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Displayed below are some selected recent viaLibri matches for books published in 1837

        Caspian Tern. Sterna Caspia (Linn)

      This splendid hand-colored, folio-size lithograph, Caspian Tern. Sterna Caspia (Linn), from John Gould?s (1804-1881) monumental book "Birds Europe" (1832-1837) is in mint condition. Measuring 14.25" x 21", this lithograph magnificently displays the author?s scientific skill and attention to detail. This seabird is expertly hand-colored with a white body and gray and black wings and a black hood and feet. The beak of these birds is a vibrant orange, commonly with a small black tip.John Gould was an English ornithologist, self-taught artist and naturalist. Gould first worked as a gardener under his father in the Royal Gardens of Windsor from 1818-1824, where he began his illustrations. He became an expert taxidermist, opening his own practice in London in 1824 and in 1827 he became the first Curator and Preserver at the museum of the Zoological Society of London. Through his work he was able to meet with the country?s leading naturalists and view new collections of birds given to the Zoological Society.His interest in birds was continually developing and in 1830 he published his first volume on birds, ?A Century of Birds From the Himalaya Mountains.? For the next fifty years, Gould, his wife and artists working with them traveled around Asia, the East Indies and Australia. His wife Elizabeth and other artists were able to transfer his sketches to stone; hand print and hand-color them.One of the most accomplished and engaging natural history works of the 19th century, ?The Birds of Europe? was also the first of Gould's works to feature plates by Edward Lear. A total of sixty-eight images bear Lear's name, and they are among the most remarkable bird drawings ever made. Lear endowed his illustrations with some measure of his own whimsy and intelligence, and his style is at once fluidly spontaneous and realistically precise. In this way, the images of ?The Birds of Europe? are amazingly distinctive, while also highly realistic.Gould undertook this work partly in an effort to redress the imbalance between the study of local and foreign ornithology. Gould portrayed birds native to Europe in a manner that had only been thought appropriate for the colorful species of distant places. In this way he managed to draw much popular interest back to native birds, which were suddenly considered equally beautiful to exotic species.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries]
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        Race for the Great St. Leger Stakes, 1836. Doncaster Races. (Tafel 2). London 1837. Altkolor. Aquatinta-Radierung von J. Harris nach J. Pollard. 44 x 55 cm.,

      1837 - Prächtige Rennpferde auf der Bahn, im Hintergrund Zuschauer, Kutschen, und Gebäude auf dem Lande.- Auf Papier montiert. Gewicht in Gramm: 500

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Daniel Schramm e.K.]
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        Natural History and Antiquities of Selborne, The

      1837. A Superb Art Nouveau Binding[KELLIEGRAM BINDING]. WHITE, Gilbert. The Natural History and Antiquities of Selborne. With the Naturalist's Calendar; and Miscellaneous Observations, extracted from his papers. London: Printed [at the Chiswick Press] for J. and A. Arch; Longman and Co.,[et al], [1837]. Octavo (8 7/16 x 5 1/4 inches; 214 x 135 mm.). xxiv, 640 pp. Forty-five engraved vignette illustrations. A New Edition; with notes , by Edward Turner Bennett and others. Original front cloth cover and spine bound in at end.Bound ca. 1910 in a stunning Art Noveau binding of dark green crushed morocco, handsomely gilt and inlaid, by Kelliegram (stamp-signed on rear turn-in), covers with fanciful Art Nouveau-style frame formed by inlaid flowers of sky blue and leaves in two shades of green, these inlays connected by gilt and inlaid red morocco dots, and the spaces between them featuring swooping gilt birds and sprinklings of gilt dots; raised bands, spine compartments tooled in gilt with similar inlaid leaves and flowers, turn-ins with gilt tendrils and continuing the bird, flower, and leaf motifs, the turn-ins enclosing pictorial morocco doublures, the front doublure depicting Gilbert White?'s vine-covered house in Selbourne, the rear a slate-roofed country church and cemetery, moss green silk endleaves, all edges gilt. Original cloth spine and cover bound in at rear. Housed in a ca. 1930s felt lined, quarter dark green morocco clamshell case by James MacDonald of Norwalk, Conn.With numerous engravings of flora, fauna, and landscapes in the text. Verso of front free endpaper with engraved armorial bookplate of James Douglas.This is a lovely copy of White?'s beloved account of the wonders of nature, offered in a very pleasing pictorial binding from the firm that is best known for that kind of work. First published in 1789, Gilbert White?'s beloved account of the wonders of nature, which he wished to inspire readers to observe in their own backyards, ?"is open to everyone, for everyone has observed much of what it describes. Writer and reader each share the inheritance of the natural world, and delight in what is given, so that Selbourne becomes an expression of universal thanksgiving, treasured by all.?" (DNB) The present edition is in a binding that reflects the passions of the writer?'s life. Kelly & Sons had one of the longest histories in the London binding trade, having been founded in 1770 by John Kellie, as the name was then spelled. The firm was continued by successive members of the family into the 1930s. Though the bindery would never be considered among the two or three outstanding workshops, it produced consistently high quality bindings and was notably innovative in its designs. Our cover design is animated and unusual, the gilt birds in flight adding a charming note of whimsy to the graceful Art Nouveau design. As with many Kelliegram bindings, pictorial inlays are prominently featured ?- though here they are atypically large and found inside, rather than on, the covers. The doublures represent two things dear to White?'s heart: his Selbourne home, ?"The Wakes,?" and a small country church like the one where he served as a perpetual curate, forsaking a more brilliant career in the church or at Oxford in order to remain in the place that he loved. The doublure scenes employ at least ten different consonant colors of morocco and much incising to give a fine level of detail. James Douglas (1867-1949) was the founder of the Phelps Dodge mining empire in Arizona. He was known by the colorful nickname ?"Rawhide Jimmy?" for his method of protecting the rollers on mining equipment with untanned leather. Douglas?' bookplate gives us an idea of the size and range of his library: the design includes the words ?"History Science Literature Theology?" and there is a space provided for a shelf number, in which the complete Dewey Decimal call number for this work has been neatly written.

