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Displayed below are some selected recent viaLibri matches for books published in 1842

        Notices on Chinese Grammar. Part I. Orthography and Etymology....

      Batavia. Mission Press. 1842. [4pp] + 148pp. Handsome later half-crushed morocco, marbled paper covered boards, spine lettered in gilt. Presentation copy inscribed "From the Rev. Char Gutzlaff" in ink on first blank, ownership details of "G.G. Alexander R.M. Artillery/Chusan Feby 1843. Notes in ink, in Chinese and English, relating to Chinese study on several leaves, some marginalia, last blank includes pencilled notes apparently in a romanization of Chinese. Edges water stained, some browning. Lust 1014. Cordier 1669- Löwendahl 1670. Octavo. 21.5 x 12.5cm. Rare. Although standard bibliographies such as Lust 'Western Books on China Published up to 1850' state that Philo Sinensis was the pseudonym of Walter Henry Medhurst, "Philo Sinensis" is also usually accepted as the pseudonym used by Carl Gutzlaff around this time and what is believed to be his work appears in publications such as the Chinese Repository using this pseudonym. The use of Philo-Sinensis as the compiler of this grammar seems to be without doubt as stated in The Chinese Repository (Volume II, 1842 page 318) "Still our best thanks are due to Mr Gutzlaff who often takes the signature Philosinsesus) for compiling, and to Mr Medhurst for revising and publishing this volume...". Bridgmann notes at the end of his review that "The responsibility for the publication at least in a pecuniary point of view rests with Mr Medhurst." Missionary printer Walter William Medhurst arrived in Malacca in 1817 where he quickly learnt Malay and also became literate in Chinese. He worked in Batavia as superintendent of the London Missionary Society's printing press with John Robert Morrison [1814 - 1843], (son of the pioneer of Protestant mission work in China) and William Milne [1785 - 1822]. Following a period working at the LMS press in Malaacca, Rev. Medhurst moved first to Penang and then to Batavia where this book was published. He finally took up residence in China after the conclusion of the First Opium War and opening of Shanghai as a Treaty Port in 1843. He was one of the translator's of the Delegates' version of the New Testament. His output of works was impressive - 59 in Chinese, 6 in Malay and 27 in English.Fellow missionary E.C. Bridgman wrote in The Chinese Repository (Volume 11. Page 317) "This little volume of grammatical Notices is a book almost unique in its mode of printing. In 1831 and 1832, Mr Medhurst, the indefatigable superintendent of the Batavia Mission and its 'mission press', published two vocabularies, Japanese and Corean, which were printed entirely by lithography. The toil and expense of writing out so many words and writing them too in a Roman text hand, induced Mr Medhurst to try if he could not use common movable types and lithographic printing in conjunction; and this little book is the result. All the English portion of it was 'set up' (as the printers phrase it) in movable types with blanks left for Chinese characters, and an impression was then taken and transferred to the lithographic stone, on which the blanks for Chinese writing were afterwards filled in with the pencil, - and the whole was then printed together in the same manner as ordinary lithography" (When referring to this item please quote stockid 157183)....

      [Bookseller: Asia Bookroom]
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        Catalogue of the greater portion of the Valuable Publications of the Revd T.F. Dibdin, D.D. Purchased for Joseph Walter King Eyton, Esqr. … by Messrs Pickering and Thorpe, At the Sale of the Library of Sir G.H. Freeling, Bart. By Messrs Evans On Tuesday June 7 and following Day, 1842

      Elgin Villa, Leamington, 1842. With a watercolor coat of arms. 21 leaves in ink in a minute hand, rectos only, with a clipping from the Times tipped to last leaf; the remainder of the notebook is blank. 1 vols. Small 8vo. Half black calf. Worn, spine perished, front board hanging. Internally clean and very good. Custom morocco backed folding box. With a watercolor coat of arms. 21 leaves in ink in a minute hand, rectos only, with a clipping from the Times tipped to last leaf; the remainder of the notebook is blank. 1 vols. Small 8vo. Mad about Dibdin. Manuscript account of the Dibdin portion of the sale of the books of G.H. Freeling, including a Bibliographical Decameron, two volumes extended to ten, and the supplement extended to two, 12 volumes in all, extra-illustrated with portraits, prints, drawings, autograph letters, in full blue morocco by Lewis: "Charles Lewis had carte blanche to do the needful in his way … Purchased by Pickering for £150/0/0 … Proofs of the whole of the plates of Dibdins Tour in France and Germany … unique set, folio, bound in Red morocco by Lewis, Purchased by Pickering for £93/0/0" With a Signed twice by the collector, and inscribed to Mr. Charlton, 2nd July, 1842 With the signature of a Dibdin descendant, 1933.

      [Bookseller: James Cummins Bookseller]
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        La Bohème Quatre actes de MM. G. Giacosa et L. Illica. Version française de Paul Ferrier. Musique de Giacomo Puccini

      cartonnage rouge estampé de l'éditeur Première édition française de la partition pour chant et piano. Envoi a. s.: à Monsieur Em. Mennesson, Giacomo Puccini. Paris, 17/1/99. Émile Mennesson (1842-1920) était facteur de piano, luthier et marchand d'instruments, à Reims. Mélomane abusif et fou, il n'assistait qu'à la troisième représentation d'un Opéra ou d'un récital, au fauteuil 51 précisément, fauteuil qui lui était en permanence réservé et qu'il occupait chaque fois une violette cendrée à la boutonnière, quelle que fut la saison. Nombre de musiciens et compositeurs (ainsi Debussy qui fit le voyage de Reims pour lui porter Pelleas dédicacé) le fréquentaient et connaissaient sa réputation. Facteur reconnu mondialement, il est l'inventeur du Molliphone Mennesson qui assourdit le piano à volonté et à un tel point que ni des pièces contiguës, ni des appartements situés au-dessous, on n'entend les études musicales. Heureusement, ce dispositif tarda à se répandre dans les appartements parisiens et Jules Laforgue put écrire sa Complainte des Pianos qu'on entend dans les quartiers aisés. Ces enfants, à quoi rêvent-elles, dans les ennuis des ritournelles ? « Préaux des soirs, Christs des dortoirs ! » Et Mennesson de piano ?

      [Bookseller: Pierre Saunier]
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        Flore médicale décrite par MM. Chaumeton, Poiret, Chamberet, peinte par Mme E. Panckoucke et par M. J. Turpin. Nouvelle publication.

      Paris, Panckoucke, 1842. ____ Cette nouvelle édition - de plus grand format que la première - est illustré par 421 planches en couleurs (360 et 61). Le dernier volume est une " Iconographie végétale ou organisation des végétaux", illustrée au moyen de figures analytiques par P. J. F. Turpin, avec un texte explicatif raisonné et une notice biographique sur Turpin, par Richard. Des planches très légérement brunies. Bel exemplaire. Nissen 349. *****. 7 volumes in-4. [270 x 169 mm] Collation : Demi-chagrin rouge, dos orné en long. (Reliure de l'époque.).

      [Bookseller: Hugues de Latude]
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        Les deux frères (La rabouilleuse)

      Hippolyte Souverain. Edition originale rare qui deviendra Un ménage de garçon dans l'édition Furne des Oeuvres puis La rabouilleuse dans l'édition définitive de La Comédie humaine. Balzac y peint, sous les traits de Joseph et Philippe Brideau, Eugène Delacroix et son frère.bindings en demi basane mouchetée, spine lisses ornés de filets dorés, plats de papier raciné, bindings de l'époque.Quelques mouillures claires, exemplaire court de marge.Provenance: de la bibliothèque du château du Lac Tegern (Tegernsee), propriété du Prince Charles-Théodore de Bavière (1795-1875). Charles-Théodore de Bavière, fils du premier roi de Bavière Maximilien Ier, était  "Generalfeldmarschall" et conseiller privé du roi de Bavière (Tampon "S.K.H.D Prinzen Carl V. Bayern Güter Administration Tegernsee"). Rare exemplaire, de provenance princière, en bindings strictement du temps. Hippolyte Souverain Paris 1842 12,5x19,5cm 2 volumes reliés

      [Bookseller: Librairie Le Feu Follet]
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        Notices on Chinese Grammar. Part I. Orthography and Etymology....

      Batavia. Mission Press. 1842. [4pp] + 148pp. Handsome later half-crushed morocco, marbled paper covered boards, spine lettered in gilt. Presentation copy inscribed "From the Rev. Char Gutzlaff" in ink on first blank, ownership details of "G.G. Alexander R.M. Artillery/Chusan Feby 1843. Notes in ink, in Chinese and English, relating to Chinese study on several leaves, some marginalia, last blank includes pencilled notes apparently in a romanization of Chinese. Edges water stained, some browning. Lust 1014. Cordier 1669- Löwendahl 1670. Octavo. 21.5 x 12.5cm. Rare. Although standard bibliographies such as Lust 'Western Books on China Published up to 1850' state that Philo Sinensis was the pseudonym of Walter Henry Medhurst, "Philo Sinensis" is also usually accepted as the pseudonym used by Carl Gutzlaff around this time and what is believed to be his work appears in publications such as the Chinese Repository using this pseudonym. The use of Philo-Sinensis as the compiler of this grammar seems to be without doubt as stated in The Chinese Repository (Volume II, 1842 page 318) "Still our best thanks are due to Mr Gutzlaff who often takes the signature Philosinsesus) for compiling, and to Mr Medhurst for revising and publishing this volume...". Bridgmann notes at the end of his review that "The responsibility for the publication at least in a pecuniary point of view rests with Mr Medhurst." Missionary printer Walter William Medhurst arrived in Malacca in 1817 where he quickly learnt Malay and also became literate in Chinese. He worked in Batavia as superintendent of the London Missionary Society's printing press with John Robert Morrison [1814 - 1843], (son of the pioneer of Protestant mission work in China) and William Milne [1785 - 1822]. Following a period working at the LMS press in Malaacca, Rev. Medhurst moved first to Penang and then to Batavia where this book was published. He finally took up residence in China after the conclusion of the First Opium War and opening of Shanghai as a Treaty Port in 1843. He was one of the translator's of the Delegates' version of the New Testament. His output of works was impressive - 59 in Chinese, 6 in Malay and 27 in English.Fellow missionary E.C. Bridgman wrote in The Chinese Repository (Volume 11. Page 317) "This little volume of grammatical Notices is a book almost unique in its mode of printing. In 1831 and 1832, Mr Medhurst, the indefatigable superintendent of the Batavia Mission and its 'mission press', published two vocabularies, Japanese and Corean, which were printed entirely by lithography. The toil and expense of writing out so many words and writing them too in a Roman text hand, induced Mr Medhurst to try if he could not use common movable types and lithographic printing in conjunction; and this little book is the result. All the English portion of it was 'set up' (as the printers phrase it) in movable types with blanks left for Chinese characters, and an impression was then taken and transferred to the lithographic stone, on which the blanks for Chinese writing were afterwards filled in with the pencil, - and the whole was then printed together in the same manner as ordinary lithography" (When referring to this item please quote stockid 157183)....

