated variously in

      and 1845 1844 - Horne, Thompson and Holland, coach builders and harness makers, and successors to the coach makers Edward and James Houlditch, had premises at 93 Long Acre (London) having just moved from 254 Oxford Street (according to the Post Office London Directory for 1843). Timothy Hutton (b. 1779) had purchased the Cliftonestate in 1802, demolished the original Clifton Castle and commissioned John Foss to build the present Grecian style house. In 1844/45 Hutton was High Sheriff of Yorkshire. He died without heirs in 1863. Clifton Castle is now the seat of the Marquess of Downshire. The principal document in this small archive is a single folded sheet (folio size: 40 x 25.5 cms), with clean tears at folds (no loss), comprising a long and detailed quotation for the supply of a new coach at a total estimated cost of a massive 304 guineas (5% discount for cash). It begins thus: 'April 17 1844. Estimate of an elegant new chariot of the very best materials & workmanship with sword case & inside seat-box, the inside lined with fine cloth & improved watered silk or morocco squabs stuffed with the best curled hair & trimmed with lace double folding steps recessed in the doors trimmed with cloth & morocco the roof covered with leather & mounted with brass or silver plated mouldings, fashionable door handles, a splash frame covered with double patent leather, & a pair of patent double bodied lamps. .'. There follow an extensive list of further details of fixtures and fittings. The four accompanying letters are: 1. Horne, Thompson & Holland, 23 July 1844, informing Hutton that his new chariot would be sent up to Yorkshire 'per 8 o'clock morning train from Euston Square'. 2. Retained copy of a letter from Hutton dated July 30, 1844, enclosing £300 draft but also noting that 'the carriage appears large and heavy' but hoping that 'when a little more used, will not prove too much so for a pair of horses'. Hutton also points out a defect to the steps which has 'injured the spokes of the wheel'. 3. Horne & Co.'s response of 31 July 1844 apologising for the wheel problem ('which can be remeaded [sic] with a very little attention') and thanking Hutton for the £300. 4. Retained copy of another letter from Hutton dated April 7, 1845, suggesting in strong terms that a further bill from Horne's was unacceptable. [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: John Drury Rare Books ABA ILAB]
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        Gedichte von Wilhelm Waiblinger

      Hamburg, Heubel, 1844 - 293 Seiten Erstausgabe in dunkelgrünem Pappeinband mit Goldprägung, Rücken an den Gelenken angerissen, Bindung hinten gelockert, Buchblock in sich jedoch fest. Marmorschnitte. Seiten stockfleckig und an den Außenrändern gebräunt. Besitzer-Namensaufkleber im vorderen Innendeckel sowie handschriftlicher Namenseintrag auf dem Vorblatt. Sprache: Deutsch Gewicht in Gramm: 163 [Attributes: First Edition]

      [Bookseller: PlanetderBuecher]
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        The Dispatches and Letters of Vice Admiral Lord Viscount Nelson.

      London: Henry Colburn, , 1844–46. With notes by Sir Nicholas Harris Nicolas. 7 volumes, octavo (218 x 130 mm). Late 19th-century navy blue full morocco by Bedford (with his name in gilt on the turn-in), richly gilt spines, gilt French fillet border on sides, all edges gilt, richly gilt turn-ins, marbled endpapers. Portrait frontispiece of Nelson by Freeman after Abbott (volume I), 4 facsimile letters, 3 plans (2 folding). Contemporary engraved armorial roundel bookplate of Sir Henry Hope Edwardes, 10th baronet (1829-1900), of the Edwardes baronetcy of Shrewsbury (whose "choice and valuable library" was auctioned at Christie's, May 1901). An excellent set. First edition. The essential starting point for any attempt to understand either the mercurial personality or instinctive tactical genius of Nelson, never superseded. "This is the standard work of reference for Nelson's correspondence and is the principal source from which his biographers have drawn (and still do draw) their material" (Cowie). A beautifully bound set, from the atelier of one of the premier London binders of the period.

      [Bookseller: Peter Harrington]
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        The Dispatches and Letters of Vice Admiral Lord Viscount Nelson. With notes by Sir Nicholas Harris Nicolas.

      London: Henry Colburn, 1844–46 - 7 volumes, octavo (218 x 130 mm). Late 19th-century navy blue full morocco by Bedford (with his name in gilt on the turn-in), richly gilt spines, gilt French fillet border on sides, all edges gilt, richly gilt turn-ins, marbled endpapers. Contemporary engraved armorial roundel bookplate of Sir Henry Hope Edwardes, 10th baronet (1829-1900), of the Edwardes baronetcy of Shrewsbury (whose "choice and valuable library" was auctioned at Christie's, May 1901). An excellent set. Portrait frontispiece of Nelson by Freeman after Abbott (volume I), 4 facsimile letters, 3 plans (2 folding). First edition. The essential starting point for any attempt to understand either the mercurial personality or instinctive tactical genius of Nelson, never superseded. "This is the standard work of reference for Nelson's correspondence and is the principal source from which his biographers have drawn (and still do draw) their material" (Cowie). A beautifully bound set, from the atelier of one of the premier London binders of the period. Cowie 144 [Attributes: First Edition]

      [Bookseller: Peter Harrington. ABA member]
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        The Life And Adventures Of Martin Chuzzlewit [1st Edition / 1st State]

      London: Chapman and Hall. Very Good with no dust jacket. (1844). First Edition; First Printing. Hardcover. B&W Illustrations; Complete with the frontis-piece, engraved title [showing the improperly placed pound sign], and 38 plates by "Phiz". The Errata Page has the "Errata" with 13 lines listed below it. Xiv, [1], 624pp, bound in 3/4 leather and cloth, raised bands on spine, marbled endpapers, marbled page edges, and armorial bookplate of Rev. Mitchell Harvey, mild aging, binding and hinges tight. Considered the last of his picaresque novels. It was originally serialised in 1843 and 1844. Dickens thought it to be his best work, [1] but it was one of his least popular novels; 0 .

      [Bookseller: poor mans books]
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        Neue Gedichte. Erstausgabe.Halbleder.

      Hoffmann und Campe,Hamburg 1844 - Hamburg/Paris, Hoffmann und Campe,Dubochet 1844. 8°. 2 Bl., 421 S., 1 Bl. Halbleder d. Zt. mit reicher Rückenvergoldung.-Erste Ausgabe. - Die Sammlung enthält die Gedichte, die Heine in den siebzehn Jahren seit Erscheinen des Buch der Lieder in den Bänden des Salon und in verschiedenen Zeitschriften veröffentlicht hat. Die Seiten 244-421 enthalten Deutschland. Ein Wintermährchen mit Stellen, die in dem gleichzeitig erschienenen Einzeldruck wegen der Zensur verändert oder weggelassen werden mußten. - Goedeke VIII, 560, 73. - Wilhelm/Galley I, 436. - Gutes Exemplar. [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Stammerjohann]
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        The Cruise of H.M.S. Galatea, Captain H.R.H. the Duke of Edinburgh, K.G., in 1867-1868.London, W. H. Allen & Co., 1869. 8vo. With a photographic portrait of the Duke of Edinburgh, 8 chromo-lithographed and 4 double-tinted plates, 6 full-page and 6 smaller black-and-white illustrations, and a folding "engraved" lithographed map (34 x 50 cm), mounted on cloth. Contemporary half calf, shell-marbled sides, re-backed and with new endpapers.

      Allibone, Crit. Dict. Eng. Lit., p. 1117; Ferguson 12627; Forbes 2846; Mendelssohn II, p. 20; South African Bibliography III, p. 333. An account of a journey around the world including a visit to the British colonies in Australia, New Zealand, India and Hong Kong, conducted by Prince Alfred, Duke of Edinburgh (1844-1900) in 1867 and 1868. In 12 chapters, 8 devoted to the visit to Australia, and with an "amusing and lively" account of an elephant hunt. With a folding world map and a list of officers serving on Prince Alfred's ship, the H.M.S. Galatea. Alfred was the first prince to visit Australia, India and Hong Kong, and the first member of the royal family to visit New Zealand. With the stamp of the York Subscription Library and a 20th-century bookplate of A.R. Michaelis. Binding rubbed. A very good copy. An extensively illustrated account of a royal visit to the British colonies.