      [Bookseller: David Brass Rare Books, Inc.]
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        Black-Eared Wheat Ear, Saxicola aurita; (Temm)

      London 1837 - This splendid hand-colored, folio-size lithograph, Black-Eared Wheat Ear, Saxicola aurita; (Temm), from John Gould’s (1804-1881) monumental book "Birds Europe" (1832-1837) is in excellent condition with a few light foxing marks. Measuring 21.5" x 14.5", this lithograph magnificently displays the author’s scientific skill and attention to detail. These Black-Eared Wheatears are expertly hand colored, the male seen on the ground with a white forehead and crown, buff body and black wings. The female, perched on the branch, is similarly colored but with an all buff head. John Gould was an English ornithologist, self-taught artist and naturalist. Gould first worked as a gardener under his father in the Royal Gardens of Windsor from 1818-1824, where he began his illustrations. He became an expert taxidermist, opening his own practice in London in 1824 and in 1827 he became the first Curator and Preserver at the museum of the Zoological Society of London. Through his work he was able to meet with the country’s leading naturalists and view new collections of birds given to the Zoological Society. His interest in birds was continually developing and in 1830 he published his first volume on birds, “A Century of Birds From the Himalaya Mountains.” For the next fifty years, Gould, his wife and artists working with them traveled around Asia, the East Indies and Australia. His wife Elizabeth and other artists were able to transfer his sketches to stone; hand print and hand-color them. One of the most accomplished and engaging natural history works of the 19th century, “The Birds of Europe” was also the first of Gould's works to feature plates by Edward Lear. A total of sixty-eight images bear Lear's name, and they are among the most remarkable bird drawings ever made. Lear endowed his illustrations with some measure of his own whimsy and intelligence, and his style is at once fluidly spontaneous and realistically precise. In this way, the images of “The Birds of Europe” are amazingly distinctive, while also highly realistic. Gould undertook this work partly in an effort to redress the imbalance between the study of local and foreign ornithology. Gould portrayed birds native to Europe in a manner that had only been thought appropriate for the colorful species of distant places. In this way he managed to draw much popular interest back to native birds, which were suddenly considered equally beautiful to exotic species.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
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        Strafford: An Historical Tragedy

      London: Longman, Rees, Orme, Brown, Green, & Longman, 1837. First edition. Original brown wrappers with original printed paper label on cover. 132pp. Side and bottom edges uncut. With 4pp advertisements at end dated April 15, 1837. A superlative copy, the best copy we have seen in many years. The paper covering on spine is almost completely intact, hinges are integral, contents clean and bright. A near fine copy of Brownings early work, his first play and perhaps his most original: (Michael Peverett) "... the one that is least like a closet drama; five acts and numerous speaking parts. It played for five nights in 1837, with Macready in the title role." Though the performance was critically, rather than well received, it was well attended and certainly contributed to Browning's early popularity and respect in literary circles.

      [Bookseller: Nudelman Rare Books ]
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        Rant-Che-Wai-Me, Female Flying Pigeon

      Philadelphia: E. C. Biddle, 1837. Hand-coloured lithograph. In excellent condition. A fine image from McKenney and Hall's 'Indian Tribes of North America': `One of the most important [works] ever published on the American Indians' (Field),` a landmark in American culture' (Horan) and an invaluable contemporary record of a vanished way of life. The devoted and audacious wife of the famous Iowa chief Mahaska, Flying Pigeon or Rant-Che-Wai-Me accompanied her husband, with his six other wives, on his 1824 trip to Washington to visit President Monroe. Upon her return, she organized a meeting of Iowa women to whom she recounted her trip to the White House. Of all Mahaska's wives, Flying Pigeon was his favorite, and she bore him a son, Mahaska the Younger, who would later become a respected Iowa chief. She was killed in a riding accident the following year. Young Mahaska is said to have recognized his mother's portrait, this image, in a visit to Washington years later by the fan in her hand. Mckenney and Hall's 'Indian Tribes of North America' has long been renowned for its faithful portraits of Native Americans. The portraits are largely based on paintings by the artist Charles Bird King, who was employed by the War Department to paint the Indian delegates visiting Washington D.C., forming the basis of the War Department's Indian Gallery. Most of King's original paintings were subsequently destroyed in a fire at the Smithsonian, and their appearance in McKenney and Hall's magnificent work is thus our only record of the likenesses of many of the most prominent Indian leaders of the nineteenth century. Numbered among King's sitters were Sequoyah, Red Jacket, Major Ridge, Keokuk, and Black Hawk. After six years as Superintendent of Indian Trade, Thomas McKenney had become concerned for the survival of the Western tribes. He had observed unscrupulous individuals taking advantage of the Native Americans for profit, and his vocal warnings about their future prompted his appointment by President Monroe to the Office of Indian Affairs. As first director, McKenney was to improve the administration of Indian programs in various government offices. His first trip was during the summer of 1826 to the Lake Superior area for a treaty with the Chippewa, opening mineral rights on their land. In 1827, he journeyed west again for a treaty with the Chippewa, Menominee , and Winebago in the present state of Michigan. His journeys provided an unparalleled opportunity to become acquainted with Native American tribes. When President Jackson dismissed him from his government post in 1830, McKenney was able to turn more of his attention to his publishing project. Within a few years, he was joined by James Hall, a lawyer who had written extensively about the west. McKenney and Hall saw their work as a way of preserving an accurate visual record of a rapidly disappearing culture. (Gilreath). Cf. Howes M129; cf. Bennett 79; cf. Field 992; cf. Lipperheide Mc 4; cf. Reese American Color Plate Books 24; cf. Sabin 43410a.

      [Bookseller: Donald Heald Rare Books]
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        Vor den Toren der Porta Portese in Rom

      1837. Aquarell über Bleistift auf zwei zusammengesetzten Blättern eines Skizzenbuches, unten rechts bezeichnet und datiert: "fuori porta Portese 12/4 37", verso mit dem Nachlassstempel des Künstlers, 8,5 x 29,2 cm. Professionell unter säurefreiem Museumspassepartout montiert.. Theobald von Oer erreichte am 20. März 1837 zusammen mit Heinrich Matthäi, dem Sohn seines Dresdner Lehrers Johann Friedrich Matthäi, Rom. Unser Aquarell gehört zu den wenigen überlieferten Landschaftsstudien aus den ersten Tagen in der italienischen Metropole und scheint das früheste nachweisbare Zeugnis der Rom-Erkundung zu sein. Auch wenn die Landschaftsmalerei nicht im Zentrum seines Schaffens steht, so beweist gerade dieses Aquarell sein Gespür für die Natur und es ist interessant zu sehen, dass er sich auch außerhalb der sonst üblichen Landschaftstopoi bewegt. Obwohl sich von jenem Standpunkt, den von Oer in diesem Aquarell wählte, ein wunderbares Panorama auf die Umgebung Roms eröffnet, findet man diesen Blickwinkel verhältnismäßig selten dargestellt. Möglicherweise entsprach die Aussicht nicht ganz dem idealisierenden Blick: Die ruinösen Gebäudereste rücken die Cestius-Pyramide und die Porta S. Paolo stark in den Hintergrund und die Tiberufer mit ihren zerklüfteten Abbruchkanten zeugen eher von einer tatsächlich belebten Landschaft als von einem erträumten Ideal antiker Monumente. Das geschäftige Treiben am nahen Porto di Ripa Grande dürfte dazu beigetragen haben, die Realität der Gegenwart in jedes sich versenkende Sehen zu wehen, was den seit seinem zwölften Lebensjahr tauben von Oer jedoch nicht gestört haben dürfte. Scheinbar hatte gerade dieser Kontrast, dieses natürliche Verschmelzen der Antike mit ihrer Umgebung für von Oer seinen Reiz entfaltet. Auch wenn von Oer weder in Dresden noch bei seinem späteren Lehrer Wilhelm von Schadow in Düsseldorf gezielt Landschaftsmalerei betrieb, so wird er gerade in der Stadt am Rhein die Umwälzungen innerhalb der Akademie mitbekommen haben. Unter Johann Wilhelm Schirmers Leitung setzte sich die Landschaftsmalerei als eigenständige Gattung innerhalb der Akademiehierarchie immer stärker durch. Wichtige Vertreter dieser Düsseldorfer Landschaftsmalerei wie Andreas und Oswald Achenbach verhalfen diesem Zweig der Malerei zu stetig steigendem Ruhm. Lag die Reduktion auf die reine Landschaft dem Historienmaler von Oer zwar fern, so kann man doch in diesem Aquarell Tendenzen beider Kunstschulen wiederfinden. In der klaren Strukturierung und der summarischen Detailwiedergabe, die dem Diktat der Linie folgt, fühlt man sich an Künstler aus Ludwig Richters Kreis erinnert. Die flächige Erschließung des Blattes durch die Aquarellierung wiederum scheint er von Johann Wilhelm Schirmer übernommen zu haben. Schirmer selbst hat zwei Jahre nach von Oer die Landschaft vor der Porta Portese studiert,3 doch seine Skizzen verraten wesentlich stärker als von Oers Blatt den Drang nach Idealisierung, nach einem harmonischen Ausblick auf die Landschaft.