      [Bookseller: Asia Bookroom]
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        MASTER TIMOTHY'S BOOK CASE; or the Magic - Lanthorn of the World.

      1st edition (Gimbel H381 ["1844"]; Kitton, 'Dickensiana' 532; Miller, p. 246; NCBEL III, 794). Not in Wolff. SIGNED by Cruikshank on the recto of the frontis leaf. London: William Emans, 1842. [2], 3, [1 (blank)], 593, [1] pp. "Directions to the Binder" last page. Frontis, engraved title & 14 inserted plates. 8vo. 8-1/4" x 5-1/4" Average wear to binding. 2 prior owner signatures. Modest foxing. A Very Good copy.

      [Bookseller: Tavistock Books]
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        Report of the Dinner Given to Charles Dickens, in Boston, February 1, 1842. Reported by Thomas Gill and William English, reporters on the Morning Post. Most of the speeches revised by their authors. FIRST EDITION.

      Boston: William Crosby and Co. 1842 Orig. pale pink printed wrappers; spine later reinforced with appropriate paper. Blind university stamp on title. 66pp.BL, NLS & V&A only on Copac. Dickens first trip to America (which was memoralised in American Notes

      [Bookseller: Jarndyce Rare Books]
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        Album Pittoresque d'un Voyage autour du Monde, exécuté par ordre du gouvernement Français. Gravures en taille-douce entièrement dessinées par l'Amiral Paris. Texte par M. Casimir Henricy, publiciste, ancien marin, ayant fait partie de l'expédition.

      Paris: Ch. Noblet, n.d., but, 1842. Oblong folio, with 25 engraved plates; some foxing, cloth a bit spotted, small chip from corner of title-page; yet a very good copy in original crimson cloth, lettered and decorated in black and gilt. A scarce series of views of places visited by Laplace's Artémise voyage, bearing a short inscription by the author explaining his commission aboard the Artémise, signed by Pâris and dated 1886.The plates, all by Pâris, include a fine Hawaiian view ("Honorourou, capitale d'Ouahou, vu du mouillage - Iles Hawaï") as well as a view of the Tasmanian penal settlement("Etablissement Pénitentiaire de Port Arthur - Terre de Van Diemen"). There is also a view of the Artémise being careened at Papeete in Tahiti. The other images show the Artémise at sea under full sail, the African coast, South Africa, Indian Ocean, Coromandel, Bengal, Ceylon, Malabar, Bombay, Middle East, Philippines, China, and South America.Pâris started his naval career on the Astrolabe under Dumont d'Urville; he sailed as an officer on the Favorite on Laplace's first voyage, and sailed again with Laplace on the Artémise in her final voyage of 1837-1840. This was to be his last voyage too since he lost an arm as a result of a terrible accident. Nonetheless he continued a distinguished naval career. This was not his only book: his important study of native ship-building (Essai sur la construction navale des peuples extra-européens) was published in 1841.This is a remarkably rare book, not recorded by Cordier, Ferguson, Forbes, Borba de Moraes, Mendelssohn, the Hill Catalogue, Sabin, Judd, or Blackmer. The only bibliographical references we have found for the book are those by Rolf du Rietz (who records a copy in the Kroepelien collection) and O'Reilly-Reitman. This must be one of the scarcest books relating to the French grands voyages, and one wonders whether there may have been some impediment to full publication.These images are of Laplace's second voyage, a voyage that set out to consolidate French interests in the Pacific, particularly in Tahiti and Hawaii. The visit to Hawaii in July 1839 was one of "avowed hostility" (Judd), forcing the government to sign a treaty granting freedom of worship by Catholics, the introduction of French priests, wines and brandies, and the trial of French nationals by foreign juries only, backed up by a $20,000 guarantee, which emptied the treasury.

      [Bookseller: Hordern House]
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        A Ramble in Malta and Sicily, in the Autumn of 1841.

      London: Tyler & Reed for Smith, Elder & Co, 1842. Royal octavo, chromolithographic additional title by Angas, printed by M. and N. Hanhart, engraved dedication plate, 12 tinted lithographic plates by Angas, two wood-engraved illustrations; in original green cloth, all edges gilt. First edition of Angas' first illustrated work, published the year before he sailed for Australia. This is a subscriber's copy, signed John Abraham on the front free endpaper: there are one hundred and seventy-nine names (including 'Abraham, J. Esq.') on the list of subscribers, and one hundred and ninety-seven copies subscribed for.Angas early showed an interest in natural history and art, but as a young man took a place in a London office. He studied under the natural history artist Benjamin Waterhouse Hawkins, thanking the latter's 'new and infallible system' of drawing in the introduction to this work. In August 1841 he left on a tour of the Mediterranean, returning in November, and publishing this account of the trip less than a year later.The work features a handsome series of twelve lithographic plates, taken from his own sketches from nature and drawn by him on the stone. The letterpress is taken from Angas' journal and shows his lively and inquisitive imagination, as well as giving many descriptive details of the pictures.Now surprisingly rare, the Ramble shows Angas coming to maturity as an artist, and makes an important addition to any collection of Australian illustrated books. Plates a little spotted else very good.

      [Bookseller: Hordern House]
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        New Government House, Sydney.

      Sydney: J.S. Prout, 1842. Lithographic view, 185 x 295 mm; mounted. An idyllic view of Government House and its castellated bathing house seen across Farm Cove, from the Botanical Gardens. The signal station on Fort Phillip Hill is in the background to the left and Macquarie Fort to the right. The view was one of the suite of lithographs which Prout published in four parts as Sydney Illustrated.John Skinner Prout arrived in Sydney in 1841 and spent three years lecturing on art, working as a scene painter and art teacher. He made extensive sketching tours of New South Wales, before travelling to Van Diemen's Land in January 1844 where he worked for four years before returning to England. Lacking margins.

      [Bookseller: Hordern House]
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        Wiener Zeitschrift für Kunst, Literatur, Theater und Mode, 1842, drittes Quartal.

      Anton Strauß, 1842. 40 SeitenEhem. Bibliotheksexemplar mit Stempel und Signatur. Noch GUTER Zustand, ein paar Gebrauchsspuren. Einband bestossen, kleinere Anstreichungen möglich. Ex-library with stamp and signature. Still in a GOOD condition, same visible traces of use, bumped, small markings possible. Versand D: 5,00 EUR

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Bookfarm]
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         PLEIADE (La) Ballades, fabliaux. Nouvelles et légendes. Homère, Veda-Vyasa, Marie de France, Burger, Hoffmann, Ludwig Tieg, Ch. Dickens, Gavarni, H. Blaze.

      Paris, L. Curmer, 1842, pet. in 8°, ill. de 11 front. gravés à l'eau-forte, 1 planche h.t. et 66 vignettes in t. gravées sur bois d'après les dessins de Penguilly, Jacque, Jeanron, Trimolet, Féart, Daubigny, Pauquet, dont 10 sur Chine monté, demi-chagrin marron XIXe, dos à caissons dorés, t. dorée, rousseurs. Exemplaire du premier tirage de ce recueil romantique fort recherché, formé de dix livraisons parues séparément en 1841 et réunies sous ce titre. Il comprend : BURGER, Léonore, - HOFFMANN, le Conseiller Krespel - DICKENS le Baron de Grogzwig - EMMICH, Geneviève de Brabant - HOMÈRE le Combat des rats et des grenouilles - BLAZE Rosemonde - SAVITRI Episode de Mahabharate - GAVARNI Madame Acker - MARIE DE FRANCE Lai des deux amants - TIECK la Réconciliation. Belle impression de Curmer. ¶ " un des plus importants livres illustrés du XIXe siècle " (Cartertet) - Escoffier, le mouvement romantique, n°1886 - Vicaire VI/704

      [Bookseller: L'intersigne Livres anciens]
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         Cours d'économie politique fait au Collège de France année 1841-42 et année 1842-43

      Paris, Capelle, 1842-1844, 2 vol. in 8°, de 2ff. 420pp. - relié à la suite : Les fortifications de Paris, lettre à M. le Comte Molé. P. Gosselin 1841, 31pp.; & 2ff. III-547pp., demi-basane verte époque, dos lisse à filets dorés, qq; rares rousseurs. Exemplaire de Jules Chodron de Courcel avec un cachet d'inventaire au titre et le nom "J. Chodron" frappé en queue. Edition originale du Cours d'économie de Michel Chevalier successeur de Rossi à la chaire d'économie politique. Vulgarisateur de talent, dans la ligne de Bastiat il va opérer une synthèse originale entre la doctrine libérale libre-échangiste et de celle des saint-simoniens. En 1850 un 3e volume consacré à la monnaie paraîtra séparément. ¶ cf Einaudi 1049 - Goldsmiths' 32532. - Kress C.5766 - Coquelin & Guillaumin I p.363 - Palgrave I p.275 - Walch, 362.

      [Bookseller: L'intersigne Livres anciens]
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        Objections to the project of His Excellency Sir George Gipps, for raising a Loan to be secured on the ordinary Revenue of the Colony; submitted by His Excellency to the Legislative Council of New South Wales, 1841.

      Sydney: James Tegg, George Street, 1842. Octavo, 20 pp.; in plain brown wrappers. Scarce attack on Gipps: the final ten pages comprise a protest regarding the New South Wales Legislative Council signed by both John Jamison and John Blaxland. Having unsuccessfully sought English aid in cancelling immigration orders after the expensive rush of bounty immigrants, and after being severely censured for issuing orders in excess of land revenue, Gipps submitted a plan to the Local Legislature 'for raising by Debentures the sum of £200,000, to be secured on, and paid out of the Ordinary Revenue of the Colony, if not satisfied within three years, out of the Land Fund, and bearing interest not exceeding the rate of six per cent. per annum, payable out of the Ordinary Revenue of the Colony... '. This pamphlet sets out the objections to the plan, which was not accepted. Gipps was then forced to draw on the military chest, and when that was exhausted, withdrew government deposits from the banks to meet the deficits already incurred for bounty payments. When all these measures proved inadequate, he finally borrowed £50,000 in debentures, "a daring innovation" (ADB). Very good.

      [Bookseller: Hordern House]
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        The Trust Account [for the] Estate of William Rae Deceased, with Wellwood Hyslop and Andrew Murray his executors and trustees, Jamaica...

