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Displayed below are some selected recent viaLibri matches for books published in 1832

        The Rèpublic of Mexico in 1876. A political and ethnographical division of the population, character, habits, costumes and vocations of its inhabitants. Translated into English by George F. Henderson.

      - Palau 65704. Interesting work on the politics, history and ethnography of Mexico, by the Mexican scientist Antonio Garcia Cubas (1832-1912). In the third part on ethnography the focus is on several indigenous Mexican Indian families. "For a better knowledge of the races, their real characteristics, their uses and customs should be studied, as I have mentioned on another occasion, in the depths of the mountainous regions where they still preserve their ancient habits and their dialects with greater purity. Tlapacoyan at the foot of the Sierra of Tezuitlan, and Amatlan in the neighbourhood of Cordoba, both in the State of Vera Cruz, display to us the best types of the Mexican family" (pp. 67-68). The text is also clarified by tables, for example a 'Synopsis of the Indian languages of Mexico, formed according to the classification of D. Francisco Pimentel'.

      [Bookseller: ASHER Rare Books]
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        THE SIAMESE TWINS. FOR [ONE] DAYS ONLY [caption title]

      Ithaca: Mack and Andrus, [1832 or 1838].. Broadside, 15 1/2 x 12 1/2 inches. Some separation at folds, several closed tears at edges. Light soiling and moderate wear. Good. A promotional broadside for Chang & Eng Bunker, the original "Siamese twins." The broadside is printed with space for completing the date and times in manuscript, as has been done in the title - "one" is written in by hand. The top of the broadside has a large woodcut vignette showing the two boys, the band joining them at the center of their torsos plainly evident. The rest of the text reads, with the manuscript portions in brackets: "It is very respectfully made known to the Ladies and Gentlemen of [Salem] and its neighbourhood, that an opportunity is now offered to such as have a desire to see the young men known as the Siamese Twin Brothers, who have excited so much astonishment, and so many curious speculations among the scientifick men and the publick generally, from the extraordinary manner in which their bodies are joined together. They will be at [Mr. Henry Malls Tavern in Salem on Monday nest the 29th of October] admittance 25 cents." The hours of admission are also given, and it is advertised that "Pampohlets containing an historical account, and also a full length likeness of the twins, can be had in their room only. Price 12 1-2 cents." Chang & Eng Bunker, born in Thailand in 1811, were "discovered" by a British promoter in 1829 and taken on world tour. They eventually settled in North Carolina, in 1839, and led relatively normal lives, marrying two sisters and having between them twenty-one children. Printed in the 1830s, October 29th occurred on a Monday in 1832 and 1838, tentatively dating this broadside. Rare and interesting.

      [Bookseller: William Reese Company - Americana]
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        First Report of the Council of the Australian College

      Sydney,: printed by Horatio Wills, at the Sydney Gazette Office,, 1832.. Octavo, 8 pp.; very good in original dark blue paper wrappers, stitch-sewn, bookplate of Australian entomologist Nancye Kent Perry (1972). Very rare, in very good original condition: the earliest report of the Australian College, and a rare Horatio Wills-printed work; Wills was the successor to Robert Howe at the Gazette.The Reverend Lang had always been interested in promoting education, opening a primary school in 1826, and planning the Australian College some time around 1831, with work on their premises in Bridge Street beginning the same year; the school 'survived with ups and downs till 1854; at its best in the late 1830s it appears to have been run very efficiently' (ADB). As this pamphlet attests, in the early days the school could certainly count on some high profile support from council members including Major Mitchell, and the great banker and benefactor Thomas Walker. This pamphlet sketches out the salient figures of the new college, with good notes on the four teachers whose employment was being sought; the Reverends Pinkerton, Anderson, Carmichael, and McGarvie (John, not his brother the printer William).Horatio Wills was an enigmatic figure. He was born in Sydney in 1811, and in 1812 his widowed mother married George Howe, printer and editor of the Gazette. His education was sketchy, and he seemed to positively dislike his step-brother Robert, the more so after Robert took over from his father and, in 1823, young Horatio became his apprentice. Over the next years he routinely absconded, but continued to work in the firm after Robert Howe's death in 1829. He took over the firm in 1832, beginning publication of The Currency Lad the same year, but he left the printery for good in June 1833; Morrison was able to list only a handful of books published over his name.Ferguson knew only his own copy and a second in the Mitchell Library. Ferguson noted that the Reverend Carmichael was the superintendent and Lang the secretary of the College, and that his copy was liberally annotated by Carmichael, "who attacks Dr. Lang with great asperity.".Ferguson, 1508.

      [Bookseller: Hordern House Rare Books]
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        Comic Magazine Vol I [DATED 1832]

      James Gilbert, U.K, 1832. First Edition. Hardcover (Half Leather). Good/No Jacket. xvi, 272 pages, size 6.25 inches tall by 3.75 inches. Profusely illustrated with humourous line drawings. Edited by 'the Editor of 'Figaro in London' namely Gilbert á Beckett and illustrated by Robert Seymour who later produced the first illustrations for Dickens' 'Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club' Tragically Seymour committed suicide in 1836. CONTENTS : John Smith-A Ballad; Philosophy; Change of Hair; Dropping In-A n-iceTale; Remonstrance-To a Person Driving Fast; A Rake's Lament-By the Editor of " Figaro in London."; Laconics; Sonnet; The Printer's Devil's Walk; On Intemperance-By the Editor of " Figaro in London."; Sonnet; The Interrupted Dinner Story; A Passage from the Life of an Illustrious Character, by the London Lazzarone; The Eve of the Bridal, by an " Advertiser for a Wife; The Old Shepherd Menalcus to the God Pan, by the Author of " Absurdities."; The Sad Lot of Romeo and Juliet-By John Poole, Esq. Author of " Paul Pry."; Street Cries, a Dramatic Sketch-By R. B. Peake, Esq. with an Illustration by himself; Lines to John Jones, the Poetical Footman-By the Editor of " Figaro in London."; A deaf Man; Sonnet by a Deaf Man; Lord Augustus-By the " Great Unmentionable."; An S,A.; Sophorisba's Song; The Blister-By John Poole, Esq. Author of " Paul Pry."; The disadvantages of Knowledge, or the Dictionary at Fault-By W. T. Moncrieff, Esq.; John Tims, A Ballad-By the Editor of " Figaro in London.".; The Lament of an Old Tinder Box-By the Author of " Absurdities."; Just of Age, A parody on " Had I a Heart, &c."-By Bertie Vyse, Esq; The Adventures of a Hawker-By tlie " Great Unmentionable."; To my Fair One-By the " Great Unmentionable."; A Punster's Narrative; Woes of Change, or the Lachrymatory Laments of Laudator Temporis (et Rerum) Acti-By Thomas Dibdin, Esq; Something-By one of the Authors of " Dramatic Stories."; Valedictory Stanzas, by the " Great Unmentionable."; Horrors of the Country-By the Editor of " Figaro in London."; A Grate Party, or Fire-side Frolics-By W. T. Moncrieff, Esq; A Black Fast-Impromptu-By Miss L. Sheridan, Editor of " The Comic Offering."; He-artful Complaints-By the "Great Unmentionable."; The Comet-By Thomas Dibdin, Esq.; Rejected Addresses; Epitaphs-By Thomas Dibdin, Esq.; The Man of Feeling. Book - in Good half leather and marble papered covered boards - rubbing and worn to the leather and surface abrasion to the marbled paper, paper title label to spine. Contents, scattered browning and marking otherwise clean and though a couple of gathers are 'proud' the binding is tight, previous owner's (Lt General Loveday) bookplate, to the front pastedown. A rare and interesting copy of this collection of illustrated humerous often satirical proses & poems. Quantity Available: 1. Shipped Weight: 201-750 grams. Category: Antiquarian & Rare; Fiction Classic & Modern; Humour; Art & Design. Inventory No: 003554..

      [Bookseller: John T. & Pearl Lewis]
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        Common Pheasant

      London: The Birds of Europe., 1832-37.. Lithograph. Original colour. Fine condition Size: 34 x 47 cm. (13½ x 18½ inches). Mounted size 57 x 69cm. The Birds of Europe is the first of Gould's works to feature plates by Edward Lear. The greater number were drawn and lithographed by Elizabeth Gould, but a quarter of them were drawn and lithographed by Lear. All the plates were coloured under the direction of My Bayfield. Finally the printing was done by C. Hullmandel (Copenhagen/Anker). Engraved by LEAR, Edward.