      [Bookseller: H. W. Fichter Kunsthandel e.K.]
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        BENTLEYS MISCELLANY. Volumes 1-10. Containing the first appearance of Oliver Twist, Thackerays first publication, and the first UK appearance of works by Longfellow and Poe.

      Richard Bentley . These volumes contain the first appearance of Oliver Twist in volumes: 1-4, Feb.1837 - March, 1839 (It was first printed in book form in 1838); also first publication of works by Thackeray, Harrison AINSWORTH, Washington Irving, etc.; and the first UK appearance of works by Longfellow and Poe. Illustrators include George Cruikshank, Crowquill and Leech. BINDING: The ten volumes are bound in matching half leather over marbled boards, with gilt ruling to spines and gilt lettered label to each volume. CONDITION: spine of volume two scuffed and two other volumes with the spines a little darker than the rest (see image), others with light scuffing; many of the plates are browned at the edges; on the whole a very good run of the first ten volumes.

      [Bookseller: ELY BOOKS]
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        JOURNAL DU PALAIS. Recueil le plus complet de la Jurisprudence Francaise. 1837-1847.

      F.F.Patris, Paris - Disponibile un'ampia raccolta del celebre repertorio di giurisprudenza francese, comprendente tutti i primi 47 volumi pubblicati. 2^-3^ edizione. Testi francesi su due colonne. Cm.26x16. Legature in mz.pergamena con piatti marmorizzati. Tasselli con titoli in oro ai dorsi, trattati con trasparente protettivo. La numerazione seguita è quella della terza edizione. Disponibili: N°1, 1791 - anno VIII (3^ edizione, anno di stampa 1838, pg.756); N°2, anno IX - anno X (3^ edizione, anno di stampa 1837, pg.756); N°3, anno XI - Floréal anno XII (3^ edizione, anno di stampa 1839, pg.780); N°4, Prairial anno XII - anno XIII (3^ edizione, anno di stampa 1837, pg.796). N°5, anno XIV - Marzo 1807 (3^ edizione, anno di stampa 1838, pg.796); N°6, Aprile 1807 - Giugno 1808 (3^ edizione, anno di stampa 1838, pg.802); N°7, Luglio 1808 - 1809 (3^ edizione, anno di stampa 1838, pg.688); N°8, 1810 (3^ edizione, anno di stampa 1838, pg.764); N°9, 1811 (3^ edizione, anno di stampa 1838, pg.860); N°10, 1812 (3^ edizione, anno di stampa 1838, pg.1002); N°11, 1813 (3^ edizione, anno di stampa 1838, pg.908); N°12, 1814 - Luglio 1815 (3^ edizione, anno di stampa 1839, pg.780); N°13, Luglio 1815 - 1816 (3^ edizione, anno di stampa 1839, pg.800); N°14, 1817-1818 (3^ edizione, anno di stampa 1839, pg.1198); N°15, 1819 - Giugno 1820 (3^ edizione, anno di stampa 1839, pg.1128); N°16, Luglio 1820 - 1821 (3^ edizione, anno di stampa 1839, pg.1096); N°17, 1822 - Luglio 1823 (3^ edizione, anno di stampa 1840, pg.1264, lievi abrasioni al capitello superiore); N°18, Luglio 1823 - 1824 (3^ edizione, anno di stampa 1840, pg.1340); N°19, 1825 (3^ edizione, anno di stampa 1840, pg.1148, lieve abrasione al capitello superiore); N°20, 1826 (3^ edizione, anno di stampa 1840, pg.1108); N°21, 1827 - Luglio 1828 (3^ edizione, anno di stampa 1841, pg.1656); N°22, 1828-1829 (3^ edizione, anno di stampa 1841, pg.1728); N°23, 1830-1831 (3^ edizione, anno di stampa 1841, pg.1818); N°24, 1831-1832 (3^ edizione, anno di stampa 1841, pg.1768); N°25, 1833 (3^ edizione, anno di stampa 1842, pg.1164); N°26, 1834-1835 (3^ edizione, anno di stampa 1842, pg.1628); N°27, Aprile 1835 - 1836 (3^ edizione, anno di stampa 1842, pg.1770); N°28, 1837 (1° volume, 2^edizione, pg.700); N°29, 1837 (2° volume, 2^edizione, pg.684); N°30, 1838 (1° volume, 2^edizione, pg.736); N°31, 1838 (2° volume, 2^edizione, pg.734); N°32, 1839 (1° volume, 2^edizione, pg.732); N°33, 1839 (2° volume, 2^edizione, pg.756); N°34, 1840 (1° volume, 2^edizione, pg.840); N°35, 1840 (2° volume, 2^edizione, pg.874); N°36, 1841 (1° volume, 2^edizione, pg.820); N°37, 1841 (2° volume, 2^edizione, pg.828); N°38, 1842 (1° volume, 3^edizione, pg.840); N°39, 1842 (2° volume, 3^edizione, pg.832); N°40, 1843 (1° volume, 3^edizione, pg.828); N°41, 1843 (2° volume, 3^edizione, pg.916); N°42, 1844 (1° volume, 3^edizione, pg.920); N°43, 1844 (2° volume, 3^edizione, pg.718); N°44, 1845 (1° volume, 3^edizione, pg.860); N°45, 1845 (2° volume, 3^edizione, pg.868); N°46, 1846 (1° volume, 3^edizione, pg.840); 1846 (2° volume, 3^edizione, pg.840); N°47, 1847 (1° volume, 3^edizione, pg.836); 1847 (2° volume, 3^edizione, pg.836). Gli ultimi due volumi sono rilegati in mz.pelle. La prima edizione comparve come "Journal du Palais" fondé pendant la Révolution par une société d'avoués, composé de «questions oiseuses, quelquefois plaisantes ou étrangères à la jurisprudence»". La seconda edizione, completamente riveduta, apparve con l'intestazione "Journal du Palais: présentant la jurisprudence de la Cour de Cassation et des cours royales. Nouvelle édition" e curatore ne fu M.Bourgois: tra il 1823 e il 1827 furono pubblicati 24 volumi, che coprivano un arco temporale compreso tra il 1791 e il 1822. La terza edizione fu infine curata da Alexandre Auguste Ledru-Rollin (1807-1874), che ottenne ampia fama nella difesa dei Repubblicani. Ledru Rollin ne mantenne la direzione fino al 1847, affiancato dal 1845 da Jean Antoine Levesque. Dal 1848 al 1852 il suo n 5 [Attributes: First Edition; Soft Cover]