      1842 7 numbered pages of ms. on 5 folio sheets, ms. title on first page & with secretarial notes on final page, as originally sewn & with signed ms. witness statement attached with pin; old folds & a little dusted.The Rae brothers, James, William and John, were Scottish born plantation owners on the Island of Jamaica. James died in 1815 whereupon his estate was divided equally between his siblings. William died in 1837 assigning Wellwood Hyslop and Andrew Murray, to execute his will and oversee the ongoing operations at his plantations, Petersfield, St. Davids and St. Thomas. This document, drawn up by the solicitors Mais & Duff, records the outstanding accounts up until the death of Murray on 18 December, 1841. Wellwood Hyslop, the surviving trustee, was an influential merchant and public figure in Jamaica. His roles included that of Colonel in the Surrey Militia horse Regiment, a member of the House of Assembly for the constituency of Port Royal, magistrate and judge, and chairman of the Planters' Bank.

      [Bookseller: Jarndyce Rare Books]
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        Notices on Chinese Grammar. Part I. Orthography and Etymology.

      Batavia.: Mission Press.. 1842.. [4pp] + 148pp. Handsome later half-crushed morocco, marbled paper covered boards, spine lettered in gilt. Presentation copy inscribed "From the Rev. Char Gutzlaff" in ink on first blank, ownership details of "G.G. Alexander R.M. Artillery/Chusan Feby 1843. Notes in ink, in Chinese and English, relating to Chinese study on several leaves, some marginalia, last blank includes pencilled notes apparently in a romanization of Chinese. Edges water stained, some browning. Lust 1014. Cordier 1669- Löwendahl 1670. Octavo. 21.5 x 12.5cm. Rare. Although standard bibliographies such as Lust 'Western Books on China Published up to 1850' state that Philo Sinensis was the pseudonym of Walter Henry Medhurst, "Philo Sinensis" is also usually accepted as the pseudonym used by Carl Gutzlaff around this time and what is believed to be his work appears in publications such as the Chinese Repository using this pseudonym. The use of Philo-Sinensis as the compiler of this grammar seems to be without doubt as stated in The Chinese Repository (Volume II, 1842 page 318) "Still our best thanks are due to Mr Gutzlaff who often takes the signature Philosinsesus) for compiling, and to Mr Medhurst for revising and publishing this volume...". Bridgmann notes at the end of his review that "The responsibility for the publication at least in a pecuniary point of view rests with Mr Medhurst." Missionary printer Walter William Medhurst arrived in Malacca in 1817 where he quickly learnt Malay and also became literate in Chinese. He worked in Batavia as superintendent of the London Missionary Society's printing press with John Robert Morrison [1814 - 1843], (son of the pioneer of Protestant mission work in China) and William Milne [1785 - 1822]. Following a period working at the LMS press in Malaacca, Rev. Medhurst moved first to Penang and then to Batavia where this book was published. He finally took up residence in China after the conclusion of the First Opium War and opening of Shanghai as a Treaty Port in 1843. He was one of the translator's of the Delegates' version of the New Testament. His output of works was impressive - 59 in Chinese, 6 in Malay and 27 in English. Fellow missionary E.C. Bridgman wrote in The Chinese Repository (Volume 11. Page 317) "This little volume of grammatical Notices is a book almost unique in its mode of printing. In 1831 and 1832, Mr Medhurst, the indefatigable superintendent of the Batavia Mission and its 'mission press', published two vocabularies, Japanese and Corean, which were printed entirely by lithography. The toil and expense of writing out so many words and writing them too in a Roman text hand, induced Mr Medhurst to try if he could not use common movable types and lithographic printing in conjunction; and this little book is the result. All the English portion of it was 'set up' (as the printers phrase it) in movable types with blanks left for Chinese characters, and an impression was then taken and transferred to the lithographic stone, on which the blanks for Chinese writing were afterwards filled in with the pencil, - and the whole was then printed together in the same manner as ordinary lithography" .

      [Bookseller: Asia Bookroom]
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        Ansicht des Hilmteiches].

      , Ohne Jahr (um 1842). - Hübsche und detaillierte Ansicht des Hilmteiches noch vor seiner Vergrößerung. Links ist die kleine Gastwirtschaft zu sehen, die erst 1858 zum „Hilmteichschlössl" ausgebaut wurde. Im Hintergrund der Schöckel. - Auf Untersatzkarton montiert; dieser verso mit dem Bleistiftvermerk „Hilmteich 1842". Das Aquarell im Himmel etw. lichtrandig u. fleckig. Unterer Rand mit winzigem Ausriß. - ge Gewicht in Gramm: 500 Orig.-Aquarell (17,5 x 21,1 cm). [Attributes: First Edition; Signed Copy]

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Wolfgang Friebes]
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        Voyage dans l'Amerique du Sud 1864-1865.[Various places in South America], 1864-1865]. Oblong 1mo (ca. 33.5 x 52 cm). Album with 98 watercolours (the majority ca. 20 x 33 cm) mounted on the thick album leaves and mostly signed with monogram "E", titled and dated in ink on the mounts. Contemporary blind- and gold-tooled green sheepskin (Maison Alphonse Giroux, Paris).

      - On Quesnel: Numa Broc, Amérique, p. 269. Album with spectacular watercolour views of many places in South America, painted by Edouard Quesnel (1842-1891). In June 1864, Quesnel undertook a voyage to South America and toured Brazil, Argentina, Uruguay and Paraguay before returning home to Le Havre in April 1865. He recorded his impressions in the present album of watercolours and in a series of letters addressed to his mother. The correspondence was published posthumously as Souvenirs de Voyage (Rouen, 1892). Quesnel's letters often refer to the sketches he is making. His remarks suggest that he based the watercolours in present album on those field sketches. He made them for his mother, writing to her from Montevideo on 13 December: "Ma chère et bonne mère . en somme ce ne sont des croquis faits à la hâte, mais d'après lesquels on pourrait faire de jolies choses. Je n'en occupe surtout par la pensée qu'ils pourront vous faire plaisir à voir." (Souvenirs, pp. 115-116). Quesnel succeeds in painting precisely and at the same impressionistically, combining topographical exactness with very subtle nuances of light and colour. But he doesn't just reproduce the landscape, he also records his own, personal perception, reflecting the subjective experiences of a Frenchman travelling through South America in the 1860s. Little is known of Quesnel's work beyond the present album and a large album of French landscapes. With occasional minor foxing, but otherwise in fine condition. Part of the inside front hinge has come loose and there are a few small scuff marks, but the binding is otherwise very good. Splendid views of South America, made on a voyage in 1864 and 1865.

      [Bookseller: ASHER Rare Books]
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        Les Ressources de Quinola

