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Displayed below are some selected recent viaLibri matches for books published in 1832

        China

      London:: J. Arrowsmith,. 1832.. Map of China by John Arrowsmith, whose position in the Admiralty lead to the most recent discoveries being translated quickly to new information on his maps. 23 3/4 x 19 1/2". Original outline and wash color. Korea showed at the top right corners, as well as Taisan (Formosa) and the Loo Choo Islands. Published 15 Feby. 1832. Slt. darkening at fold o/w very good condition. . HKD5800

      [Bookseller: Antipodean Books, Maps & Prints]
 1.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  


        Jack Snipe - Scolopax Gallinula; (Linn)

      London 1832 - John Gould (1804-1881)A selection from Birds of Europe, published in London 1832-37. Hand-colored lithograph measuring 14 1/2” x 21 1/2”. Condition: Some very minor age spots. The Jack Snipe is the smallest of the snipes and breeds in marshes, bogs, tundra and wet meadows with short vegetation in Northern Europe and Northern Russia. John Gould was without question the most prolific natural history artist of the nineteenth century. He worked during a period of intense fascination with discoveries in natural history, especially regarding knowledge of the wildlife of exotic lands. Gould shared the romantic enthusiasm of his time for such subjects, as well as the popular impulse to catalogue exotic wildlife. He combined his passion for natural history with outstanding scientific, artistic, and entrepreneurial talents. Drawing on these abilities, he embarked on a series of projects that would eventually make him the leading publisher of ornithological illustrations in Victorian Britain. Gould’s unparalleled career spanned five decades, and he produced a monumental series of books of birds throughout the world. Gould planned the Birds of Europe in an effort to redress the imbalance between the study of local and foreign ornithology. In his preface he stated his mission: “the Birds of Europe, in which we are, or ought to be , most interested, have not received that degree of attention which they naturally demand. The present work has been undertaken to supply that deficiency.” Gould portrayed birds native to Europe in a manner that had only been thought appropriate for the colorful species of distant places. In this way he managed to draw much popular interest back to native birds, which were suddenly considered equally beautiful to exotic species. ***If you frame up this item with Arader Galleries you can take a 50% discount off the listed price of this work of art.***

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
 2.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  


        A manual of surgery Valentine Mott's copy

      London: E. Cox, 1832. Cooper, Astley (1768-1841). A manual of surgery . . . The third edition . . . edited by Thomas Castle. 459 [i.e., 467]pp. London: E. Cox; Boston: Munroe and Francis, and Charles S. Francis, New York, 1832. 177 x 102 mm. Quarter cloth, marbled boards, printed paper label ca. 1832, some wear at extremities, spine a bit faded. From the library of Valentine Mott (1785-1865), with his signature on the title; stamp of the Mott Memorial Medical and Surgical Library on the title and a few other places.Third edition. From the library of Valentine Mott, the most celebrated American surgeon of the first half of the nineteenth century. Mott studied surgery under Cooper in London from 1807-9; Cooper was so impressed with Mott that he made Mott his assistant in surgery. "During his career [Mott] performed nearly a thousand amputations, operated 150 times for stone in the bladder, and ligated forty large arteries. According to his former teacher, Sir Astley Cooper, he performed more major operations than any surgeon in history, up to his time" (Dictionary of American Biography).

      [Bookseller: Jeremy Norman's Historyofscience.com]
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        Invito. P. T. [Assicurazioni Generali Austro Italiche]

      (S.n.) (June 1832.), (Trieste) - First edition. 1 bifolio (4 printed pages). Very early publication of the insurance company Assicurazioni Generali that has been established on December 26, 1831, and the first about their specific service, "Beneficenza de' notabili" a special form of investment, a tontine for a higher number of participants. The company, that was established by a group of notable Jewish families of Trieste and Venice, unlike the most of the Trieste based compatitive insurance companies, provided services not merely for maritime and flood insurance but also land, life, pension and any area of insurance that permitted by law. The underwriter of the broshure is Giuseppe Lazzano Morpurgo the founder of the company. One of the earliest publications from the founding epoch of Generali, which in a few years became the largest insurance company in Italy and today the fifth-largest in Europe. Scarce document from the earliest time of Generali. We could not trace any copy in institutional holdings. Folded once. In fine condition. [Attributes: First Edition]

      [Bookseller: Földvári Books]
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        La Mimica Degli Antichi Investigata nel Gestire Napoletano

      Napoli: Fibreno. 1832. Hardcover. Ex-Library. Pioneering work with aquatints by the first ethnographer of body language! Hardcover in contemporary half-calf, 1832, small quarto, 380pp., illustrated with 21 plates, 16 of which are sepia aquatints. Book ex- library with minor indications, edgewear, handsome gilt decorations and title to spine, binding tight, text bright. No DJ, but in protective mylar wrap. De Jorio's recognition that gestures he saw in the frescoes of Pompei and Herculaneum were similar to those he saw every day on the streets of Naples led to his great insight. The book was translated into English as Gesture in Naples and Gesture in Classical Antiquity (IUP, 1990). Text in Italian.