      [Bookseller: studio bibliografico pera s.a.s.]
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        [Broadside]: Ann Greene Chapman, of Boston [from The Liberator]

      (Boston): [No publisher]. (1837). Single quarto leaf printed both sides in double columns. Fine. A memorial tribute to an active feminist, abolitionist, and member of the Boston Female Anti-Slavery Society, who died at age 35. Apparently all of the tributes are extracted from William Lloyd Garrison's newspaper The Liberator, and include a 400-word tribute from Lydia Maria Child (which is not listed in BAL), a poem by Anne Warren Weston, a death notice from The Reformer, and a resolution by the Boston Female Anti-Slavery Society. Very uncommon. NUC locates two copies. .

      [Bookseller: Between the Covers- Rare Books, Inc. ABA]
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        Das System der Pilze. Durch Beschreibungen und Abbildungen erläutert. Erste Abtheilung.

      Bonn: Henry und Cohem 1837.. Mit 1 schwarzen u. 11 colorierten Tafeln. VI, 74 S. Neuerer Halbleinenbd. m. handbeschrieb. Rückenschild. 23x14 cm. (Versandstufe 2).. - Selten! -- Ebd. berieben u. etw. fleckig, an der unteren Kante leicht gestaucht, Rückenschild teilw. abgelöst, Exlibris, einige S. u. Taf. leicht stockfleckig, schönes Exemplar. --- Wir akzeptieren VISA und MASTERCARD. Credit cards accepted. ---

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat im Kloster]
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        Die Betende

      um 1837 um 1837. Aquarell und Farbkreide über Bleistift auf festem Papier, verso am unteren Rand signiert: "Marie Ellenrieder" (fragmentiert), 66,4 x 48,2 cm. Professionell unter säurefreiem Museumspassepartout montiert.. Marie Ellenrieder ist die wohl bekannteste Malerin aus dem Umfeld der Nazarener. Lang ersehnt, war es der Konstanzerin 1822 endlich möglich nach Italien zu reisen, wo sie sich bis 1824 aufhielt. In Rom hatte sie Kontakt zu dem Künstlerkreis um Friedrich Overbeck, mit dem sie die Überzeugung teilte, Kunst solle vor allem der Stärkung des Glaubens dienen. Die Verehrung Raffaels und anderer Meister der italienischen Renaissance, welche sie vor Ort studierte, teilte sie ebenso inbrünstig. Sowohl die Religiosität der Künstlerin, als auch das Studium Raffaels finden in unserer Darstellung einer Betenden ihren Niederschlag. Die fein ausgeführte, kolorierte Zeichnung zeigt das Hüftbild einer jungen Frau, hinterfangen von einem Himmel mit vereinzelten Wolken. Sie ist nach rechts gewendet und trägt ein schlichtes historisierendes Gewand mit feinem Faltenwurf. Die Hände im Gebetsgestus sind bis über die Brust erhoben. Ihr nach oben gerichteter Kopf wird im strengen Profil gezeigt. Der Blick gen Himmel und der leicht geöffnete Mund drücken tiefe Andacht und starken Glauben aus. Die Betende geht mit ihren idealisierten Zügen und dem locker geknotetem, blondem Haar mit dünnem Schleier auf einen Frauentypus zurück, der sich in vielen Gemälden Raffaels findet. Die Profilansicht, der nach oben gerichtete Bick und die zum Gebet zusammengeführten Hände erinnern besonders an Raffaels in Grisaille gehaltene Figur der personifizierten Hoffnung aus der Predella des Baglioni Altars. Doch im Gengensatz zu der Darstellung Raffaels ist Ellenrieders Komposition stärker gen Himmel orientiert, der Kopf und die Hände sind weiter erhoben. Während Raffaels Figur neben dem Gebetsgestus durch ihren vom Wind verwehten Mantel klar als Hoffnung erkennbar ist, verzichtet Ellenrieder auf dieses Element. So ist ihre Darstellung zwar nicht mehr als Personifikation der Spes zu verstehen, aber das tiefe Gottvertrauen, welches Haltung und Blick der jungen Frau ausdrücken, vermittelt ebenso Trost und Hoffnung. Das Blatt entstand als Entwurf für das Ölgemälde Betende Frau 3, das rückseitig auf 1837 datiert ist und sich heute im Napoleon-Museum in Schloss Arenenberg befindet. Das Gemälde, das der Zeichnung bis ins Detail entspricht - lediglich der untere Bildrand wurde etwas nach oben verschoben -, stammt aus dem Besitz von Hortense de Beauharnais (1783-1837). Die Stieftochter Napoleons residierte ab 1817 in Schloss Arenenberg unweit von Konstanz. Stimmig zum symbolischen Gehalt der Darstellung ist überliefert, dass die Malerin das Bild zunächst für eine Karlsruher Familie schuf, aber überredet wurde, die Arbeit der im Sterben liegenden Hortense zu überlassen. Die Komposition fand auch als Lithografie Verbreitung, zudem schuf Ellenrieder 1840 eine weitere Version in Öl.

      [Bookseller: H. W. Fichter Kunsthandel e.K.]
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        The School for Statesmen, or, the Public Man's Manual;

      London: Smith, Elder and Co.,, 1837. Being a complete guide to the constitution since the Reform Bill. By an old M.P. Octavo (200 × 122 mm). Recent half calf to style, spine with gilt devices in compartments, red morocco label, marbled sides, brick red endpapers, edges untrimmed. A very good copy. First edition of this lively survey of the contemporary British political scene, written as an interchange of letters between the old MP and various less experienced observers. The work is attributed to Edmund Frederick J. Carrington, author of Confessions of an Old Bachelor (1827) and Confessions of an Old Maid (1828).

      [Bookseller: Peter Harrington]
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        [Broadside]: Ann Greene Chapman, of Boston [from The Liberator]

      (Boston): [No publisher]. (1837). Single quarto leaf printed both sides in double columns. Fine. A memorial tribute to an active feminist, abolitionist, and member of the Boston Female Anti-Slavery Society, who died at age 35. Apparently all of the tributes are extracted from William Lloyd Garrison's newspaper The Liberator, and include a 400-word tribute from Lydia Maria Child (which is not listed in BAL), a poem by Anne Warren Weston, a death notice from The Reformer, and a resolution by the Boston Female Anti-Slavery Society. Very uncommon. NUC locates two copies. .