      [Bookseller: Peter Harrington]
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        Pompeiana. Topography, Edifices and Ornaments of Pompeii, the results of excavations since 1819

      Jennings and Chapman, London 1832 - FIRST EXPANDED EDITION. The one volume edition of 1817-19 was written by John P. Gandy and illustrated by Gell. Excavations continued throughout the 1820s. The 1832 edition was written by Gell himself and covers the recent excavations. Imperial octavo. Two volumes. (17x26.5cm) Contemporary silken green cloth with gilt labels to spine. Complete with 87 full page plates. With an additional 30 vignettes tipped on india. Untrimmed. Minor foxing to preliminaries; an excellent set in an attractive early binding [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: CollectorsFolio]
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        Pompeiana: The Topography, Edifices and Ornaments of Pompeii, the Result of Excavations Since 1819. In two volumes

      n two volumes, 1832 Book. Very Good. Hardcover. A set of Gell's influentialstudy of Pompeii based on excavations, illustrated with lovely engravings. Featuring tissue-guarded engraved frontispieces. Volume I features an additional engraved titlepage. All of the 88 plates listed are present, two of which are handcoloured. Complete in two volumes. With the armorial bookplates of Sir William H. Cooper to the front pastedowns. With bookseller's labels for W. Seymour,Twickenham,to the front pastedowns. Sir William Gell (17771836), was a classical archaeologist and traveller. His Pompeiana (2 vols. , 181719) was the first account of Pompei in English. J. P. Gandy (later J. P. Deering) helped to prepare the work, which ran to several editions. Gell had obtained from the government special facilities for visiting the excavations, and made very numerous sketches (reproduced in the volumes) of objects which he declared would otherwise have perished unrecorded. DNB. Condition: In half morocco bindings with marbled boards. Externally, sound with slight rubbing. Front joint of Volume I starting. Internally, firmly bound. Some scattered foxing prominent to the plates. Overall: GOOD..

      [Bookseller: Rooke Books]
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        Cary's Travelling Map of Ireland; exhibiting the Whole of the Post Roads, Rivers, Canals, with the Distance from Town to Town

      London: G. and J. Cary. 1832. Map. Fine. 1832. Folding map, 20 panels, laid down on linen, with original slipcase. Hand colored. Map measures 25.5 x 30 inches (approx. 65 x 76 cm.). Fine, bright map. Faintest soil to edges. No tearing; light soil to blank side does not show through. The hardcover slipcase is in Very Good condition and shows some tearing and wear along the edges, but is still quite strong and sturdy; owner's signature on one side. A scarce, beautiful map. Digital images available upon request.

      [Bookseller: Caliban Books ABAA-ILAB]
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        Histoire chimique de la méconine (précieux exemplaire de Chevreul).

      s.n., s. l. 1832 - Tiré à part avec nouvelle pagination Extrait des Annales de Chimie et de Physique, Août 1832. Précieux exemplaire avec envoi de l'auteur "A M. Chevreul membre de l'Institut"; comporte également un "Errata." de la main de l'auteur en dernière page. In-8 de 24 p., couv. souple marbrée, étiquette de titre apposée sur la première couverture, petit déchirure marginale sans manque feuillet 21-22.-- Cet envoi à Chevreul est d'autant plus significatif que celui-ci fut concerné, comme en témoigne le rapport qu'il fit, à la séance de l'Académie du 10 décembre, sur l'"Histoire chimique de la méconine, par M. Couerbe", à la suite duquel l'Académie ordonna l'impression de ce mémoire dans le Recueil des savans étrangers. Couerbe compte parmi les principaux contributeurs à l'analyse de l'opium, avec Alston, Buchner, Schwartz, Lavoisier, Dubuc, Derosnes, Sertuernr, Seguin, Robiquet, Pelletier, Caventou, Aubergier, Orfila, etc. (cf. Revue scientifique, 4e trim. 1832: Académie des On connait par ailleurs son démêler avec Orfila (arsenic). -- [Attributes: First Edition; Soft Cover]

      [Bookseller: LA 42EME LIGNE - LIBRAIRIE-GALERIE]
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        Observations on Our Indian Administration, Civil and Military.

      Smith Elder and Co. London 8vo 1832 - pp. (viii), 118, (ii) Advertisements. Original grey, printed wrappers, entirely uncut, faint string-mark at the fore-edge, slight wear to the backstrip, else an exceptional copy of a very scarce title. *COPAC - no copy; but 4 locations on WORLDCAT : Universities of Edinburgh, Glasgow, St. Andrews and SOAS. PREFACE : I have endeavoured to preserve my mind uninfluenced by personal views. Whatever they may be, I am frigidly indifferent as to the effect this work may have in facilitating, or retarding them.'. POLITICAL : '.it is clear, that colonization, under limited restrictions, should be admitted, and unless this necessary step be taken, our footing in India must continue infirm, and exposed to every commotion which may agitate the public mind.' MILITARY : 'It is not difficult to discover, that the present exalted situation of our Indian possessions has much less to hope than to fear from the chance of arms; that in the prosecution of remote wars, the undertaking gradually becomes more difficult, the event more doubtful, the possession more precarious and less beneficial.' At the time of writing, JAMES CAULFIELD [1782-1852], was Lieutenant-Colonel in the Bengal Army; he became a Director of the East-India Company in 1848, until 1851. [Attributes: Soft Cover]

      [Bookseller: Patrick Pollak Rare Books ABA ILAB]
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        Tombleson's Views of the Rhine

      London - W. Tombleson and Comp., 1832 Book. Very Good. Hardcover. First edition. Views of the Rhine byWilliam Tombleson (1795 -c1846) an English topographical and architecture artist, illustrator, copper and steel engraver, writer and printmaker. Edited by William Gray Fearnside. With a foldout Panoramic Map of the Rhine. First edition. The first volume of two. In the 1830s, Tombleson's topographical drawings of the upper and middle River Rhine in Germany, and of the rivers Thames and Medway in England were published as engraved prints and book). For volumeone of Views of the Rhine he provided 69 illustrations - the book was also published in French and German editions. Engravers who worked on Tombleson's drawings included Thomas Clark, John Cleghorn, T. Cox, R. Harris, W. Hood, J. Howe, W. Lacey, O. Smith, Shenfield, J. Stokes, D. Thompson, W. Tombleson, W. Watts, R. Wilson, H. Winkles and others. Condition: In a contemporary calf binding. Externally, sound but with some wear to extremities, rubbing and marks to boards. Joint starting slightly and slight loss to head of spine. Internally, generally firmly bound. Bright but with slightscattered foxing and handling marks and an ink stain to text block edge to rear. Map has closed tears. Overall: GOOD.

      [Bookseller: Rooke Books]
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        Asia for the Elucidation of the Abbe Gaultier's Geographical Games

      London,: John Harris, 1832.. Engraved map, 345 x 432 mm. (image size), original hand-colouring; mounted. An attractive children's educational map of Australia, Asia and the east coast of Africa.The map is based on the work of the AbbÈ Gaultier, an educationalist originally from Piedmont, who had settled in France in 1780 and later fled the revolution to London. Gaultier began publishing his works in the late eighteenth century, and his philosophy of teaching geographical knowledge through games was an influence on game-makers and educational publishers both on the continent and in England. He died in 1818 but his Geography continued to be reprinted. In 1815 it was "collated with the author's last Paris edition by Jehoshaphat Aspin", a cartographer (see Juliana Bayfield, 'Games of Virtue and Learning', The La Trobe Journal, 1997). Aspin seems to have produced the first edition of this work in 1821.Aspin's versions of the maps evidently had some success as an entertainment and teaching aid. They were originally issued as a portfolio or atlas, which included maps of many different parts of the world, some blank, as here, and others with geographical information added. Although bibliographical information is a little sketchy, similar English editions appear to have been published in 1821, 1823, 1829 and 1838. This particular map seems to derive from the "fourth" edition, the Atlas adapted to the Abbe? Gaultier's Geographical Games of 1838, in which some maps were dated as early as 1832.All editions of the full atlas are now very scarce, with the 1838 edition being the only one recorded in Australia, at the National Library of Australia. The National Library also has a copy of this individual map dated 1823, but otherwise identical to this one.Tooley, 132 (1823 issue).

      [Bookseller: Hordern House Rare Books]
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        TALES OF MY LANDLORD, Fourth and Last Series

      1832. In Four Volumes. Edinburgh: Printed for Robert Cadell / London: Whittaker and Co., 1832. Original grey-green cloth with spine labels. First Edition of the last of the Waverley Novels -- actually comprising two separate novels, "Count Robert of Paris" (2-1/2 volumes) and "Castle Dangerous" (1-1/2 volumes). This set is in the original morocco-grain grey-green cloth with spine labels; we have had another set in drab paper-covered boards with spine labels, which included a Longman Rees ad catalogue.~This set is complete, with the errata slips in the first two volumes; as specified in Todd & Bowden, the first volume has a half-title, while the other three volumes have a half-title, a series title, and a fly-title for the individual story (in addition, of course, to a title page itself). Condition is remarkably near-fine: the labels are a bit browned and have minor wear, but the cloth bindings themselves have very little wear other than slight rubbing. Most remarkable, most of the leaves remain unopened, after a full 175 years of existence. Todd & Bowden 253A; Worthington 23. Housed in two morocco-backed slipcases with felt-lined chemises.~Each volume bears three bookplates -- the small leather one of noted book collector John Stuart Groves, plus (earlier) that of Howard Pyle and that of Jean Hersholt (one of them signed by Hersholt). Howard Pyle (1853-1911) was the famous American illustrator and writer, primarily for young audiences, one of the founders of the Brandywine school of art, and perhaps best known for his Robin Hood tales. Jean Hersholt (1886-1956) was the great Danish-born actor, perhaps best remembered as Heidi's grandfather, who rose to become President of the Motion Picture Academy (and in whose name the Hersholt Humitarian Award is now given). Quite a provenance -- and amazing condition for the original bindings.