      [Bookseller: Antiquariaat FORUM BV]
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        A Christmas Carol

      Philadelphia: Carey & Hart, 1844. First Edition. Hardcover. Very Good. First American edition, first printing. Publisher's dark blue cloth with covers stamped in blind and spine in gilt. Near Fine. Cloth lightly rubbed and corners pushed in. Several tiny specks to top edge of page block. Pages with an occasional small spot or bit of foxing. With four hand-colored lithograph plates and four black and white lithographed illustrations. Quite a remarkable copy, with the gilt stamping very sharp and bright.

      [Bookseller: Burnside Rare Books]
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        ESSAYS ON SOME UNSETTLED QUESTIONS OF POLITICAL ECONOMY.

      London, John W. Parker, West Strand, 1844.. FIRST EDITION 1844. 8vo, approximately 225 x 140 mm, 8½ x 5½ inches, pages: half-title, title page, Preface, Contents, [1]-164 plus 4 pages of adverts, original boards, rebacked in thick paper with printed paper label. Boards rubbed with uneven pale staining, slight wear to corners, shelf wear to lower edges, neat ink number to verso title page, pastedowns and pale foxing to pastedowns and endpapers, first inner paper hinge neatly strengthened, hardly noticeable, tip of several corners have small turning crease, small hole to first free endpaper neatly repaired, otherwise a very good copy. See: Goldsmith, Volume 2, page 635, No. 33591. MORE IMAGES ATTACHED TO THIS LISTING, ALL ZOOMABLE, FURTHER IMAGES ON REQUEST. POSTAGE AT COST.

      [Bookseller: Roger Middleton]
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        An outline of the various social systems and communities which have been founded on the principle of co-operation. With an introductory essay, by the author of 'The Philosophy of Necessity'.

      London: Longman, Brown, Green, and Longmans. 1844. 12mo., in 6s, cxiv + 252pp., small circular inkstamp of a library on blank verso of title, original green cloth embossed in blind. A fine, fresh, copy. First edition. A fascinating and remarkable defence and analysis of the growth of the co-operative system by a female advocate, Mary Hennell, in which she outlines various communities throughout history which have been founded upon such guiding principles. The essay on Social Systems> was first published in 1841 as an appendix to The Philosophy of Necessity> written by her brother-in-law, Charles Bray, an ardent believer in the new wave of socialist theories of the time. The essay itself attracted much attention and was published in its own right three years later, sadly a year after Hennell's death from consumption in 1843. Bray felt that its publication was a fitting tribute to her 'untiring zeal and energy in the cause of truth, and in the promotion of every object which appeared to her strong intellect to lead to the advancement and happiness of mankind' [p.iv]. In his introductory preface, Bray outlines the reason behind the essay's initial conception. 'Its object was to add force to certain arguments in favour of the organisation of industry, by proving that such is no new doctrine, fresh-created in the brains of some of our modern visionaries, but one which has had its enlightened advocates in all ages and almost every clime' [p.iii]. Bray then adds a substantial, and previously unpublished essay, as an Introduction, which is an informed and detailed analysis of population and capitalist economics as further evidence of the benefits and necessity of co-operations. Hennell presents as models of co-operation a vast number of early and contemporary 'social systems', communities and civilisations. These include the North American Indians, Peruvians, Mexicans, Anabaptists, and Prussian peasantry. The ideas of philosophers such as Plato, More and Bacon are also used in defence of co-operatives. Although the purpose of her work was to highlight historical precedents, Hennell does not overlook her contemporaries, and she concludes by discussing such things as 'Mr. Owen's Plan', 'Fourierism', and 'Co-operative societies', amongst many topics. Indeed the work is notable for her full account of Robert Owen's theories and practical experiences, as well as of Fourier and his followers, and Saint Simon. Aware of the many detractors of the system, Mary Hennell presents a spirited, well informed and detailed account and analysis of the growth of such organised societies. She concludes with the words of 'Fourier's disciple'. Although aware that the inherent ideals of co-operativism - equality, harmony and perfection would always be scorned by some 'we shall not conclude with saying - That is impossible, because it is too beautiful; we shall conclude on the contrary, religiously - That is too beautiful not to be possible.' [p.252].

      [Bookseller: John Drury Rare Books]
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        Das "Va Banque!" Louis Napoleons III. oder Der Kampf mit Deutschlands Erbfeind. Gedenkbuch des Krieges mit Frankreich im Jahre 1870. Dem deutschen Volke gewidmet.

      24,5 x 20 cm 600 S. mit 24 farblithographischen Tafeln und der rotgetönten Titelseite. HLn der Zeit. Einband stärker gebräunt und am Rücken angeplatzt, Innendeckel mit Namenseintragungen, Titelseite mit Blutspur und Stempel der Leipziger Kunsthandlung Thust, die ersten 10 Blatt am Rand etwas lädiert, sonst an der Ecke durchgängig fingerspurig, eine Lage leicht ausgebunden, zwei Tafeln fleckig, es fehlen die Seiten 3 - 6 und ebenfalls die Seiten nach Seite 600. Erstausgabe des Freundes und Knastkumpans von Karl May. Julius Eduard Maximilian Dittrich (10.6.1844 - 10..5.1917) war Hauslehrer, Journalist und ab 1870 Redakteur verschiedener Zeitungen in Dresden. Da der frühere kaufmännische Angestellte vom 13.7.1866 - 13.1.1868 wegen Betrugs und Unterschlagung in Schloss Osterstein inhaftiert war, kannten sich May und Dittrich vermutlich bereits aus dieser Zeit. (May sass ab 14.6.1865 ebendort ein.) Das umfangreiche und detaillierte Werk zum Deutsch-Französischen Krieg stellt wohl einen Vorgänger zum 1889 bei Münchmeyer erschienenen Prachtband dar. Eindrucksvoll die farbstarken Lithos von: Preußischen Ulanen bei Rheinheim, Forbach nach der Einnahme der Preußen, Saarbrücken während der Beschießung durch die Franzosen, Eroberung der ersten Mitrailleuse durch die Bayern, Vernichtung der französischen Kürassiere bei Wörth, Erstürmung von Weißenburg, Ansicht von Pont a Mousson, Schlacht bei Vionville, Demolirte Batterie in Straßburg, Preußische Batterie vor Metz, Schlacht bei Belfort, deutsche Truppen überfallen Garibaldianer, Ankunft des Kaisers in Frankfurt, Pflanzung der Friedenseiche in München. Die Datierung erfolgte auf Grund einer handschriftlichen Eintragung auf dem Innendeckel. Der Titel ist in deutschen Bibliotheken nicht bekannt.

      [Bookseller: bebuquin]
 27.   Check availability:     booklooker.de     Link/Print  


        Die Ichneumonen der Forstinsecten in forstlicher und entomologischer Beziehung. Ein Anhang zur Abbildung und Beschreibung der Forstinsecten. [Bd. I-III]

      Berlin: Nicolaische Buchhandlung, 1844-52. 3 vols: viii,224; vii,238; xviii,[2],272, 7 engraved plates, 7 folding tables, text figs. 4to. HB. Orig. green printed boards, spines worn, one with some loss; vol. 3: hinges weak, boards coming loose. Some foxing. Good complete set in the original binding. Rare. Complete in 3 vols. This work is intended as a supplement to the series on 'Forstinsecten' by the same author. Contains descriptions of many new species.[Horn-Schenkling, 17693; Nissen ZBI, 3308].

      [Bookseller: Pemberley Natural History Books]
 28.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  


        Mexkemahuastan. Chief of the Gros-Ventres des Prairies

      , 1844. 1844. BODMER, Karl. Mexkemahuastan. Chief of the Gros-ventres des Prairies. [London: Edward Lumley, 1844]. Original re-engraving, plate impression measures approximately 8 1/2 inches by 12 inches, matted, entire piece measures 16 1/2 inches by 19 1/2 inches. $1500.One of 33 hand-colored

      [Bookseller: Bauman Rare Books ]
 29.   Check availability:     ABAA     Link/Print  


        China historisch, romantisch, malerisch.

