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Displayed below are some selected recent viaLibri matches for books published in 1842

        Paralipomeni Della Batracomiomachia

      Baudry, Parigi 1842 - Paralipomeni della Batracomiomachia. Parigi, Libreria Europea di Baudry, 1842. In 8vo, brossura originale giallina, pp. 137. Edizione originale autentica, col foglio finale di avvisi editoriali che manca nelle successive contraffazioni. Minimi difetti alle copertine, fioriture, ma buon esemplare completamente intonso. Assai raro. Translated info: Size: 8vo

      [Bookseller: Henry Pordes Books Ltd]
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        Physiologie Complète du Rébus. Ouvrage Illustré Par 800 petites Figures, Et rédigé

      Chez Delarue, Paris - N.d., circa 1842. 12mo. 15 by 10 cm. 169, [1], [10] pp. Each page is printed with a decorative frame. Throughout are woodcut vignettes. This is a visual dictionary of sorts -- one geared to solving rebus puzzles. Besides these pictograms, the diminutive book comes with a history of rebuses and plenty of examples and instructions on how to solve these often tricky puzzlers. In addition, there is a two page section on the manual alphabet used in sign language. To our knowledge, this is a most unusual reference, the only one of which we are aware to aid in the solution of rebuses, and it is also quite scarce. Scattered foxing. Spine cracked but still holding. [Attributes: Soft Cover]

      [Bookseller: White Fox Rare Books, ABAA/ILAB]
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        "Journal of a Whaling Voyage to the Pacific Ocean on Board the Eliza L. B. Jenney. FairHaven, John Church Master, 1842."

      Folio, 131 pages of manuscript entries. Pioneer oceanographer Matthew Fontaine Maury based much of his work on information gleaned from ship's logs. There was a huge cache of them at the Navy's Depot of Charts and Instruments where he worked while forming his theories. He supplemented this knowledge by distributing, then collecting, pre-printed journals from ship captains and, supposedly, by transcribing information from journals of American whaling captains, who were by far the most traveled sailors on the planet. I've seen examples of the pre-printed journals, but I've never seen any evidence of Maury working with whaling journals... Until now. Written twice on the front blanks of this journal are the words, "Copied for M. F. Maury." Reading through the journal we can see why it was of use to Maury. Position and weather conditions are meticulously recorded, often with ocean conditions noted as well. The "Eliza L. B. Jenney" was a 381 ton ship built in Fairhaven in 1842. This was her maiden voyage, and it was a successful one, returning 2400 sperm (The tabulation at the back of this journal shows a total of 2491 bbl. It also notes the amount of oil each whale yielded, and where and when it was caught. This sort of information must have been especially valuable to Maury as he compiled his famous "Whale Chart.") The journal keeper was probably Hiram Luther, 1st mate, who identifies himself by writing, on October 28, 1843, "This day I am 38 years of age. May the lord in mercy preserve me through this voyage and return me to my native home." The journal keeper occasionally skips a day, but this is a complete account of a four-year whaling cruise on the west coast of South America. Maury's "Wind and Current Chart of the North Atlantic" was published in 1847, and "Physical Geography of the Sea" in 1855. So the journal fits well within that time frame. Aside from the Maury connection this journal also has the advantage of being accompanied by scholarly notes, genealogy, and a complete transcription made in 2003. The writing is something of a scrawl, but is legible, and the book is in excellent condition, securely bound in original half calf over marbled boards with "Journal Whaling Voyage" in gold lettering on the backstrip.

      [Bookseller: Ten Pound Island Book Co.]
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        THE DANUBE: Its History, Scenery, and Topography.

      Virtue and Co., London 1842 - 4to., iv, 236pp., illustrated with portrait frontispiece, engraved vignette title page, 80 steel engravings, and text illustrations. Bound in full morocco, with boards decorated with floral pattern in blind. Shortened title in gilt on spine. Blue stained end papers. a.e.g. A bit of glue residue on the front board. Hinges starting. Mild rubbing to the boards. Some finger soiling, with light scattered browning. All engravings have their tissue guard. A Very Good copy. ****No date on title page, 1842 on the engraved title page.*** [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Frey Fine Books]
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        Gaeta dai Cappuccini del Borga

      Napoli 1842 - Veduta di Gaeta e Formia. Incisione in rame, colorata a mano, in ottimo stato di conservazione. Rara. Copperplate with later hand color, in good conditions. Dimensioni 337 235mm

      [Bookseller: Libreria Antiquarius]
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        Péhriska-Rúhpa. [A Minatarre or Big-Bellied Indian]

      [Paris, Coblenz and London 1842 - Hand-coloured aquatint engraving by Paul Legrand after Bodmer, state with three figures in the background, blindstamp, issue without imprint line or English sub-title. There are two distinct states of this image: one with three small figures in the mid-ground to the right of the main figure, and a second where these figures have been removed This powerful portrait of Péhriska-Rúhpa ('Two Ravens') presents the warrior and chief of the Hidatsa as a figure of great dignity. He adopts an attitude that would have been familiar to all men of power and rank, his worth displayed symbolically in his clothing and adornment. His shirt is trimmed with bands of bright yellow quillwork, elaborately fringed with ermine, locks of human hair and dyed horsehair. He wears a striped woolen breechclout and quilled leggings of deer skin. Around his neck is a necklace of bear claws, fastened to an otter-skin band and spaced with blue and white beads. Symbols of great wealth, these necklaces were made from the foreclaws of grizzly bears, preferably from animals taken in the spring when the claws were large comparatively unworn and showing white tips. A decorated buffalo robe over one shoulder and arm, Péhriska-Rúhpa holds his decorated pipe in the crook of his other arm. This is one of Bodmer's masterpieces of portraiture, and was carried out during the travellers' winter stop-over at Fort Clark in 1833-1834 Karl Bodmer's images show great versatility and technical virtuosity and give us a uniquely accomplished and detailed picture of a previously little understood (and soon to vanish) way of life. Swiss-born Bodmer was engaged by Prince Maximilian zu Wied-Neuwied (1782-1867) specifically to provide a record of his travels in North America, principally among the Plains Indians. In the company of David Dreidoppel (Prince Maximilian's servant and hunting companion), their travels in North America were to last from 1832 to 1834. Well-armed with information and advice, the party finally left St.Louis, on the most important stage of their travels, aboard the steamer Yellow Stone on April 10 1833. They proceeded up the treacherous Missouri River along the line of forts established by the American Fur Company. At Bellevue they encountered their first Indians, then went on to make contact with the Sioux tribe, learning of and recording their little known ceremonial dances and powerful pride and dignity. Transferring from the Yellow Stone to another steamer, the Assiniboin, they continued to Fort Clark, visiting there the Mandan, Mintari and Crow tribes, then the Assiniboins at Fort Union, the main base of the American Fur Company. On a necessarily much smaller vessel they journeyed through the extraordinary geological scenery of that section of the Missouri to Fort Mackenzie in Montana, establishing a cautious friendship with the fearsome Blackfeet. From this, the westernmost point reached, it was considered too dangerous to continue and the return journey downstream began. The winter brought its own difficulties and discomforts, but Bodmer was still able to execute numerous studies of villages, dances and especially the people, who were often both intrigued and delighted by his work. The portraits are particularly notable for their capturing of individual personalities, as well as forming a primary account of what were to become virtually lost cultures. Graff 4648; Howes M443a; Pilling 2521; Sabin 47014; Wagner-Camp 76:1.

      [Bookseller: Donald A. Heald Rare Books (ABAA)]
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        "Journal of a Whaling Voyage to the Pacific Ocean on Board the Eliza L. B. Jenney. FairHaven, John Church Master, 1842."

      Folio, 131 pages of manuscript entries. Pioneer oceanographer Matthew Fontaine Maury based much of his work on information gleaned from ship's logs. There was a huge cache of them at the Navy's Depot of Charts and Instruments where he worked while forming his theories. He supplemented this knowledge by distributing, then collecting, pre-printed journals from ship captains and, supposedly, by transcribing information from journals of American whaling captains, who were by far the most traveled sailors on the planet. I've seen examples of the pre-printed journals, but I've never seen any evidence of Maury working with whaling journals... Until now. Written twice on the front blanks of this journal are the words, "Copied for M. F. Maury." Reading through the journal we can see why it was of use to Maury. Position and weather conditions are meticulously recorded, often with ocean conditions noted as well. The "Eliza L. B. Jenney" was a 381 ton ship built in Fairhaven in 1842. This was her maiden voyage, and it was a successful one, returning 2400 sperm (The tabulation at the back of this journal shows a total of 2491 bbl. It also notes the amount of oil each whale yielded, and where and when it was caught. This sort of information must have been especially valuable to Maury as he compiled his famous "Whale Chart.") The journal keeper was probably Hiram Luther, 1st mate, who identifies himself by writing, on October 28, 1843, "This day I am 38 years of age. May the lord in mercy preserve me through this voyage and return me to my native home." The journal keeper occasionally skips a day, but this is a complete account of a four-year whaling cruise on the west coast of South America. Maury's "Wind and Current Chart of the North Atlantic" was published in 1847, and "Physical Geography of the Sea" in 1855. So the journal fits well within that time frame. Aside from the Maury connection this journal also has the advantage of being accompanied by scholarly notes, genealogy, and a complete transcription made in 2003. The writing is something of a scrawl, but is legible, and the book is in excellent condition, securely bound in original half calf over marbled boards with "Journal Whaling Voyage" in gold lettering on the backstrip.

      [Bookseller: Ten Pound Island Book Co.]
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        Autograph Letter signed, to Nathaniel Ingersoll Bowditch

      New Haven, 1842. 2pp. on recto and verso of the first leaf, with conjugate leaf addressed on verso. 1 vols. 4to. Soiled and stained, a few cellotape repairs, small piece torn away from conjugate address leaf. 2pp. on recto and verso of the first leaf, with conjugate leaf addressed on verso. 1 vols. 4to. Silliman (1779-1864), the pioneering American scientist and founder of THE AMERICAN JOURNAL OF SCIENCE AND THE ARTS, writes "I did not expect to trouble you to acknowledge my small pamphlet but I am gratified that it is approved by you." Silliman continues at length regarding the illness of "our much valued friend, Mrs. Jackson. ...In rising from the oblivion of a fever, perhaps it was not a very unnatural delusion that the friends whom she has ceased to see about her - were dead ..." The "Mrs. Jackson" referred to is probably the wife of James Jackson, M.D., co-founder, along with Bowditch, of Massachusetts General Hospital.