      [Bookseller: Sumner & Stillman]
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        [DOCUMENTS, PRINTS, AND PHOTOGRAPHS RELATING TO THE ASCENT OF THE MOUNTAIN PIETER BOTH IN MAURITIUS, INCLUDING SEVERAL MAURITIUS IMPRINTS]

      [1832-1865].. Three items. Autograph manuscript: 17pp., 800 words, quarto, sewn in brown paper wrappers. Two uncolored lithographic plates (19 1/2 x 12 1/2 inches) with accompanying folio broadsheet. Printed book: 15pp. plus six mounted photographs, 12mo., half brown morocco gilt with marbled boards, small tear in lower cover, inscription, with accompanying leaf from THE ILLUSTRATED LONDON NEWS, Feb. 4, 1865. All contained in a large folio brown cloth folding case. A noteworthy collection of items documenting and illustrating attempts to climb Pieter Both, an unusually shaped mountain located near Port-Louis in Mauritius. Included are several interesting and quite rare Mauritius imprints. The earliest item is an autograph manuscript by Lieut. Arthur Taylor, "Account of the Ascent of the Peter Both Mountain, Mauritius, on the 7th of September 1832." Written in letter format, it details Taylor's climb, the first British expedition to successfully reach the top (a French group led by Claude Peuthé is thought to have scaled the peak in 1790). The party, which had suffered an unsuccessful attempt the previous year, included Taylor, Capt. Lloyd, Lieut. Phillpots, and The Hon. Thomas Keppel. Taylor's account, which includes a small sketch of the "head" of the mountain, lists previous attempts, doubting the veracity of the French attempt in 1790, and recounts the difficulty of the climb, particularly a long sheer cliff face passable only by a narrow ledge. When the summit was reached in the afternoon, the party celebrated with a bottle of wine and spent the night on the mountain with brandy and cigars. Next are two lithographic plates, titled in both French and English. The first is "View of Peterbot, from the Moka side," and the second is "Ascent on the peak of Peterbot on the 24st May 1848." They were drawn by Lieut. Swinny in situ, and lithographed by V. Devreaux in Port Louis. Accompanying the plates is a broadsheet, ASCENT OF PETERBOT, ISLAND OF MAURITIUS, printed in Port Louis on the June 15, 1848, which recounts the second successful ascent of the mountain by an English party led by Swinny, sixteen years after Taylor. TOUSSAINT A617. The third item is a printed book titled THE ASCENT OF PIETERBOTH MOUNTAIN and published in Mauritius by E. Dupuy and P. Dubois (undated and without author). The book contains the first photographic record of a Peterboth climb, shot during an expedition by Capt. Johnston and Mr. Symons of the 2/24th Regiment and others. Although accompanied by Mr. B. Greene "who had with him a camera and everything requisite to take photographic views," the weather did not permit him to do so. The photographs were taken a few days later by Mr. G. Burgman, who was able to ascend the mountain on a fine day. The photographs include the "head" of the mountain, the ascent of the "Ladder Rock," and a view of Port Louis. The inscription present on the front pastedown testifies to the difficulty of the climb: "I tried to climb the Pieterboth in 1865 with a party from the troop ship Tam[ar]. Owing to a heavy fog when near the top the ascent failed. P.H. Leith 11th regiment." TOUSSAINT A783. Accompanying this item is a leaf from the newspaper, THE ILLUSTRATED LONDON NEWS of Feb. 4, 1865. It includes the text of this item as an article titled the "Ascent of the Peter Botte Mountain, in the Mauritius," and three wood engravings based on Burgman's photographs. A splendid collection that features several rare Mauritius imprints and pays tribute to the indomitable spirit of mountain climbing. TOUSSAINT A617, A783.

      [Bookseller: William Reese Company - Americana]
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        Resa genom Umeå Lappmarker i Vesterbottens Län,

      - förrättad år 1832. Örebro, N.M. Lindh, 1833. 8:o. XVIII,398 s. + 3 litografier varav 2 utvikbara kartor. Samtida halvklotband. Något skadad vid ryggens huvud. 3 cm bortklippt av främre försättsblads överkant. 21 x 13 cm.[#36352]

      [Bookseller: Antiquaria Bok & Bildantikvariat AB]
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        England And France Or A Cure For The Ministerial Gallomania

      John Murray, 1832. FIRST EDITION 1832. Published by John Murray. Extremely rare early title. Lovely clean tight book. Bookplate on front pastedown, small stamp on endpapers. Slight spotting on preliminary pages. Original patterned boards with leather five band spine. Gilt lettering. Some rubbing to spine. Lovely condition. . First Edition. Half-Leather. Good.

      [Bookseller: Hibernia Books]
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        Thomas Scott THE HOLY BIBLE Stereotype Edition, Six Volume Set

      Samuel T. Armstrong, 1832. Later. Hardcover Hardcover. Good. Scott, Thomas. The Holy Bible, Containing the Old and New Testaments, According to the Authorized Version; with Explanatory Notes, Practical Observations, and Copious Marginal References, Six Volume Set. Stereotype Edition, From the Fifth London Edition, with the Author's Last Corrections and Improvements. Samuel T. Armstrong, 1832. The COMPLETE and very scarce set! Each book in original calf leather binding. Moderate bumping and rubbing. Interior foxing throughout. Overall in good condition.

      [Bookseller: Yeomans in the Fork]
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        The Spectator: A Weekly Review of Politics, Literature, Theology and Art. vols. 5-15

      London:, 1832-1842. volumes 5 to 15, an uninterrupted run, very large and thick folios, 1/4 leaqther, ex library, overall very good,. Photos available upon request.

      [Bookseller: Zubal Books]
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        Andrew Jackson Autograph Document Signed

      0001-01-01 00:00:00. Unknown Unknown. Very Good. Land Grant Issued to Brigadier General Peter Muhlenberg Washington, D.C. March 1, 1832. One sheet, 12 x 14 1/2 inches, writing on both sides. Handsomely displayed in custom frame. Land grant in excess of 10,000 acres of land being awarded to several in exchange for the military service of Brigadier General Peter Muhlenberg. Muhlenberg, namesake of Muhlenberg County, KY and a personal friend of George Washington, commanded Lafayette's Light Division at the Battle of Yorktown. In addition he saw action at Valley Forge, Brandywine and Monmouth. Counter-Signed by Elijah Hayward. Seal intact. Slight wear at folds. Very good condition.

      [Bookseller: Yeomans in the Fork]
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        Mitchell's Traveller's Guide through the United States. A Map of the Roads, Distances, Steam Boats & Canal Routes &c

      Philadelphia.: S. Augustus Mitchell.. 1832.. Map, handcolored, 17 x 21 1/2 on sheet 17 1/2 x 21 3/4 inches, folding as issued into gilt decorative black leather covered boards 5 1/2 x 3 1/2 inches. Cover worn, head of spine chipped, inner hinge split, previous owner's name and date of 1832 plus other pen marking on front pastedown; archivally repaired splits at several map folds, but overall the map is in very bright, crisp condition. There is no "single separate folded sheet" as described in the David Rumsey record for this map (there is paper residue to the front endpaper and this may have been where the folded sheet was tipped in). This is the first edition of this important map in the settlement of the United States. The map extends west to the Missouri Territory with nine map insets. .