      Karlsruhe, im Kunstverlag (1843-1844). - Text- und Bildband in 2 Bänden. Gross-8°. Gestochener Titel, XLVIII, 351 S.; 1 Bl. Lieferungsumschlag und 35 Tafeln mit Stahlstichen von Thomas Allom. Schöne Bordeauxrote Halblederbände der Zeit mit reicher romantischer Rückenvergoldung und blindgeprägter Deckelverzierungen. Einzige deutsche Ausgabe. - Auszug aus dem englischen Werk "China in a series of views". Die deutsche Ausgabe nur mit einem Teil der Kupfer der englischen Ausgabe, wobei die Tafel "Der kaiserliche Palast in Tsau-Tschän", die im Tafelverzeichnis angekündiget ist, wohl nie beigebunden wurde, da sie bei Vergleichsexemplaren immer fehlt. - Rücken verlbasst. - Sonst schönes, nahezu fleckenloses Exemplar in schönen dekorativen Einbänden.

      [Bookseller: Daniel Thierstein]
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        Prospecter af danske herregaarde (band 1-8 av en total utgivning på 20 band)

      Bok. C.A. Reitzel, Kjøbenhavn 1844-56. 96 litografiska planscher och beskrivande text bundet i ett samtida lätt slitet halvfranskt band. 24,5x34 cm. Nära 3 kg. Ställvis milt lagringsfläckad inlaga, planscherna som regel rena. Enstaka textsidor med veck. Proveniens: Främre pärmens insida bär stämpel "WEGEHOLMS BIBLIOTEK. I. SIÖKRONA". Johan Joakim Sjöcrona köpte Vegeholm 1846 och ägde slottet till sin död 1874. De här ej inkluderade 12 banden utkom 1857-68 och har C.E. Secher som författare.

      [Bookseller: Falks Hörna]
 31.   Check availability:     Bokbörsen     Link/Print  


        JOHANN ADAM KLEIN (1792 - 1875). "Radierungen von I.A. Klein". Titelblatt der Zeh'schen Ausgabe mit einer Ganzfigur nach halbrechts des Meisters, links beim Zeichnen unter einer Eiche sitzend, vorne Haustiere (Pferd, Kühe, Schafe usw.), im Hintergrund Gesamtansicht von Nürnberg, darüber Arabesken mit zwei von Kleins Radierungen (römischer Viehtreiber, russischer Schlitten) in Verkleinerung, dazu Affen, eine Katze usw.

      - Radierung, in der Platte bez., sign. und dat. "J.A. Klein f. München 1844", 23,5 x 17,5 cm. Jahn 328, III. - "Der Arabeskenzug ist von Eugen Neurether einradirt" (Jahn). - Im Rand vereinzelt minimal fleckig.

      [Bookseller: Peter Bierl Buch- & Kunstantiquariat]
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        The Cruise of H.M.S. Galatea, Captain H.R.H. the Duke of Edinburgh, K.G., in 1867-1868.London, W. H. Allen & Co., 1869. 8vo. With a photographic portrait of the Duke of Edinburgh, 8 chromo-lithographed and 4 double-tinted plates, 6 full-page and 6 smaller black-and-white illustrations, and a folding "engraved" lithographed map (34 x 50 cm), mounted on cloth. Contemporary half calf, shell-marbled sides, re-backed and with new endpapers.

      - Allibone, Crit. Dict. Eng. Lit., p. 1117; Ferguson 12627; Forbes 2846; Mendelssohn II, p. 20; South African Bibliography III, p. 333. An account of a journey around the world including a visit to the British colonies in Australia, New Zealand, India and Hong Kong, conducted by Prince Alfred, Duke of Edinburgh (1844-1900) in 1867 and 1868. In 12 chapters, 8 devoted to the visit to Australia, and with an "amusing and lively" account of an elephant hunt. With a folding world map and a list of officers serving on Prince Alfred's ship, the H.M.S. Galatea. Alfred was the first prince to visit Australia, India and Hong Kong, and the first member of the royal family to visit New Zealand. With the stamp of the York Subscription Library and a 20th-century bookplate of A.R. Michaelis. Binding rubbed. A very good copy. An extensively illustrated account of a royal visit to the British colonies.

      [Bookseller: Antiquariaat FORUM BV]
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        Su rutas. Áyurvédas. Id est Medicinae Systema a venerabili d?Hanvantare demonstratum, a Susruta discipulo compositum. Nunc primum ex Sanskrita in Latinum sermonem vertit, introductionem, annotationes et rerum indicem adjecit. 3 Bände in 1.

      Erlangen, F. Enke, 1844-50. - Groß-8vo (25.5 : 16.5 cm). I: VIII S., 2 Bl., 206 S., 1 Bl. Errata. - II: VIII, 248 S., 2 Bl. Tabellen, 1 Bl. Errata. - III: VI, 186 S., 1 Bl. Errata. Erste Übertragung des altindischen Kompendiums der Heilkunde in eine westliche Sprache, sehr selten. Das Werk ist etwa im 7. Jahrhundert n. Chr. um einen älteren Kern entstanden und gliedert sich in Abschnitte zum ärztlichen Ehrenkodex, zu Pathologie, Somatologie, Therapie und Toxikologie. Die Übersetzung schließt mit einem Index Sanskrito-latinus der erwähnten Pflanzen und Bäume. ?First translation of the Su ruta Samhitâ into Latin, and the first publication of this text in the West . includes the earliest description of plastic surgery? (Garrison & Morton, no. 11). - Hessler (1799-1890), bayerischer Gerichts- und Bezirksarzt, bestritt bereits seine Dissertation und Approbation mit indologischen Themen. Er ließ 1852/55 noch zwei Hefte Commentarii et Annotationes (24 und 106 S.) folgen, die von Garrison & Morton als ?separate volumes? unter eigener Nummer (7168) geführt werden. - Unteres Kapital etwas zerschlissen, stellenweise stockfleckig. Insgesamt schönes, sauberes Exemplar. Dunkelgrüner Leinenband d. Zeit mit Rückentitel sowie Rücken- und Deckelfileten in Goldprägung, marmorierter Schnitt.

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Müller & Draheim (VDA/ILAB)]
 34.   Check availability:     IberLibro     Link/Print  


        History Of the War In France And Belgium, in 1815. Containing Minute Details of the Battles of Quatre Bras, Ligny, Wavre, and Waterloo. [together with:] Plans and Maps to the History of the Waterloo Campaign. [&:] SIBORNE, H.T. Waterloo Letters: A Selection from Original and hitherto Unpublished Letters bearing on the Operations of the 16th, 17th, and 18th June, 1815, By Officers who served in the Campaign. Edited with Explanatory Notes