      [Bookseller: James Cummins Bookseller]
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        [DUMONT D'URVILLE] Vincendon-Dumoulin : autograph letter signed, to Casimir Gide, circa 1842

      Single sheet, octavo, manuscript in brown ink, written on one side only, undated but probably 1842, a note from the hydrographer Vincendon-Dumoulinto Dumont d'Urville's publisher, Casimir Gide, suggesting an amendment to one of the maps in the fourth volume of Dumont d'Urville's Voyage au Pôle Sud (Vincendon-Dumoulin was the editor of the work, published in 24 volumes between 1842 and 1854): "Si la carte du 4ème volume (iles Viti) n'et pas tirée, nous y ferons ajouter un nom d'ile qui est désignée dans la narration. C'est une omission de peu d'importance et qui, dans tous les cas, ne fera pas grand bruit si on ne peut plus la réparer"; signed Dumoulin; the note closes with "Salut et amitié à MM. Gide et Beadry"; original folds; clean and legible. Vincendon-Dumoulin sailed with Dumont d'Urville to the Antarctic and the Pacific on the second voyage of theAstrolabe(1837-40). He was responsible for drawing the first map ofAdélie Land. After the expedition, he acted as the principal editor ofVoyage au Pôle Sud.

      [Bookseller: Douglas Stewart Fine Books]
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        Journal of an exploring tour beyond the Rocky Mountains, under the direction of the A.B.C.F.M. in the years 1835, '36, and '37; containing a description of the geography, geology, climate, productions. and the numbers, manners, and customs of the natives: with a map of Oregon Territory

      Mack, Andrus, & Woodruff [etc.], Ithaca, N.Y. 1842 - Third edition (first published 1838), 8vo, pp. 408; folding frontispiece map of the Oregon Territory dated 1838, plus 1 engraved plate; original blindstamped brown cloth lettered in gilt on spine; moderate wear, slight chipping at extremities, minor foxing; map slightly miscreased; all else very good and sound copy. Howes P-89: The map is "earliest showing accurately the Oregon interior ? Parker accompanied a fur-trading party, in 1835, from Council Bluffs to Walla Walla." Forbes 1120: "After arriving at the Columbia River and exploring Oregon and Washington, Parker joined the barque Columbia headed for the Hawaiian Islands in June 1836 ? Parker was invited to stay at the Binghams. He describes Honolulu at some length ? visited Waikiki ? later went to Ewa, Wialua, and Kaneohe, and has brief remarks on resident missionaries at each station?" [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Rulon-Miller Books (ABAA / ILAB)]
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        Anatomie et physiologie du système nerveux de l'homme et des animaux vertébrés; ouvrage contenant des observations pathologiques relatives au système nerveux et des expériences sur les animaux des classes supérieures

      Fortin, Masson, Paris 1842 - ____ Première édition, rare. Renferme "un exposé analytique et raisonné de ce qu'on a écrit, jusqu'à nos jours, de plus important sur l'anatomie et la physiologie du système nerveux. Nous nous sommes imposés la tâche longue et difficile de soumettre les opinions d'autrui au contrôle des expériences et de l'observation, puis de comparer les résultats de nos propres recherches à ceux qu'avaient obtenus nos devanciers." François Achille Longet y ajoute le résultat de ses remarquables études sur les fonctions de la moëlle épinière et l'innervation du larynx. Illustré par 8 planches dépliantes en lithographie. "François Achille Longet, a noted Parisian physician and physiologist, performed many experiments on different animals and supported Flourens's thesis that the hemispheres lacked a motor finction." Garrison, MacHenry, History of neurology 215. Accroc à une coiffe, mais bon exemplaire. Heirs of Hippocrates 1770. *-------*. 2 volumes in-8. [209 x 132 mm] Collation : VIII, 942 pp., 4 pl. /(4), 698 pp., 4 pl. Demi-basane brune, dos orné. (Reliure de l'époque.).

      [Bookseller: Hugues de Latude]
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        [NEW ZEALAND] Letter to an early Hutt River settler, Dr. Relph, from his sister in England, 1842

      Entire letter, single sheet folding to form [4] sides, quarto, neatly written manuscript in ink on 3 sides (cross written on the last page), headed 'Enford, near Chippenham, July 10th 1842', addressed to 'My dear Brother'; signed at the foot 'Your only affectionate and sincerely attached Sister, Harriet Eleanor Silcock'; outer side with address panel, to 'Mr. H.B. Relph, Surgeon &c., Petoni, nr. Wellington, Port Nicholson, New Zealand', with 'PAID 15 JY 1842' in red, 'CHIPPENHAM JY 15 1842' in black, 'SHIP LETTER / LONDON / JULY 16 1842' in red, and 'WELLINGTON / NEW ZEALAND FE 1 1843' in black; remnants of red wax seal with tiny perforation; the letter is complete and in fine condition. Dr. H.B. (Humphry) Relph, a native of Enford in Wiltshire, arrived at Port Nicholson on 14 November 1840 as a cabin passenger on the Martha Ridgeway. This vessel was only the twelfth emigrant ship to reach Port Nicholson, and it brought out the news that the name of the new settlement was to be changed from Britannia to Wellington. Relph settled at Petoni in the Hutt Valley, and is mentioned in Charles Heaphy's Narrative of a Residence in Various Parts of New Zealand (London, 1842, p.75) as one of the 'gentlemen [who] were engaged in clearing land and cultivating' in 'the Valley of the Hutt'. An advertisement for his services as 'Surgeon accoucheur' (obstetric surgeon) at Petoni was placed in the New Zealand Gazette and Wellington Spectator on 6 March 1841; in the 22 December 1841 edition of the same newspaper, Relph's witness statements feature prominently in a report on the inquest into the death of Archibald Milne at Petoni. The letter we offer here was carried on the ship Thomas Sparkes, which arrived at Wellington on January 31 1843. (An account of this voyage by passenger J. Hursthouse is held in the Alexander Turnbull Library, MS HUR 1841-3). It was written by Relph's sister, Harriet, who had married into a local Wiltshire family, the Silcocks. Their widowed mother had also recently married Harriet's father-in-law: the close knit Relph and Silcock families jointly owned an iron foundry under the company name Silcock and Relph, at Langley Burrell, near Chippenham, Wiltshire. Reference to the foundry, as well as to their mother's marriage, is made in Harriet's letter, which is in reply to Relph's letter received in March, 1841. Harriet's missive is full of family and local news. A deeply religious person, she is deeply concerned that no letter has been received from Humphry since March, and she includes her and her husband's prayers for her brother, also directing him to read certain hymns in the hymn book she had evidently given him before he departed for New Zealand. Note: A typed transcript of the letter, made by a previous owner, may be viewed in the images in this listing.

      [Bookseller: Douglas Stewart Fine Books]
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        A chart of the world on Mercator's projection.

      [Reduced from the large chart by John Purdy]. London : Richard Holmes Laurie, 9th Jan. 1842. Engraved map with original hand colouring, dissected and laid on linen, cloth covers, 660 x 995 mm; collection label of A.C. Papineau (1828-1913), Canadian judge and historian; fine condition. A highly detailed chart of the world showing numerous routes of the maritime explorers; the three voyages of Cook; Vancouver; Biscoe; La perouse; Boulton; Phipps; Ross and Parry and others; with many detailed historical notes on first discoveries etc. A rare edition of Purdy's map reduced from the larger format version published in the early nineteenth century. This edition shows Texas as a republic. (The Republic of Texas existed between 1836 and 1845, when it joined the United States). No other copy located.

      [Bookseller: Douglas Stewart Fine Books]
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        Map of a section of Wayne County, NC]

      Manuscript 1842 - This 5x6" map seems to be of a 770 acre parcel south of Goldsboro, NC, in Wayne County. There are several old tears at the folds. Good condition. +++Back when I had an open shop I would occasionally have surveyor customers who would come in after hauling themselves back to our civilization, telling stories of doing some re-survey of some piece of land in the out-yonder and finding old heart of pine stakes from a 19th c survey still in place and just very slightly off from where the modern surveying tools would place them. These guys held these earlier surveyors in high regard, as they did hard work and did it very well, using relatively rudimentary tools (optics, chains, measures) in sometimes very difficult conditions and doing a splendid job of it. These stories came to mind just this afternoon again while cataloging an 1842 manuscript map made by Britton Hood, Jr., who was the son of a surveyor Hood Sr. who worked through the late 18th c and into the middle 19th. The family was in Wayne County, and it looks as though the son stayed their, at least according to a hint or two on this map. Although the location is not identified the major feature is, and the "Cabin Branch" of the map may be the "Cabin Branch" creek that is south-central Wayne County, south of Goldsboro. The very attractive part of this map of course are the landmarks used by the surveyor, and as is very often in these cases, the "landmarks" tend to be simple trees and stumps and such. Of course is you identify a starting place and base all of the landmarks upon that, then virtually anything can be used, so long as it is referenced to something. +++ Some of the then-essential and now-delightful boundary markers for Hood's 770-acre survey include:Maple at the fork of the branch; stake at the turn of the branch; pine at the west edge of the swamp; large cypress at the edge of the swamp; through the meander of the Rockish (?) Creek; Lightwood stump; small pine; pine; large dead pine; stake; pine at the prong of the NW branch; and of course a pine, pine, and small pine, among other things.

      [Bookseller: JF Ptak Science Books]
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        ALS. To Aaron Vail Esq. Chargé d'affaires of the U.S., Madrid. About Consular business to a subordinate in Madrid while he was en route there as U.S. Minister to Spain (18342-1846)

      Birmingham, 1842. 4to. Old folds. 4to.