      The rare first edition. Half caramel morocco, spine in five compartments, marbled pastedowns and endpapers, restored wrappers preserved, marbled edges.Foxed. With an important autograph inscription signed by Honoré de Balzac to his friend Laurent-Jan, to whom Vautrin was dedicated, and the model for Bixiou, Léon de Lora and several other characters in The Human Comedy.He was at the same time Balzac's best friend, trusted secretary, ghost writer and perhaps even "beloved.""the singular phenomenon of the inventor who moved, in 16th century Barcelona, a vessel by steam past three hundred thousand spectators; that today we have no idea what became of him, denies this rage. But I've guessed the why, and that is [the basis of] my Comedy" (letter to Mme Hanska). The Resources of Quinola is at the same time Scapin's Deceits and The Marriage of Figaro. Balzac's ambition from the 1840s up to his death was in essence to make a name for himself comparable to that of his illustrious predecessors. A hope as futile as it was abiding, he nonetheless never doubted his imminent success despite every setback.The author of The Human Comedy may well have thought that the principal source of humor in the work was the hero and his scathing repartee. For Balzac in fact knew this character, this fierce and eloquent harlequin, well - his name was Laurent-Jan and he was Balzac's most faithful friend in the last years of his life.Though most of their correspondence seems to have disappeared, it is thought that they met before 1835 (Albéric Second mentions a dinner in the rue Casini, where Balzac lived from 1829 to 1835).An eccentric and provocative character, Laurent-Jan had pride of place in the Bohemian life that Balzac led during these years, most notably with Léon Gozlan, Charles Lassailly, Paul Gavarni and Albéric Second, according to whom the writer "was slumming it both pleasurably and profitably" (Maurice Regard, Balzac et Laurent-Jan).All of them remained silent on the "excesses" of these tumultuous years, of which some eloquent traces have nonetheless come down to us in their correspondence; like the letter in which Balzac invites Gavarni to a soirée at Laurent-Jan's to "stretch a very well dressed chotepis a tad," signed "TicTac dit vit d'ours [TicTac, quick say bear]". Laurent-Jan was the principal organizer of these Balzacian orgies in his house at 23 rue des Martyrs, which inspired some scenes in The Human Comedy:"The seraglio, like the salon of a brothel, offered temptations for every eye and voluptuaries for every taste. There was a dancer naked under veils of silk, pretend-virgins who breathing sacral innocence, aristocratic beauties - proud and indolent, a pale and chaste Englishwoman, and young ladies starting conversations by establishing certain basic truths, such as: "Virtue we'll leave to the ugly and hunchbacked!" (cf. Hervé Manéglier, Les artistes au bordel, 1997).These crazy years coincided in Balzac's work with characters who were sexually ambivalent or clearly homosexual, like the androgynous Zambinella and Séraphita, Raphaël de Valentin, who had "a sort of effeminate grace," Louis Lambert "always gracious, like a woman in love," Lucien de Rubempré, and above all the character now considered the first homosexual in French literature: Vautrin.Seeing this particular interest for different sexualities evidenced in The Human Comedy between 1830 and 1836 (but not before or after, if Maurice Regard is to be believed), a number of commentators have been interested in Balzac's sexuality during this period, in which the author was 'with' almost all his young collaborators.Thus, S. J. Bérard and P. Citron raise the question of the surprising witticisms that run through Balzac's correspondence with his young "protégés." "You, who tell me to fuck myselfyou've summed up my feelings about you perfectly - so come here, then, and get yourself fucked; and be quick about it!" he writes to Latouche. Even stranger are the formulas with which he signs off his correspondence with Eugène Sue, which are a little surprising to say the least: "Yours, in the Pineal Gland," "Yours perineally," "I admire your foreskin and I remain yours," etc.We've not found any correspondence with Laurent-Jan before 1840, at which time he writes Balzac letters commencing "Beloved," or "My darling," and ending with an explicit "I press myself against your great big chest."According to allusions by some of his contemporaries, this dual sexuality of Balzac's seems to have been well known. Albéric Second compared his male relationships to those of Nisus and Euryale, while Roger de Beauvoir gave him the nickname "Seraphinus" and Edward Allet captioned his caricature of Balzac: "the Reverend Father don Seraphitus culus mysticus Goriot...conceives...a mass of inconceivable things and ephialtesticulary incubuses," [a reference to Ephialtes, who 'took King Leonidas from behind' at Thermopylae]. For contemporary critics, however, the question of what Pierre Citron terms Balzac's "ambisexuality" remains open. Among the theories advanced by Citron, S. J. Bérard, and P. Berthier is that Balzac's relationship with Laurent-Jan (for whom we are not aware of any escapades with women) fits with a hypothesis of active or imagined homosexuality on Balzac's part.If we add that the play Vautrin is dedicated to Laurent-Jan, to thank him - Gautier writes - for having "really rolled up his sleeves", Laurent-Jan appears as one of the principal figures tied to the "shadowy areas of Balzac's psychology," (the title of Pierre Citron's study of the subject). From 1841 on, the correspondence between Balzac and Laurent-Jan is distinctly less ambiguous and their extravagant language gives way to professions of friendship and mutual admiration right up to the Master's death on the 18th August 1850; Laurent-Jan signed his death certificate.During these final ten years, the man whom Gozlan considers "Balzac's best friend" and Philibert Audebrant "the right hand of the author of The Human Comedy," was more specifically Balzac's principal partner in his great theatrical adventure, a passion that was to consume the debt-stricken novelist in search of recognition and financial success. Théophile Gautier tells us that in 1840, when Balzac urged Laurent-Jan, Ourliac and de Belloy to write the play Vautrin, which he had already sold to the Porte-Saint-Martin Theatre but not as yet written, only Laurent-Jan was willing: "Balzac started out by saying, when referring to Vautrin, your piece, then little by little, our piece and eventuallymy piece." Laurent-Jan nonetheless got a prestigious dedication in print, an honor he shares with a handful of illustrious contemporaries like Victor Hugo, George Sand and Eveline Hanska, to whom Balzac also dedicated works.The banning of the piece did not discourage Balzac, who persisted in his dream of making his fortune in theatre with the active and enthusiastic co-operation of Laurent-Jan, to whom the Master entrusted the writing, correction or re-writing of numerous plays and works: Lecamus, Monographie de la presse parisienne [A Monograph of the Parisian Press], Le Roi des mendiants [The Beggar King] ("a superb basis for a two-man play"), etc."Also, you'll be getting several scripts to fill your spare time, because I want your help," Balzac wrote him from Wierzchownia in 1849.One year earlier, before leaving for Poland, Balzac made this collaboration official by means of a power of attorney for literary affairs to Lauren-Jan, dated the 19th September 1848. "I declare that I have invested Monsieur Laurent-Jan with all my powers in everything relating to literary mattershe can make additions or cuts, and any necessary changes;in fact, he shall represent me entirely."Laurent-Jan took his task very seriously, as his many exchanges with the unhappy demiurge show. Balzac would never live to see the success he craved, as opposed to his friends Dumas and Hugo, to whom he compared himself, even during his failures. Thus, after the Resources of Quinola flopped, he wrote to Mme Hanska:"Quinola was the subject of a memorable battle, comparable to Hernani." Duly noted!On the 10th December 1849, more or less at death's door, Balzac still ties Laurent-Jan to all his projects in a letter that is admirable for its courage and hope: "Come, my friend, a little courage, and we shall board the ship of drama, good subjects in hand, to sail to the lands of Marivaux, New-Beaumarchais and New Comedy." It is more than likely that the character of Quinola was partly inspired by this faithful friend, admired by Balzac, who signed his letters "a thousand times your friend," or "my heart is all yours," or "your respectful master, all proud of his pretend valet," (reflecting on the title Laurent-Jan gave himself).Laurent Jan, as brilliant as he was vain, never produced any work worthy of this title, but was nonetheless undoubtedly a significant source of inspiration for Balzac, who owed him a number of 'bon mots' peppering his works. In The Human Comedy, it is Bixiou and Léon de Lora above all who are directly inspired by this eccentric bohemian, but beyond these two characters (writes Maurice Regard) "many of Balzac's shadows accompany this ancient, hunched and wrinkled form: Schinner, Steinbock, Gendrin" owe him "a little bit of themselves [and] much of their spirit."   Balzac never stopped telling those who were close to him of the indefatigable affection he cherished for his "unrepentant misanthrope," who did not always enjoy a good reputation. "He's better than he seems. I, for one, love him seriously and well," (letter to Laure de Surville). A few days before the death of her husband, Eve de Balzac recounted to his niece Sophie de Surville the transformative effects of the visits from his beloved. "Your uncle is really much better, he's very cheerful and animated all day, and I attribute this to a good visit from our friend Laurent-Jan, who was more dazzling than ever yesterday evening - he was really fascinating and my dear patient kept repeating both yesterday and today: 'admit that no one is more spirited than that boy.'" Hippolyte Souverain Paris 1842 13,5x22cm relié

      [Bookseller: Librairie Le Feu Follet]
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        Observations on the Poetics of Aristotle, by Metastasio... with a biographical notice of the author...

      Sydney: Kemp & Fairfax, 1842. Small quarto; original embossed cloth boards with dark green calf spine gilt, partially unopened. Rare, and very fine: a presentation copy (inscribed on the front endpaper to Walter Wrottersley "from the translator") of an unusual publication for this period in Australia, a translation of an obscure commentary on Aristotle. Almost nothing of a philosophical bent was published in Australia before the 1850s and the creation of the Universities of Sydney and Melbourne.Elwin says that he translated part of the eighteenth-century writer Metastasio's critical observations on the Poetics in order to place "such portion as appeared to be likely to engage the attention, as well from the nature of the immediate topic, as from the spirited manner in which it is treated... within reach of the English reader". Metastasio, or Pietro Antonio Domenico Trapassi, is best known today because Mozart used his "La Clemenzo di Tito" as the basis for his libretto.Ferguson originally entered the translator as Elwin Hastings, but the Addenda notes that his identity as Hastings Elwin was established by an inscribed presentation copy offered by Henry Cork, London, Cat. 5 (1929) No. 294. Hastings Elwin was a rather grand figure, friend of the poet Thomas Moore, elected to the NSW Legislative Council in 1843. Fine.

      [Bookseller: Hordern House]
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        By Royal Letters Patent. Preserved potato. The Patentees of the Preserved Potato solicit the attention of merchants, ship owners, and others ......

      London, 1842. single leaf, 2pp., 4to. (25.5 x 20.2 cms), very small nick in blank upper margin, unbound as issued. A very good copy. Probably very rare: no other copy located. Patent no.8597, dated 8th August, 1840, had been taken out by Downes Edwards for 'preserving potatoes and other vegetable substances'. This advertisement comprises a lengthy and quite detailed description of the desiccated potato (the 'Patent Preserved Potato'), cooking instructions and its virtues, particularly for use on long voyages. On the verso of the leaf are several testimonials claiming the product to be all that was claimed for it. (There is also a chemical analysis by the analytical chemist Dr. Andrew Ure). The authors of the testimonials themselves include such distinguished people as Professor J.F. Daniell F.R.S., of King's College; Dr. J.A. Paris, author of the Treatise on Diet>; Prof. William Brande F.R.S. of the Royal Institution; Dr. Andrew Ure F.R.S.; Dr. M. Prichett, the surgeon on H.M.S. Wilberforce, Niger Expedition, Ascension; and Captain H.D. Trotter R.N., commanding the Niger Expedition. But it is probably Dr. Ure's verdict that was the most valuable to Edwards, Brothers, & Co. the patentees: 'Messrs. Edwards' process for concentrating the nutritious powers of potatoes, and preserving their qualities unimpaired for any length of time, and in any climate, is, in my opinion, the best hitherto devised for that purpose, and, chemically considered, the best possible. I find that one pound of their Patent Potato, when cooked with about three pounds of water, affords a dish equal to a mash of fresh mealy Potatoes. When milk is used instead of water, then a much richer dish is obtained than can be formed from the best ordinary Potatoes boiled, because it is free from the water contained in fresh Potatoes, amounting to fully three-fourths of the Weight. By adding eggs, sugar, and spices, to the milky mash, a delicious pudding may be made. EDWARDS' Patent Potato will be found an invaluable preparation, not only in sea voyages and tropical countries, but at home in the after part of the season, because it continues uniformly wholesome and agreeable, whereas by this time our Potato have become unsound from frost, growth, &c. It also possesses all the antiscorbutic properties of the fresh Potato.' Edwards, Brothers, & Co. had premises at No.1, Bishopsgate Street, corner of Leadenhall Street, London. It is worth noticing that two boards of U.S. Navy officers were instructed 'to examine certain desiccated alimentary vegetable substances' in 1851/2, substances which included 'the preserved potato of D. and H. Edwards and Co. No.1 Bishopsgate Street, London'.

      [Bookseller: John Drury Rare Books]
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        Incidents of Travel in Central America, Chiapas, and Yucatan Volumes 1 and 2 New Edition (Volume 2 formerly the property of Isambard Kingdom Brunel)

      London: John Murray, 1842. 2nd Edition. Hardcover. Very Good. Vol 1: pp viii, foldout map (2" tear), 424. Vol 2: frontispiece, pp vii, 474. Octavo.Original decorative brown cloth binding with same gilt illustration to front of each, gilt design and lettering to spines. Each volume shows light rubbing and wear, end of spine of Vol 2 more heavily rubbed. Ink inscription inside front cover of Volume 1 is dated 1849 but is partially erased. Foxing to endpapers and to a lesser extent to page margins and water staining to edge of pages in last part of volume 1. Volume 2 has rhomboid stamp on second endpaper: "I.K.B. 18 Duke Street Westminster". This was the address of Isambard Kingdom Brunel. Frontispiece of altar tablet occupies two pages, the first of which has bleed through onto second endpaper. Little foxing in this volume. Volume 1: All illustrations and plates (with original tissue protection) present (Profile of Nicaragua Canal said to be opposite p312 actually opposite p412). Volume 2: All plates present with original tissue) (not all plates were tissue protected); plate after p352 appears upside down. Fascinating to discover that one of the great engineers of the modern age was studying the constructions of a lost civilisation - how did it affect his work? Please enquire for postage costs due to weight and value.[removed][removed]

      [Bookseller: Scarthin Books ABA, ILAB]
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        Scènes de la Vie privée et publique des Animaux. 2 volumes.