      [Bookseller: oldimprints.com]
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        Domestic Manners of the Americans

      London: Whittaker, Treacher, and Co., 1832. First edition. Hardcover. Very Good/very good. A Fine copy of the first edition, first printing, finely bound by Bayntun-Riviere of Bath in three-quarters blue leather with elegantly marbled boards and endpapers, with the pages trimmed and their top edge gilted. Frances Trollope's report on American manners. Of course, Frances Trollope was Anthony Trollope's mother. Her husband, his father, was a lawyer whose law practice suffered from Trollope's habit of yelling at his Clients. Ultimately, the father took up farming, at which he also was a miserable failure. In 1827, Frances moved to America, living first in Fanny Wright's utopian community in Tennessee and, when that community failed, removing to Cincinnati, a frontier town at the time, to open a general store. As Frances Trollope had no experience in that line of work, the store was a miserable failure as well, adding to the family's financial stress. However, after her return to England, the indomitable Mrs. Trollope, having observed the cultural peculiarities of the Americans first-hand, wrote "Domestic Manners of the Americans", in which she presented a caustic view of the Americans, portraying them as uneducated and lacking in proper manners, and describing America's appalling middle-class egalitarianism. Acerbic and witty, the book was an instant sensation in England -- with multiple editions of the work being issued during its first year of publication -- and brought her from the brink of financial ruin to prosperity and fame. Of course, the book was not well received in America and of it Mark Twain said "Mrs. Trollope was so handsomely cursed and reviled by this nation [for] telling the truth... she was painting a state of things which did not change at once. ... I remember it." The book is illustrated with 24 lithographs by August Hervieu who accompanied Mrs. Trollope to America, a fact which resulted in much speculation about their relationship. Frances Trollope went on to further literary success and fame by authoring numerous well-received novels. Without doubt her experiences shaped her the careers of her two most literary sons, Thomas Adolphus Trollope, and the more famous Anthony Trollope. A Fine copy, elegantly bound. (Please also see our listing for a RARE print published by Childs & Inman in Philadelphia in response to Frances Trollope's Domestic Manners of the Americans mocking Mrs. Trollope and containing a visual speculation about her relationship with August Hervieu.)

      [Bookseller: Allington Antiquarian Books, LLC]
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        The Cambrian Quarterly Magazine and Celtic Repertory Volume IV

      London, Chester, Caermathen: H Hughes, 1832 In worn black leather covers with gilt tooling at edges, corners and edges a little bumped and worn. Spine has gilt tooling, edges and joints worn and bumped, title in gilt to maroon leather label. Internally, marbled endpapers, ink name (Geo P Davies 1843) to fep, some light foxing and browning, [4]. 560 pp, printed by Adlard, Bartholomew Close. Articles on Church Listings in Anglesea, Review of New Books - The Celtic Annals - Clerical Legacy, Sir SR Meyrick on Irish Mythology, Letter from an Amateur Gipsy, Adventures of a Welsh Medical Student, Tithe Commutation and many more. Originally published in 5 volumes between 1829 and 1833. Superb! Very Scarce and Important! (Allibone 1272)

      [Bookseller: Madoc Books]
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        Goldfinch - Carduelis elegans

      London 1832 - ***If you frame up this item with Arader Galleries you can take a 50% discount off the listed price of this work of art.*** This splendid hand-colored, folio size lithograph from John Gould's (1804-1881)monumental work "Birds of Europe" is in excellent condition, measures 14 ½” x 21 ½” and magnificently displays the author's scientific skill and attention to detail. John Gould was without question the most prolific natural history artist of the nineteenth century. He worked during a period of intense fascination with discoveries in natural history, especially regarding knowledge of the wildlife of exotic lands. Gould shared the romantic enthusiasm of his time for such subjects, as well as the popular impulse to catalog exotic wildlife. He combined his passion for natural history with outstanding scientific, artistic, and entrepreneurial talents. Drawing on these abilities, he embarked on a series of projects that would eventually make him the leading publisher of ornithological illustrations in Victorian Britain. Gould’s unparalleled career spanned five decades, and he produced a monumental series of books of birds throughout the world. Gould planned the Birds of Europe in an effort to redress the imbalance between the study of local and foreign ornithology. In his preface he stated his mission: “the Birds of Europe, in which we are, or ought to be, most interested, have not received that degree of attention which they naturally demand. The present work has been undertaken to supply that deficiency.” Gould portrayed birds native to Europe in a manner that had only been thought appropriate for the colorful species of distant places. In this way he managed to draw much popular interest back to native birds, which were suddenly considered equally beautiful to exotic species. Rich, vibrant color is an important attribute of the best 19th Century prints. Many prints by John Gould found on the market today have modern color that affects both the appearance and the value of these great works. John Gould died in 1881 still actively illustrating and producing fine bird books. His stock of unsold copies, unbound text and plates in various states, lithographic stones, drawings and paintings, amounted to nearly three tons. Many of the uncolored pulls from his monumental "Birds of Europe" have been recolored in the last thirty years, and these are often found on the market. Fortunately, the difference between original and modern color can be discerned by looking carefully at the print. When modern color is applied to 180 year old paper, the application is inconsistent; the cellulose of the aged paper has begun to breakdown and can no longer evenly absorb the watercolors, resulting in a splotchy uneven appearance All of the Gould bird prints in Arader Galleries' inventory have exquisite original color. The vastly superior quality of original color can be clearly differentiated from new color by its smooth and even appearance. The inks have noticeably deeper, richer tones. The difference can also be seen in the lovely surface "sheen" that results from the application of gum arabic when the lithograph was first pulled. The hand coloring of engravings and lithographs reached its zenith in the 19th Century. Works that still display their original color are more rewarding to view, and will better hold their value in the years to come.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
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        [St. Leger The Start] Doncaster Races. To the Noblemen and Gentlemen of the Turf, and the Subscribers this print representing the Horses starting for the Great St. Ledger [sic.] Stakes, is most respectfully dedicated by their obedient and most obliged Servants, S. and J. Fuller

      London: S. & J. Fuller, '1 June 1832' [but watermarked '1864']. Aquatint, printed in colours and finished by hand, by R.W. Smart and C. Hunt. 13 3/4 x 24 3/4 inches. A fine image capturing the excitement of the moment before the pistol is fired to start the St. Leger. "..the Horses starting for the Great St Leger..." is a pair with (#18679) "..passing the Judges' stand.." also by the great James Pollard The St Leger, known world wide as the oldest classic turf race, was first entitled 'A sweepstake of 25 guineas' and was not given its present name until 3 years later. It was first run on 25 September 1776, as a sweepstake of 2 miles on Cantley Common in Doncaster. (Colts to carry 8 stone and fillies 7 stone 12 pounds). The first race was won by Allabaculia, a brown filly, owned by the Marquess of Rockingham. The second horse past the post was owned by a military gentleman, Lt Colonel Anthony St Leger, of Park Hill estate, near Firbeck, 9 miles from Doncaster. There is some controversy over the naming of the St Leger, some claim it occurred over a meal at The Red Lion in the Market place, others claim it was at the Salutation on South Parade, others at Warmsworth Hall or at Wentworth Woodhouse, the seat of the Marquess of Rotherham. When it was suggested that it should be called the Rockingham Stakes, the Marquess is said to have replied, ' No it was my friend St Leger who suggested the thing to me - call it after him.' The first official St Leger, was won by Hollandaise ridden by George Herring and owned by Sir Thomas Gascoigne. James Pollard was the youngest son of the London engraver and print-seller Robert Pollard. He began work at the age of fifteen as a painter but quickly turned to engraving as well. In the 1820s his coaching scenes became both fashionable and lucrative. "A stream of coaching paintings followed, many of which he engraved himself. From 1821 he exhibited a small number of pictures at the Royal Academy and the British Institution which brought him more patrons. Between 1830 and 1840, Pollard also painted a number of racing pictures and some of the earliest scenes of steeplechasing on purpose-made courses, many recording the prowess of the few professional and more amateur riders of the day... [In all his work Pollard took great pains over accuracy, this is particularly true of his large scale works and] it is Pollard's large racing scenes which really take off and into which one can gaze and discover a microcosm of the turf" (Charles Lane British Racing Prints p.146) Lane British Racing Prints p.149; Selway James Pollard p.45; Siltzer p.221

      [Bookseller: Donald Heald Rare Books]
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        LA MIMICA DEGLI ANTICHI INVESTIGATA NEL GESTIRE NAPOLETANO bound with GUIDA DI POMPEI CON APPENDICI bound with Plan de Pompei de M. le Chanoine D. André de Jorio

      Napoli: Dalla Stamperia E Carthiera Del Fibreno, 1832. Two Jorio works bound together with additional hand-coloured plan: Mimica Degli Antichi - pp. [2] xxxvi, 380, [4] + 21 plates (16 sepia aquatints and 5 engraved). Guida di Pompei - pp.176 + 8 numbered plates on 7 sheets of which 3 are folding. Inserted into a pocket in the front board is the large fine hand-coloured engraved plan dated 1838 (Plan de Pompei de M. le Chanoine D. André de Jorio), folding and mounted onto linen. Contemporary binding of half calf over marbled boards, good and strong with a little general wear and some rubbing, front joint expertly and inconspicuously rejointed, title label chipped to edges, corners a little more worn with boards showing through. Contents good and tight, a little general reading wear, title pages lightly dust marked/foxed, slight spotting; plates very good, title lettering to two aquatint plates trimmed; colour folded plan very good and bright, no tears. A very good copy.. First Edition. Hard Cover. Very Good. 8vo.