      [Bookseller: James Cummins Bookseller]
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        The Auckland Times. Tempora mutantur Nos Non mutamur in illis. Vol. 1 Tuesday November 8 1842 No. 17

      Auckland : Printed (In a Mangle) and Published by Henry Falwasser, Sole Editor and Proprietor, 1842. Large folio sheet, 2 leaves (integral), printed recto only, in a variety of printing types on a washing mangle; subscriber's (?) names 'Mr. & Mrs Sim' in brown ink beneath the masthead; tear to blank corner of initial leaf; original fold lines with some mild discoloration. An exceptionally rare copy of this curious publication, one of New Zealand's pioneering newspapers. The issue of November 8 1842 is not held in the Alexander Turnbull Library. Dating from the early phase of British settlement, prior to the first Colonial Parliament (1853), The Auckland Times was owned and edited by Henry Falwasser. The first issue was printed by Moore at the Government Printing Press and issued on September 5 1842. After only a few issues having been printed at the Press, the acting Governor, Lieutenant Shorland, prevented Falwasser from having use of the Press. Falwasser's resourcefulness, however, allowed him to continue publishing. He collected all the old printing type that he could find, and by employing an old washing mangle continued to print the weekly paper in his own house, using coarse, spongy paper. The result was a crude, yet ultimately effective production that used an astonishing variety of typefaces and depth of impressions. What had started life as a newspaper whose intention was to be uncontroversial and not to take political sides now became a voice of dissent against the Governor's perceived attempts to stifle an independent press. Over the ensuing months, until the last of the Mangle newspapers was issued on 13 April 1843, Falwasser was able to refine his printing technique to some extent, improving the quality of the newspaper. The copy we offer here is from one of the earliest Mangle editions. "There can be no better proof that Falwasser was a man of determination than his initial decision to launch his paper in August 1842. After all, in the previous thirteen months Auckland's first two newspapers had come to grief - virtually killed, let it be said, by the hostility of Governor Hobson's officials who had a morbid fear of Press criticism. Perhaps Falwasser thought his paper would survive where its predecessors expired because he was determined to steer clear, as best he could, of politics. In his first issue he laid down his policy as editor. Though the Auckland Times would 'exercise the irrepressible POWER OF TRUTH' it would 'be untrammelled by any party' since 'dissensions in our infant community can only hinder our progress'. But quickly the Times was driven into opposition to officialdom. You will easily understand why if you appreciate that Falwasser had hoped to buy up the plant and press of the recently defunct Auckland Standard. However the Government forbade him to. In an early editorial Falwasser bitterly denounced what he believed was a Government attempt to destroy the liberty of the Press by monopolising all printing plants in the capital ... Copies of the Times are rare: but preserved in the Auckland Public Library are isolated numbers which show the typographical ingenuity of Falwasser. Some issues have a curious patchwork appearance. As one set of type was used up, Falwasser would work his way through his assortments of founts: canon, Baskerville, non-pareil, brevier, italics, Gothic and so on. One particular letter was in very short supply. This was the lower-case 'k'. So ; Falwasser made do as best he could, using capitals, Gothics, even German text. And when no 'k' of any sort was left, Falwasser represented his 'k' by leaving a gap. The effect was quaintly hilarious. Falwasser laughed, it seems, at his own efforts, for he was not a pompous man. All the early issues bore the imprint 'Printed in a mangle and Published by Henry Falwasser; at the Mangle, Chancery Street'. Yet he also believed he had been enabled by his 'ponderous revolver' - as he once called his mangle - to 'strike a blow at would-be despotism'. 'We consider our mangle an ingenious and honorable triumph over as contemptible and sneaking an attempt to stifle the press as was ever perpetrated.' As time went by, Falwasser gathered fresh type from odd quarters. So the appearance of the Times improved. But it went into recess on 13 April 1843. later in the year, Phoenix-like, it rose again, using up-to-date type and plant imported from Sydney. The Times continued until 17 January 1846. A week later Falwasser died. It's somehow fitting that the Mangle newspaper and its spirited proprietor should quit the Auckland scene together." (Russell Stone,  Associate Professor of History at the University of Auckland. Originally published in Art New Zealand 4, February / March 1977)

      [Bookseller: Douglas Stewart Fine Books]
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        ANNALI DI LIVORNO DALLA SUA ORIGINE SINO ALL'ANNO DI GESU' CRISTO 1840. Colle notizie riguardanti i luoghi più notevoli antichi e moderni dei suoi contorni. 1842-1856.

      Giulio Sardi, 1842. Prima edizione. Opera completa in quattro volumi. Cm.24,4x15,7. Pg.X, 430; 570; 552; 732, XL. Legatura coeva in mz.pelle con titoli e fregi in oro al dorso. Una tavola in grande formato con una doppia pianta della città di Livorno. In fine al quarto volume è aggiunto l'"Indice ragionato degli Annali di Livorno", redatto a cura di Cesare Caporali (Livorno, Sardi, 1856), Sono unite solo due delle tre tavole fuori testo in grande formato, rispettivamente al terzo e al quarto volume. Esemplare da studio, completo nel testo, che presenta bruniture diffuse e numerose chiose e sottolineature ad inchiostro. La legatura del quarto volume è diversa rispetto agli altri. Fondamentale studio di storia livornese. > Lozzi, 2299 "Raro. L'opera non va oltre all'epoca XVI colle relative annotazioni, ossia sino agli anni 1737. Molto difficile a trovarla completa per le molte vicende a cui l'impressione andò soggetta". "Mostra Editoria Livornese" (Casa della Cultura, Maggio 1964), 625. Codice libreria 129796.

      [Bookseller: Studio Bibliografico Pera]
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        Die Privilegien der kaiserl. königl. landesfürstlichen Stadt Radkersburg in Untersteyer, nebst einer kurzgefaßten Geschichte und Beschreibung dieser Stadt, ihrer Merkwürdigkeiten und Umgebungen.

      Radkersburg, Alois Weitzinger, 1842. 8°. Mit einer Holzschn.-Abbildung (Titel verso) u. einem lithogr. Stadtplan. VIII, 168 S., OKart. Erstausgabe; ohne die sechs Tafeln, die diesem Handexemplar nie beigebunden waren. - Der Holzschnitt mit einer Abbildung des ältesten Stadtsiegels von 1418. - Durchschossenes (interfoliiertes) Handexemplar des Verfassers mit zahlr., tlw. umfangreichen Ergänzungen u. Anmerkungen sowie einigen Korrekturen. Titel verso mit dem mont. lithogr. Namensschildchen Hofrichters. - Umschlag berieben u. bestoßen. Unteres Kapital m. Fehlstelle. Innendeckel m. altem Namensstempel. Ecken etw. bestoßen. Gebräunt u. stockfleckig. - Schlossar 212. Versand D: 12,00 EUR Radkersburg, Die Privilegien der kaiserl. königl. landesfürstlichen Stadt Radkersburg in Untersteyer, nebst einer kurzgefaßten Geschichte und Beschreibung dieser Stadt, ihrer Merkwürdigkeiten und Umgebungen, Bad Radkersburg, Steiermark, Slowenien, Untersteiermark, Handexemplar, Manuskripte

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Wolfgang Friebes]
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        Cakes and Ale (2 Volumes)

      London: How & Parsons, 1842. First Edition. Three Quarter Leather. Fine. Cruikshank, George. 322, [2] ads, 316 pp. 12mo. Burgundy leather spines and corners, spine leather on each volume has faded slightly to brown. Five raised bands to spine, gold embossed tooling to bands, titles, and date at base of each volume, marbled insets to each volume, matching marbled endpapers. Bound by Bartlett of Boston. Original cover cloth and spine bound in at rear of each volume. Red silk ribbon markers. George Cruikshank illustration to title page and frontispiece of each volume.

      [Bookseller: Artisan Books & Bindery ABAA/ILAB]
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        Alter Jungfernstieg von Giovanoly gesehen. Doppeltondruck von Wilhelm Heuer mit ornamentaler Bordüre um 1858 ( Aus: Hamburg und seiner Umgebungen, Blatt 61 ).

      Gassmann, Hamburg - Bildmaß der Darstellung: 15,6 x 23,2 cm ( Höhe x Breite), alt unter Glas gerahmt ( Rahmenmaß: 31,5 x 38 cm ): Auf dem Blatt erscheint die St. Petrikiche noch ohne Turm ( als Folge des Hamburger Brandes von 1842 ). Zwischen den Bäumen der Turm der St. Jacobi-Kirchturm, vorn der alte Alsterpavillon von 1834. ( vergleiche hierzu im Werkverzeichnis Heuers von Salomon die Werkverzeichnisnummer 61a , FH ) Das Blatt gleichmäßig leicht gebräunt, minimal fleckig. - selten - ( Das Pic leider mit Blitzlichtreflexion ) ( Pic erhältlich // webimage available )

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Friederichsen]
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        Encampment of Piekann Indians

      1842. BODMER, Karl. Encampment of Piekann Indians, Near Fort McKenzie on the Muscleshell River. Philadelphia: Daniel Rice and James G. Clark, circa 1842. Folio (measures 20-1/2 by 14 inches), mounted and matted. $1800.Early printing of Bodmer's 43rd plate made during his travels into the “deep west” with Baron Braunsberg, Prince Maximilian, in June 1833, finely hand-colored.The print depicts the three tribes of the Blackfeet at McKenzie on the Marias River, erroneously identified as the Muscleshell River in McKenney and Hall. “These three hard-riding, maraudering, and treacherous tribes were the Huns of the plains. War was their god and they broke as many treaties as the white man. The Piegans [Piekanns] were the most congenial of the three tribes” (Horan, 354). Bright, clean lithograph with a few small closed tears. A lovely print.

      [Bookseller: Bauman Rare Books]
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        Dir. Gedichte von Heinrich Vogeler, Worpswede.

      4to. Mit Illustrationen u. Buchschmuck des Autors. 32 nn. Bl. (2 weiß). OHpgt. m. farbigen Überzugspapieren u. Deckelschild. 2 unbeschnittene Büttenkanten. Buntpapiervorsätze. Sarkowski 1842. - Erste Ausgabe der ersten Veröffentlichung Heinrich Vogelers, der hier ein Gesamtkunstwerk aus einer Hand erschuf mit den Gedichten, den Illustrationen, Buchschmuck und Gesamtausstattung des Bandes. - Bei Schuster und Loeffler, Berlin auf Inselbütten gedruckt. Ein Jahr später erschien eine Titelauflage mit der Angabe Insel-Verlag. - Einband besonders an den Kanten berieben u. fleckig gebräunt. Tintenschrift auf dem Vorblatt "Weihnacht 1899". Im Buchblock sauber u. wohlerhalten.

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Düwal Berlin]
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        An Encyclopaedia of Architecture, Historical, Theoretical, and Practical.

      Longman, Brown, Green, London 1842 - pp xii, 1089, [32]. Early green half calf with red titling piece. Illustrations, small split on bottom back hinge. A handsome copy. [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Anah Dunsheath RareBooks ABA ANZAAB ILAB]
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        Dir. Gedichte.