      London: T. and W. Boone, 1844 - 3 octavo text volumes, together with folio portfolio containing the maps. First-named in the original red morocco-grained cloth, title gilt to the spines, large trophy of arms within broad panels in blind to all boards, pale cream surface-paper endpapers; the plans in the publisher's red cloth portfolio, title gilt to the upper board, trophy of arms gilt to the lower; the Waterloo Letters in original red cloth, title gilt to the spine, blind single-ruled panels to the boards. A little rubbed and soiled, spines relined and with some minor judicious repairs, rear hinges repaired, frontispiece of volume I foxed and offsetting onto the title page, as usual, as also some foxing throughout, but overall a carefully restored copy in the original cloth; the portfolio a little rubbed and stained, professionally cleaned, the lining and flaps renewed, as also the ties; the Letters a little rubbed, spine sunned, but overall very good. Together an excellent group in the publisher's bindings. In the first, a superbly engraved medallic portrait frontispiece to each, and 9 other similar portraits in all; the portfolio with 11 engraved maps, dispositions in colour, loosely inserted, as issued; the last-named with folding map frontispiece, and on other similar map, 17 plans with dispositions printed in colour, 8 of these folding, 4 plans to the text The History is the second edition, same year as the first - which "sold off in a very few days" - with minor corrections, and there was only one issue of the extraordinary, and highly sought-after, Plans and Maps, offering the best possible contour view of the field, outside of Siborne's model itself. The Letters are a first edition. Siborne's published works represent an unprecedented synthesis of wide-ranging research, informed direct enquiry, physical immersion, expert surveying, and cutting-edge visual representation. Remains foundational to the understanding of the most famous, and controversial, military engagement of the nineteenth century. A recognized authority on surveying and plan-drawing, having published on the subject, Siborne was commissioned in 1830 to produce a minutely accurate scale model of the field of Waterloo. "He lived for eight months at the farm of La Haye-Sainte on the field of battle, and made a survey of the whole ground, upon which he based his model. The execution of this work occupied some years, as Siborne devoted to it only such time as his professional duties permitted. In 1833 the progress of the work was interrupted by the refusal of the new ministry to allot funds for it. Thrown upon his own resources he continued the work until its completion in 1838, at a cost of nearly £3000" (ODNB) The model stirred controversy, revealing as it did the vital intervention of Blücher's 48,000 Prussians; Wellington pointedly absented himself from the exhibition at the Egyptian Hall, and Siborne failed to recoup costs. He subsequently made a model of a smaller portion of the field on a larger scale to show the decisive charge of Anglesey's cavalry and Picton's infantry, exhibiting both side by side, and publishing his guide to the New Waterloo Model. "Having amassed much information from surviving officers on the battle and the entire campaign, Siborne in 1844 published his two-volume History of the War in France and Belgium in 1815 (with folio atlas); it long remained a standard work." The plates are all engraved by Alfred Robert Freebairn using the anaglyptographic process, whereby "objects with raised surfaces, such as coins, medals, and reliefs, into patterns of printed lines which suggest the contours of the original" (ODNB). The battlefield maps offer truly remarkable visual effects when viewed, as suggested, with the upper edge "placed nearest the light", this atlas is extremely uncommon, and we have never seen another set offered in the original cloth portfolio. Offered in addition to this set is an excellent copy of the volume of correspondence relating to Siborne's mode [Attributes: First Edition]

      [Bookseller: Peter Harrington. ABA member]
 35.   Check availability:     ZVAB     Link/Print  


        Martin Chuzzlewit - True First Issue with 100£

      Chapman and Hall, 1844. Hardcover. Very Good. A first edition, first printing, first issue with the '100£' sign on the frontispiece. Bound in contemporary marbled boards with leather spine and corners. Neat name twice to prelims and previous owner's very small bookplate to the front pastedown. Binding is sound and tight. PP. 624 with some spotting to the prelims and to the rear pages. Rubbing and wear to the edges, but a very good copy overall.

      [Bookseller: John Atkinson Books]
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        Cartouche, The Celebrated French Robber.

      London: Hugh Cunningham, 1844. 3 vols, 8vo, contemporary black sheep, marbled paper sides, gilt lettering. Bound without the half-titles. A scarce novel about the legendary French highwayman, Louis Dominque Cartouche (1693-1721). Peake (1792-1847) was a playwright for most of his career, but later wrote fiction for Bentley's Magazine. Edges rubbed; a couple of signatures sprung; a good copy.

      [Bookseller: Brick Row Book Shop]
 37.   Check availability:     Direct From Seller     Link/Print  


        Collection of Letters from Elihu Vedder to Porter E. Sargent, concerning printing and publication of Vedder?s poetry, including retained copies of Sargent?s letters to Vedder, plus original manuscripts of Vedder, promotional materials et cetera, 1914-1923