      [Bookseller: Between the Covers- Rare Books, Inc. ABA]
 14.   Check availability:     IOBABooks     Link/Print  


        Avocet. Recurvirostra avocetta; (Linn)

      London 1837 - This splendid hand-colored, folio-size lithograph, Avocet. Recurvirostra avocetta; (Linn), from John Gould’s (1804-1881) monumental book "Birds Europe" (1832-1837) is in good condition with light foxing and staining throughout and evidence of verso page text. Measuring 14.75" x 21.5", this lithograph magnificently displays the author’s scientific skill and attention to detail. Commonly called Pied Avocet, this large wading bird is finely colored in black and white with blueish legs. The upturned bill, an Avocet characteristic allows for easier feeling in the shallow waters where live. John Gould was an English ornithologist, self-taught artist and naturalist. Gould first worked as a gardener under his father in the Royal Gardens of Windsor from 1818-1824, where he began his illustrations. He became an expert taxidermist, opening his own practice in London in 1824 and in 1827 he became the first Curator and Preserver at the museum of the Zoological Society of London. Through his work he was able to meet with the country’s leading naturalists and view new collections of birds given to the Zoological Society. His interest in birds was continually developing and in 1830 he published his first volume on birds, “A Century of Birds From the Himalaya Mountains.” For the next fifty years, Gould, his wife and artists working with them traveled around Asia, the East Indies and Australia. His wife Elizabeth and other artists were able to transfer his sketches to stone; hand print and hand-color them. One of the most accomplished and engaging natural history works of the 19th century, “The Birds of Europe” was also the first of Gould's works to feature plates by Edward Lear. A total of sixty-eight images bear Lear's name, and they are among the most remarkable bird drawings ever made. Lear endowed his illustrations with some measure of his own whimsy and intelligence, and his style is at once fluidly spontaneous and realistically precise. In this way, the images of “The Birds of Europe” are amazingly distinctive, while also highly realistic. Gould undertook this work partly in an effort to redress the imbalance between the study of local and foreign ornithology. Gould portrayed birds native to Europe in a manner that had only been thought appropriate for the colorful species of distant places. In this way he managed to draw much popular interest back to native birds, which were suddenly considered equally beautiful to exotic species.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
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        Das Recht des Besitzes. Eine civilistische Abhandlung.

      Giessen, Druck und Verlag von Georg Friedrich Heyer, Vater, 1837.. 6., vermehrte und verbess. Aufl. 8vo. LXXII, 688 S., 1 Bl. (Druckfehler). Neuer Halbledereinband. (Papier stellenw. etw. gebräunt).. Letzte von Savigny verbesserte und vermehrte Auflage!

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat + Verlag Klaus Breinlich]
 16.   Check availability:     ZVAB     Link/Print  


        Anleitung zur Analyse organischer Körper

      Brauschweig : Bruck Und Verlad Von Friedrich Vieweg Und Suhn , 1837. First edition of one of the worlds 100 books famous in science. Contains 2 folded copper engraved plates, 1 lithographed plate, 2 folding charts - includes the rare folding chart at the end of the book which was designed to be pasted to board and hung as a wall chart. Horblit 67, Paolini 237, Dibner 46. Ex library book marked discard. There are 2 lines drawn on the introduction page other wise the book appears to be notation and defect free. The book has some light foxing but the pages are mostly remarkably bright given the age of the book. This book was printed on very good paper. This book was issued as a soft cover book and the rear soft cover has been bound into this book. Very collectible book and a nice candidate for rebinding in a fine binding. .. First Edition. Hard Cover. Very Good/No Dust Jacket. 8vo - over 7¾" - 9¾" tall. Ex-Library.

      [Bookseller: JPollard Bookseller]
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        Journal des National-Theaters in Bamberg

      Bamberg 12mo (17 cm, 6.75"). [12] pp.. 1837 Beautifully => silk-bound souvenir edition of the calendar of performances of the Bamberg National Theatre for the year 1837, along with the staff and cast list, privately printed for Lida Bornhagen in commemoration of her retirement as the house prompter in that year. A charming poem presumably written by Bornhagen, celebrating her delight in her quiet contributions to "Thalia's Temple," opens this little volume, dedicated to theatrical patron (and father of Empress Elisabeth of Austria) Duke Maximilian Joseph in Bavaria; an affectionate and slightly melancholy farewell verse closes it. The elegant binding seems to indicate that this was the dedicatee's copy, with the author's name inked on the front cover as seen on other volumes in his library. Emphatically this is not "just" a keepsake: It details => a particular year's worth of a particular theater's administrative and performance data in a nice neat "microcosmic" way that's seldom found. Binding: Contemporary cream silk framed and panelled in gold appliqué with attached gilt corner fleurons, front cover with central teal medallion lettered "Aus Ehrfurcht gewidmet." => No copies located via WorldCat, NUC, KVK, or COPAC. Binding as above, Bornhagen's name neatly inked in upper portion of front cover, front cover with small portions of appliquéd medallion-edge and borders lacking; back cover with short gap in gold appliqué at one corner and with one leaf broken off from one fleuron. Clean, crisp, and with a small repair to inner corner of front fly-leaf, this is a => very pretty association item.

      [Bookseller: SessaBks, A Division of the Philadelphia]
 18.   Check availability:     IOBABooks     Link/Print  


        Griffon Vulture. Vultur Fulvus, (Linn)

      London 1837 - John Gould (1804-1881) was an English ornithologist, self-taught artist and naturalist. Gould first worked as a gardener under his father in the Royal Gardens of Windsor from 1818-1824, where he began his illustrations. He became an expert taxidermist, opening his own practice in London in 1824 and in 1827 he became the first Curator and Preserver at the museum of the Zoological Society of London. Through his work he was able to meet with the country’s leading naturalists and view new collections of birds given to the Zoological Society. His interest in birds was continually developing and in 1830 he published his first volume on birds, “A Century of Birds From the Himalaya Mountains.” For the next fifty years, Gould, his wife and artists working with them traveled around Asia, the East Indies and Australia. His wife Elizabeth and other artists were able to transfer his sketches to stone; hand print and hand-color them. One of the most accomplished and engaging natural history works of the 19th century, “The Birds of Europe” was also the first of Gould's works to feature plates by Edward Lear. A total of sixty-eight images bear Lear's name, and they are among the most remarkable bird drawings ever made. Lear endowed his illustrations with some measure of his own whimsy and intelligence, and his style is at once fluidly spontaneous and realistically precise. In this way, the images of “The Birds of Europe” are amazingly distinctive, while also highly realistic. Gould undertook this work partly in an effort to redress the imbalance between the study of local and foreign ornithology. Gould portrayed birds native to Europe in a manner that had only been thought appropriate for the colorful species of distant places. In this way he managed to draw much popular interest back to native birds, which were suddenly considered equally beautiful to exotic species. This hand-colored lithograph, Vulture Fulvus, (Linn), measures 21.5” x 14.75” and is in very good condition with light foxing and staining throughout. This vulture, commonly called the Griffon Vulture, is expertly hand-colored in rich shades of brown and gray with a white collar and head. The precise lines on this bird detail and define each feather creating a large plumage. The Griffon Vulture has a large wing span with small, darkly colored tail feathers. This vulture is prominently displayed among an abstract background, where the artists fine detailing and shading can be appreciated.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
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        Sha-Ha-Ka, A Mandan Chief