      [Bookseller: Loe Books]
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        Deutschlands Einheit durch Nationalrepräsentation

      Stuttgart, Schweizerbarth 1832. 21 cm. 8, 333, (3) Seiten Festeinband, Halbledereinband der Zeit - ADB 32, 752 - Erstausgabe des bekannten Liberalen. Sein unter vollem Namen erschienenes Hauptwerk aus dieser Zeit, Rotteck und Welcker gewidmet, wurde nur in Preußen und Württemberg verboten, diente jedoch im nachfolgenden Prozess gegen ihn als Beweismittel. Leicht berieben, stellenweise stockfleckig -

      [Bookseller: Wenner Antiquariat]
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        PROBEN Aus der Schriftschneiderei Schrift- und Metall-Buchstaben-Giesserei.,

      Frankfurt, 1832. - 6 3/4 x 8. (83) pages plus fold-out price list (dated 1831); printed one side only. Original decorated wraps, cloth spine. A little wear and soiling, two pieces of tape around spine, text block separated at p. 43, one leaf with a tear. Very good, in cloth covered tray case. An elegant specimen, especially for the period. It opens with a tipped in folding price list printed within a floral border in multiple colors. Following is a nice range of roman and italic faces, frakturs, Egyptians, plus Greek and Hebrew. There are 30 pages of decorative material (a few on pink, blue or green paper and two printed in blue). The last page of decorative material shows five multi-colored mosaic-patterned borders. An early use of colored printers' ornaments. The covers are printed with a geometric/mosaic pattern in brown, tan and green. Rare. OCLC locates only a copy in Amsterdam; HOLLIS notes a partial copy at Harvard. Bigmore & Wyman I p. 185. [Attributes: Soft Cover]

      [Bookseller: Veatchs Arts of the Book, ABAA]
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        Domestic Manners of the Americans

      London: Whittaker, Treacher, and Co., 1832. First edition. Hardcover. Very Good/very good. A Fine copy of the first edition, first printing, finely bound by Bayntun-Riviere of Bath in three-quarters blue leather with elegantly marbled boards and endpapers, with the pages trimmed and their top edge gilted. Frances Trollope's report on American manners. Of course, Frances Trollope was Anthony Trollope's mother. Her husband, his father, was a lawyer whose law practice suffered from Trollope's habit of yelling at his Clients. Ultimately, the father took up farming, at which he also was a miserable failure. In 1827, Frances moved to America, living first in Fanny Wright's utopian community in Tennessee and, when that community failed, removing to Cincinnati, a frontier town at the time, to open a general store. As Frances Trollope had no experience in that line of work, the store was a miserable failure as well, adding to the family's financial stress. However, after her return to England, the indomitable Mrs. Trollope, having observed the cultural peculiarities of the Americans first-hand, wrote "Domestic Manners of the Americans", in which she presented a caustic view of the Americans, portraying them as uneducated and lacking in proper manners, and describing America's appalling middle-class egalitarianism. Acerbic and witty, the book was an instant sensation in England -- with multiple editions of the work being issued during its first year of publication -- and brought her from the brink of financial ruin to prosperity and fame. Of course, the book was not well received in America and of it Mark Twain said "Mrs. Trollope was so handsomely cursed and reviled by this nation [for] telling the truth... she was painting a state of things which did not change at once. ... I remember it." The book is illustrated with 24 lithographs by August Hervieu who accompanied Mrs. Trollope to America, a fact which resulted in much speculation about their relationship. Frances Trollope went on to further literary success and fame by authoring numerous well-received novels. Without doubt her experiences shaped her the careers of her two most literary sons, Thomas Adolphus Trollope, and the more famous Anthony Trollope. A Fine copy, elegantly bound. (Please also see our listing for a RARE print published by Childs & Inman in Philadelphia in response to Frances Trollope's Domestic Manners of the Americans mocking Mrs. Trollope and containing a visual speculation about her relationship with August Hervieu.)

      [Bookseller: Allington Antiquarian Books, LLC]
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        [TWO PRINTED LAND GRANT DOCUMENTS, COMPLETED IN MANUSCRIPT, FOR A FORTY-ACRE PLOT IN CHEROKEE COUNTY]

      [Cherokee County, Ga.]. 1832, 1835.. Two sheets, approximately 10 x 8 inches, attached at bottom with ribbon and wax seal. Old folds. First sheet separating at folds. Second sheet separated at folds; top half in several pieces, bottom half still attached to first sheet. Light soiling from wax seal. About good. A pair of documents concerning a land grant for forty acres of land in Cherokee County, Georgia, surveyed in 1832 and granted in 1835, based on the Land Lottery of 1832. The first document grants forty acres of land in Cherokee County to Sarah Dubose, widow, from Burke County. The land, situated in the fourteenth district of the first section, was surveyed May 31, 1832, and the plot is mapped out at the top of the sheet. It is signed by Willim W. Carnes, Comptroller General, and Thomas Haynes, Treasurer, on either side of the map. The second document, dated Sept. 19, 1835, affirms the grant as according to the "Act to lay out the gold region on the lands at present in the occupancy of the Cherokee Indians, into small lots, and dispose of the same by separate lottery," passed on Dec. 24, 1831. The whole is signed on the front below the ribbon with the signature of Wilson Lumpkin, governor. Georgia used a lottery system to distribute land taken from the Cherokee and Creek Indians. The lot sizes varied, with the largest being up to 490 acres and the smallest being 40 acre lots distributed during the Gold Lottery of 1832. An act passed by the Georgia General Assembly on Dec. 24, 1831, authorized approximately one third of the 160-acre land districts previously set aside for the sixth lottery to be designated as gold districts and divided into 40-acre lots, to be distributed in a separate lottery. This separate lottery was the seventh land lottery, known as the Gold Lottery of 1832. The Cherokees went to court to prevent distribution of lands which they claimed belonged to them, and won the case (Worcester v. Georgia), but Andrew Jackson ignored the decision in his zeal for Indian relocation. Sarah Dubose was the widow of a Revolutionary War soldier who received several plots of land during the lottery.

      [Bookseller: William Reese Company - Americana]
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        Kormaks Saga sive Kormaki Oegmundi filii vita. Ex manuscriptis leganti magnaeani cum interpretatione Latina, dispersis Kormaki carminibus ad Calcem adjectis et indicibus personarum, locorum ac vocum rariorum.

      Kopenhagen, H. H. Thiele, 1832. - Mit gest. Vignette am Vortitel. (4), XVI, 340, (2) SS. Mod. Lederband mit gepr. Rückentitel. 8vo. Erste Ausgabe der altisländischen Saga des 13. Jahrhunderts. Durchgehend im isländisch-lateinischen Paralleltext. Übersetzt und hrsg. von P. Gudmundsson. - Vorsatz mit Exlibris der Islandica-Sammlung Uwe Wolters. Papierbedingt vereinzelt unbedeutend braunfleckig. Fiske 326. Kindler XVIII, 917f. [Attributes: First Edition]

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat INLIBRIS Gilhofer Nfg. GmbH]
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        [MANUSCRIPT MUSTER ROLL OF THE "MIXED BAND OF SENECA & SHAWNEE INDIANS OF LEWISTOWN, OHIO," SIGNED BY JAMES McPHERSON]

      Lewistown, Ohio. Aug. 13, 1832.. [3]pp. manuscript text. Oblong folio sheet, folded. Some minor staining, slight gnawing at top and bottom of center fold, else quite good. In a half morocco box. The Lewistown Indians ceded their lands and agreed on removal west of the Mississippi in the treaty of 1831. This agreement gave some of their lands to McPherson, "in consideration of the sincere attachment of the said chiefs and their people for [him], who has lived among them...for forty years." McPherson signs the present manuscript document, certifying "that the within Roll of Shawnees and Senecas of Lewis Town is entitled to rations." The document lists thirty-six names of heads of Indian families, with numbers of males and females in each family noted as well.

      [Bookseller: William Reese Company - Americana]
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        Raccolta di Aringhe Penali. 5 Vols

      1832. Lauria, Francesco [1769-1818]. Raccolta di Aringhe Penali. Naples: Stabilimento Letterario-Tipografico dell'Ateneo, 1832. Five volumes. Volume I has portrait frontispiece. Octavo (7-1/2" x 4-3/4"). Contemporary quarter calf over marbled boards, gilt titles and fillets to spines. Light rubbing to extremities, corners lightly bumped. A few contemporary annotations to the title page of Volume I, interiors otherwise clean. * Only edition. A title in the series Opere Diverse di Francesco Lauria. With a biography of the author, a distinguished professor at the University of Naples. This is a collection of forensic orations and writings on criminal and criminal cases. OCLC locates 1 copy in North America (At UC-Berkeley Law School).