      Archive of correspondence, original manuscripts, promotional and other materials pertaining to publication of Elihu Vedder's two volumes of poetry. The archive consists of 19 letters, 48 pages from Elihu Vedder to Porter Sargent; 25 letters 42 pages written by Porter Sargent to Elihu Vedder; 53 pages of original manuscript verse by Elihu Vedder, some with small sketches and designs; 20 pages of typescript copies of Vedder's verse, edited and corrected by Sargent; 8 letters, 26 pages of correspondence between Anita Vedder and Porter Sargent; 3 letters, 7 pages Enoch R. Vedder to Porter Sargent; 43 letters, 45 pages to and from Porter Sargent concerning the printing, publication and marketing of Vedder's verse; Introduction and notes by Porter Sargent, 14 pages; over 20 promotional ephemeral items for Vedder's publications; approximately 16 clippings of reviews and other notices concerning Elihu Vedder. Elihu Vedder was born in New York City, the son of Elihu Vedder, a dentist, and Elizabeth Vedder. His parents were cousins. Between 1844 and 1849 young Elihu shuttled between Cuba, where his parents had settled, and the home of his grandfather in Schenectady, New York. As a boy, Vedder attended the Brinkerhoff School on Long Island and then served a brief apprenticeship at an architect's office before going to study, at about the age of 18, under Tompkins H. Matteson, a landscape, genre and portrait painter. In 1856 Vedder went to Paris to study painting with the French artist Francois-Edouard Picot. He worked with Picot for seven months and then traveled to Rome and Florence. While in Europe, he examined at first-hand the works of the Italian masters and studied with Raffaello Bonaiuti in Florence. He also became friendly with members of the Macchiaioli, the Italian precursors of the French Impressionists. To please his father, who had been supporting him on his Italian sojourn, Vedder briefly returned to Cuba but moved to New York in 1861. The Civil War had begun, and Vedder tried to enlist in the Union army but was rejected on physical grounds. Vedder then found work as an illustrator and contributed to Vanity Fair. He also created comic valentines and continued painting. He exhibited six works at the National Academy of Design in 1862, and his well known The Questioner of the Sphinx (1863, Museum of Fine Arts Boston) was shown there in 1863. The following year he sent his The Lair of the Sea Serpent (1864, Museum of Fine Arts Boston) to the National Academy's Exhibition. He became a full academician in 1865. Near the end of 1865 Vedder settled in Paris, but he soon returned to Rome. Using Rome as his winter home, he made sketching tours of Italy, particularly the Umbrian region. In 1866 he met the art student Elizabeth Caroline Rosekrans, called Carrie, the daughter of a wealthy Glens Falls, New York, family. The couple became engaged, and Vedder returned to the United States to convince her parents of his suitability as a husband. The two married in 1869 and, with funds from Carrie's sister, returned to Italy in October of that year for a honeymoon. The couple had three children, one of whom died in infancy. Italy, particularly Rome, remained Vedder's home for the remainder of his life. He also had a residence on the island of Capri. Vedder made frequent trips to the United States and traveled extensively throughout Europe. He met a number of Pre-Raphaelite painters while on a visit to London in 1876 and attended an exhibition of William Blake's work at the Burlington Club. Vedder's work subsequently displayed a more idealized human form. Vedder exhibited at the Paris Exposition in 1877 ? 1878. While on a trip to New York in 1879-1880, he won a Christmas card design contest sponsored by the Boston publisher Louis Prang. He became friends with the architect Stanford White, who assisted Vedder in obtaining a commission for five covers of the Century Magazine. Another commission to illustrate the 1884 edition of Edward Fitzgerald's Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam (Houghton Mifflin and Co., Boston) established his fame at home and abroad. His illustrations, intricately linked to the verses (which he rearranged to suit his vision of the book) were a popular success and exhibited widely. He converted a number of the illustrations, such as The Cup of Love (1887, location unknown), into full scale paintings. In 1889-1890 Vedder visited Egypt and saw several exotic sites, including the Sphinx, which he had painted more than twenty times earlier. The biblical subject of Lazarus also occupied Vedder. His Lazarus Rising from the Tomb(c.1895-1899, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston) is a closely cropped portrait of Lazarus depicted from the perspective of a viewer inside the tomb. It was not painting, however, but a wide range of decorative arts, murals, stained glass, mosaics, and metalwork that dominated much of Vedder's public art in the later decades of his life. Among his major work during this period were murals for the mansion of railroad magnate Collis P. Huntington and for the Walker Art Gallery at Bowdoin College in Brunswick, Maine. The latter was completed in 1892. Although he failed to secure the mural commission for the Boston Public Library (won by John Singer Sargent), Vedder was among the artists selected to adorn the newly built Library of Congress building in Washington, D.C. His murals for the library were completed in 1895. He completed a mosaic, Minerva, for the library in 1897. In 1898 he was elected a charter member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters. Vedder completed a number of pastels of the Italian countryside in the 1910s. Path into the Woods, Viareggio (1911, Munson-Williams-Proctor Institute) and Villa Borghese ? Rome(1913, University of Connecticut Museum of Art) are examples of these rustic depictions of Italy. After his wife's death in 1909, Vedder devoted more of his time to writing. His autobiography, Digressions of V., appeared in 1910. Vedder also published two books of poetry, Miscellaneous Moods in Verse (1914) and Doubt and Other Things (1923). He died in Rome. Vedder was one of the most popular artists of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. At his death, the Nation placed him in the "highest ranks" of American painters. However, his mystical and imaginative works fell out of favor with the public quickly after his death. A large retrospective exhibition of his work was organized by his daughter Anita in 1937 at the American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters in New York City. In 1957 the art historian Regina Soria discovered Vedder's papers (with the exception of the present group of papers) and hundreds of sketches in an apartment above his favorite café in Rome, the Caffe Greco. This discovery revived interest in his work, and since then his accomplishments as a mural painter have been recognized as important contributions to the mural revival of the late nineteenth century. Porter Edward Sargent (1872-1951) born in Brooklyn, New York, and raised in California, was a prominent educational critic and the founder of Porter Sargent Publishers in Boston in 1915. He studied at Harvard with William James, Nathaniel Shaler, Charles Eliot Norton, and William Gilson Farlow. He was described in 1949 as "probably the most outstanding and consistent critic of the American educational scene." Sample Quotations from the Letters: "6 Porta Pinciana, Rome, March 14th, 1914, Elihu Vedder to Porter Sargent My dear Mr. Sargent, I know I have delayed too long, but a virulent attack of laziness has set in owing to a recent birth-day ? showing me that I must not lavish the rest of my life in writing letters altho ? I write this with pleasure. Our little Japanese friend Nomura responded to the receipt of the directions you forwarded to him with promptness, sending me two books and some "nice base for vases" ? but fortunately delayed the other suggestions but will order "to do them newly" is so directed. I find that with me this is no time to go into the least extravagance, I must not only content myself with what I have but seek to dispose of all I can. The "Cassone" hangs fire ? the tapestries are in Germany and we are corresponding about the other things, so no more of Japanezeries for me. The whole "bag of tricks" relating to Alfaru ? I shall make over to you and send to where you direct. ? There are some good drawings among the things. The scheme is useless but makes a fine curiosity as the record of a "fad" ? in fact breaks the record. I have been drawing up some directions for teaching the child you said you experiment with. The demand for the poems keeps up ? but I have been reading the "Tea-Cups ? of Dr. Holmes ? and his comments apropos of verse making have discouraged me ? for I notice that I like some of my things better than I do his, which is a sure symptom of an advanced state of the disease. Only my ignorance of spelling keeps the divine efflatus from coming to the point of bursting. The fact of having to decide whether there should be two Ls or one in a word gives the vision time to vanish. ?" "6 Porta Pinciana, Rome April 26, 1914, Elihu Vedder to Porter Sargent Dear Mr. Sargent, You certainly are comfortingly prompt, card from Bangkok rec'd ? and from it I hope the package of mass ? I send tomorrow may synchronize with your arrival home in Boston. The job of revision has been a tough one also the making out of the Index. I hope it will correspond with the list my daughter sent on to my son, since that young lady has taken to art in which she has made astounding progress all type writing has ceased and so I have had to do all by hand. From 122 on all are new and I trust good. When I picked up by chance number 124 ? a neglected scrap I said to my self ? where in god's name did this come from ? it had such a glowing inspiration. Of course the number are pro tem ? I send all in hopes some may survive ? The editor will close up the ranks, omitted are 54, 57, 100, 103. I know Eben Thomson or Mr. Dearth might take an interest in the things. I write rather despondingly for all my affairs have struck a rut or adverse stream of fortune ? go wells are few and the go badlys many and serious ? but health, teeth, hair, digestion, are better than could be expected, all but a dizziness which prevents much practice on the wire or slack-rope, please remember I scarcely expect you will be in couraged [sic] to attempt anything in the way of decoration or illustration. I should be most gratified if I could see the things well printed in impressive clear type ? such as I see in many circulars or "booklets" and at a modest price take their chance. But I am talking into space, full of possibilities as that last word is of Is but at present seemingly empty. The phonetic business I will make a package of and send as a curiosity ? to be shown as "sich" and only as such. Will be a great weight off my shoulders and mind. What better closing is there than the old one ? I trust this will find you prosperous and well ? with kindest regards to the family ? I feel I have not said much that needs talking over but will wait until I hear from you ? name of book, cover design, which will depend on price tec. In case of need my cable address is simply VedderRome Anita sends her best regards ? E. V. ?" "May 12, 1914, [Boston] Porter E. Sargent to Elihu Vedder, Rome My dear Mr. Vedder, ? Yesterday I received your letter of April 26th and a package of manuscript, registered, which was apparently mailed in Rome on April 14th. This package contained the Table of Contents, the corrections, and the new poems, 123 to 128. I have not received the first 120 poems. I am left a little in doubt from your letter as to whether these have been sent? From your letter, I am left in doubt as to whether you have yet sent the manuscript of "Doubt" and "The Alfaru" manuscript. If you have not, I should be glad to have you do so, as I think I could do better with the whole series than with one. I should like to have Miss Vedder send me, as early as possible, a transcript of names, and so far as possible, the addresses from your "Register of Visitors." As I proposed