      Philadelphia: E. C. Biddle, 1837. Lithograph, printed and hand-colored by J. T. Bowen after a portrait by Saint-Memin in the American Philosophical Society. In excellent condition apart from faint off-setting in plate. A fine image from McKenney and Hall's 'Indian Tribes of North America': `One of the most important [works] ever published on the American Indians' (Field),` a landmark in American culture' (Horan) and an invaluable contemporary record of a vanished way of life. Shahaka, or Coyote (c. 1765 - c. 1810) was known to Lewis and Clark as Big White. He was a large, affable man, and unusually talkative, a trait despised by Native Americans generally. Chief of the "Lower Village" of Mandan on the Missouri in present day North Dakota, he won the friendship of Lewis, Clark and the rest of the expedition, and he was invited back to meet President Jefferson who entertained him at Monticello. During his visit to Philadelphia, Charles Balthasar Julien Febret de Saint-Mémin painted the chief's portrait, which was given to the American Philosophical Society, and it is from this that McKenney's portrait was made. Accused of being seduced by the white man's world and of fabricating tales, Shahaka's people were extremely uninterested in hearing his travel stories. He was killed in a battle with the Sioux a few years later. Mckenney and Hall's 'Indian Tribes of North America' has long been renowned for its faithful portraits of Native Americans. The portraits are largely based on paintings by the artist Charles Bird King, who was employed by the War Department to paint the Indian delegates visiting Washington D.C., forming the basis of the War Department's Indian Gallery. Most of King's original paintings were subsequently destroyed in a fire at the Smithsonian, and their appearance in McKenney and Hall's magnificent work is thus our only record of the likenesses of many of the most prominent Indian leaders of the nineteenth century. Numbered among King's sitters were Sequoyah, Red Jacket, Major Ridge, Cornplanter, and Osceola. After six years as Superintendent of Indian Trade, Thomas McKenney had become concerned for the survival of the Western tribes. He had observed unscrupulous individuals taking advantage of the Native Americans for profit, and his vocal warnings about their future prompted his appointment by President Monroe to the Office of Indian Affairs. As first director, McKenney was to improve the administration of Indian programs in various government offices. His first trip was during the summer of 1826 to the Lake Superior area for a treaty with the Chippewa, opening mineral rights on their land. In 1827, he journeyed west again for a treaty with the Chippewa, Menominee , and Winebago in the present state of Michigan. His journeys provided an unparalleled opportunity to become acquainted with Native American tribes. When President Jackson dismissed him from his government post in 1830, McKenney was able to turn more of his attention to his publishing project. Within a few years, he was joined by James Hall, a lawyer who had written extensively about the west. McKenney and Hall saw their work as a way of preserving an accurate visual record of a rapidly disappearing culture. (Gilreath). Cf. Howes M129; cf. Bennett 79; cf. Field 992; cf. Lipperheide Mc 4; cf. Reese American Color Plate Books 24; cf. Sabin 43410a.

      [Bookseller: Donald Heald Rare Books]
 20.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  


        Journal de la navigation autour du globe de la frégate La Thétis et de la corvette L'Espérance pendant les années 1824, 1825 et 1826.

      Paris: Arthus Bertrand, 1837 - Deux volumes in-4 et un volume d'atlas grand in folio. Texte: xvi, 742p. (deux ff. inversés pp. 3-6), et [viii], 351p., 165p., [2p. errata]. Atlas: [2ff.: titre, table], et 56 planches et cartes comprenant: 34 vues et planches de scènes diverses lithographiées et tirées sur Chine monté, 12 planches d'histoire naturelle finement coloriées (oiseaux, kangourou, papillons, plantes et animaux divers), 8 cartes et profils des côtes à double page, 1 planche double coloriée représentant des types d'embarcations, et une grande carte dépliante de l'itinéraire suivi. Jolie reliure pastiche, uniforme pour les trois volumes, en demi-veau havane, dos lisses ornés de filets dorés avec pièces de titre et de tomaison rouges et noires, plats et gardes marbrés. Mouillures pâles dans les volumes de texte, affectant le dernier quart du premier volume et la première moitié du second; quelques rousseurs dans l'atlas, pour l'essentiel confinées au support des planches mais n'affectant pas les tirages sur Chine, avec une tache plus développée sue le plan n°49. Fils aîné du célèbre navigateur du "Voyage autour du Monde" au siècle précédent, Hyacinthe de Bougainville (1781 - 1846) entre dans la Marine à sa sortie de Polytechnique, et participe de 1800 à 1814 à l'expédition de Baudin aux terres australes. En 1824 il prend le commandement de la présente expédition, dont le but principal est de renouer les relations commerciales et diplomatiques avec l'Annam et la Chine. Après avoir doublé le cap de Bonne Espérance et fait escale à l'île Bourbon, l'expédition rejoint Macao puis le port annamite de Tourane en janvier 1825. Malgré un accueil au port en grande pompe, Bougainville ne peut obtenir d'audience de l'empereur, qui refuse même la lettre de Louis XVIII. Il se rend alors à Java et contourne l'Australie au Sud pour rejoindre la Tasmanie, puis Port Jackson (Sydney). Les navires traversent ensuite le Pacifique et font escale à Rio et Valparaiso avant de rejoindre Brest en juin 1826. Si les résultats politiques de l'expédition sont décevants, l'expédition rapporte des observations géographiques et scientifiques intéressantes. La plus grande partie du second volume est consacrée aux notes explicatives détaillées des planches de l'atlas par De La Touanne, aux descriptions d'histoire naturelle par Lesson, et à la discussion des observations astronomiques par Fabré, La Pierre, Penaud et Jeanneret. Le spectaculaire atlas contient de nombreuses vues de paysages tirées sur Chine et de belles planches coloriées d'histoire naturelle dont de superbes oiseaux.