      Sarkowski 1842. Vorsatz, Vortitel, Titel, Rahmen und Vignetten von Heinrich Vogeler. Original-Halbpergamentband ohne Pag., auf unbeschnittenem Insel Bütten, gr. 8. Erstausgabe. Sehr frisches Exemplar. Insel-Verlag, Inselverlag, Buchkunst, Bibliophilie, Pressendrucke, Vorzugsausgabe

      [Bookseller: Versandantiquariat]
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        The Miser's Daugher

      Ainsworth's Magazine, London 1842 - The 1842 true 1st edition in book form of Ainsworth's "The Miser's Daughter", extracted from "Ainsworth's Magazine". Complete with George Cruikshank's 20 wonderful engraved plates. Full tan polished calf boards (and signed) by Riviere. 5 raised bands, leather title and author labels, fine gilt-tooled decoration to the compartments. Clean and tight and VG+. Octavo, 418 pgs. Top-edge gilt and fine decorative gilt-bordering along the pastedowns. [Attributes: First Edition; Signed Copy; Soft Cover]

      [Bookseller: APPLEDORE BOOKS, ABAA]
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        Großherzogthum Baden Zunft-District Kleinlaufenburg . Meister-Brief, ausgestellt am 18. Oktober 1856, mit Siegel, im oberen Teil grosse Gesamtansicht von Laufenburg am Rhein ( D + CH )

      Blatt Gr. H 35 x B 40 cm - (guter Zustand, unter Glas gerahmt mit Passepartout) 1 Bl. S. mit 1 Lithographie gezeichnet von C. Gerspacher, Säckingen 1842 (Grösse der Text lautet: Der Vorstand der 2. Vereinszunft in Kleinlaufenburg bezeugt hiermit das Baptiste Meier von K.burg am heutigen Tage in unseren Zunftverband als Meister auf- und angenommen sei, und zwar in Folge dernach vorgelegten Wanderbuche und Professionszeugnisse gesezlich zurü(c)k gelegten Wanderjahre, und des zur vollkommenen Zufriedenheit der Zunftvorsteher gefertigten Meisterstückes, sowie der hinzu ertheilten Ermächtigung des Grossh. Bad. des. Amtes No 24, 9. 5. 9 vom 5ten Nov. d. J. diese Meisterurkunde . zur ungehinderten Ausübung seines Gewerbes hiermit ausgestellt. ( Schiffsleute und Flösser , Flößer, Flösserei / Fischer, Fischerzunft )

      [Bookseller: Johann Peter Hebel Antiquariat]
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        Die Natur in Bildern. Ein belehrendes und unterhaltendes Bilderbuch zum Behufe einer naturgemäßen Entwicklung und Bildung des Verstandes und Gemüthes der Kinder. 2 Tle. in 1 Bd. Stuttgart, Hallberger, 1842. VIII, 52 S.; 2 Bll., 92 S. Mit 28 kolor. lithogr. Tafeln. 4°. Neuer Hlwd. mit goldgepr. RSch.

       1842 Doderer/Müller, 60-62; Pressler 56; Wegehaupt I, 1688.- Seltene erste Ausgabe.- In der Tradition des Orbis Pictus gestaltetes Anschauungswerk, das für die Auffassung von Anschauungswerken in der Romantik und im Biedermeier als stellvertretend gilt.- Mit insgesamt 355 liebevoll kolorierten Abbildungen.- Stellenweise etwas fingerfleckig, etwa 15 Blätter mit Feuchtrand in oberer Außenecke. Versand D: 5,00 EUR

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Schramm]
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        Alcorani textus universus ex correctioribus Arabum exemplaribus summa fide, ... Eadem fide, ... in Latinum translatus; appositis unicuique capiti notis, atque refutatione: ...[vol. 2 title:] Refutatio Alcorani, in qua ad Mahumetanicae superstitionis radicem securis apponitur; ...Padova, Typographia Seminaria, 1698. 2 volumes bound as 1. Folio (35.5 x 25 cm). Blind-tooled vellum (ca. 1800?), reusing and retooling vellum from a slightly earlier blind-tooled binding.

      Cat. Bibl. A.-R. Courbonne, dont la vent ... 1er février 1842, 30 (this copy); 34; Schnurrer 377; Sheikh Al-Shabab, "The place of Marracci's Latin translation of the Holy Quran: ...", in: Journal of King Saud University: language & tanslation, 13 (2001), pp. 57-74. The first scholarly printed Quran, prepared by the anti-Islamic Catholic Ludovico Marracci, with a much more accurate Arabic text than any previously printed and the first accurate Latin translation, also including extensive notes based on the Islamic commentaries, as well as the editor's extensive "refutations" of each sutra. Each sura is given first in Arabic, then in Latin translation, followed by notes and then the refutation. The entire first volume of about 430 pages is taken up with preliminary matter, including a 24-page life of Muhammad (one of the first detailed biographies ever printed and again more accurate than its predecessors), an 8-page profession of faith with the Arabic and Latin in parallel columns, and additional commentaries and introductory matter. The fact that this edition was produced explicitly as an attempt to refute the views of Islam has naturally led Islamic scholars to dismiss it, but both the Arabic text and the Latin translation were far better than any previously printed and had no serious rival until the Leipzig edition of 1834. The commentaries also made a great deal of Islamic scholarship available to a European audience for the first time and both the Arabic and the Latin text influenced nearly every edition for the next 150 years.With two bookplates and an occasional early manuscript note and a few letters or numbers inscribed in the foot margin of one leaf. With a tear running into the text of one leaf, repaired, but otherwise in very good condition. With generous margins. The boards are slightly bowed and there is a small tear repaired at the foot of the spine. A ground-breaking work of Quranic scholarship, a valuable source for the study of the Quran and an essential source for European views of Islam.

      [Bookseller: Antiquariaat FORUM BV]
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        THE NATIVITY AND OTHER MUSIC [manuscript title]

      [Various places, including Antarctica, the Northwest Coast, and shipboard, 1842. 54pp. including four original color sketches. Oblong quarto. Contemporary black morocco, ornate gilt cover, stamped with the initials of James D. Dana and James C. Palmer, neatly rebacked with most of the original spine preserved. Corners slightly worn. Internally bright and clean. Later presentation inscription on front free endpaper. Overall in fine condition. A superlative album of music, lyrics, and artwork composed by officers of the United States Exploring Expedition (1838-42), originally composed during their landmark voyage. Included are several of the earliest views of Antarctica, as well as a superb watercolor of Oregon. The work is the collaboration of expedition scientist James D. Dana and expedition Acting Surgeon James C. Palmer, shipmates aboard the U.S.S. Peacock and evidently close friends. Dana, a young officer of twenty- five, was the only scientist of the expedition with previous naval experience. His work was shaped by his mentor, Prof. Benjamin Silliman of Yale, who became his father-in-law upon his return. Palmer served as a well respected medical officer. Together the two, with artistic contributions from colleagues, recorded the events of the expedition in this album in remarkable fashion. The musical scores were Dana's forte, while the lyrics fell to Palmer. The album consists of eight selections of music, four of which are adorned by original artwork, delineated as follows: 1) "The Nativity, A Dramatic Canticle." The first and longest piece in the album, likely written and performed in the interest of buoying morale. Stage directions and music were later printed in broadside format, located in only one copy, at the John Hay Library of Brown University. 2) "Veni Parvule." Dedicated to Palmer's wife, Juliet, occasioned by the death of his son during the expedition. An unattributed color portrait of the little boy precedes the music. 3) "The Stars May Aye Their Vigils Keep. Pacific Ocean - 1841." A melancholy tune, lamenting a father's absence upon the death of his newborn child, no doubt related to the previous title. 4) "A Breeze from the Unpopular Opera of The Iceberg!!" Below the ornate manuscript title of this piece appears a detailed watercolor of the Peacock locked in Antarctic ice, labeled in large block letters: "The Icebergs!" A small party of men in the foreground are engaged in what is likely repair of the damaged vessel. The sketch is captioned: "Accurately drawn by Dr. Guillou [a quarrelsome medical officer and Palmer's subordinate], January 24, 1840. Computed area, 32 miles." At the time the Wilkes expedition had travelled closer towards the pole than any previous American venture, making this image among the earliest evidence of the United States' "farthest south." This song was later published in Palmer's ANTARCTIC MARINER'S SONG... (New York: D. Van Nostrand, 1868), pp.75-76. Historian David B. Tyler cites Passed Midshipman Henry Eld's journal description of the Peacock at this moment as a "happy" ship, continuing that the crew could be heard "stamping about the decks the whole day in the most merry mood - dancing and singing most of the time." This merriment was likely the product of Dana and Palmer's song-writing efforts, though the mood changed dramatically in a moment. Tyler writes: "On the morning of the twenty-fourth this merry mood suddenly changed into one verging on panic. It was a clear day with light winds and smooth water as the ship worked her way into a bay searching, as always, for a means of reaching land. Space for maneuvering was limited...the first crash threw those having breakfast out of their seats, making them think the whole bow must be stove in, but actually the most serious damage was at the stern where the starboard wheelrope was carried and the neck of the rudder wrenched so that it became inoperable." The next twenty-four hours saw the condition of the Peacock deteriorate substantially, and it was only through the competent labors of the ship's carpenters that catastrophic disaster was avoided. The resulting "Breeze," also titled "The Old Peacock," was written in Honolulu, to entice shipmates to re-enlist by reminding them in song of the hardships that had brought the crew so close together. A selection referring to the loss of the ship's rudder reads: "Our pluck did not fail, till we lost our tail / And then 't was high time to belay; / But we stuck here clean through, and it came out anew, / And if any man says this yarn is not true, / Let him go there himself, some day." 5) "One Gentle Word...Oregon - 1841." A romantic love song addressed to an unnamed lover, likely Palmer's wife. 6) "My Tent Beside the Oregon." A light ditty, with an introduction based on the Chinook language. Above the title of this piece is a detailed watercolor of the expedition's camp beside the Columbia River drawn by Joseph Drayton, the primary artist of the expedition. The sketch is among the first views of Army exploration in the Pacific Northwest. It shows two tents surrounded by evergreens, with an American flag mounted on a makeshift pole to the right. An officer is shown seated upon a captain's chair outside the nearest tent. A pencil note, evidently added later, reads: "Sketched with camera lucida. The flag is the one referred to by Dr. Kane, vol. I, p.298." In that narrative, Elisha Kane's ARCTIC EXPLORATIONS... (Philadelphia: Childs & Peterson, 1856), the author writes that the flag was later flown high into the Arctic near Cape Constitution. The camp, affectionately dubbed "Peacockville," was built along the Columbia following the wreck of the Peacock at the river's mouth. The ship had struck the bar upon approaching what was thought to be the channel to the Columbia River. Over the next forty-eight hours the ship was wrecked entirely as a rising sea repeatedly smashed the vessel against the shore. Through the heroics of Capt. William Hudson no lives were lost, and enough supplies were salvaged to allow for the construction of the camp a short distance from Astoria where, for a time, Palmer was assigned command of a shore party. The accompanying music and lyrics, later published in the aforementioned ANTARCTIC MARINER'S SONG (pp.44-45), describe the loss: "My tent beside the Oregon o'er looks the sullen wave, Whose turbid waters darkly frown, Above the Peacock's grave; Where surges weave the shifting sands Around her for a pall; And like a spectral sentry, The toppling over. Mourn not her fate that, round the world, Thrice circled with the sea. And thrice to every land unfurled, The banner of the Free: She came to plant her standard fast, Where it had drooped before; Content to lay her bones at last, Beside it on the shore...." Despite their unlucky landing, the time spent at Peacockville was singularly productive. Under Wilkes' immediate direction the entire Columbia River region was systematically surveyed for the first time, thus elevating the Northwest's commercial potential. 7) "Young Shepards' Canzonet. China Sea. 1842." An introduction to "The Nativity," composed at a later date. 8) "Antarctic Mariner's Song. From 'Thulia' unpublished poem. Sooloo Sea - 1842." At the head of this score appears the last watercolor, of a schooner tacking hard amidst a sea of small icebergs and floes. Like "The Iceberg!!" before it, this sketch also ranks among the earliest views of America's southward progress and records the highest southern latitude of any exploring expedition vessel. The short ink caption reads: "Wm. May, USN. (on the spot)." William May served as a Passed Midshipman on the expedition and was later tried for insubordination. The polar ambitions of the Wilkes expedition are summed in a simple phrase repeated throughout the short tune: "Ease the sheet and keep away; Glory guides us South today." At the time of writing, this song was unpublished as stated, though it later appeared as THULIA. A TALE OF THE ANTARCTIC... (New York: Samuel Coleman, 1843), pp.27,42-46, and again as part of ANTARCTIC MARINER'S SONG (pp.65-72). Given its lavish binding, stamped with the authors' initials, and superlatively neat interior, it is most likely the present album was assembled immediately after the expedition's return, though the songs and watercolors were undoubtedly composed en route. The illustrations are probably fine copies of rougher sketches done "on the spot" by the original artists. That Dana, Palmer, Guillou, May, and Drayton would have collaborated on the album is not unlikely; all were simultaneously engaged in the production of the official expedition report and remained in close contact. The penciled captions were added later, as the 1856 Kane reference attests. While the extant narrative journals of the Wilkes expedition are invaluable research sources, the present album offers a unique sentimental view of morale and good spirits under repeated extreme duress. Dana and Palmer have provided in song a description of the mood of the endeavor in a way that would be impossible in a traditional narrative account. Further, the artwork supplied by Guillou, May, and Drayton offers wholly original and early views of two of the expedition's most important stops: the Northwest Coast and Antarctica. The juxtaposition of scenes from these diverse locations is testament to the broad range and scope of the expedition. Palmer himself writes in his introduction to THULIA that his journals and notes were lost with the wreck of the Peacock, making this volume, reconstructed from memory, the best record of his experiences. That this voyage was the defining event in the careers of both Dana and Palmer is certain, and it is evident both took great pride in their participation. Dana's scientific contributions, especially his work with crustaceans, elevated him to the forefront of American scientists. Palmer, for his part, was later offered the direction of naval hospitals in Washington and Brooklyn. Though Wilkes' expedition was riddled with strife and discord, the efforts and character of these two men, appropriately displayed here, offers an early hint to their future successes. In all, a tremendous and singular memoir of the expedition that vaulted the scientific efforts of the United States to new and unparalleled heights. David B. Tyler, THE WILKES EXPEDITION... (Philadelphia: American Philosophical Society, 1968), passim. DAB XIV, p.185; V, pp.55-56.