to you last November, what I want to do is to send out to a list of several hundred of your friends, made up from your Register and the names in the back of "Digression", a circular letter suggesting or announcing the proposed publication of these volumes in two editions; one, a broad margin Edition de Luxe, offering them an opportunity to subscribe in advance. I want to spend $ 100.00 or so in promoting sales and getting subscriptions before I approach a publisher with any proposition. Then, if they do not jump at the opportunity, I want to publish them myself. As to business, I undertake all responsibility and risk and expense, but if the thing yields me revenue, I will deduct actual expenses from the profits, all of which will otherwise be turned over to you. If I so undertake it, I most certainly want to have the book or both books, "Poems" and "Doubt". Illustrated. I should be glad to have you send me the illustrations that I might get estimates as to the cost of reproduction. This is putting large trust in me, but I will have manuscript copied, ready for printer, and the original returned to you, if you request. In drawing up the circular letter, offering opportunity to subscribe, may I announce a limited edition of 100 copies numbered, with the title-page inscribed by you. Title pages could be sent you, returned here, and afterwards bound in. How much would you be willing to undertake to do as to this? The subscription price of such a volume should be $ 10.00, and if the book is decently, but not expensively printed, it ought to pay the cost of the entire edition. As soon as I have the list of names and the manuscript, I shall begin my campaign, but you must allow me three or four months before entering into any contract to print. The time is needed to create interest and get subscriptions, and I have a few other things that need attention in the meantime. Mr. Nomura was pleased to be of service to you. He has instructions to honor your orders and to render no bills. I might as well explain my attitude. Selfishly, I have my eyes on some of those chalk things which I couldn't buy, but I am willing to wait until they are reproduced ?" "May 15, 1914 [Boston] Porter E. Sargent to Enoch Vedder, 152 East 36th St., New York, New York My dear Mr. Vedder, This morning I received your letter of the 13th and a large package of manuscript containing the bound manuscript and poems, illustrated manuscript of "Simple Simon" and 30 or more photographs and originals of the illustrations. I shall take the best care of them, keeping them in a fire-proof vault. In the course of a few days I shall get printers' estimates on the cost of printing and reproducing the illustrations in half-tone. ? When I have a sufficient number of subscriptions, I thought it might be well to again approach Houghton & Mifflin, offering them the opportunity of publishing these forthcoming volumes so as to have their list complete?" "Capri May 27, 1914, Elihu Vedder to Porter Sargent My dear Mr. Sargent, Your letter came at the very last moment as we were leaving for Capri. We have frequently "come the Warbles" but never as we did this time in getting to Capri ? losing hand bags and trunks ? but this time we lost the cook and maid. However they turned up the next day. Anita left very ill with an ear ache which we hoped the change of air would modify but it has been steadily growing worse until she is worn out and I nearly crazy. We have been here 3 days and my trunk is still unpacked ? all this to explain the delay. She has written to Rome for the address book and I shall get out what I have brought today. And now to business, which I find hard to conduct with the materials in two places ? Capri and Rome. A moment's thought would have brought to mind Bay State but it didn't. Of course you must have from my son all the mass and illustrations I sent on to him ? if not tell him to turn everything over to you ? that I hereby authorize you to hold them. Your propositions are all most generous and I shall make it a point to see to it that you shall not loose anything ? the drawings and pictures you will get I hope if I turn out to anything will even up the accounts, and I will see that my daughter ? or rather I will direct her to see that my intentions are carried out in case anything happens to me. I think you ought to ? or beg you will keep to the poems only. The doubt is doubtful ? a fragmentary thing at best, but I will go on getting it into shape and then you can judge ? after consulting the proper persons if it is worth including in the book. ? The port folio of the Alfaru was left in Rome as that can be of no earthly use for publication ? except that as a Fad and accent might go into thoughtswhile dreaming another thing I have my doubts about. ?." "Capri, July 6, 1914, Elihu Vedder to Porter Sargent My dear Mr. Sargent, If I don't get this off to day, god only knows when it will reach you, my daughters illness and callers and now the advent of people who are going to make a little stay with us have combined to retard the "Doubt" perhaps providentially as I have been able to make many corrections I found that the quickest was to rewrite all ? which with what you already have would make a neat little book, one I think for which there would be a demand ? not coming from literary people but from the common sort. ? About the covers ? I will send on designs, very simple for the doubt, and somewhat more elaborate yet still simple for the poems as soon as I hear from you and the title has been settled ?" "July 13, 1914 [Boston] Porter E. Sargent to Elihu Vedder, Torre Quatro Viente, Capri, Italy My dear Mr. Vedder, Pressure of work has prevented my replying at any length to your two letters of the 27th and the 31st until this time. I wished to be able to report some progress before writing. In the next week or ten days I hope to be able to report much more. We have gone over the list and completed addresses from Directories and Social Registers, so far as possible. There still remain some names without addresses. Further, we have begun to compile an additional list of names to bring the total up to one thousand, from "Who's Who," from Club books, from officers of Art Clubs, and similar sources. I am getting up a little circular announcing the publication of these volumes. I wish to have on the front page very little ? the title, and in the center of the page a portrait of you ? the one that Curtis & Cameron use on their little circular by Pennington. The second page is to give a partial Table of Contents, taking the more imaginative and significant titles. The third page should be a very brief discourse or essay on the poems made up briefly of quotations from the poems, using some of the best lines and outlets ? the sort that will whet one's appetite for more. Then on the back of the four page circular should be an order form like the enclosed. As for the title, I like your "MISCELLANEOUS MOODS." Why should it not read thus:-MISCELLANEOUS MOODSIn VerseOne Hundred PoemsBy Elihu Vedder. Accompanying this circular, I want to send a very brief letter. The enclosed is what I have drafted to go to your personal friends, this to be modified for others. You needn't give your approval to all this if it troubles your modesty to do so, but unless you suggest other alternatives, I shall go ahead with this program as outlined. I have gone over the poems pretty carefully, but not your corrections in lead pencil on your manuscript. Some of the corrections, I think, should not be adopted, the original version being preferable. If you are willing, I should like to cut the number of poems to an even hundred. I think it would, on the whole, improve the volume. I believe it might save us possible unkindly criticism. You see I write frankly and without mincing words. ?" "July 22, 1914 [Boston] Porter E. Sargent to Elihu Vedder, Torre Quatro Viente, Capri, Italy My dear Mr. Vedder: Your "DOUBT" has arrived safely and I have read it through with the keenest enjoyment. I think it's big virile stuff and I should be interested to help it into print. The 58 quatrains present no difficulties to straight printing. How to handle the twelve short sections which you sent on half sheets, I am in DOUBT. I notice that you say, "The things sent now with the body of verses are the following," then naming the titles of these twelve short sections, "Creed," "Supine Comedy", etc. Tell me what your idea was as to the printing of these. My suggestions would be that we print four quatrains (of the 58) to a page, and then follow them by the twelve shorter poems ? one to a page. I think it would add much to the appearance of such a volume and little to the cost to have a few head and tail pieces simple sketches in line that could be reproduced by the zinc process. Now I come to the matter of the poems. We have edited the poems roughly, introducing your corrections, selecting certain ones for omission, to bring the total to one hundred. I think the volume would gain by that. I have gone over the text and the illustrations with two printers and gotten two sets of estimates. The expense of printing will vary between $ 400.00 and $ 750.00. It depends on how we do it?" "Capri, July 29, 1914, Elihu Vedder to Porter Sargent My dear Sargent- Your anxiously expected letter has come. I thought first to cable you but imagined that silence would mean to you to go ahead as I see you doing. The title will do. I had wished to limit the poems to ninety nine ? that being the number of the "disgrazie" or misfortunes of pulcinella Number 100 is a "mal augurio" fatal to him. I wish him to go on living; but do as you please, you have full control as you should have. Of course I expected the number to be cut down, but in avoiding "possible unkindly criticism" I hope you will not omit "Chippendale" or Libations" and such like. I hope you will take good advice as to my penciled emendations, of course correct all obvious errors. A Mr. Eben Francis Thompson has been here ? came on purpose to see me. He is a reader (with slides) of Omar Khayam, an enthusiastic admirer of mine ? he might be of great use . He is a friend also of Mr. Dole who it would be well to consult. I see no notice of an ordinary edition. Friends are constantly asking about this with a view of distribution among friends ?" "Capri Aug. 5th, 1914 Elihu Vedder to Porter Sargent My dear Mr. Sargent, ? of all my portraits I consider Pennington's the best adapted for the poems. It is not vignette a thing I hate and would spoil the title-page. It is good ? but as it gives not only the front face but the two sides, it is too broad a sort of mercator's projection as it were. The best for this purpose is Paxton's, the Boston portrait painter's You can get a photo from him ? We think the war craze will not affect us much here in Italy ? but 'tis a case of who knows ? if ever there was one?" "Capri August 8, 1914 My dear Sargent, Yours of July 2nd came the other day ? but Anita's departure for Rome ? she left yesterday ? prevented me answering at once. You see she goes on to dismantle the house and move the things into a studio and the deciding on what to save ? what to sacrifice has put us in a fearful quandary. Then the War craze and now the prospect of your sending on the whole "Bag of Tricks" fills me with dismay. First as to the "Doubt" ? I am glad you enjoyed it and think printed black it might be impressive even raise a Tempest ? in a Tea-pot. If you have rec'd allthe drawings last sent on you will see one with two philosophers and the symbol ? the labyrinth hanging against the sky between them. Now instead of making for the "Doubt" little head and tail pieces (the hardest thing to do) ? my idea is to take the symbol as a frontispiece ? print opposite the lines from Omar K-ym verse 27 my edition "myself when young did especially frequent " etc. for you will see by following its lines you evermore come out by the same door wherein you went ? which well illustrates Doubt and theology in general. For the ending the "Ever Open Door" would be appropriate ? Also "The Advent of Man" and the "Birth of the Idea" might be used making four full page illustrations by E. V. The quatrains of Doubt