      [Bookseller: Caliban Books ABAA-ILAB ]
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        A Ramble of Six Thousands Miles through the United States of America

      London: Effingham Wilson,, 1832. Octavo (213 × 130 mm) Contemporary green calf by J. Kelly, matching morocco label, narrow bands with dotted roll, compartments gilt with floral and foliate arabesque tools within a triple fillet panel, panel of triple gilt fillet and double fillet in blind to the boards, gilt edge-roll, marbled edges and endpapers, red silk page-marker. Plate of the Cherokee language. A little rubbed, light toning, some heavy browning in the lower margin of 7 early leaves and the plate, but overall very good. First edition. A slightly chatty, but informative travelogue. The author (whose real name was O'Ferrall) set out to experience America as it really was, from his choice of ship onwards; "Our vessel was manned with a real American crew, that is, a crew, of which scarcely two men are of the same nation - which conveys a tolerably correct notion of the United States." From New York City he toured New York state, visiting Niagara Falls, then Cincinnati, Robert Owen's New Harmony in Indiana, St. Louis, Louisville, and south to Tennessee, Kentucky, Maryland, and Louisiana, returning to New York via Philadelphia "the handsomest city in the union." An attractive copy of a useful and well-travelled account of the state of America in the early nineteenth century, with much on the condition of the black population and the indigenous races. Howes considered it a "valuable source for the Illinois and Indiana frontier" (Howes).

      [Bookseller: Peter Harrington]
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        Memoir on the Pearly Nautilus (Nautilus Pompilius, Linn.) with illustrations of its external form and internal structure.

      London, W. Wood, 1832. 4to (285 x 225mm). pp. 68, with 8 plates of which plates 1-7 in two states. Later half calf, spine with red gilt lettered label, marbled sides. A scarce work. The plates are after drawings by the author. Some minor foxing.//Nissen ZBI, 3039.

      [Bookseller: Antiquariaat JUNK B.V. (Natural History]
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        A New Treatise on the Use of the Globes,

      New York, Samuel Wood & Sons,, 1832. or A Philosophical View of the Earth and Heavens. Contemporary full tree calf, tan label, decoration to spine gilt, library plate to front pastedown. With six engraved plates at the back, five of which are folding, and illustrations and tables in text. Rubbing and minor scratchings to binding, minor foxing throughout but mostly confined to edges. A very good copy.

      [Bookseller: Peter Harrington]
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        Mank's Shearwater - Puffinus Anglorum

      London 1832 - John Gould (1804-1881) A selection from Birds of Europe published in London 1832-37. Lithograph with original hand-coloring measuring 14 ½” x 21 ½” accompanied by corresponding natural history description written by John Gould. Condition: Very good. John Gould was without question the most prolific natural history artist of the nineteenth century. He worked during a period of intense fascination with discoveries in natural history, especially regarding knowledge of the wildlife of exotic lands. Gould shared the romantic enthusiasm of his time for such subjects, as well as the popular impulse to catalogue exotic wildlife. He combined his passion for natural history with outstanding scientific, artistic, and entrepreneurial talents. Drawing on these abilities, he embarked on a series of projects that would eventually make him the leading publisher of ornithological illustrations in Victorian Britain. Gould’s unparalleled career spanned five decades, and he produced a monumental series of books of birds throughout the world. Gould planned the Birds of Europe in an effort to redress the imbalance between the study of local and foreign ornithology. In his preface he stated his mission: “the Birds of Europe, in which we are, or ought to be, most interested, have not received that degree of attention which they naturally demand. The present work has been undertaken to supply that deficiency.” Gould portrayed birds native to Europe in a manner that had only been thought appropriate for the colorful species of distant places. In this way he managed to draw much popular interest back to native birds, which were suddenly considered equally beautiful to exotic species. Rich, vibrant color is an important attribute of the best 19th Century prints. Many prints by John Gould found on the market today have modern color that affects both the appearance and the value of these great works. John Gould died in 1881 still actively illustrating and producing fine bird books. His stock of unsold copies, unbound text and plates in various states, lithographic stones, drawings and paintings, amounted to nearly three tons. Many of the uncolored pulls from his monumental "Birds of Europe" have been recolored in the last thirty years, and these are often found on the market. Fortunately, the difference between original and modern color can be discerned by looking carefully at the print. When modern color is applied to 180 year old paper, the application is inconsistent; the cellulose of the aged paper has begun to breakdown and can no longer evenly absorb the watercolors, resulting in a splotchy uneven appearance All of the Gould bird prints in Arader Galleries' inventory have exquisite original color. The vastly superior quality of original color can be clearly differentiated from new color by its smooth and even appearance. The inks have noticeably deeper, richer tones. The difference can also be seen in the lovely surface "sheen" that results from the application of gum arabic when the lithograph was first pulled. The hand coloring of engravings and lithographs reached its zenith in the 19th Century. Works that still display their original color are more rewarding to view, and will better hold their value in the years to come.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
 9.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  