      Paris, J. Hetzel et Paulin 1842 - Études de Moeurs contemporaines publiées sous la direction de M. P.-J. Stahl. Avec la collaboration de Messieurs De Balzac, L. Baude, E. de La Bédollierre, P. Bernard, J. Janin, Ed. Lemoine, Charles Nodier, George Sand. ÉDITION ORIGINALE. Paris, J. Hetzel et Paulin - 1842 - 386 et 390 pages. 95 et 104 gravures hors texte et 2 titres gravés, soit 201 hors texte. Nombreux dessins dans le texte. Avec tables des matières et classement des dessins, illustrées. Complet & Contrôlé. Reliure à la bradel demi maroquin prune à coins de l'époque, signée. Dos lisse aux titre, auteur et date en pied dorés. Pas de rousseur. Très bon état. Bel exemplaire, bien relié. Format in-4°(28x20). 1ère Edition [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Livres et Collections]
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        Two issues of the newspaper "Te Waka Maori"].Grisborne, James Grindell, 1878. 2 loose issues. Folio. With a wood engraving of a Maori war-canoe incorporating the name of the newspaper, on top of issue no. 13. No. 2 in loose folded sheets, no. 13 glued in the gutter.

      - Hocken, p. 544; Williams 554; cf. Curnow e.a., "Rere Atu, Taku Manu! Discovering history, language, and politics in the Maori-language newspapers" (1842-1933). Two issues of the Maori newspaper Te Waka Maori ("the Maori canoe") from 4 September 1878 (no. 2) and 21 December 1878 (no. 13). This bilingual publication was an intent to revive the old Waka Maori which had ceased to exist in July 1877. After the fifth number "o Niu Tirani" ("of New Zealand") was removed from the title and replaced with an image of a Maori war-canoe and the caption "Hoea te Waka, ha!" ("paddle the canoe"). Only 42 issues were published of this short lived newspaper and in 1884 a further attempt was made to revive the paper.Included in no. 2 is an article on the final words of George Selwyn (1809-1878), who as bishop of Auckland was very active in converting the Maori and who is supposed to have said "E marama ana (It is light), an expression which he had often heard from the lips of dying Maories" (p. 23). A political article in no. 13, advocates the right of "Native women" owning land, to keep their possessions even after their marriage. This to avoid them losing their inheritance "through being married to spendthrift or drunken husband[s]" (p. 192).From the library of the New Zealand ornithologist Arthur Thomas Pycroft (1875-1911). Both issues in fair condition, with a horizontal fold in the middle; paper browned, spotted and with small tears near the edges. No. 2 with some tears in the inner folds, notably on the outside sheet; no. 13 with a strip of woven paper glued as an outer binding and with some holes in the pages, leading to slight loss of text.

      [Bookseller: ASHER Rare Books]
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        [Ansicht des Hilmteiches].

      , Ohne Jahr (um 1842). Orig.-Aquarell (17,5 x 21,1 cm). Hübsche und detaillierte Ansicht des Hilmteiches noch vor seiner Vergrößerung. Links ist die kleine Gastwirtschaft zu sehen, die erst 1858 zum „Hilmteichschlössl“ ausgebaut wurde. Im Hintergrund der Schöckel. - Auf Untersatzkarton montiert; dieser verso mit dem Bleistiftvermerk „Hilmteich 1842“. Das Aquarell im Himmel etw. lichtrandig u. fleckig. Unterer Rand mit winzigem Ausriß. - Versand D: 12,00 EUR Graz - Hilmteich, Ansicht des Hilmteiches, Aquarell

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Wolfgang Friebes]
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        Die jüdischen Gauner in Deutschland, ihre Taktik, ihre Eigenthümlichkeiten und ihre Sprache, nebst ausführlichen Nachrichten über die in Deutschland und an dessen Grenzen sich aufhaltenden berüchtigsten jüdischen Gauner

      Hartkarton Solide Noch Titel: "Nach Kriminalakten und sonstigen zuverlässigen quellen bearbeitet und zunächst praktischen criminal-und Polizeibeamten gewidmet". ZWEI BÄNDE, VOLLSTÄNDIG. Zwei pappbezogene Hartkartoneinbände, Efalinecken (Efalin: Strapazierfähiges Feinleinenpapier aus sehr festen Zellstoffen, das sich sehr gut als Einbandmaterial für Bücher eignet. Efalin ist nicht nur schmutzunempfindlich, kratz- und stoßfest, es lässt sich auch hervorragend prägen und ist bestens für den Druck detaillierter Motive geeignet), Efalinrücken mit handgeschriebenen montierten Rückenschildchen, solide und ordentlich trotz Abriebsspuren. Buchschnitt rundum marmoriert. Papier gelegentlich sanft stockfleckig. +++ ERSTER BAND: Zweite Auflage, 1842. VIII, 328 Seiten, inklusive Wörterbuch (letzte 106 Seiten). +++ ZWEITER BAND: Erste Auflage 1843. Vorwort, 364 Seiten. Die Seiten 86 bis zum Schluss enthalten die Portraits und Lebensläufe der sogenannten Gauner.+++ Eine wahre Rarität, eine Schrift aus der Lebenszeit von Heinrich Heine, die uns daran erinnert, dass die Judenfeindlichkeit ein sehr altes Phänomen ist (seit etwa 2500 Jahren) und die dunkelsten Stunden der Geschichte Europas immer prägen wird. +++ 13,5 x 22 cm, 800g +++ Stichwörter: Judenfeindlichkeit Antisemitismus Judaica Kulturgeschichte Verleumdung Kriminalistik Diskriminierung Polizeigeschichte Straftaten Reportage Sensationspresse

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Clement]
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        Small archive of papers relating to the Schooner Seaford and Littleton Waller Tazewell, a former Governor of Virginia

      Norfolk, Virginia, 1842. Unbound. Very good. Six manuscript documents. All are legible; five easily so, one with effort. All have storage or mailing creases. Four are in very nice shape; two have small holes, and one of those is worn with wrinkles, fading, and a dampstain. Two have chips/holes affecting some text. The papers include: 1834 - Two-page folded letter of instruction signed by Floyd to Captain Chandler of the Schooner Seaford: "You will proceed with the first favorable wind for the Island of Martinique where you will lay off and on to try the market . . . your Tobacco . . . to the one that offers the best inducement. Having sold, you will buy for a return cargo 800 gallons or there abouts of French brandy . . . if iron called by the name of Rolled and Bloom iron can be had in Martinique you will buy 15 Tons if it does not cost more than 40 to 45 $ per ton. . . . you will then buy 10 . . . 20 tons of good sugar, if the iron can't be had you will buy . . . 10 Tons of Sugar more. . . . Having finished your buying in Martinique you will proceed to St. Thomas where you will get any cargo according to my orders. . . . May God speed you." 1841 - Two-page ledger sheet titled, "William S. Floyd esq. in a/c with Littleton W. Tazewell" signed by Tazewell that identifies "half profits on Schooner Seaford to 20th Dec 1841" as 122.44, 1841 - One-page folded letter to Floyd signed by Tazewell regarding payments and various cargo transactions (beans and cable), 1842 - One-page folded letter to Tazewell forwarding an attached one-page record of corn sales from the Schooner Seaford, 1842 - One-page folded letter signed by Tazewell discussing the "absence of ale funds from the Customs house" and its effect on other accounts, and 1842 - One-page folded letter to Floyd signed by Tazewell regarding a "bag of silver," the Seaford and various accounts. Other correspondence-but none related to the Schooner Seaford-between Tazewell and Floyd is held by the Library of Virginia.

      [Bookseller: Read 'Em Again Books, ABAA]
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        Bildnis einer jungen Frau, Dreiviertelfigur sitzend und nahezu en face.

      - Bleistift, teils gewischt, auf cremefarbenem Velin, links unten signiert und datiert „A. Wenderoth 1842". 25,5:21,3 cm. Provenienz: Sammlung Rosenstock, Kassel. Der Sohn und Schüler des Bildnis- und Historienmalers Karl Wenderoth (tätig 1. Hälfte 19. Jahrhundert in Dresden, Kassel und Warschau) studierte an der Akademie in Kassel. Seit etwa 1845 bildete er sich in Paris weiter, von wo aus er an einer Expedition nach Algier teilnahm. 1849 ging er zusammen mit dem Kasseler Maler Carl Nahl (1818-1878) und dessen Familie nach New York/USA und heiratete dort 1856 in Philadelphia die Schwester Nahls, Laura Nahl. Er war tätig als Porträt-, Historien- und Landschaftsmaler und schuf auch Pferdebilder.

      [Bookseller: Galerie Joseph Fach GmbH]
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        Grotta Conea alla Cava.

      - Bleistift auf bräunlichem Velin, rechts unten betitelt und datiert "19 Settbre 1842.". 23,2:30,5 cm. Skizzenbuchblatt. Cava ist nicht weit von Salerno gelegen. Müller war Schüler der Düsseldorfer Akademie unter K. Sohn und W. v. Schadow. Zusammen mit seinem Bruder Andreas, E. Deger (1809-1885) und F. Ittenbach (1813-1879) weilte er 1840/43 in Rom und unternahm von dort aus Studienreisen. 1844/50 war er mit denselben Künstlern an der Ausmalung der Apollinariskapelle bei Remagen beteiligt. Seit 1857 war er Professor für Historienmalerei, seit 1883-1893 leitete er stellvertretend für den anderweitig beschäftigten H. Wislicenus (1825-1899) die Düsseldorfer Akademie.

      [Bookseller: Galerie Joseph Fach GmbH]
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        Eigenh. musikalisches Albumblatt mit U. ("A. H. Chelard"). Weimar, 10. XII. 1842.

      1842. 1 S. Qu.-8vo. Sieben Takte für Singstimme und Klavier mit unterlegtem Text aus seiner 1827 in Paris uraufgeführten Tragédie lyrique "Macbeth".

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Inlibris]
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        Wiener Zeitschrift für Kunst, Literatur, Theater und Mode, 1842, drittes Quartal.

      Anton Strauß, 1842 - 40 Seiten Ehem. Bibliotheksexemplar mit Stempel und Signatur. Noch GUTER Zustand, ein paar Gebrauchsspuren. Einband bestossen, kleinere Anstreichungen möglich. Ex-library with stamp and signature. Still in a GOOD condition, same visible traces of use, bumped, small markings possible. Sprache: Deutsch Gewicht in Gramm: 330

      [Bookseller: Antiq. Bookfarm/ Sebastian Seckfort]
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        The Ports, Harbours, Watering-Places, And Picturesque Scenery of Great Britain.