      [Bookseller: The Lawbook Exchange, Ltd.]
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        Notes on the Law and Practice, ... Applications Against Debtors

      1832. Barclay, Hugh [1799-1884]. Notes on the Law and Practice, Relative to Applications Against Debtors as in Meditatione Fugae. Edinburgh: Thomas Clark, 1832. xii, 117 pp. 12mo. (7" x 4"). Recent period-style quarter calf over marbled boards, raised bands and lettering piece to spine, endpapers renewed. Toning to text, light wear to edges of a few leaves, internally clean. * Only edition. "Meditatio Fugae is an old principle of Scots law that if a creditor could make an oath that his debtor was in meditatione fugae to avoid payment of his debt, he may apply to a magistrate who may grant warrant for apprehending the debtor for examination, and subsequently, grant warrant to imprison the debtor until he finds caution judicio sisti" (Walker). OCLC locates no copies in North America. Copies located at the Library of Congress and Harvard Law School. Walker, Oxford Companion to Law 832. Sweet & Maxwell, A Legal Bibliography of the British Commonwealth 5:9.

      [Bookseller: The Lawbook Exchange, Ltd.]
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        Nouveau Keepsake FranÁais. Souvenir de LittErature Contemporaine

      Paris: Louis Janet, n.d., ca. 1832. 12mo. 8 engraved plates. [viii], 331, [1] pp. Bound in publisher's peach paper-covered boards, blocked in gilt with a neo-classical border, decorated with red, blue, yellow and green paint, with hand-colored engravings of a stormy sea and peaceful harbor on the covers, spine gilt and painted, a.e.g., light wear to corners, in original gilt and painted paper slipcover. Carteret III, 336 . A charming gift book in its original publisher's binding with hand-colored engravings on the covers

      [Bookseller: James Cummins Bookseller]
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        Swift - Cypselus murarinus; White-bellied Swift - Cypselus alpinus

      London 1832 - ***If you frame up this item with Arader Galleries you can take a 50% discount off the listed price of this work of art.***This splendid hand-colored, folio size lithograph from John Gould's (1804-1881) monumental work "Birds of Europe" is in excellent condition, measures 14 ½” x 21 ½” and magnificently displays the author's scientific skill and attention to detail. John Gould was without question the most prolific natural history artist of the nineteenth century. He worked during a period of intense fascination with discoveries in natural history, especially regarding knowledge of the wildlife of exotic lands. Gould shared the romantic enthusiasm of his time for such subjects, as well as the popular impulse to catalog exotic wildlife. He combined his passion for natural history with outstanding scientific, artistic, and entrepreneurial talents. Drawing on these abilities, he embarked on a series of projects that would eventually make him the leading publisher of ornithological illustrations in Victorian Britain. Gould’s unparalleled career spanned five decades, and he produced a monumental series of books of birds throughout the world. Gould planned the Birds of Europe in an effort to redress the imbalance between the study of local and foreign ornithology. In his preface he stated his mission: “the Birds of Europe, in which we are, or ought to be, most interested, have not received that degree of attention which they naturally demand. The present work has been undertaken to supply that deficiency.” Gould portrayed birds native to Europe in a manner that had only been thought appropriate for the colorful species of distant places. In this way he managed to draw much popular interest back to native birds, which were suddenly considered equally beautiful to exotic species. Rich, vibrant color is an important attribute of the best 19th Century prints. Many prints by John Gould found on the market today have modern color that affects both the appearance and the value of these great works. John Gould died in 1881 still actively illustrating and producing fine bird books. His stock of unsold copies, unbound text and plates in various states, lithographic stones, drawings and paintings, amounted to nearly three tons. Many of the uncolored pulls from his monumental "Birds of Europe" have been recolored in the last thirty years, and these are often found on the market. Fortunately, the difference between original and modern color can be discerned by looking carefully at the print. When modern color is applied to 180 year old paper, the application is inconsistent; the cellulose of the aged paper has begun to breakdown and can no longer evenly absorb the watercolors, resulting in a splotchy uneven appearance All of the Gould bird prints in Arader Galleries' inventory have exquisite original color. The vastly superior quality of original color can be clearly differentiated from new color by its smooth and even appearance. The inks have noticeably deeper, richer tones. The difference can also be seen in the lovely surface "sheen" that results from the application of gum arabic when the lithograph was first pulled. The hand coloring of engravings and lithographs reached its zenith in the 19th Century. Works that still display their original color are more rewarding to view, and will better hold their value in the years to come.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
 35.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  


        Andrew Jackson Disdains Rewarding One Of His Political Enemies

      "He appears to have some interest of feeling in this case for his Georgia & friends and particularly as it is given...to such an open undisguised tra- & ducer of the administration as he says Mr. Longstreet is." & Jackson believed that changing officeholders & would prevent the development of a corrupt & bureaucracy. He implemented the theory of ro- & tation in office, declaring it "a leading principle & in the republican creed." In practice, this fine & theory involved rewarding Jackson's support- & ers and fellow party members with government & posts, as a way to strengthen party loyalty. This & system of firing opponents and filling their & places with party loyalists came to be known as & the "spoils system," and Jackson received the & reputation of being its initiator. & During Jackson's first term, there was a high & tariff on imports of manufactured goods made & in Europe. This made those goods more expensive than ones from the northern & U.S., raising the prices paid by planters in the South. Southern politicians argued & that high tariffs benefited northern industrialists at the expense of southern & farmers. South Carolina went so far as to claim the right to "nullify"Ñdeclare & voidÑthe tariff legislation, and more generally the right of a state to nullify any & Federal laws which went against its interests. Although Jackson sympathized & with the South in the tariff debate, he supported a strong union with effec- & tive powers for the central government and violently opposed nullification. He & vowed to send troops to South Carolina to enforce the laws, and in December & 1832 issued a resounding proclamation against the "nullifiers," stating that he & considered "the power to annul a law of the United States, assumed by one & state, incompatible with the existence of the Union." South Carolina, and by ex- & tension all nullifiers, the President declared, stood on "the brink of insurrection & and treason. In 1833, Congress passed a "force bill" which authorized Jackson to & use violence to preserve the Union. & Augustus Baldwin Longstreet was the publisher of the Augusta (Georgia) States & Rights Sentinel, a newspaper that advocated nullification in the recent crisis & and thus opposed Jackson's policies. The year after this letter, he would publish & what is considered the South's first important literary work, "Georgia Scenes, & Characters, Incidents, Etc. in the First Half Century." His brother Gilbert shared & his politics. These Longstreet brothers were uncles of Confederate General James & Longstreet - Lee's famed "war horse." Gilbert owned rights to the Augusta- & Savannah mail route and there were complaints that under his aegis, the mails & were not delivered often enough. The Georgia congressional delegation brought & these to the President's attention. & Perhaps spoils politics was also on Jackson's mind when he wrote the following & letter, which was ostensibly about bidding and the granting of other Georgia & postal routes. The William Barry mentioned was Jackson's Postmaster General. & John Forsythe, his Secretary of State, was a Georgian who, when South Carolina & nullified the federal tariff in 1832 and asked Georgia to follow persuaded his & fellow Georgians to support Jackson instead of its neighbor. & Autograph Letter Signed, Washington, November 8, 1834, to Charles K. Gard- & ner, acting postmaster responsible for postal appointments, criticizing the selec- & tion of political foe (and possibly inept) Longstreet for a government contract & instead of one of the President's supporters. "I am this moment advised that there & is great complaint of unfairness in the letting of the route in Georgia - from Augusta & to Savannah. The complaints came to me through a high source and is well calculated & to do the Department an injury, as it would seem to throw a suspicion that it was & done to the injury of our friends, to favor Mr. Longstreet a bitter enemy and constant & reviler of the administration. It is stated that Mr. Reesides proposed to carry the mail & for $10,000 per annum to run the one half the time on the South Carolina side & one & half on the Georgia side, and the Messrs. Holliday proposed to carry the mail on the & Georgia side for $8,500 and round by Waynesborough, ten miles round, for $8,800. & Mr. Reeside's proposal was accepted and as alleged transferred to Mr. Longstreet. It & is complained of because passing on the east on the South Carolina side of the river is & a useless route & costs the government $1,500 without any public benefit. If this ar- & rangement is not closed, let it be kept open for the return of Major Barry & I wish you & to see Major Forsythe on this subject - he appears to have some interest of feeling in this & case for his Georgia friends and particularly as it is given by Mr. Reesides to such an & open undisguised traducer of the administration as he says Mr. Longstreet is."

      [Bookseller: The Raab Collection]
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        PROCLAMATION BY ANDREW JACKSON, PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES. [Printed Broadside, text begins:] "Whereas, a Convention assembled in the State of South Carolina, have passed an Ordinance... [declaring "unauthorized by the Constitution" and therefore null and void, the acts of Congress imposing duties and imposts on the importation of foreign commodities] ... Done at the City of Washington, this 10th day of December, in the year of our Lord, one thousand eight hundred and thirty-two ... Andrew Jackson. By the President: Edward Livingston, Secretary of State."