divided up into sections according to subject ? Hell, Saints Jerusalem etc separated by some little devise which I will send ? and the other things in the nature of short poems coming in at intervals- as the verses of Love come in, in Richard le Galienne's ? Omar Khayyam. ? this would break up the dog trot of the quatrains. Four illustrations then would make the book ? and not be very expensive ? half tone engraved by Simeone Chadwick? ? The book should be cheap consult le Galliene's book?" "August 12, 1914, [Boston] Porter E. Sargent to Elihu Vedder, Torre Quatro Viente, Capri, Italy My dear Mr. Vedder:- ? At last I see clearly how the volume is to look. We will take out all the verses from "Doubt," saving them for the second volume ? "Doubt." We will with your permission, keep the number one hundred. There will be six full page half tone inserts; twelve full page line cuts, reproducing your own lettering of the poems; and thirty or more head and tail pieces?" "Capri Aug. 18th 1914, Elihu Vedder to Porter Sargent My dear Sargent, I write this not knowing if you will get it unless sent by private hand such is the ridiculous but also the awful state of affairs brought on by the peace-loving German Emperor ? may the devil fly away with him. Of course all is panic here but I think if Italy cannot remain neutral, she will have to side with France and England, else risk a revolution. ?" September 30, 1914, [Boston] Porter E. Sargent to Elihu Vedder, Torre Quatro Viente, Capri, Italy My dear Mr. Vedder:- Since I wrote you last on Sept. 17th, I have received your two letters, dated August 18th and Sept. 5th. It is evident that the mails are halting and irregular. ? First, however, we must see the volume of poems successfully floated. I expect to send out, about the first week in October, two hundred letters with the printed circulars announcing the poems and with proof sheets of the illustrations, to two hundred of your friends. If the response is slow, then I shall wait another month before sending out the other eight hundred. If the response is favorable, I will push them out promptly. The poems and annotations are now all in shape for the printer and as soon as I have subscriptions for one hundred or so volumes, we will go ahead with the printing. We shall need from you a design for the title. The book, you understand is to be bound in rough, grayish Italian hand-made paper, - no cloth about it ? and I want the design for the title to be printed on Japanese vellum and pasted on the back and front, "Miscellaneous Moods" by Elihu Vedder. The book will be printed on Old Stratford paper which costs twenty cents a pound, and in Old Stratford Type. The enclosed proof shows the size of the type. ? No, there will be no Travel School this year and God knows when there will be if the Britons keep their backs up and Russia wins out as seems inevitable. I am absolutely neutral. My friends here accuse me of being strongly pro-German. At any rate, I am not frothing at the mouth with Germanophobia. You ask me for my frank opinion of your verses presented in your last letters. My opinions are always frank and they can be had for the asking, sometimes without. "The Year of Our Lord, 1914" is, I think, rather weak. Evidently the war has effected it. "In Umbria" is a corker, and I like the added poems you sent for "Doubt." I get more and more enthusiastic about "Doubt" each day. Some of the stanzas are undoubtedly weak, but fully two-thirds of them keep running through my head and they do not wear out by any means?." "October 28, 1914, [Boston] Porter E. Sargent to Elihu Vedder, 6 via Porta Pinciani, Rome My dear Vedder: ? I can see you wondering why things move so slowly. As I have suggested before, these poems are not my only source of pleasure. The war has gotten so on my mind that I can't sleep o' nights, and so I have taken to writing my thoughts while sleepless in the form of a little book entitled. "After the War, - What?" which I hope to see it in print in a month. How many years can we count on the war's continuing? In addition to such diversions, I am naturally doing somethings which I hope will eventually bring some bread and butter. I have recently reapproached the editors of the "Century," "Harper's" "Scribner's," and The Atlantic Monthly" in the attempt to stimulate in the editors some appreciation for really good poetry. Some of them claim appreciation but have no confidence in their readers. The result is the same in any case. We have to do all the printing ourselves. ?" "53 B Palazzo Patrizzi, Rome, Nov. 4, 1914, Elihu Vedder to Porter Sargent My dear Sargent ? Yours of Oct. 8th with "booklet" rec'd. Packing up in Capri and trying to settle in new quarters in Rome has brought all to a stand-still. Of course all later things are crude and must ripen a bit for the public stomach. Yes I will send them along. My daughter has found a lot of things I had rejected but did not tear up. I will send one with this she thought ought to be saved ? P.S. Just arrived The Cornhill Booklet for Novr. ? a fine sendoff, you are certainly doing things in style. Bravo!! I hope with all my heart the reproductions will be of the size and excellence of the "Labyrinth" sent folded ? only in the book not folded. Also the poems in larger type for I see how much more impressive those in my lettering are. The selections are good. If the poems remain in the type sent ? they will be very clear and legible only I would like them bolder. ?" "53 B Palazzo Patrizzi, Rome, Nov. 15th, 1914, Elihu Vedder to Porter Sargent My dear Sargent, Yours of Oct 28th just rec'd. The circular is all that can be asked of a circular, except the "original drawing" which seems to promise too much, slight sketch and artist's signature might have been better, some may expect an oil painting framed. However I will do my best "for Vedder's friends." I sent from Capen ? the Paxton portrait ? but see that the Pennington portrait on the circular will do very well, it ought to have a black line about it to unite it with the type ? I mean weakens the look of the page. I am sorry you have the impression that I think things have been moving slowly ? on the contrary I am amazed that they are so advanced - ? You cant imagine what confusion this moving into smaller quarters ? and this being seated in two spots Capri and Rome involves, I have to literally excavate things from innumerable portfolios & don't always find them even then. ?" "November 23, 1914 [Boston] Porter E. Sargent to Elihu Vedder 53 B Palazzo Patrizzi, Rome My dear Mr. Vedder, ? However, as I now have the proof before me and the thing is to go to press the last of this week, it seems a little doubtful. I shall then have the title printed on the cover in gold. This will look well on the dark brown hand-made paper of the cheap edition and also on the vellum of the more expensive edition. I will endeavor to concoct some kind of an editor's note to preface the thing and shall make up some explanatory notes to the poems, largely from extracts from your letters, thinking that you will not chide me too severely for violation of private correspondence. I am sending you under another cover some additional circulars of the poems. At present, we have as a result of the thousand circulars sent out and other work done to attract attention to it, sixty-two subscriptions to the $ 2.00 and thirty-three to the $ 10.00. I do not believe I can dispose of anything like five hundred copies, but I suppose you will want and can dispose of a considerable number in Rome, so I shall ship you fifty unless you say that is too many ?" "December 12, 1914, [Boston] Porter E. Sargent to Elihu Vedder 53 B Palazzo Patrizzi, Rome My dear Vedder: I am sending you under another cover the first two "forms" of your "Moods", showing how it will appear in the cheap $ 2.00 edition. Some of your poems you will hardly recognize. It will shock you at first to find them so mutilated. I see already from your letter of the 19th that you are going to grieve over the final stanza of the "Midsummer Day Dream" which is omitted. All the critics and literary advisers who have assisted me tell me it weakens it, - that it is an anti-climax and I could not but agree with them though if I had not consulted them I should have left it. I have taken the best advice I could get, which was pretty good and have adopted it very conservatively, attempting to retain everything that was especially characteristic unless it weakened other things. Still I imagine you will be as much shocked as the fond mother who first sees her darling with his curls clipped ? but in many such cases she has later grown accustomed to it and continued to love him., ? ? What I am working for however is a big Loan Exhibit of your work in line and color and type, which will show something of your range. I want to have this take place in Boston under the auspices of the Copley Society, in your eightieth year? I wish you would send me a list of such things as you have in Rome that are for sale, with prices. I think I could place some of them ?" "December 24, 1914 [Boston] Porter E. Sargent to Elihu Vedder 53 B Palazzo Patrizzi, Rome My dear Mr. Vedder: The Poems are out and in part distributed, and I am sending by this mail one copy, - others to follow. The $ 10.00 edition is going well and I have doubled the price on the last twenty copies, and have already some subscriptions at the increased price. Perhaps one hundred and fifty of the $ 2.00 edition have already been placed. ? I have received the inscribed pages for the first six De Luxe volumes. One of them I noticed was not signed. The others, I think, will answer. Of course it is important to have each drawing not only inscribed with the name of the subscriber, but signed by you, in order to fulfill the letter of the contract ?" "Rome May 26, 1915, Elihu Vedder to Porter E. Sargent Dear Sargent, Having just made my last will and testament ? reminds me that I must write you a last letter from Rome ? on the verge of this I hope my last moving. We keep this studio as a storing place ? although our things are stored also in other places and with friends. It has been something awful ? the combination of the war this moving and my son's illness and the uncertainty about my fine old chest ? which was held up by the authorities. We have just learned that the veto on its exportation has been removed ? a thing of great importance to us as the sale of it will give a little more to the money in my daughter's name on the interest of which she must try to scrape along? All things have been changed by this state of war ? even the boats to Capri, replaced by one little one?" "Capri June 28, 1915, Elihu Vedder to Porter E. Sargent My dear Sargent, ? I can now only hint at the things under which we are living and leave the rest to your imagination. After all the moving in Rome and from Rome we joined my son and his wife here. Heis simply quite crazy and we do not know from one moment to another ? day or night what may take place. His mind is one long disordered and troubled dream ? with only rarely a gleam, like sunshine, of his old sweet self. Inordinate greed in eating ? a total lack of consideration for others ceaseless activity beginning and never ending, or a dull reading over and over again of the same book. He never asks for a key but bursts open the trunk or room he wishes to examine ? and spends the rest of the day in mending the locks. In the mean time every available moment at all hours night or day ? killing flies pursuing them outside as well as inside the house. He is stubborn to the degree of scarcely admitting it is noon when the sun is pointed out to him high over head. And always an indulging threat of violence. All this while his wife was here ? and it keeps up now that she has gone ? for she has left for America. He since her departure has never even asked for her this after all her devotion to him. You can see what has become of my "little hermitage" - It looks sweeter than ever as it takes its departure. But the strain? I do not know at my age how long I can stand it. ?" American National Biography, volume 22, pp., 312-313 Dictionary of American Biography, vol. X, pp., 244-245