      [Bookseller: LIBRAIRIE DES CARRÉS]
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        Anser Segetum (Bean-Goose)

      London 1837 - This splendid hand-colored, folio-size lithograph, Anser Segetum, from John Gould’s (1804-1881) monumental book "Birds of Great Britain" (1862-1873) is in good condition with staining and foxing throughout. Measuring 14.75" x 21.5", this lithograph displays the author’s scientific skill and attention to detail. Commonly called Bean-Geese, these birds are expertly hand-colored with brown and black feathers, beaks, and vibrant orange feet. Precise lines define and detail each feather and the intricate patterns on the geese. John Gould was an English ornithologist, self-taught artist and naturalist. Gould first worked as a gardener under his father in the Royal Gardens of Windsor from 1818-1824, where he began his illustrations. He became an expert taxidermist, opening his own practice in London in 1824 and in 1827 he became the first Curator and Preserver at the museum of the Zoological Society of London. Through his work he was able to meet with the country’s leading naturalists and view new collections of birds given to the Zoological Society. His interest in birds was continually developing and in 1830 he published his first volume on birds, “A Century of Birds From the Himalaya Mountains.” For the next fifty years, Gould, his wife and artists working with them traveled around Asia, the East Indies and Australia. His wife Elizabeth and other artists were able to transfer his sketches to stone; hand print and hand-color them. Gould was especially proud of this sumptuous work “Birds of Great Britain” describing the volumes as a return to his old love of native birds. Unlike in earlier publications, however, the illustrations incorporate more nests, eggs, and young than the earlier works, with a focus on landscapes and family groupings. The ornithologist and his collaborators took more of an interest in creating accurate, appropriate settings, and included more plants and fully delineated environments, resulting in a number of lavish scenes of action and interaction. Gould's rightful pride in these illustrations was reflected in his preface explanation of their coloring: " every sky with its varied tints and every feather of each bird were colored by hand; and when it is considered that nearly two hundred and eighty thousand illustrations in the present work have been so treated, it will most likely cause some astonishment to those who give the subject a thought." Gould's pride in “The Birds of Great Britain” was matched by its public success.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
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        Manuscript Volume containing the text of 15 Sermons preached in Wiltshire.

      "Wiltshire" -8 1837 - 8vo., 203 pages, (approx 50,000 words), written throughout in one neat hand, bound in half black morocco, now worn with most of backstrip absent. A Collection of 15 long Non Conformist sermons preached by a variety of Preachers collected and written in one hand, possibly that of Pinniger. The first Sermon "On the Word of God" starts "My Brethren." and signed at end "Mr Morgan on behalf of the Society for instructing the Irish" (35pages). Other Sermons are noted in pencil as preached by "Phipps, Horlock or Cockle", another is "Preached by the Rev. B. Elliot on behalf of the London Missionary Society at Averbury", another "Promotion of Xry (sic) amongst Jews by the Rev. Ayerst. Missionary from Berlin", and finally "On a recent occurrence at Swindon". Of particular interest is the Elliot sermon. Elliot was a particularly popular preacher operating in the environs of Devizes and notice of his passing was posted in The Gentleman's Magazine (Vol. 58, Part 2, p. 1184), appended with the note: "When he quitted the Church of England we have not learned." Elliot was an anti-slavery campaigner and one of the two prominent charismatic preachers (the other being Robert Sloper) noted by Pevsner as being attached to the Congregationalist Chapel of St. Mary's in Devizes. Elliot in fact succeeded Sloper at St. Mary's and is reputed to have done more than any other single individual to raise the profile of Congregationalism & its attendant interests, including anti-slavery and the London Missionary Society, in the county. The Avebury sermon was most likely to have been delivered at the Avebury Congregational Chapel. We think it highly probable that the compiler of this volume, J.F. Pinniger, was associated with, or related to, the company Robbins, Lane & Pinniger which owned much of the village of Woodborough in the Vale of Pewsey, a short distance from Avebury, at this time when it was responsible for building barges for use on the Kennet & Avon Canal. [Attributes: Signed Copy; Soft Cover]

      [Bookseller: A. R. Heath Rare Books]
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        The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club

      London: Chapman & Hall 1837. xvi., 609 pp., respined - green calf with red morocco title label. Boards are contemporary dark green diced calf with a gilt border. A couple of the later pages have tears that do not effect text, stab marks - bound from parts. Plates by Phiz are quite stained. . Very Good. Full Calf. First Edition, Second Issue. 1837. 8vo - over 7¾" - 9¾" tall.

      [Bookseller: Stephen Foster Books]
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        Illustrations of the History and Practices of the Thugs, and Notices of Some of the Proceedings of the Government of India.

      Wm. H. Allen & Co., London 1837 - half-leather Bookplate on fixed flyleaf. Some slight rubbing & scuffing, VG. 22x14cm, (2), 475 pp, Nineteenth century binder's half-leather. Raised spine edges. Heraldic device on spine. Full title concludes: ".Proceedings of the Government of India, for the Suppression of the Crime of Thuggee". Bookplate on fixed flyleaf. Some slight rubbing & scuffing, VG. [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Expatriate Bookshop of Denmark]
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        The Felonry of New South Wales. The Felonry of New South Wales: Being a faithful picture of the real romance of life in Botany Bay

      For the Author, Whaley and Co, London 1837 - Octavo, with a folding map of the Town of Sydney as frontispiece (repaired), bound in later half calf. First edition of this controversial book, published in London, and unanimously attacked in Australia as frivolous, slanderous, and prejudiced.The 1830s saw increased friction in New South Wales between colonial conservatives and the liberal governor, Sir Richard Bourke, who introduced a number of reforms that endeared him to the Emancipists, notably a new law allowing former convicts to serve as jurors and criminal cases to be tried by civil juries. Bourke retaliated to the attacks of Mudie and other opponents by depriving them of their Magistracies: "This loss of caste was too much for Mudie, who sold up and returned to England vowing revenge. It came in the form of a hastily written book? 'Felonry', Mudie explained, was his own word, encompassing all of the 'criminal population' of the colony, including the Emancipists, no matter what their wealth or professional standing. It corresponded, he said, to the orders of the old world - 'the tribe of appellatives distinguished by the same termination, as peasantry, tenantry, yeomanry, gentry?&c.' Such people, he argued, were 'for ever infamous? infamous in law? unworthy of future trust'; they and their offspring should be disenfranchised forever?" (Robert Hughes, "The Fatal Shore", 1987, p. 330). Mudie's word has duly made its way into the Oxford English Dictionary.In 1840, Mudie foolishly returned to Sydney, but apparently not sufficient time had elapsed; the son of one of his victims publicly horsewhipped him. From the collection of Robert Edwards. [Attributes: First Edition]

      [Bookseller: Hordern House Rare Books]
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        Account of an Expedition to the Interior of New Holland. Account of an Expedition to the Interior of New Holland

      London: Richard Bentley, 1837. Small octavo; half-title discarded, no publisher's advertisements which appear in some copies; a fine copy in full green morocco by Sangorski & Sutcliffe. Imaginary travels in the Australian inland. Rare Australian utopia and imaginary voyage: first edition of this fantastical tale chronicling an 1835 expedition from Bathurst to the interior, in which the exploring party comes across a group of English-speaking settlers, part of an utopian civilisation of three or four million, descendants of sixteenth-century refugees from the Reformation wars intermixed with whole tribes of Aborigines.Raymond Howgego has carefully re-examined the attribution of this text. He points out that an early taste of the book appeared in Lady Fox's "Friendly Contributions for the Benefit of Three Schools" (1836); that it was developed into the book-length version by Lady Fox and others; that the traditional identification of Archbishop Whateley as a co-author is probably wrong; but that Whateley's wife Elizabeth may probably have had a hand in it.Marcus Clarke thought it 'very entertainingly written, and in style and matter above the average of such compositions'; it was a success, requiring a third edition by 1860 and a modern reprint (in Claeys's Modern British Utopias, 1997).Lady Mary Fox herself was a most interesting figure, one of 10 children of the duke of Clarence, later King William IV, by his mistress. She was close to royal circles, and was appointed housekeeper of Windsor Castle where she spent most of her life. Her largely liberal views (and/or those of her co-authors of course) are reflected throughout the novel: for instance, she condemns racism, and satirises the convict system in Australia: 'a new settlement with convicted criminals, - to form a new nation of the scum and refuse of mankind, - appeared to them so preposterous, that for some time they could not help supposing they must have misunderstood their informants'.