      [Imprint at bottom:] New York: G.F. Hopkins & Sons, Printers and Stationers, 44 Nassau Street, [1832]. Folio (29-1/4 x 16-1/4 inches; 80 x 50 cm.). Broadside printed on silk in four columns within ornamental border. Some dampstaining. Framed and glazed. OCLC: 48877946; Not in American Imprints ( but cf. American Imprints 13105 [Washington, DC printing]; cf. Streeter Sale 1738 [idem] . One of the most important assertions of the supremacy of federal over state law in the early history of the nation, this is Jackson's famous proclamation in which he denounced nullification as treason and told the people of South Carolina in no uncertain terms that he proposed to enforce the laws of the United States. "- I consider then, the power to annul a law of the United States, assumed by one State, incompatible with the existence of the Union, contradicted expressly by the letter of the Constitution, unauthorized by its spirit, inconsistent with every principle on which it was founded, and destructive of the great object for which it was formed." Of all of the known broadside printings of this important Jackson proclamation, OCLC lists only one printed on silk (U. of NC) of the same approximate dimensions and format as ours - but without an imprint

      [Bookseller: James Cummins Bookseller]
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        Short-Toed Eagle. Circaeëtus brachydactylus

      London: [by the Author, 1832-1837]. Lithograph, coloured by hand, by Edward Lear, printed by C. Hullmandel. Very good condition apart from some overall light soiling. 21 5/8 x 14 3/8 inches. A beautiful image from John Gould's 'The Birds of Europe': a work which, according to Hyman, 'included some of the most remarkable bird drawings ever made'. This plate is from the second of John Gould's great ornithological portfolios. Gould undertook this work not only hoping to build on the success of his first work (on the birds of the Himalaya mountains), but also in an effort to redress the imbalance between the study of local and foreign ornithology. It was his opinion that too much attention had focused on the exotic, whilst the beauty of the more local species was ignored. He wrote in the preface to the work from which this image comes: 'It has been frequently remarked that the productions of distant countries have received a much larger share of attention than those objects by which we are more immediately surrounded; and it is certainly true, that while numerous and costly illustrations have made us acquainted with the Ornithology of most other parts of the world, the Birds of Europe, in which we are, or ought to be, more interested, have not received that degree of attention which they naturally demand. The present work has been undertaken to supply that deficiency.' The images in this work are the first to be published by Gould that show the liveliness of treatment that was to become such a feature of later works. This break from the traditional methods of bird depiction can be largely attributed to the influence of and contributions from Edward Lear: 'They are certainly among the most remarkable bird drawings ever made, [for] it is evident that Lear endowed them with some measure of his own whimsy and intelligence, his energetic curiosity, his self-conscious clumsiness and his unselfconscious charm'. (Hyman) Cf. Anker 169; cf.Balis 101; cf.Fine Bird Books (1990), p. 102; cf.Nissen IVB 371; cf.Sauer 2; cf.Zimmer p. 251.

      [Bookseller: Donald Heald Rare Books]
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        Freckled Bittern

      London, 1832-1837. . Print. Lithographed plate with original hand-colour, approx 37.5 x 55.5 cms, from the Birds of Europe, by Edward Lear for Gould. The Birds of Europe, Gould’s second major project (described by Hyman as his magnum opus), is dominated by the extraordinary contribution of Edward Lear. Arguably Gould's inspiration for the project was Lear's folio lithographed work on Parrots. Lear chose the large folio size which became general for later bird books, he was also among the first to draw from life where possible and he was the first to appreciate the full potential of the new process of lithography for ornithological illustration. Lear learned the process of lithography from Charles Hullmandel, author of 'The Art of Drawing on Stone' and the printer of the Birds of Europe. Hullmandel visited Germany to learn the technique directly from Senefelder, its inventor. Hundreds of faithful impressions could be taken from a lithographic stone, and drawing directly onto the stone preserved the style and sponteneity of the original drawing, rather than translating the original medium into the lines and dots necessary when etching onto copper or steel. It was perfect for showing strong flight feathers, or plumage ruffled by the wind. Lear's financial difficulties - he was forced to abandon his work on Parrots and sell the copyright to Gould - enabled Gould to employ him more fully in the Birds of Europe than he had in his work on Toucans. Lear supplied 67 plates, and chose to illustrate many of the largest and most charismatic birds. He also influenced the work of his fellow artist, Gould’s wife Elizabeth. The Birds of Europe received a rapturous welcome at the time, and is arguably among the most magnificent and important ornithological works ever produced.

      [Bookseller: Tim Bryars Ltd]
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        Great Bustard. Otis tarda

      London: [by the Author, 1832-1837]. Lithograph, coloured by hand, by Edward Lear, printed by C. Hullmandel. Very good condition apart from some overall light soiling, minor foxing. 14 3/8 x 21 3/8 inches. A beautiful image from John Gould's 'The Birds of Europe': a work which, according to Hyman, 'included some of the most remarkable bird drawings ever made'. This plate is from the second of John Gould's great ornithological portfolios. Gould undertook this work not only hoping to build on the success of his first work (on the birds of the Himalaya mountains), but also in an effort to redress the imbalance between the study of local and foreign ornithology. It was his opinion that too much attention had focused on the exotic, whilst the beauty of the more local species was ignored. He wrote in the preface to the work from which this image comes: 'It has been frequently remarked that the productions of distant countries have received a much larger share of attention than those objects by which we are more immediately surrounded; and it is certainly true, that while numerous and costly illustrations have made us acquainted with the Ornithology of most other parts of the world, the Birds of Europe, in which we are, or ought to be, more interested, have not received that degree of attention which they naturally demand. The present work has been undertaken to supply that deficiency.' The images in this work are the first to be published by Gould that show the liveliness of treatment that was to become such a feature of later works. This break from the traditional methods of bird depiction can be largely attributed to the influence of and contributions from Edward Lear: 'They are certainly among the most remarkable bird drawings ever made, [for] it is evident that Lear endowed them with some measure of his own whimsy and intelligence, his energetic curiosity, his self-conscious clumsiness and his unselfconscious charm'. (Hyman) Cf. Anker 169; cf.Balis 101; cf.Fine Bird Books (1990), p. 102; cf.Nissen IVB 371; cf.Sauer 2; cf.Zimmer p. 251.

      [Bookseller: Donald Heald Rare Books]
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        FIFTEEN MONTHS' PILGRIMAGE THROUGH UNTRODDEN TRACTS OF KHUZISTAN AND PERSIA, in a journey from India to England, through parts of Turkish Arabia, Persia, Armenia, Russia, and Germany. Performed in the years 1831 and 1832

      2 volumes, complete set, 1832. 8vo, 205 x 130 mm, 8 x 5 inches, LACKING THE 2 FRONTISPIECES AND THE FOLDING MAP, GOOD FACSIMILES OF THE COLOUR FRONTISPIECES HAVE BEEN ADDDED. pages xii, 263, [1]; [2], v, [1], 228, [4] - adverts, bound in original publisher's cloth backed drab boards, remains of original paper label on Volume I, missing on Volume II. Green cloth slightly discoloured, some chipping to surface paper next to spines, small dark spot to upper cover of Volume I, several tiny dark spots to lower cover of Volume II, corners slightly worn and slightly bumped, label of Foley's Circulating Library on pastedowns, pale offsetting to colour facsimile in volume 1 and slight pale age browning to frontispiece in volume 2, little light spotting and/or pale marks to a few margins, an occasional pale fingermark, otherwise contents nice, bindings tight and firm.  A good working set of the scarce original edition.  J. H. Stocqueler (1801 - 1886) was an English journalist, government employee, entrepreneur in England, India, and the United States of America and wrote several books about his travels and experiences in various wars.  Not in Cox, Blackmer nor in Howgego;  listed in the catalogue of the library of Robert Michael Burrell, No. 784.  MORE IMAGES ATTACHED TO THIS LISTING.  POSTAGE AT COST.