      1842 1842 - Illustrated with views taken on the Spot, by W. H. Bartlett, J. D. Harding, T. Creswick, and others. With Descriptions, Historical and Topographical. 2 vols. London: George Virtue [1842]. With 2 frontispieces + 120 full-page plates, all steelengraved. Small 4to. Nice and clean copy bound in one orig. blue pictorial clothbinding, all edges gilt. [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Peter Grosell, Antiquarian Bookseller]
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        Histoire de la chimie depuis les temps les plus reculés jusqu'a notre époque

      2 volumes in-8 de I. X, (2) Paris, Bureau de la Revue Scientifique et Hachette, 1842-1843, , 2 volumes in-8 de I. X, (2) et 510 pages ; et de II. VIII et 518 pages, pleine basane orange maroquinée de l'époque, riche décor à froid sur les plats (dos fortement insolé et reliure légèrement frottée dans son ensemble), Edition originale de la première grande histoire de la chimie. La page de titre annonce une analyse détaillée des manuscrits alchimiques de la bibliothèque Royale de Paris, un exposé des doctrines cabalistiques sur la pierre philosophale, l'histoire de la pharmacologie, de la métallurgie, et en général des sciences et des arts qui se rattachent à la chimie, etc. Malgré une reliure passée, bon exemplaire, à l'intérieur très frais.

      [Bookseller: Librairie Alain Brieux]
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        Pauly's Real-Encyclopädie der classischen Alterthumswissenschaft in alphabetischer Ordnung. Zweite völlig umgearbeitete Auflage, hrsg. v. Wilh. Sigm. Teuffel. 6 in 8 Bänden.

      J. B. Metzler 1842-1866, Stuttgart - Gr.-8vo. Je Band ca. 1800 S. Hldr. d. Zeit m. 2 RSchildern. (OBrosch. beigebunden). An zwei Kanten unbeschnitten. Der "Ur-Pauly", Grundlage der später auf 84 Bände angewachsenen Realenzyklopädie, erschien noch in recht bescheidenem Umfang. Der erste Band, ursprünglich 1837 erschienen, in der ausführlicheren, auf 2 Bände angewachsenen Neubearbeitung von Teuffel, während die weiteren Bände keine Neubearbeitung mehr erfuhren. - Einbände berieben, kl. Fehlstellen im Leder. Kl. Name auf Vorsatz. Vereinzelt etw. stockfleckig, in Bd. 4 eine Lage in Kopie. Sonst wohlerhaltene, schöne Bände. gr.

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Düwal]
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        Théorie de la vis d'Archimède et des autres surfaces tournantes propres à reproduire une impulsion suivant leur axe de rotation, suivi d'une description d'une nouvelle balance destinée à mesurer la force impulsive de ces surfaces, des roues à aubes [...]

      de 44 pages et 3 planches Paris, Imprimerie Royale, 1842, in-8, de 44 pages et 3 planches, cartonnage moderne à la bradel, Très rare tiré à part, nouvellement paginé, extrait des annales maritimes et coloniales de septembre 1842. Après avoir donné la théorie mathématique des surfaces tournantes, l'auteur décrit la balance inventée par lui-même servant à la mesure de la force impulsive de ces différentes surfaces, ainsi que des roues à aubes ordinaires ou inclinées, et des autres mécanismes tels que l'appareil palmipède [...] et les divers systèmes de rames qui ont été proposés dans le même but. 3 planches repliées montrent les rouages et la composition de cette balance. Rousseurs

      [Bookseller: Librairie Alain Brieux]
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        Élements de statique, suivis de quatre mémoires sur la composition des moments et des aires

      XI-526 p., 4 planches Paris, Bachelier, 1842, in-8, XI-526 p, 4 planches dépliantes, demi-veau vert de l'époque, dos à faux nerfs, Huitième édition. Paraphes imprimés de l'auteur et du libraire. Étiquette ex-libris d'Henri Viellard. Cachet annulé de l'Institut catholique et étiquette en pied du dos.

      [Bookseller: Librairie Alain Brieux]
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        Le Petit Chansonnier 1841. Paris, Marcilly (1840). 28 x 22 mm. 64 S., mit 6 (mitpag.) Kupfertafeln, Goldschnitt, Vorsätze mit Seidenbezug. Hldr. d. Zt. mit Buchdeckeln aus Bein (Voderdeckel mit schwarz gefärbter Gravur "Almanach").

      - Vgl. Welsh 5551 (Ausg. f. 1842).- Vollständig gestochen bzw. radiert. Miniatur-Liederbuch mit sechs Liedtexten mit winzigen ganzseitigen Illustrationen sowie einem Kalendarium. Enth.: Regrets d'amour -- Chacun son tour -- Les vendages -- La paresse -- L'orage -- L'art d'etre heureux.- Schönes Exemplar.# Entirely engraved throughout.- Collection of six songs followed by calendar listing the saints' days for the year; illustrated with six tiny, full-page engravings, each preceding the text of a song.- Fine copy.

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Johannes Müller]
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        MÜNCHEN. - Steinheil, Karl August. Beschreibung des für die Feuerwacht auf dem St. Petersthurme in München ausgeführten Pyroskop's.

      Mchn., () 1842 - 28 x 22,5 cm. (561-) 585 S. Mit 9 gefalt. lithogr. Tafeln nach Gustav Seeberger. Heftstreifen. Poggendorff II, 997; vgl. Lentner 13753; Pfister Bd. II, S. 66. - Erste Ausgabe. - Aus den "Abhandlungen der H. Classe der Akademie der Wissenschaften", (Bd. III/3). - Steinheils Pyroskop ermöglichte eine sichere Bestimmung der jeweiligen Brandstelle. - Eine der Tafeln mit dem Grundriß des Turms von St. Peter und den Einzelteilen des Pyroskops. Die weiteren acht Tafeln zeigen das Panorama von München vom Turm ausgesehen. [Attributes: First Edition]

      [Bookseller: Peter Bierl Buch- & Kunstantiquariat]
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        LE GRAND CHEMIN DE LA POSTÉRITÉ : 3 panneaux (les gens de lettres, les genres dramatiques et les artistes lyriques)

      3 lithographies panoramiques Paris, Aubert et Arnaud de Vresse [Imprimerie Roche], [1842 et 1853-1870], , 3 lithographies panoramiques en couleurs, montées chacune en 2 parties [27 x 71 cm] dans un encadrement double, sous verre, cadres de bois pitchpin [153 x 27 cm], Très rare ensemble complet des tableaux lithographiés du "Grand chemin de la postérité", fameux "panthéon charivarique" panoramique, dont la première publication avait été donnée feuille à feuille (6 feuilles par panneau) dans la célèbre revue de Charles Philipon, de 1839 à 1841. Benjamin y a caricaturé les personnalités les plus éminentes de l'univers des arts et des lettres de son temps : tout ce petit monde du spectacle et de la littérature romantiques, auteurs, acteurs et chanteurs, défile le long de 3 grandes frises. Premier tirage de la planche des artistes lyriques, à l'adresse d'Aubert, 29 place de la Bourse et nouveau tirage pour les 2 autres planches, publiées à l'adresse d'Arnaud de Vresse (55 rue de Rivoli), successeur d'Aubert, actif à son propre compte de 1853 à 1870 ; les planches de de Vresse sont en coloris d'époque. Benjamin Roubaud (1811-1847), peintre, lithographe et caricaturiste, fut, avec Daumier, Grandville et Cham l'un des piliers du Charivari. Il s'installa en Algérie vers 1843 comme correspondant de l'Illustration. 1. La planche la plus célèbre figure l'Armée Romantique menée par Victor Hugo comme "roi des Hugolâtres", c'est-à-dire comme chef de file du mauvais goût, chevauchant un pégase à queue de dragon en brandissant une bannière sur laquelle est inscrite : "Le laid c'est le beau". Sur la queue de sa monture sont assis, à sa suite, Théophile Gautier, Cassagnac, Francis Wey et Paul Fouché. A grande enjambées, Alexandre Dumas tente de les rattraper, tandis que Eugène Sue essaye de grimper derrière eux et que Lamartine, égaré dans des nuées, est "livré à ses méditations politiques, poétiques et catholiques". Enfin, sur une voiture à vapeur, Eugène Scribe transporte ses collaborateurs et devance de nombreux écrivains parmi lesquels Balzac, Jules Janin, Paul de Kock, Charles Desnoyer, etc... Les deux autres panneaux sont de la plus grande rareté : 2. La frise des genres dramatiques représente les comédiens en vogue, en 6 tableaux : la Tragédie, la comédie, le drame, le mélodrame, le cirque-Olympique et les Champs-Elysées. 3. La planche de l'univers des spectacles parisiens, figure les artiste lyriques du Grand Opéra, du corps de ballet, avec son "rassemblement de rats de toute espèce et à tout prix, même au rabais", des Italiens, de l'Opéra-comique, des Variétés, du Palais-Royal perruqué à l'ancienne, du théâtre de M. et Mme Ancelot et du Gymnase. Superbe ensemble présenté dans des encadrements pitchpin d'époque : chaque panneau est partagé en deux par une baquette de bois centrale. Des petites rousseurs sur la planche 3, aux très beaux coloris modernes.

      [Bookseller: Librairie Alain Brieux]
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        Traité de cristallographie

      XV-208 pages, 12 planches Paris, Bachelier, 1842, in-8, XV-208 pages, 12 planches dépliantes représentant des structures de cristaux. Exemplaire interfolié, broché, couverture factice, titre manuscrit en tête du dos, double emboîtage moderne, Première édition française, traduite par le minéralogiste Henri Hureau de Senarmont (1808-1862), de A Treatise on Crystallography de William Hallowes Miller (1801-1880). Exemplaire personnel du traducteur, comprenant un envoi autographe de l'auteur à son adresse, rédigé en deuxième de couverture (envoi masqué par un papier de garde contrecollé ultérieurement par dessus). Il provient de la collection du minéralogiste et chimiste Charles Friedel (1832-1899). Entièrement interfolié et très abondamment annoté par les deux spécialistes. L'un d'eux, probablement Friedel, a placé une note en tête d'ouvrage : "exemplaire interfolié, avec des corrections et des annotations dont plusieurs pourraient trouver place dans une seconde édition". On distingue trois encres (rouge, turquoise et brune), une mine de plomb, ainsi que deux écritures ; l'une est probablement de Sernamont, l'autre de Charles Friedel. L'encre rouge semble être la plus ancienne : elle est concentrée sur le texte imprimé et concerne des fautes ponctuelles. Ces corrections sont parfois reprises à l'encre brune ou biffées en turquoise avec un nouveau texte sur le feuillet interfolié. Les ajouts sur les feuillets interfoliés sont de plus en plus conséquents, au fur et à mesure que l'on avance dans l'ouvrage. Il reste cependant difficile d'attribuer distinctement les notes à une main plus qu'à une autre. Cet exemplaire exceptionnel pourrait donner lieu, encore aujourd'hui, à une nouvelle édition de ce grand texte de la cristallographie. L'ouvrage, publié en anglais en 1839, ne connut pas d'autre édition. Miller (1801-1880) en publia un abrégé, A tract on crystallography, en 1863.