      [Bookseller: Hordern House Rare Books]
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        The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club

      Chapman & Hall 1837, London - xvi., 609 pp., respined - green calf with red morocco title label. Boards are contemporary dark green diced calf with a gilt border. A couple of the later pages have tears that do not effect text, stab marks - bound from parts. Plates by Phiz are quite stained.

      [Bookseller: Stephen Foster - ABA ILAB & ibooknet]
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        The Victims of Whiggery; Being A Statement of the Persecutions Experienced by the Dorchester Labourers; The Victims of Whiggery; Being A Statement of the Persecutions Experienced by the Dorchester Labourers; Their Trial, Banishment, &c. &c.; Also Reflections upon the present system of Transportation; With an account of Van Dieman's Land

      London: Effingham Wilson, circa, 1837. Octavo, 32pp., a very good uncut copy in later polished half navy calf, a little worn at extremities; from the Ingleton collection, with bookplate. Crucial publication in the history of trade unionism. Third edition of Loveless' important pamphlet on transportation to Van Diemen's Land, itself a pivotal document in the history of trade unionism.George Loveless (1797-1874) was a Dorchester labourer and Tolpuddle martyr. In the early 1830s he represented the Dorchester agricultural labourers in discussions with local farmers, who agreed to raise wages, however the deal went sour and Loveless and his colleagues formed the Friendly Society of Agricultural Labourers, a sort of trade union. While unionising itself was not illegal, it was ruled illegal to have members bound to the Society by 'unlawful oaths', legalese which led to the conviction of Loveless and five others in March 1834. Each was sentenced to seven years transportation to Australia.Loveless arrived in Van Diemen's Land on 4 September of the same year. Initially assigned to work in irons on the roads, a meeting with Governor Arthur led to him being reassigned to work on the Governor's farm. He was later employed by Major William de Gillern at Glen Ayr, near Richmond, who allowed him the privilege of reading his newspapers. Early in September 1836 Loveless was reading the London Dispatch where he learnt of the campaign to release the Dorchester labourers and the free pardons issued to them. Some months previously, Loveless had been persuaded to write to ask his wife to join him in the colony, when offered a free passage to England he refused to accept it until certain that she had not already sailed. He finally set sail for England on 29 January 1837, some time before his companions.The last major section of this pamphlet is an excellent description of the system of transportation, with lengthy reflections on conditions aboard transports and the dangers of the voyage. Loveless finishes by concluding that 'Van Dieman's Land is a fine-looking country' even if it is not the 'garden of Eden for emigrants that the deluded people of England imagine.'.

      [Bookseller: Hordern House Rare Books]
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        "A Visit From St Nicholas" In The New-York Book Of Poetry

      New York: George Dearborn, Publishers. Very Good. 1837. Hardcover. A Very Good copy in original publisher's cloth with gilt decoration, showing some foxing to pages. Marshall 15; Contains the first formal book appearance of Clement Moore's "A Visit from St. Nicolas," now also known as the children's classic story "The Night Before Christmas." Although there were previous appearances of the poem, this is the first time that Moore is identified as the author .

      [Bookseller: Books Tell You Why]
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        Plataea Flavipes; Gould (Yellow-Legged Spoonbill)

      London 1837 - This splendid hand-colored,folio size lithograph Platalea Flavipes: Gould, from John Gould’s (1804-1881) monumental book "Birds of Australia" is in very good condition with light foxing and staining throughout. Measuring 22" x 15", this lithograph magnificently displays the author’s scientific skill and attention to detail. Commonly called the Yellow-Legged or Yellow-Billed Spoonbill, these tall wading birds are expertly hand-colored in vibrant white with black accenting feathers and yellow bills and legs. The Yellow-Legged Spoonbills are finely detailed from each feather on their bodies to their spatulate bills, used for collecting food in the shallow waters they live in. At the time "Birds of Australia's" publication, the birds of this region were essentially unknown to a European audience and as Gould himself admitted in the preface to the book, “the field was comparatively a new one”. John Gould was without question the most prolific ornithological artist of the 19th century, and the only one to rival John James Audubon in ambition and quality. The 19th century was a time of intense fascination with discoveries in natural history, especially regarding knowledge of the wildlife of exotic lands. Gould combined his passion for natural history with outstanding scientific, artistic, and entrepreneurial talents, and embarked on a series of projects that would eventually make him the leading publisher of ornithological illustrations in Victorian Britain. Gould’s unparalleled career spanned five decades, and he produced a monumental series of books of birds throughout the world. The Birds of Australia is John Gould’s largest and most important work. Because he himself spent so much time in the field making his own observations, the text that accompanies the illustrations is by far the most accurate and detailed of all his works. Each of the illustrations is stunningly colored and flawlessly drafted, highlighting the exquisite plumage and elegance of the birds. The colossal work is tremendous throughout, and quite rightly, it is considered Gould’s masterpiece. When Gould began work on the Birds of Australia, the ornithology of that continent was all but unknown in Europe. Gould started his research using specimens available in England, but quickly realized that the supply was far from sufficient. He discarded the work and traveled to Australia to begin his effort anew on his magnum opus. Arriving in Australia in September 1838, Gould and his wife, Elizabeth, spent the following eighteen months exploring Tasmania and the adjacent islands, South Australia, and New South Wales, and penetrated well into the interior. Over the course of these extensive travels Gould made many of the preliminary drawings that were translated into the remarkable series of 681 lithographs. Gould collected and documented so many new species, more than three hundred, that very few additions have been made since. His voyage to Australia was unsurpassed in the annals of ornithology.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
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        The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club

      London: Chapman and Hall, 1837. First. hardcover. fine. With 43 illustrations by R. Seymour and Phiz. 607pp., thick 8vo, full polished black crushed morocco, gilt dentelles, silk end-leaves . London: Chapman and Hall, 1837. First Edition. Spotless copy, with half-title, the plates & text having been washed, sized & toned throughout. Contains the Veller & Buss plates, and also includes 30 plates plates by Thomas Onwyn. Nearly all the plates are first issues. Laid in is a cheque dated June 11, 1866, signed by Dickens.

      [Bookseller: Argosy Book Store]
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