      [Bookseller: Roger Middleton]
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        The Trollope Family: being a Rare lithographic Print published in Philadelphia in Response to Frances Trollope's Domestic Manners of the Americans, Mocking Mrs. Trollope and Her Family WAS $5,250

      Philadelphia: Childs & Inman, 1832. First edition. No Binding [Framed]. Johnston, David Claypoole. PRESENTLY DISCOUNTED. WAS $5,250. A Near Fine original Print, first issue, published in Philadelphia in response to Frances Trollope's "Domestic Manners of the Americans" (1832), Frances Trollope's report on Americans and their manners then recently published, not examined outside the frame, and executed after a sketch previously made in Cincinnati (1829); nicely matted and framed; Artist: David Claypoole Johnston, a noted 19th Century American cartoonist, printmaker, painter, and actor who had aspirations of becoming America's Cruikshank.. Copies of the print were placed on sale in September, 1832 and very few have survived. Frances Trollope was the mother of the great Victorian Era novelist Anthony Trollope and the wife to Thomas Trollope, Anthony's father, a Barrister whose law practice suffered from Trollope's habit of yelling at his Clients, as well as from his other failings. Ultimately, the father gave up his legal practice and took up farming, an endeavor at which he had not experience whatsoever and at which he also was a miserable failure, leaving the family in great financial distress. In 1827, Frances Trollope relocated to America, living first in Fanny Wright's utopian community in Tennessee and, when that community failed, removing to Cincinnati, a frontier town at the time, to open a Museum and a Bazaar. As Frances Trollope had no experience in that line of work, the enterprise was a miserable failure as well, adding to the family's financial stress. However, after her return to England, the indomitable Mrs. Trollope, having observed the cultural peculiarities of the Americans first-hand, published her debut book, "Domestic Manners of the Americans" (1832), in which she presented a caustic view of the Americans, portraying them as uneducated and lacking in proper manners, and describing America's appalling middle-class egalitarianism and other shortcomings. Acerbic and witty, the book was an instant sensation in England and rescuing the family from the brink of financial ruin and bringing instead prosperity and fame. Of course, the book was not well received in America and of it Mark Twain said "Mrs. Trollope was so handsomely cursed and reviled by this nation [for] telling the truth... she was painting a state of things which did not change at once. ... I remember it." On her trip to and from America, and during her stay there, Mrs. Trollope was accompanied by her three youngest children: her son Henry and her two youngest daughters, Cecilia and Emily, as well as by the French artist August Hervieu. Hervieu's participation, officially as the tutor and companion to the Trollope children, gave rise to much speculation about the exact nature of the relationship between Mrs. Trollope and Hervieu. Clearly the two were close, as Hervieu sold his Art in America to help maintain the group. In the Rare Print offered here, Hervieu is shown painting with a silly-looking Henry serving as a model for Lafayette. A falsely plump Frances Trollope is shown seated with her two unattractively-portrayed fat-cheeked daughters reclined next to her. An older man and and a foolish-looking Thomas Trollope (the husband who did not, in fact, take part in the trip) are shown watching Hervieu paint with Thomas Trollope standing in front of hung piece of art depicting a stag. Thomas Trollope is so placed that the animal's horns appear to be coming out of Trollope's head, thus portraying him as being cuckolded. [Cuckolds are sometimes described as "wearing the horns of a cuckold" or just "wearing the horns", an allusion to the mating habits of stags, who yield their mates when defeated by rival male. Interestingly, Anthony Trollope's bookplate itself depicts a stag.] The noteworthy Print offered here takes one back to the very foundations of the writing Trollopes and to the events which gave birth to an important English writing family. The Print is quite rare indeed and this is the only copy we have seen in over 30 years of diligently searching for Trollope rarities; a remarkable survival, a QUITE RARE piece of Trollope ephemera, and a collection-distinguishing item for the Trollope collector, other copies of which can be found at Princeton University, the Pennsylvania Historical Society, the Smithsonian Museum, and the Library of Congress. QUITE RARE INDEED.

      [Bookseller: Allington Antiquarian Books, LLC]
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        The British Dominions in North America; or a Topographical and Statistical Description of the Provinces of Lower and Upper Canada, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, the Islands of Newfoundland, Prince Edward, and Cape Breton. . . Land Granting, Emigration, etc

      London: Longman, Rees, Orme, Brown, Green, and Longman, 1832. 1st Edition. Hard Cover. Very Good. 4to [29 x 23 cm]; 3 volumes, 30 plates, maps, plans, portrait, including folding, extra engraved titles in first 2 vol., half-titles in Vol. II, III, tables. & New (about 30 years ago) 3/4 leather covers, 5 raised bands and gold type on spine, with brown cloth and new end papers. & Vol. 1. xxvi, [2]list of plates & errata, 498& Vol. 2. xi, [1]list of plates, 296; & half-titles in Vol. II, III& Vol. 3. xii, [358]. [last volume unpaginated & printed in double columns). with half-titles. The third volume is entitled 'Topographical Dictionary of the Province of Lower Canada., Uncommon in this level of condition. No flaws other than the previous owners blue stamp 1/8" x 1.5" on the front end paper. The inside is exceptionally clean and virtually all the plates are fox free (pencil mark on each plate to show insertion page) & The plates include lithographs, aquatints, engraved plates and are finely done, mostly being views and scenery, including of Montreal, Fredericton, Quebec City, Fort Chambly, Isle aux Noix, Long's Farm on Lake Jimiscouata, Harrower's Distillery, the falls of the St. John, plans of York Harbour, the Niagara River and others. First Edition, Second Issue, with titles of Vols. I-II dated '1832' (first issue dated '1831'), & Bouchette, Joseph. The British Dominions in North America; or a Topographical and Statistical Description of the Provinces of Lower and Upper Canada, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, the Islands of Newfoundland, Prince Edward, and Cape Breton. & Note: Sabin 6848-51-st Vol. III under the title: Scenery scenes and town views show by the majority "A Topographical Dictonary of the Province of Lower Canada ." the finely ausgefuhrten coppers, the lithographies and aquatints like Montreal, Fredericton, Quebec town, fort Chambly, Isle aux Noix, the Niagarafall etc. the author was 37 years an inspector there and intensely travelled around the land. - Small collector's stamps recto and verso on the Vorsatzen. &

      [Bookseller: Lord Durham Rare Books Inc. (IOBA)]
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        A Compendious History of the Northern Part of the Province of New Brunswick, and of the District of Gaspe, in Lower Canada

      Printed by Joseph Howe, Halifax 1832 - 288 p. Paper-covered boards. Front board has a stain and pencil marks, corners heavily rubbed. New endpapers. Ink inscription on title page and pencil on 41. Ink stamps on first page of introduction and 51. Darkening of pages and some spotting. Cooney (1800-1870) was a Methodist clergyman, journalist and author. Between 1829 and 1831, Cooney wrote for the Chatham, NB Gleaner and, while there, gathered notes for this, his best-known work. He covers geography and resources, "Indians," French and British settlement. TPL 1704. [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Attic Books (ILAB, ABAC)]
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        Globe Terrestre Dresse par Fx. Delamrche, Succr. de R. De Vaugondy 1832

      Paris, 1832. No Binding. Very Good. 9 ½ inches (24 cm.) diameter; 21 inches (53 cm.) total height. Single pedestal globe with horizon ring, armature & meridian all of wood, wear and staining on meridian at point where fits into stand, some chipping at extremities, else fine; globe with vibrant original color and clear, sharp patina; some abrasion & losses, mostly in lower and upper extremities; overall very good plus condition. An attractive, very capably executed table or desk globe, in the distinctive style of the Delamarche firm, "the most successful French entrepreneur[s] in maps and globes" (Dekker/ van der Krogt). This was an original work by the son, Felix, who succeeded his father in the management of the firm in 1817. The globe is geographically up-to-date, notably in the South Pacific and Alaska, with information from then recent Russian voyages, such as Krustenstern's. Related to this, at the time the globe appeared and reflected on it, Europeans were beginning to differentiate between various regions of the Pacific. These were based on a better understanding of cultural and other differences between the peoples of various areas encountered on these recent voyages. For example, in 1831 the French explorer Dumont d'Urville proposed the use of the terms "Micronesia" and "Melanesia" for various parts of the Pacific as distinguished from Polynesia. Printed dashed lines on this globe, labeled "Division Oceanique," roughly approximate the three eventually accepted divisions of what is referred to as the South Pacific, though the regions are not named on the globe. Delamarche also clearly identifies on the globe the more traditional divisions of the Pacific between "Grand Ocean Boreal," "Grand Ocean Equinoxial," and "Grand Ocean Austral." The Delamarche firm was the first to successfully reach a fairly sizable, general market of globe buyers. It accomplished this by reducing the cost of constructing globe stands and other parts, while maintaining a high level of quality in the maps of their globes, which are cleanly and attractively engraved. Traditional brass meridians were replaced by wooden ones, and the horizon rings and armatures supporting the rings were greatly simplified and made from either wood or stiff board. Also, the firm generally used simpler, single-pedestal stands rather than four-legged designs. Yet, as this well-preserved example demonstrates, Delamarche's design and materials proved to be very durable. Charles-Francois Delamarche (1740-1817), the founder of the family firm, was the successor of the great map and globemaking family, the Robert De Vaugondys, as is cited in the title of this globe. Delamarche, in fact, seemed to have cornered the globe market in France by also incorporating the stocks of Jean Fortin and Jean Lattre. Delamarche's son, Felix took over the firm upon his father's death and managed it until 1848, when Gosselin succeeded him. The firm continued well into the latter 19th century under yet another Delamarche descendent. Dekker/ Van der Krogt, Globes from the Western World, pp. 63, 74; Dekker, E. Globes at Greenwich, pp. 321-25; Suarez, T. Early Mapping of the Pacific, p. 25.

      [Bookseller: Martayan Lan, Inc.]
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