      [Bookseller: William Reese Company - Americana]
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        Palazzo Publico, Sienna

      Londra 1842 - "Bella veduta tratta dall'opera "The Ecclesiastical Architecture of Italy: From the Time of Constantine to the Fifteenth Century ", di Henry Gally Knight, stampata da Day & Haghe e pubblicata a Londra, in 2 volumi, nel 1843. L'opera è illustrata da 81 tavole di esterni ed interni di architetture ecclesiastiche di città italiane, i cui disegni furono realizzati da G. Moore, D. Quaglio, J. Aliusetti, J. M. Knapp, Hallman, and Edw. Lear, mentre le litografie da Owen Jones, G. Moore, T. T. Bury, and R. K. Thomas. La presente litografia è opera di G. B. Moore, da un disegno di Domenico Quaglio. Litografia tinta, timbro di appartenenza nell'angolo destro, in ottimo stato di conservazione. Dimensioni del foglio: 370x555 mm" "View taken from "The ecclesiastical architecture of Italy. From the time of Constantine to the fifteenth century, with an introduction and text by Henry Gally Knight " 2 vv illustrated with 81 plates, illustrative of the ecclesiastical architecture of Italy, published by Henry Bohn, London 1843, printed by Day & Haghe. Plates by Owen Jones, G. Moore, T. T. Bury, and R. K. Thomas; after G. Moore, D. Quaglio, J. Aliusetti, J. M. Knapp, Hallman, and Edw. Lear. Coloured lithograph with tint stones and chromolithograph, in very good condition." Dimensioni 357 290mm

      [Bookseller: Libreria Antiquarius]
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        Bibliotheca Grenvilliana; or Bibliographical Notices of Rare and Curious Books, Forming Part of the Library of the Right Hon. Thomas Grenville: by John Thomas Payne and Henry Foss

      London: Printed by William Nicol, Shakspeare Press [and] Chiswick Press, 1842-72. 3 Parts in 4 vols., 4to, one of only 30 large paper copies, [iv],6,[2],xxxiii,[i],388; [iv],[389]-846; [ii],4,[2],472,xlii[2]; 6,[2],219,[1]pp., with half-titles, photographic frontispiece in part three, all four volumes are from the library at Woburn Abbey, vols. 1-3 have the bookplate or label of the Duke of Bedford, some light foxing, as usual, uniformly bound by Clarke and Bedford in cont. quarter green goatskin, purple boards (lightly rubbed), small nick to head on vol. one, the fourth vol. has been expertly bound to match the others, smooth spines lettered in gilt, purpose made felt-lined marbled slip-cases. A fine set of the extremely rare large paper edition of this important catalogue. "The Hon. Thomas Grenville (1755-1846), after a brilliant parliamentary career, retired from public life in 1818 and devoted himself entirely to his books. He was a true bibliophile, in the highest sense of the word... When he died he left his books to the British Museum... His 20,000 volumes form the greatest gift of books that any private individual has ever made to the Museum. He had fine books of every description, but he seems to have specialised in early Americana (he was the first collector to buy Columbus and Vespucci letters), Aldines, early Spanish and Italian books (Dante, Petrarch and Ariosto), classics (especially Aesop and Homer), books on Ireland and lastly incunables on vellum, including the Mazarin Bible, the 1457 Psalter and the 1469 Livy, this catalogue, by Payne and Foss, is a lasting monument to his enlightened efforts as a collector." - De Ricci, p.114.

      [Bookseller: Forest Books]
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        Histoire de Joseph, accompagnée de dix figures, rélatives aux principaux evenemens de la fils de ce fils du patriarche Jacob, et gravées sur les modèles du fameux Reimbrandt.Amsterdam, Jean Neaulme, 1757. Folio. With title-page printed in red and black, and 10 full-page etched plates. Contemporary boards.

      Cohen-de Ricci 210; STCN (4 copies); for Caylus: Lugt, Marques des Collections 2919. First and only edition of a children's book beautifully illustrating the biblical story of Joseph and intended "as much for the improvement of morals as for the principles of drawing", as the title-page notes. Anne-Claude-Philippe comte de Caylus aimed to inspire his readers with a love of virtue and an appreciation of Rembrandt's masterly and evocative drawings. The original drawings have been in the Louvre since 1842, but they have lost their attribution to Rembrandt and are now sometimes ascribed to Rembrandt's pupil Gerbrand van den Eeckhout. The first recorded owner of the drawings was the painter Charles-Antoine Joseph Coypel, an acquaintance of the author.Owner's inscription on paste-down, binding chafed, spine damaged. Otherwise in good condition. A fine series of 10 etchings.

      [Bookseller: Antiquariaat FORUM BV]
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        Palazzo Publico. Sienna

      1842. Decorativa veduta del palazzo e della bella piazza, animata da personaggi. Stampata su fondo seppia

      [Bookseller: Libreria Trippini Sergio]
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        POKHOZHDENIYA CHICHIKOVA, ILI MERTVYYA DUSHI: POEMA [THE ADVENTURES OF CHICHIKOV, OR DEAD SOULS A POEM]

      Moscow: University Press, 1842. First edition. Gogol's masterpiece, a classic of nineteenth-century Russian literature, and one of his works satirising the Russian character, as he also did with Revizor [The Government Inspector]. Volume one only (as issued), 8vo (233 x 150mm.), half-title, later calf-backed brown buckram, lettered in gilt on spine, without wrappers, occasional light staining, pp.251-254 bound upside down, but generally an excellent copy. There was a second volume, published after Gogol's death by his heirs in 1855; although he had burned the second volume, there were sufficient drafts remaining for the volume to be recomposed, and the planned third volume had never been written. Gogol's "Dead Souls" sits high within the pantheon of Russian literature. It was written as a social satire, a modern "Inferno" in prose. The novel is complex, yet highly amusing as it follows the gregarious and immoral Tchitchikoff on his quest throughout the Russian countryside in attempts to purchase title to thousands of dead serfs.

      [Bookseller: Whitmore Rare Books]
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        [Two issues of the newspaper "Te Waka Maori"].Grisborne, James Grindell, 1878. 2 loose issues. Folio. With a wood engraving of a Maori war-canoe incorporating the name of the newspaper, on top of issue no. 13. No. 2 in loose folded sheets, no. 13 glued in the gutter.