      [Bookseller: Librairie Alain Brieux]
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        Le Léman, ou voyage pittoresque, historique et littéraire à Genève et dans le canton de Vaud (Suisse). [Suivi des] Extraits des journaux qui ont rendu compte de l'ouvrage

      2 volumes, [2] ff, 16 pp. Paris, G.A. Dentu, 1842 et 1845, in-8, 2 volumes, [2] ff, 16 pp. (numérotées a à q), 554-XLVI pp. + [2] ff. et pp. 555 à 1032, 40-[1] pp, demi veau lisse violine, dos lisses et filetés, ÉDITION ORIGINALE. Bailly de Lalonde, fervent catholique, était membre de l'Institut historique et correspondant de l'académie royale de Caen. "Voici un vrai voyageur qui a publié ses remarques sur Genève et le canton de Vaud, en Suisse, qu'il a pris soin de visiter avec une attention scrupuleuse. Ce n'est pas dans son cabinet, une carte géographique sur la tables, et quelque compilation sous les yeux, que l'imagination de M. Lalonde s'est mis à voir du pays. L'auteur a consacré cinq années d travail à parfaire son livre" (La France, 7 novembre 1842). Au cours de ses pérégrinations, l'auteur prit le temps de consulter quelques manuscrits, dont plusieurs de la main de Jean-Jacques Rousseau, conservés dans la collection du docteur Charles Coindet (1796-1876), neveu de François Coindet, ami genevois du philosophe des Lumières. Bel exemplaire malgré des rousseurs, dont quelques unes assez intenses sur certains feuillets du tome I.

      [Bookseller: Librairie Alain Brieux]
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        Traité des maladies des femmes, qui déterminent des flueurs-blanches, des leucorrhées, ou tout autre écoulement utéro-vaginal

      (4), 632pp. Paris & Clermont-Ferrand, Germer-Baillière & Veysset, 1842, in-8, (4), 632pp, demi-veau brun, dos plat orné d'un large motif doré. (Rel. de l'ép.), Première édition de ce traité des maladies des femmes écrit par Henri Blatin (1809-1869), médecin de Clermont-Ferrand, un des fondateurs de la SPA (cf. DBF, VI, 651) et par Vincent Nivet (1809-1893), également médecin dans le Puy de Dôme. Les auteurs ont pour but d'étudier principalement la leucorrhé, soit l'écoulement non sanglant provenant de l'appareil génital féminin ; ainsi bien que les auteurs aient d'abord voulu s'arrêter à une pathologie spéciale en étudiant ce symptôme particulier, l'ouvrage a tendance à s'élargir à une pathologie plus générale, et donc moins précise. Bel exemplaire de cette intéressante étude.

      [Bookseller: Librairie Alain Brieux]
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        Witness to the Battle of Chinkiang by British Surgeon William Gingell

      CHINA, 1842 - 1843: Chusan [Zhoushan], Golden Island in Chinkiang [Zhenjiang], Ningpo [Ningbo], Nanking [Nanjing], Chin Hai [Zhenhai]. Manuscript diary of William Raymond Gingell (1816-1863), a notable surgeon for the East India Company, describing his arrival in China during the First Opium War, his firsthand account of the Battle of Chinkiang and other war scenes, as well as post-war life in China as he settled there. The writer would live the remainder of his years in China, becoming a consular interpreter, then Consul at Amoy [Xiamen], and Consul at Hankow [Hankou]. The diary spans three years from 1 January 1841 to 31 December 1843, the latter nineteen months (91 pages) being penned in China. Previous to that, the writer was in Madras. 8vo. 343 pages. Burgundy calf boards, blue marbled endpapers, original bookbinder's label to front pastedown (R. Birchall Stationer, at 8 Poultry, London). William Raymond Gingell (1816-1863), was a surgeon for the British East India Company, translator of Chinese texts and author of works on Chinese custom, consular interpreter, and British Consul in China. Among other notable events, a most vivid and enthusiastic firsthand description of the Battle of Chinkiang unfolds in this rare primary source account of the First Opium War, penned by a participant and survivor as he sailed on the Yangtse River and along the China Sea coast to provide medical aid. Best remembered for his skillful translations of Chinese text, the author of this diary, Dr. William Raymond Gingell (1816-1863), was a surgeon by trade, and sent to Madras, then to China, by the East India Company. Ninety-one pages of this journal are devoted to the first nineteen months he spent in China. The diary begins 1 January 1840, as he prepares for his first appointment, in Madras, India, where he would serve for over one year. Prior to his departure from India, while in Madras, on the 1st of January 1842, he contemplates his upcoming voyage to China, feeling none too enthusiastic about his fate considering the intense war raging through the nation. On 28 March he boards the 'Amelia Thomson' deeming himself a martyr, and not knowing at the time that China is where he would spend the remainder of his life. [The ships Rohomany, John Fleming, and Amelia Thomson, departed together from Madras that day for Singapore and China. The writer also sails on the Rohomany later along the Yangtse River.] Gingell lands at Hong Kong on 4 June 1842, during the First Opium War (1839-1842), only 8 weeks before the signing of the Treaty of Nanking which ceded Hong Kong island "in perpetuity" to Britain. After acquiring the necessary papers and such, in about one week he proceeds to Amoy [Xiamen] on a frigate, passing Formosa [Taiwan] on the 12th. As expected, Gringell soon finds himself in the throes of war. Amidst intense fighting, he sailed on the Yangtse River between Ningbo and Nanjing, witnessing, from uncomfortably close proximity, a decisive battle at Golden Island off the Yangtse River, which would come to be known as the Battle of Chinkiang. This was to be the last major battle of the war, resulting in the Daoguang Emperor's decision to sue for peace and to sign the Treaty of Nanking. While at Zhoushan, he receives news about British forces capturing the towns Woosung and Baoshan, which had taken place only one week earlier. [The Battle of Woosung was fought between British and Chinese forces at the entrance of the Woosung River (present-day Huangpu River), Jiangsu province, China, on 16 June 1842 during the First Opium War. The British capture of the towns of Woosung (Wusong) and Baoshan opened the way to Shanghai, which was captured with little resistance on 19 June.] He makes frequent mention of the 55th (Westmorland) Regiment of Foot, as he dines at the mess, stays in their quarters, evidently providing medical support to them. [The 55th (Westmorland) Regiment of Foot was deployed to China in 1841 for service in the First Opium War. It was selected as part of the expeditionary force that moved north from Hong Kong and participated in the Battle of Amoy in August 1841. The regiment was the first to land when British forces disembarked from boats at the Capture of Chusan on 1 October 1841. Ten days later, at the Battle of Chinhai the 55th was again part of the force that engaged Qing troops, remaining there until year's end.] After the war he begins acclimatizing himself to his new life in China. In January 1843, Gringell proceeds to Ningpo where he would settle for some time. Several notable names appear in his diary jottings, including military Generals, R.B. Jackson, HM Consul at Foochow, and the like. [Ningbo was one of the five Chinese treaty ports opened by the Treaty of Nanjing which was signed 29 August 1842 at the end of the First Opium War. During the war, three days after the British captured Chinhai (Zhenhai) on 10 October 1841, they captured the nearby city of Ningpo without opposition. On 10 March 1842, the Battle of Ningpo ensued, the Chinese having dispatched Manchu Prince Yijing and his Manchu Bannermen to attempt to retake the city. Tricked into thinking the British had abandoned the city, the Chinese rushed in, only to find mines laid in the streets. The Chinese retreated but were ambushed by the British who achieved a decisive victory.] As well as performing medical services, he enjoys shooting, learning Chinese, writing home, and reminiscing about his time in Madras, although he is pleased to have left India for China. He writes of the occasion which sparked his career as an interpreter, and ultimately a translator of certain Chinese books, including an atlas. With foreshadows into his life-long success in China, the journal's final entry is made 31 December 1843. Excerpts from the diary: 1 January 1842. "... China... will receive me, I hope. Be it so." 28 March 1842. [Madras] "Went on board the Amelia Thomson - now martyr..." 20 May 1842 [At sea] ".... in voyage sailing to China when I may be such on uncertain time." 22 May 1842. "Caught a large shark..." 23 May 1842. "... We are only 280 miles from Hong Kong." 31 May 1842. "Sighted land... the great landscape... a China pilot boat came along side in the way. He anchored whilst other ships were boating in" 4 June 1842. "Made Hong Kong anchored about 11 oclock. All our ships are here but sail tomorrow... Hong Kong is... situated in a perfect harbour surrounded by immense hills very desolate and devoid of a single tree. There had been a mill to the Westward... Col. and 18 men killed. They were attacked... and almost unarmed" 5 June 1842. "Went on shore to the commissariat office, port office... saw Major-General Burrell [Royal Marines]... Wrote to Macao Tamru & Co." 11 June 1842. "I see by the papers there is some disturbance expected at Kastio [Kakchio, now Queshi, in Shantou]..." 12 June 1842. "Sighted the island Formosa [Taiwan]. It is exceedingly large and can be seen 75 miles at sea..." 17 June 1842. "Two years today I landed in India and now I am at Chusan [Zhoushan]. It is beautifully cultivated... We may now consider ourselves firmly in the enemies court... Wet to a Joss House [temple] now occupied by the 41st Regt. There are nearly 100 remarkable images... figures... beautifully decorated with guilding..." 21 June 1842. "... bound for the entrance of the Yangtse Kiang river..." 26 June 1842. "Cunningham came on board in the evening and told us the news that this place Woo Sung [Wusong] and another 16 miles distant Shin Hai [Baoshan, near Shanghai] have been surrendered... no fighting... several officers got hansome pieces of goods etc etc in the city" 8 July 1842. "... made considerable progress, the land on either side looked very rich and woody, and habitations numerous..." 16 July 1842. "Lost a man overboard and he was left to perish without sufficient efforts being made to rescue him... They say 40,000 Tartars at Nankin waiting our arrival." 17 July 1842. "There is a report that a major detachment is to be left on Golden Island." 20 July 1842. "... about two miles from our station which proved to be Golden Island. There is a Fort... situated on a hill.. well fortified... the country is really beautiful." ** Primary Source Witness Account of the Battle of Chinkiang **] 21 July 1842. "... thro' the glasses we could certainly see the attack is commenced by the Artillery after rifle men ascended .. then seemed long and continued firing. It was beautiful to see the regularity of the men attacking and the coolness with which they went to their work of destruction... no attempt to get us off... we waited all day... A note came to our skipper saying that some Tartars were sent up state, that a great number of casualties had occurred... that seven of the men had been taken prisoners..." 23 July 1842. "...severe fighting on shore... One of the Tartars brought 8000 men down and absolutely enforced the inhabitants to fight. Col Divan of the 6th was struck by fire and died. Several Colours there have been killed and wounded... The Tartars murder all their enemies and children..." 24 July 1842. "The 1st Lieut. of [Endurian?] came on board by daylight, giving us orders... disembarked and marched to our [?] which is a Joss House around the city of Ching-Kang-Foo. The city is desolate and war on every side..." 29 July 1842. "Wandered about without my guard but long way and did not reach my quarters till 1/2 10..." 10 August 1842 [Nanjing]. "... anchored weighed and came taken in tow by the steamer... Nanking is very large has three walls around they say strong and guarded by 16000 Tartars. We shall have a strong fight. Should anything - death - happen to me I should wish all my ... valuables... to my sister Anna... Between 5 & 6 oclock anchored off Nankin... We have landed some troops and as shall all be landed in a day or so, a very severe engagement is expected." 16 August 1842. "Found several boxes containing something of all sorts... some opium... 18 August 1842. "All seems favourable to peace... walked to the walls of Nankin..." 22 August 1842. "Went up to the Artillery called on Major Blundell then went to the Superintending Surgeon" 2-4 September 1842. "Made up a party to go to the Porcelaine Tower... about 260 feet 9 stories high... certainly wonderful... over-looks the whole city" 22 September 1842. "An order to embark tomorrow..." 19 October 1842. "Got into Chusan Bay [Zhoushan] about 1/2 4 or 5 oclock." [Departed here November 4th.] 8 November 1842. "Landing some of our stores..." 9 November 1842. "Up early and preparing to go on shore. We were all day long reaching the place of destruction. I landed with great difficulty in getting Boats & Guns turrets on shore..." 28 November 1842. "My birthday... long years since I was at home on this day..." 13 December 1842. "Commenced learning a Chinese language..." 1 January 1843. "... I am in China alone, and without news for months... I am growing older, wiser in a worldly sense. " 10 January 1843. "Today I start for Ningpo [Ningbo]... Marched Chin Hai [Zhenhai] about 9 oclock..." 1 March 1843. "Went outside the walls after shooting... a bit cold out..." 15 March 1843. "Put on a court enquiry in the murder of a poor unfortunate Chinaman who had been stoned to death by persons unknown." 9 November 1843. "... The General [...] requesting me to attend his quarters, that I am to do - he wants to see me about [becoming] an interpreter of Chinese..." 9 December 1843. "... I am now placed in a situation of some importance and should I acquit myself well... I may get something elsewhere and at a no very distant period... I would prefer living in China to India... I should wish to return to India for a few months..." 13 December 1843. "Called on the General... and delivered my Chinese atlas. " End Excerpts. William Raymond Gingell (1816-1863) was a surgeon for the British East India Company, serving in India and in China, where he would learn the language so proficiently as to become a consular interpreter. He wrote many papers on Chinese customs, and translated Chinese books. In his later years, he served as Consul at Amoy and at Hankow. Following in the footsteps of his father Daniel Gingell, and his elder brother, who were both also physicians, he studied medicine at St. Bartholomew's Hospital, qualifying in 1839. Also like his father before him, he was a member of the Royal College of Surgeons of England. In January 1840, having studied the necessary Indian languages, he went to Madras as a surgeon for the East India Company. After 2 years, he was transferred to China, arriving there during the final battles of the First Opium War. He learned the language and was appointed an interpreter. Later, he published two books of translations of classic Chinese texts. In a preface, his teacher, Lin Kow Hwaie, tells of his extraordinary and unusual gifts as a linguist. Examples of his Chinese script are in the archives at Kew. An excellent linguist, in the early 1850s, he was made Interpreter to the British Consulate in Amoy. In 1855 he married Fanny Sullivan, the widow of the Consul at Amoy (Xiamen), who had died a few years earlier. They had no children. For a short period in 1857 he was Consul at Bangkok, during which time King Mongkut presented Mrs Gingell with a brooch. In 1859 he was appointed Consul at Amoy [Xiamen]. In 1861 he was appointed Consul at Hankow, from where he wrote letters describing the dangers from flood and rebel activity, as well as the difficulties of setting up his home and office. In March 1863 he wrote to Lord Bruce, the Chief Superintendent, requesting permission to return home because of his poor health. This was refused. In August he made a second request, but two days later he died, aged only 46. His memorial in St Mary's Church, Thornbury is inscribed with Chinese characters, which mean 'Waiting, Watching, Longing'. In 1850, Gingell was involved in the Shen-kuang-szu Incident, one of the earliest conflicts between local Chinese and foreign Protestant missionaries. When CMS missionaries, Robert David Jackson and William Welton brought with them a letter from the bishop of Hong Kong to the Consul in June 1850, expressing their desire to reside within the city, Dr. William Raymond Gingell, who was the then consular interpreter in Fuzhou, provided assistance. Having formerly been informed about the availability of a temple on Wu-shih-shan called Shen-kuang-szu, Gingell arranged a meeting with the county magistrate Xinglian to discuss its rental opportunities. Without putting much detailed thought into the matter, Xinglian placed his seal on the agreement. The Chinese, however, were not pleased with the outcome of the meeting, protesting that foreigners other than consular officers should not be permitted to reside within the walled city. Two days after the conclusion of the rental agreement, Gingell began receiving urgent communications from Xinglian and other Chinese officials requesting to undo the rental agreement at Shen-kuang-szu. Gingell refused, taking the position that foreigners had the Treaty rights to reside within the city, and that the magistrate himself had already placed his seal on the agreement.