      [Bookseller: Michael Brown Rare Books, LLC]
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        The Book of Common Prayer Together with the Psalter

      William Pickering. 1844. Folio, [628]pp., printed throughout in red and black on Pouncey's hand-made paper, the magnificent title page is framed within a border of coats of arms of the Anglican episcopate, with large initials and ornaments engraved on wood by Mary Byfield from designs by J.A. Montague, printer's device at end, cont. vellum, gilt, expertly re-backed with original spine laid-down, leather labels. An attractive copy of this elaborate Book of Common Prayer from the press of Whittingham for Pickering. 'Printed by Whittingham and... even if the conception was Pickering's, the execution and typographic design in detail were the printer's... perhaps the crowning achievement of that great collaboration.' McLean, Victorian Book Design. p.13; Keynes p.86; Warren p. 163.

      [Bookseller: Forest Books]
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        Photographie signée (1891) dédicacé à Henry Goujon

      - France (Anatole) (1844-1924) Ecrivain français Photographie originale avec dédicace autographe signée à Henry Roujon, 1891 ; 16,7 x 10,8 cm (Reutlinger, Paris). Beau portrait de l’écrivain en buste par les studios reutlinger, en habit et cravate, de trois-quarts, les cheveux ras, portant barbe et moustache. « À Henry Goujon, son ami Anatole France 1891 ».

      [Bookseller: Thomas Vincent]
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        3 eigenh. Briefe m. Unterschrift.

      Zus. 11 S., 8. u. 4. By profession he was an architect, but subsequently devoted himself to journalism in Paris. He was one of the band of laymen who surrounded Frederick Ozanam and who founded with him the Society of St. Vincent de Paul. At Ozanam's suggestion he wrote some letters to The Tablet describing the aims and the work of the new Society. Frederick Lucas, editor of The Tablet, then wrote some articles on the same subject and in January, 1844, the English branch was formed, Wigley, who was by then living in London, becoming one of the original thirteen members. In or about 1860 Wigley took a leading part in forming both in England and in France the Peterspence Association for assisting the Pope. Shortly after, Pius IX bestowed on him the Cross of St. Gregory the Great. He met his death in attending one of the St. Vincent de Paul cases in Rome, a Protestant English sailor. Wigley nursed him, and had him received into the Catholic Church on his death-bed. Then falling ill himself, he went to the hospital of the Brothers of St. John of God, where he died on 20 January 1866 (Wikipedia). - Der Empfänger der auf Französisch abgefassten Briefe ist Jacques (Jacob) Mislin (1807-1878). Der aus ärmlichen Verhältnissen stammende Mislin konnte dank seines Onkels an der berühmten Lehranstalt von Porrentruy im Schweizer Kanton Bern studieren, wo er nicht viel später auch selbst unterrichten sollte. Der 1830 zum Priester geweihte kath. Theologe wurde 1836 auf Vermittlung des Grafen von Bombelle an den Wiener Hof berufen, wo er einer der Lehrer der Söhne von Erzherzog Franz Karl und Erzherzogin Sophie wurde und damit sowohl den zukünftigen Kaiser Franz Joseph wie auch Erzherzog Ferdinand Maximilian (später Kaiser Max von Mexiko) unterrichtete (u.a. auch in Erdkunde). Vor der Revolution von 1848 unternahm Mislin eine Pilgerreise von Wien über Budapest und Konstantinopel nach Jersusalem. Der danach erschienene Reisebericht wurde in mehrere Sprachen übersetzt und mehrfach nachgedruckt. In den folgenden Jahren leitete er die Bibliothek am Hof der Herzogin von Parma, Erzherzogin Marie Louise, wurde zum Abt von St. Maria von Deg (Ungarn), geheimer Kämmerer u. Hausprälat Papst Pius' XI., Apostolischer Pronotar, Kanoniker der Kathedrale von Großwardein, Träger zahlr. Orden (u.a. von Spanien, Parma u. des Ritterordens vom Heiligen Grab zu Jerusalem) sowie Mitglied zahlr. Akademien. Der Verfasser zahlr. Publikationen und Vertraute des belgischen Königs und des Grafen von Chambord blieb nach der Rückkehr von seiner Pilgerreise in Wien, wo er weiterhin in persönlichem Kontakt mit dem Kaiserhaus stand. - In einem numerierten, von Mislin eigenh. beschrifteten Papierumschlag. -

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Wolfgang Friebes]
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        Obras dramáticas y líricas (2 tomos)

      Establecimiento tipográfico de D. Francisco de P. Mellado, Madrid, España. 1844 - Madrid, Establecimiento tipográfico de D. Francisco de P. Mellado, 1844.Características: Media piel. En muy buen estado. Contiene diversas obras de Moratín y la obra de Hamlet de Shakespeare en la 2ª. Mitad del primer tomo. Con sellos del propietario original. 541 p. 1er. Tomo y 554 p. 2º tomo. (16 x 11) Peso: 750 grs. [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Carlos Héctor García Toscano]
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        Great American White Egret

      Birds of North America, from Drawings Made in the United States and Their Territories 1844 - Sheet Dimensions: 6 x 8.75 in. Frame Dimensions: 14.5 x 17.25 in. Hand-colored lithograph. A tireless entrepreneur, John James Audubon devoted himself to an unprecedented project, becoming the first to attempt the seemingly insurmountable task of documenting all the bird life of North America. This task grew out of a genuine and passionate interest in his subjects, and Audubon determined not only to complete a project that no one else had undertaken, but to approach it in an entirely innovative manner. His style and his persona were much like the notion of America itself: ambitious, animated, larger than life. The artist’s tireless efforts and remarkable talent culminated in the publication in London of his 435-plate Birds of America (1827-1838), undoubtedly the greatest work on birds ever produced. The celebration of this quintessentially American work, and the enterprising, talented artist who created it, has grown steadily since the time of its publication.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
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