      Hocken, p. 544; Williams 554; cf. Curnow e.a., “Rere Atu, Taku Manu! Discovering history, language, and politics in the Maori-language newspapers” (1842-1933). Two issues of the Maori newspaper Te Waka Maori ("the Maori canoe") from 4 September 1878 (no. 2) and 21 December 1878 (no. 13). This bilingual publication was an intent to revive the old Waka Maori which had ceased to exist in July 1877. After the fifth number "o Niu Tirani" ("of New Zealand") was removed from the title and replaced with an image of a Maori war-canoe and the caption "Hoea te Waka, ha!" ("paddle the canoe"). Only 42 issues were published of this short lived newspaper and in 1884 a further attempt was made to revive the paper.Included in no. 2 is an article on the final words of George Selwyn (1809-1878), who as bishop of Auckland was very active in converting the Maori and who is supposed to have said "E marama ana (It is light), an expression which he had often heard from the lips of dying Maories" (p. 23). A political article in no. 13, advocates the right of "Native women" owning land, to keep their possessions even after their marriage. This to avoid them losing their inheritance "through being married to spendthrift or drunken husband[s]" (p. 192).From the library of the New Zealand ornithologist Arthur Thomas Pycroft (1875-1911). Both issues in fair condition, with a horizontal fold in the middle; paper browned, spotted and with small tears near the edges. No. 2 with some tears in the inner folds, notably on the outside sheet; no. 13 with a strip of woven paper glued as an outer binding and with some holes in the pages, leading to slight loss of text.

      [Bookseller: ASHER Rare Books (Since 1830)]
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        CARTA DELL'ITALIA IN QUINDICI FOGLI, RICAVATA DALLE MIGLIORI MAPPE FINORA PUBBLICATE. Nella proporzione di 1 a 600.000 per servire di corredo alla corografia dei diversi Stati della Penisola.

      Firenze,, 1842.. Grande carta geografica dell'Italia di cm. 180x230, incorniciata. La carta, suddivisa in 15 grandi tavole inc. in rame, ciascuna di cm. 60x45 circa, comprende anche le isole di Corsica, Sardegna, Sicilia, Malta e le coste dell'Istria della Dalmazia. Incisa da V. Stanghi e G. Maina, titolo ornato in alto a destra (tav. n. 3) e il "Quadrato d'insieme" in basso a sinistra (tav. n. 13); una ricca bordura perimetrale racchiude l'intera carta ai quattro lati. Molto ben conservata.

      [Bookseller: Libreria Malavasi sas]
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        Les Ressources de Quinola EDITION ORIGINALE ENVOI AUTOGRAPHE