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        Essays on miscellaneous subjects: historical, moral, and political.

      Leeds: printed and published by Joshua Hobson. 1842. 12mo., 212pp., recently well bound in cloth, spine gilt lettered. A very good copy. First edition. The author was one of Robert Owen's 'social missionaries'. 'Some idea of the qualifications expected of a social missionary is given by the entry in the Minute Book, Central board, A.A.C.A.N., 10 January 1839. On his appointment as S.M. for Hull, James Napier Bailey was examined by the Central Board, with Pare in the chair. He was given a study list which included all the major works of Owen and Thompson, as well as titles of Locke, Adam Smith, McCulloch, Malthus, Godwin, Helvetius, Mirabeau, Volney and Minter Morgan.' [J.F.C. Harrison, Quest for the new moral world, Robert Owen and the Owenites in Britain and America.> 1969. p.219]. The NLW cataloguer notes that pp.91-108 of the Essays> are On the comparative merits of the competitive and co-operative systems of society.> Two of the other essays are also worth Noting: viz. On wealth producing power> (pp. 13-20) and On the doctrine of the formation of character, as held by the disciples of socialism> (pp. 193-212).

      [Bookseller: John Drury Rare Books]
 45.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  


        La Tierra Santa, o Descripción exacta de Jope, Nazaret, Belén, el monte de los Olivos, Jerusalén y otros lugares conocidos en el Evangelio, a lo que se agrega una noticia sobre otros sitios notables en la historia del pueblo hebreo. (Tres tomos).

      - México, Se expende en la Librería de Recio y Altamirano, portal de Mercaderes Número 7, 1842.Características: Pasta dura en plean piel de la época. En muy buen estado general los tres tomos. Pequeños detalles casi intrascendentes. Con bellos dorados en el lomo y márgenes de las pastas. Contiene una gran variedad de ilustraciones-láminas a página entera cada uno de los tomos. Obra formada con las relaciones literales de Chateubriand, de Lamartine de Michaud, del padre Guzmán y de otros viageros (sic), y publicada por Mariano Galván Rivera. 303 p., 324 p. + bello plano plegado de Jerusalén., 352 p. respectivamente. (18.5 x 12). Peso: 1.300 kgrs.LIBRO A LA MITAD DE SU PRECIO NORMAL [Attributes: Soft Cover]

      [Bookseller: Carlos Héctor García Toscano]
 46.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  


        Avifauna Sardiniens). Elenco degli uccelli che trovansi nell’Isola di Sardegna od Ornitologia sarda.

      Turin, Reycend 1842. - Oktav. Aufwendig vergoldetes Ganzmaroquin der Zeit, mit Innen- und Stehkantenvergoldung sowie dreiseitigem Goldschnitt (kaum bestoßen oder berieben, Buchblock an zwei Stellen etwas aufgebrochen, jedoch nicht lose, Rücken etwas ausgeblichen). XII, 207 (+1) S., 1 Bl., mit einer Holzschnittvignette auf dem Titel (Vogelfänger auf der Jagd) und einer weiteren auf S. 1 (Kardinal). Insgesamt ungewöhnliches, in einen Romantikereinband gefaßtes Exemplar in sehr guter Erhaltung. Erste Ausgabe und zugleich erste Lokalavifauna Sardiniens. – Zimmer 124. Wood 278. Ceresoli 131: „Edizione originale, assai rara. Bella e nitida stampa." – Detailliertes, taxonomisch nach Linné angeordnetes Verzeichnis der Vogelwelt Sardiniens, gewidmet Emanuele Vittorio II., König von Sardinien (und später Italiens). Bemerkenswert sind u.a. die zahlreich angeführten Namensvarianten der Vogelarten, hierunter Vulgärnamen ebenso wie frühere wissenschaftliche Benennungen mit Quellenangabe. – Der Verfasser war Archäologe und Direktor des Königlichen Naturhistorischen Museums in Cagliari. Ein auf Caras Werk aufbauendes, erweitertes Verzeichnis publizierte der italienische Ornithologe Tommaso Salvadori im Jahre 1863. 1001 g

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Stefan Wulf]
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        ERNST KAISER (1803 - 1865). Angler an der oberen Isar bei Lenggries.

      - Lavierte Feder- und Pinselzeichnung über Bleistift auf blau getöntem Papier, unten links signiert und datiert "Kaiser f. 1842", 19 x 26 cm. Ernst Kaiser, geboren in Rain, zeichnet sich durch seine lockere Aquarelltechnik und atmosphärische Licht- und Luftwirkung aus (vgl. auch die Aquarelle in der Staatlichen Graphischen Sammlung in München). Weniger anerkannt als sein Ateliergenosse Heinrich Bürkel starb Kaiser verbittert und fast vergessen in München. - Schwacher Lichtrand, sonst gut erhalten. [Attributes: Signed Copy]

      [Bookseller: Peter Bierl Buch- & Kunstantiquariat]
 48.   Check availability:     ZVAB     Link/Print  

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