      Paris: Hippolyte Souverain, 1842. Fine. Hippolyte Souverain, Paris 1842, 13,5x22cm, relié. - The rare first edition.   Half caramel morocco, spine in five compartments, marbled pastedowns and endpapers, restored wrappers preserved, marbled edges. Foxed.   With an important autograph inscription signed by Honoré de Balzac to his friend Laurent-Jan, to whom Vautrin was dedicated, and the model for Bixiou, Léon de Lora and several other characters in The Human Comedy. He was at the same time Balzac's best friend, trusted secretary, ghost writer and perhaps even... "beloved." "...the singular phenomenon of the inventor who moved, in 16th century Barcelona, a vessel by steam past three hundred thousand spectators; that today we have no idea what became of him, denies this rage. But I've guessed the why, and that is [the basis of] my Comedy" (letter to Mme Hanska).   The Resources of Quinola is at the same time Scapin's Deceits and The Marriage of Figaro. Balzac's ambition from the 1840s up to his death was in essence to make a name for himself comparable to that of his illustrious predecessors. A hope as futile as it was abiding, he nonetheless never doubted his imminent success despite every setback. The author of The Human Comedy may well have thought that the principal source of humor in the work was the hero and his scathing repartee. For Balzac in fact knew this character, this fierce and eloquent harlequin, well - his name was Laurent-Jan and he was Balzac's most faithful friend in the last years of his life. Though most of their correspondence seems to have disappeared, it is thought that they met before 1835 (Albéric Second mentions a dinner in the rue Casini, where Balzac lived from 1829 to 1835). An eccentric and provocative character, Laurent-Jan had pride of place in the Bohemian life that Balzac led during these years, most notably with Léon Gozlan, Charles Lassailly, Paul Gavarni and Albéric Second, according to whom the writer "was slumming it both pleasurably and profitably" (Maurice Regard, Balzac et Laurent-Jan). All of them remained silent on the "excesses" of these tumultuous years, of which some eloquent traces have nonetheless come down to us in their correspondence; like the letter in which Balzac invites Gavarni to a soirée at Laurent-Jan's to "stretch a very well dressed chotepis a tad," signed "TicTac dit vit d'ours [TicTac, quick say bear]". Laurent-Jan was the principal organizer of these Balzacian orgies in his house at 23 rue des Martyrs, which inspired some scenes in The Human Comedy: "The seraglio, like the salon of a brothel, offered temptations for every eye and voluptuaries for every taste. There was a dancer naked under veils of silk, pretend-virgins who breathing sacral innocence, aristocratic beauties - proud and indolent, a pale and chaste Englishwoman, and young ladies starting conversations by establishing certain basic truths, such as: "Virtue we'll leave to the ugly and hunchbacked!" (cf. Hervé Manéglier, Les artistes au bordel, 1997). These crazy years coincided in Balzac's work with characters who were sexually ambivalent or clearly homosexual, like the androgynous Zambinella and Séraphita, Raphaël de Valentin, who had "a sort of effeminate grace," Louis Lambert "always gracious, like a woman in love," Lucien de Rubempré, and above all the character now considered the first homosexual in French literature: Vautrin. Seeing this particular interest for different sexualities evidenced in The Human Comedy between 1830 and 1836 (but not before or after, if Maurice Regard is to be believed), a number of commentators have been interested in Balzac's sexuality during this period, in which the author was 'with' almost all his young collaborators. Thus, S. J. Bérard and P. Citron raise the question of the surprising witticisms that run through Balzac's correspondence with his young "protégés." "You, who tell me to fuck myself...you've summed up my feelings about you perfectly - so come here, then, and get yourself fucked; and be quick about it!" he writes to Latouche. Even stranger are the formulas with which he signs off his correspondence with Eugène Sue, which are a little surprising to say the least: "Yours, in the Pineal Gland," "Yours perineally," "I admire your foreskin and I remain yours," etc. We've not found any correspondence with Laurent-Jan before 1840, at which time he writes Balzac letters commencing "Beloved," or "My darling," and ending with an explicit "I press myself against your great big chest." According to allusions by some of his contemporaries, this dual sexuality of Balzac's seems to have been well known. Albéric Second compared his male relationships to those of Nisus and Euryale, while Roger de Beauvoir gave him the nickname "Seraphinus" and Edward Allet captioned his caricature of Balzac: "the Reverend Father don Seraphitus culus mysticus Goriot...conceives...a mass of inconceivable things and ephialtesticulary incubuses," [a reference to Ephialtes, who 'took King Leonidas from behind' at Thermopylae].   For contemporary critics, however, the question of what Pierre Citron terms Balzac's "ambisexuality" remains open. Among the theories advanced by Citron, S. J. Bérard, and P. Berthier is that Balzac's relationship with Laurent-Jan (for whom we are not aware of any escapades with women) fits with a hypothesis of active or imagined homosexuality on Balzac's part. If we add that the play Vautrin is dedicated to Laurent-Jan, to thank him - Gautier writes - for having "really rolled up his sleeves", Laurent-Jan appears as one of the principal figures tied to the "shadowy areas of Balzac's psychology," (the title of Pierre Citron's study of the subject).   From 1841 on, the correspondence between Balzac and Laurent-Jan is distinctly less ambiguous and their extravagant language gives way to professions of friendship and mutual admiration right up to the Master's death on the 18th August 1850; Laurent-Jan signed his death certificate. During these final ten years, the man whom Gozlan considers "Balzac's best friend" and Philibert Audebrant "the right hand of the author of The Human Comedy," was more specifically Balzac's principal partner in his great theatrical adventure, a passion that was to consume the debt-stricken novelist in search of recognition and financial success.   Théophile Gautier tells us that in 1840, when Balzac urged Laurent-Jan, Ourliac and de Belloy to write the play Vautrin, which he had already sold to the Porte-Saint-Martin Theatre but not as yet written, only Laurent-Jan was willing: "Balzac started out by saying, when referring to Vautrin, your piece, then little by little, our piece and eventually...my piece."   Laurent-Jan nonetheless got a prestigious dedication in print, an honor he shares with a handful of illustrious contemporaries like Victor Hugo, George Sand and Eveline Hanska, to whom Balzac also dedicated works. The banning of the piece did not discourage Balzac, who persisted in his dream of making his fortune in theatre with the active and enthusiastic co-operation of Laurent-Jan, to whom the Master entrusted the writing, correction or re-writing of numerous plays and works: Lecamus, Monographie de la presse parisienne [A Monograph of the Parisian Press], Le Roi des mendiants [The Beggar King] ("a superb basis for a two-man play"), etc. "Also, you'll be getting several scripts to fill your spare time, because I want your help," Balzac wrote him from Wierzchownia in 1849. One year earlier, before leaving for Poland, Balzac made this collaboration official by means of a power of attorney for literary affairs to Lauren-Jan, dated the 19th September 1848. "I declare that I have invested Monsieur Laurent-Jan with all my powers in everything relating to literary matters...he can make additions or cuts, and any necessary changes;...in fact, he shall represent me entirely." Laurent-Jan took his task very seriously, as his many exchanges with the unhappy demiurge show. Balzac would never live to see the success he craved, as opposed to his friends Dumas and Hugo, to whom he compared himself, even during his failures. Thus, after the Resources of Quinola flopped, he wrote to Mme Hanska: "Quinola was the subject of a memorable battle, comparable to Hernani." Duly noted! On the 10th December 1849, more or less at death's door, Balzac still ties Laurent-Jan to all his projects in a letter that is admirable for its courage and hope: "Come, my friend, a little courage, and we shall board the ship of drama, good subjects in hand, to sail to the lands of Marivaux, New-Beaumarchais and New Comedy."   It is more than likely that the character of Quinola was partly inspired by this faithful friend, admired by Balzac, who signed his letters "a thousand times your friend," or "my heart is all yours," or "your respectful master, all proud of his pretend valet," (reflecting on the title Laurent-Jan gave himself). Laurent Jan, as brilliant as he was vain, never produced any work worthy of this title, but was nonetheless undoubtedly a significant source of inspiration for Balzac, who owed him a number of 'bon mots' peppering his works. In The Human Comedy, it is Bixiou and Léon de Lora above all who are directly inspired by this eccentric bohemian, but beyond these two characters (writes Maurice Regard) "many of Balzac's shadows accompany this ancient, hunched and wrinkled form: Schinner, Steinbock, Gendrin" owe him "a little bit of themselves [and] much of their spirit."     Balzac never stopped telling those who were close to him of the indefatigable affection he cherished for his "unrepentant misanthrope," who did not always enjoy a good reputation. "He's better than he seems. I, for one, love him seriously and well," (letter to Laure de Surville).   A few days before the death of her husband, Eve de Balzac recounted to his niece Sophie de Surville the transformative effects of the visits from his beloved.  "Your uncle is really much better, he's very cheerful and animated all day, and I attribute this to a good visit from our friend Laurent-Jan, who was more dazzling than ever yesterday evening - he was really fascinating and my dear patient kept repeating both yesterday and today: 'admit that no one is more spirited than that boy.'" - [FRENCH VERSION FOLLOWS] Edition originale rare.   Reliure en demi maroquin caramel, dos à cinq nerfs, contreplats et gardes de papier peigné, couvertures restaurées conservées, toutes tranches peignées. Rousseurs.   Important envoi autographe signé d'Honoré de Balzac sur la page de faux-titre à son ami Laurent-Jan, dédicataire de Vautrin, modèle de Bixiou, de Léon de Lora et de nombreux autres personnages de La Comédie humaine. Il fut pour Balzac à la fois son meilleur ami, son secrétaire fondé de pouvoir, son nègre littéraire et peut-être même... son « dilectus ».   « ... le singulier fait de l'inventeur qui fit manœuvrer à Barcelone, au XVIème siècle un vaisseau par la vapeur, et qui le coula devant trois cent mille spectateurs sans qu'on sache ce qu'il est devenu, ni le pourquoi de cette rage. Mais j'ai deviné le pourquoi et c'est ma comédie. » (lettre à Mme Hanska)   Les Ressources de Quinola, c'est tout à la fois Les Fourberies de Scapin et Les Noces de Figaro. L'ambition de Balzac à partir des années 1840 et jusqu'à sa mort fut en effet de conquérir une renommée semblable à celle de ses illustres prédécesseurs. Espoir aussi vain que tenace, il ne douta pourtant jamais, échec après échec, de l'imminence de son succès. Peut-être l'auteur de La Comédie humaine pensait-il que le principal ressort comique tient au personnage principal et à ses réparties cinglantes. Or justement, ce personnage, cet arlequin féroce et éloquent, Balzac le connaissait bien, il se nommait Laurent-Jan et ce fut le plus proche et le plus fidèle ami des dernières années de sa vie.  Bien que la majeure partie de leur correspondance semble avoir disparu, on estime que leur rencontre est antérieure à 1835. (Albéric Second fait mention d'un diner rue Cassini où Balzac demeura de 1829 à 1835).   Personnage excentrique et provocateur, Laurent-Jan occupe une place de choix dans la vie de bohème que Balzac mène durant ces années avec notamment Léon Gozlan, Charles Lassailly, Paul Gavarni et Albéric Second, auprès desquels l'écrivain « s'encanaille avec plaisir et profit » (Maurice Regard, Balzac et Laurent-Jan). Tous sont restés discrets sur les « excès » de ces années tumultueuses dont on conserve pourtant d'éloquentes traces dans leurs correspondances, comme cette missive dans laquelle Balzac invite Gavarni à une soirée chez Laurent-Jan pour « [s]'élonger un brin une chotepis très bien habillée » signée « TicTac dit vit d'ours ». Laurent-Jan fut le principal organisateur de ces orgies balzaciennes, dans sa demeure du 23 rue des Martyrs,  qui ont inspirées quelques scènes de la Comédie Humaine : « Le sérail offrait comme le salon d'un bordel des séductions pour tous les yeux et des voluptés pour tous les caprices. Il y avait une danseuse nue sous des voiles de soie, des vierges factices, mais qui respiraient une religieuse innocence, des beautés aristocratiques, fières mais indolentes, une anglaise blanche et chaste des jeunes filles engageant la conversation en assénant quelques vérités premières comme : - La vertu, nous la laissons aux laides et aux bossues ! » (cf. Hervé Manéglier, Les artistes au bordel, 1997) Ces années folles coïncident dans l'œuvre de Balzac avec la création de personnages sexuellement ambivalents ou clairement homosexuels comme Zambinella et Séraphita les androgynes, Raphaël de Valentin qui a « une sorte de grâce efféminée », Louis Lambert, « toujours gracieux comme une femme qui aime », Lucien de Rubempré, et surtout celui que l'on considère aujourd'hui comme le premier homosexuel de la littérature française : Vautrin. Au regard de cet intérêt particulier pour les différentes formes de sexualité dont témoigne La Comédie humaine durant les années 1830 à 1836 (ni avant, ni après si l'on en croit Maurice Regard), de nombreux critiques se sont intéressés à la sexualité de Balzac durant cette période lors de laquelle l'écrivain connut la presque totalité de ses jeunes collaborateurs. Ainsi S. J. Bérard et P. Citron s'interrogent-ils sur les surprenantes saillies qui parsèment la correspondance de Balzac avec ses jeunes « protégés ». « Vous qui m'envoyez faire foutre [...], vous me prenez [...] par le sentiment que j'ai pour vous, venez donc vous faire foutre ici ; et au plus vite » écrit-il à Latouche. Plus étranges encore, ses correspondances avec Eugène Sue se concluent par des formules pour le moins étonnantes : « à vous de glande pinéale » ; « à vous de périnée » ; « j'admire votre prépuce et je suis le vôtre » ...   On n'a retrouvé aucune correspondance avec Laurent-Jan avant 1840, mais à cette date, celui-ci lui adresse des lettres s'ouvrant sur un « très aimé » ou « mon chéri » et s'achevant par un explicite « je me presse sur ton gros sein ». D'après les allusions de certains de ses contemporains, la double sexualité de Balzac semble avérée. Albéric Second compare ses relations masculines à celles de Nisus et Euryale,  Roger de Beauvoir le surnomme « Seraphitus », et Edward Allet légende sa caricature de Balzac : « le R.P. dom Seraphitus culus mysticus Goriot (...) conçoit (...)  une foule de choses inconcevables et d'incubes éphialtesticulaires. » [Référence à Ephialte qui prit à Revers Léonidas aux Thermopyles].   Pour les critiques actuels en revanche, la question de ce que Pierre Citron nomme « l'ambisexualité » de Balzac, reste posée. Parmi les hypothèses avancées par P. Citron, S. J. Bérard ou P. Berthier, les relations de Balzac avec Laurent-Jan, auquel on ne connaîtra pas d'aventures féminines, concordent avec l'hypothèse d'une homosexualité active ou fantasmée de Balzac. Si l'on ajoute que la pièce Vautrin est dédiée à Laurent-Jan - pour le remercier, écrira Gautier, d'avoir « sérieusement mis la main à la pâte » - Laurent-Jan apparaît comme une des principales figures liées aux « zones obscures de la psychologie de Balzac » (titre de l'étude que Pierre Citron consacre à ce sujet). à partir de 1841, la correspondance entre Balzac et Laurent-Jan s'avère moins ambiguë, et les excès de langage font place aux déclarations d'amitié et d'admiration réciproques jusqu'à la mort du Maître dont Laurent-Jan signe le 18 août 1850 l'acte de décès. Durant ces dix dernières années, celui que Gozlan considérait comme le « meilleur ami de Balzac » et Philibert Audebrant comme  « le bras droit de l'auteur de La Comédie humaine » fut plus particulièrement le principal partenaire de Balzac dans sa grande aventure théâtrale, passion qui allait consumer le romancier endetté en quête de reconnaissance et de succès financier.   Théophile Gautier relate qu'en 1840, lorsque Balzac le convie avec Laurent-Jan, Ourliac et de Belloy à lui écrire la pièce Vautrin qu'il a déjà vendue au théâtre de la Porte-Saint-Martin mais pas encore composée, seul Laurent-Jan se prête au jeu : « Balzac a commencé par me dire, en parlant de Vautrin, votre pièce puis, peu à peu, notre pièce et enfin... ma pièce. »   Laurent-Jan héritera toutefois d'une prestigieuse dédicace imprimée, un honneur qu'il partage avec quelques illustres contemporains dont Victor Hugo, George Sand ou Eveline Hanska, auxquels Balzac dédia également certaines de ses œuvres. L'interdiction de la pièce ne décourage pas Balzac qui persiste dans son rêve de fortune théâtrale, avec la collaboration active et enthousiaste de Laurent-Jan auquel le Maître confie l'écriture, la correction ou la réécriture de nombreuses pièces et ouvrages : Lecamus, Monographie de la presse parisienne, Le Roi des mendiants (« un scénario superbe pour une pièce à deux »), etc. « Aussi recevras-tu plusieurs scénarios qui pourront occuper tes loisirs, car je veux ta collaboration » lui écrit Balzac de Wierzchownia en 1849. L'année précédente, avant son départ en Pologne, Balzac avait officialisé cette collaboration par une procuration littéraire à Laurent-Jan établie le 19 septembre 1848 : « Je déclare avoir investi Monsieur Laurent-Jan de tous mes pouvoirs, en tout ce qui concerne la littérature. [...] Il pourra faire les coupures ou les ajouts, enfin tous les changements nécessaires ; [...] Enfin il me représentera entièrement. » Laurent-Jan accomplira sa mission avec le plus grand sérieux comme en témoignent ses multiples échanges avec le malheureux démiurge. Balzac ne connaîtra jamais le succès espéré, contrairement à ses amis Dumas et Hugo auxquels il se compare pourtant, même dans l'échec. Ainsi, après le four des Ressources de Quinola, écrit-il à Mme Hanska : « Quinola a été l'objet d'une bataille mémorable, semblable à celle d'Hernani. » Dont acte ! Le 10 décembre 1849, c'est un Balzac presque mourant qui associe encore Laurent-Jan à tous ses projets dans une lettre admirable de courage et d'espoir : « Allons mon ami, encore un peu de courage, et nous nous embarquerons sur la galère dramatique avec de bons sujets, pour aller vers les terres de Marivaux, de New-Beaumarchais, et de la nouvelle Comédie ».   Il est très probable que le personnage de Quinola soit en partie inspiré de cet ami fidèle et admiré de Balzac qui concluait ses lettres de « mille amitiés » ; « tout à toi de cœur » ou « ton maître respectueux et fier de son prétendu valet » (en réponse au titre que s'attribuait Laurent-Jan).  Cet homme d'un esprit aussi brillant que vain ne produisit aucune œuvre digne de ce nom mais fut sans doute une source d'inspiration considérable pour Balzac qui lui doit nombre de « bons mots » ponctuant ses œuvres. Dans La Comédie humaine en particulier, Bixiou et Léon de Lora, sont directement inspirés de ce bohème excentrique, mais au-delà de ces deux personnages, écrit Maurice Regard : « Bien des ombres balzaciennes accompagnent ce vieux corps bossu et sec : Schinner, Steinbock, Gendrin » lui doivent « un peu d'eux même [et] beaucoup de leur esprit ».   Balzac n'aura de cesse de communiquer à ses proches l'indéfectible affection qu'il éprouve pour son « misanthrope sans repentir » qui n'eut pas toujours bonne presse. « Il vaut mieux que ses apparences. Moi je l'aime beaucoup et sérieusement » (lettre à Laure de Surville).   Quelques jours avant la mort de son mari, Eve de Balzac rapportait encore à sa nièce Sophie de Surville, l'effet salvateur des visites de son dilectus.  « Votre oncle va beaucoup mieux, il a été fort gai, fort animé, toute la journée, et je l'attribue à une bonne visite de notre ami Laurent-Jan, qui a été plus éblouissant que jamais hier soir - il nous a fasciné véritablement, et mon cher malade a répété plusieurs fois hier et aujourd'hui : « avouez qu'on n'a pas plus d'esprit que ce garçon ».  

      [Bookseller: Librairie Le Feu Follet]
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        Scènes De La Vie Privée Et Publique Des Animaux…

      Paris: J.Hetzel Et Paulin, 1842., 1842. 2 Volumes. large 8vo. pp. 4 p.l., 386, [6]; 2 p.l., 390, [6]. with half-titles. 201 wood-engraved plates (incl 2 additional titles), numerous head & tailpieces, initials, & vignettes by Brévière & others after designs by Grandville. contemporary half chagrin (bit rubbed, spines faded, occasional light foxing – first few leaves in each vol. more heavily affected). First Edition. "The moving force behind this book was its publisher P.-J. Hetzel, who himself contributed many chapters under the pseudonym of P.-J. Stahl…Through Grandville’s animals, Hetzel and his colleagues offered a witty and telling commentary on contemporary politics and personalities. Bouchot described the result as the best satire on French manners during the middle of the century, recalling "the anger to which it gave rise, the outbursts of laughter it provoked and the lawsuits of which it ran the risk." These allusions pass largely unnoticed today, but Grandville’s animals remain as amusing as ever, thanks to the wit and verve of his compositions. The types and situations he depicts are indeed "of every period and every country." "The final plate shows the artist at the zoo of the Jardin des Plantes. He is sketching the visiting creatures who in turn are peering at cages containing Hetzel, Balzac, Jules Janin, and other authors of the Scènes de la vie privée et publique des animaux. It should be noted that the engravings for this book are by Brévière, the one craftsman whose renderings of his work Grandville refused to criticize." (Ray) Carteret III 553. Ray, The Art Of The French Illustrated Book 1700 to 1914, 194 (citing incorrect number of plates).. 1st Edition. Hardcover. Very Good.

      [Bookseller: D & E Lake Ltd. (ABAC, ILAB)]
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        Scènes de la vie privée et publique des animaux EDITION ORIGINALE

      à Paris: Chez Hetzel et Paulin, 1842. Fine. Chez Hetzel et Paulin, à Paris 1842, 18x26,5cm, 386pp. et 390pp., 2 volumes reliés. - first edition, illustrated with 201 figures inset and 120 vignettes by Grandville. Binders half red shagreen with corners ca 1860. Back to bands decorated. 3 rubbed corners. Sheet 123 of Volume 1 and detaching emerged. Top right corner of Volume 2 scuffed 2cm. Some very rare and pale foxing on a good white paper. Nice copy. No need to introduce this famous publication satire of contemporary society of the Second Empire, whose company is due to Hetzel, who under the pseudonym Stahl signed several texts and commissioned texts to famous feathers of the time Balzac, Musset, Sand, the BEDOLLIERE ... the last chapter recounts the imprisonment of various writers that one can see in different locations garden plants. One of the great works of imagination of Grandville, full of verve and imagination. - [FRENCH VERSION FOLLOWS] Edition originale, illustrée de 201 figures hors-texte et de 120 vignettes par Grandville.  Reliures en demi maroquin rouge à coins de chagrin ca 1860. Dos à nerfs ornés. Têtes dorées. 3 coins frottés. Des traces de frottements à un nerf et à certaines bordures. Feuillet 123 du tome 1 se détachant et ressorti. Coin droit haut du tome 2 éraflé sur 2cm. Quelques très rares et pâles rousseurs sur un papier bien blanc.  Bel exemplaire. On ne présente plus cette publication célèbre, satire de la société contemporaine parisienne du Second empire, dont l'entreprise est due à Hetzel, qui sous le pseudonyme de Stahl a signé plusieurs textes et a commandé des textes aux plumes les plus célèbres de l'époque : Balzac, Musset, Sand, La Bedollière... Le dernier chapitre raconte l'emprisonnement des différents écrivains que l'on peut voir dans différents emplacements au Jardin des plantes. Une des grandes oeuvres d'imagination de Grandville, pleine de verve et de fantaisie.  

      [Bookseller: Librairie Le Feu Follet]
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        VIE PRIVEE ET PUBLIQUE DES ANIMAUX

      1842 . (Grandville)illus. VIE PRIVEE ET PUBLIQUE DES ANIMAUX by Balzac et al. Paris, 1842 (1st ed). 2 vols, 4to., Original pictorial boards, 386 and 390pp., plus tables of contents, 210 illustrations on engraved plates hors texte and 120 vignettes, in-texte. One of the great illustrated books. Social satire in which animals play human roles. Grandville's mastery at presenting animals with convincing human expressions, poses, and costumes has been imitated, but never equalled. Very unusual in the pictorial boards. Light wear to the board edges and hinges, expert repair to inner hinges, else a very nice copy.

      [Bookseller: A FINE THING: Edward T. Pollack Fine Art]
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        Scenes de la Vie Privee et Publique des Animaux

      Paris: J. Hetzel et Paulin, 1842. First edition. Minor rubbing or scuffing to edges, scattered light foxing, but a very clean and tight copy, near fine. 2 volumes, contemporary full dark green morocco with richly gilt spines, morocco lettering pieces, marbled endpapers, all eges gilt; [8], 386, [6] pp. and [96] leaves of plates; [4], 390, [6] pp. and [108] leaves of plates, profusely. Originally published in 99 parts, this is the first book edition. Ray, The French Illustrated Book 194.

      [Bookseller: Chanticleer Books]
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        Scènes de la Vie Privée et Publique des Animaux. Études de Moeurs Contemporaines publiées sous la direction de M. P.-J. Stahl.

      Paris: J. Hetzel, 1842. 2 volumes. First edition. 201 engraved plates plus illustrations in text by Grandville, engreved by his preferred engraver Brévière. 4to., bound by Plow of Boston, Lincolnshire in half maroon morocco with marbled paper boards, edges and endpapers, spines decorated in gilt. Worn with repairs to upper joints, but still good strong copies. Booklabel of James Lloyd and Plow binder's tickets. Stahl was a pseudonym for the publisher Hetzel who edited texts by Balzac Jules Janin, George Sand and others to go with Grandville's superb engravings. It was seen as a great satire on French manners of the the middle nineteenth century

      [Bookseller: SOPHIE SCHNEIDEMAN RARE BOOKS]
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        Scènes de la vie privée et publique des animaux. Etudes des moeurs contemporaines publiées sous la direction de M. P.-L. Stahl.

      Paris, Hetzel 1842.. 2 vols. 4°. 6 Bll., 386 S., 4 Bll.; 4 Bll, 390 S., 3 Bll. Mit zahlr, tlw. ganaszeit. Holzst. v. J. J. Grandville. OLn. m. Rückengoldpräg. Leicht berieb. EA Sander 312; Rümann 312; Vicaire VII, 405 - Avec la collaboration de Balzac, Louis Baude, Émile de la Bédollière, P. Bernard, Gustave Droz, Benjamin Franklin, Jules Janin, Édouard Lemoine Alfred de Musset, Paul de Musset, Mme. Menessier-Nodier, Charles Nodier, George Sand, Louis Viardot.

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Burgverlag]
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        Alcorani textus universus ex correctioribus Arabum exemplaribus summa fide, . Eadem fide, . in Latinum translatus; appositis unicuique capiti notis, atque refutatione: .[vol. 2 title:] Refutatio Alcorani, in qua ad Mahumetanicae superstitionis radicem securis apponitur; .Padova, Typographia Seminaria, 1698. 2 volumes bound as 1. Folio (35.5 x 25 cm). Blind-tooled vellum (ca. 1800?), reusing and retooling vellum from a slightly earlier blind-tooled binding.

      - Cat. Bibl. A.-R. Courbonne, dont la vent . 1er février 1842, 30 (this copy); 34; Schnurrer 377; Sheikh Al-Shabab, "The place of Marracci’s Latin translation of the Holy Quran: .", in: Journal of King Saud University: language & tanslation, 13 (2001), pp. 57-74. The first scholarly printed Quran, prepared by the anti-Islamic Catholic Ludovico Marracci, with a much more accurate Arabic text than any previously printed and the first accurate Latin translation, also including extensive notes based on the Islamic commentaries, as well as the editor's extensive "refutations" of each sutra. Each sura is given first in Arabic, then in Latin translation, followed by notes and then the refutation. The entire first volume of about 430 pages is taken up with preliminary matter, including a 24-page life of Muhammad (one of the first detailed biographies ever printed and again more accurate than its predecessors), an 8-page profession of faith with the Arabic and Latin in parallel columns, and additional commentaries and introductory matter. The fact that this edition was produced explicitly as an attempt to refute the views of Islam has naturally led Islamic scholars to dismiss it, but both the Arabic text and the Latin translation were far better than any previously printed and had no serious rival until the Leipzig edition of 1834. The commentaries also made a great deal of Islamic scholarship available to a European audience for the first time and both the Arabic and the Latin text influenced nearly every edition for the next 150 years.With two bookplates and an occasional early manuscript note and a few letters or numbers inscribed in the foot margin of one leaf. With a tear running into the text of one leaf, repaired, but otherwise in very good condition. With generous margins. The boards are slightly bowed and there is a small tear repaired at the foot of the spine. A ground-breaking work of Quranic scholarship, a valuable source for the study of the Quran and an essential source for European views of Islam. [Attributes: Soft Cover]

      [Bookseller: Antiquariaat FORUM BV]
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