        Red-necked Phalarope, Phalaropus Hyperboreus

      London 1832 - John Gould (1804-1881). A selection from Birds of Europe, published in London 1832-1837, printed by C. Hullmandel. Lithograph with original hand-coloring measuring 14 ½” x 21 ½”. Lithograph accompanied by corresponding natural history description written by John Gould. Condition: Very good. John Gould was without question the most prolific natural history artist of the nineteenth century. He worked during a period of intense fascination with discoveries in natural history, especially regarding knowledge of the wildlife of exotic lands. Gould shared the romantic enthusiasm of his time for such subjects, as well as the popular impulse to catalogue exotic wildlife. He combined his passion for natural history with outstanding scientific, artistic, and entrepreneurial talents. Drawing on these abilities, he embarked on a series of projects that would eventually make him the leading publisher of ornithological illustrations in Victorian Britain. The preparatory drawings that he produced were passed on for completion to skilled illustrators, most notably his wife, Elizabeth, and Edward Lear. The plates which resulted from such partnerships were a splendid fusion of art and science, with a scope that remains unsurpassed. Stunning and at the same time highly accurate, Gould's illustrations linked beauty to science, and science to beauty, in and an unprecedented manner. Gould’s unparalleled career spanned five decades, and he produced a monumental series of books of birds throughout the world. Gould planned the Birds of Europe in an effort to redress the imbalance between the study of local and foreign ornithology. In his preface he stated his mission: “the Birds of Europe, in which we are, or ought to be, most interested, have not received that degree of attention which they naturally demand. The present work has been undertaken to supply that deficiency.” Gould portrayed birds native to Europe in a manner that had only been thought appropriate for the colorful species of distant places. In this way he managed to draw much popular interest back to native birds, which were suddenly considered equally beautiful to exotic species. Rich, vibrant color is an important attribute of the best 19th Century prints. Many prints by John Gould found on the market today have modern color that affects both the appearance and the value of these great works. John Gould died in 1881 still actively illustrating and producing fine bird books. His stock of unsold copies, unbound text and plates in various states, lithographic stones, drawings and paintings, amounted to nearly three tons. Many of the uncolored pulls from his monumental "Birds of Europe" have been re-colored in the last thirty years, and these are often found on the market. Fortunately, the difference between original and modern color can be discerned by looking carefully at the print. When modern color is applied to 180 year old paper, the application is inconsistent; the cellulose of the aged paper has begun to breakdown and can no longer evenly absorb the watercolors, resulting in a splotchy uneven appearance All of the Gould bird prints in Arader Galleries' inventory have exquisite original color. The vastly superior quality of original color can be clearly differentiated from new color by its smooth and even appearance. The inks have noticeably deeper, richer tones. The difference can also be seen in the lovely surface "sheen" that results from the application of gum arabic when the lithograph was first pulled. The hand coloring of engravings and lithographs reached its zenith in the 19th Century. Works that still display their original color are more rewarding to view, and will better hold their value in the years to come.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
 10.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  


        Fulmar Petrel, Procellaria glacialis

      London 1832 - John Gould (1804-1881). A selection from Birds of Europe. Lithograph with original hand-coloring measuring 14 ½” x 21 ½”. Lithograph accompanied by corresponding natural history description written by John Gould. Condition: Very good. John Gould was without question the most prolific natural history artist of the nineteenth century. He worked during a period of intense fascination with discoveries in natural history, especially regarding knowledge of the wildlife of exotic lands. Gould shared the romantic enthusiasm of his time for such subjects, as well as the popular impulse to catalogue exotic wildlife. He combined his passion for natural history with outstanding scientific, artistic, and entrepreneurial talents. Drawing on these abilities, he embarked on a series of projects that would eventually make him the leading publisher of ornithological illustrations in Victorian Britain. Gould’s unparalleled career spanned five decades, and he produced a monumental series of books of birds throughout the world. Gould planned the Birds of Europe in an effort to redress the imbalance between the study of local and foreign ornithology. In his preface he stated his mission: “the Birds of Europe, in which we are, or ought to be, most interested, have not received that degree of attention which they naturally demand. The present work has been undertaken to supply that deficiency.” Gould portrayed birds native to Europe in a manner that had only been thought appropriate for the colorful species of distant places. In this way he managed to draw much popular interest back to native birds, which were suddenly considered equally beautiful to exotic species. Rich, vibrant color is an important attribute of the best 19th Century prints. Many prints by John Gould found on the market today have modern color that affects both the appearance and the value of these great works. John Gould died in 1881 still actively illustrating and producing fine bird books. His stock of unsold copies, unbound text and plates in various states, lithographic stones, drawings and paintings, amounted to nearly three tons. Many of the uncolored pulls from his monumental "Birds of Europe" have been re-colored in the last thirty years, and these are often found on the market. Fortunately, the difference between original and modern color can be discerned by looking carefully at the print. When modern color is applied to 180 year old paper, the application is inconsistent; the cellulose of the aged paper has begun to breakdown and can no longer evenly absorb the watercolors, resulting in a splotchy uneven appearance All of the Gould bird prints in Arader Galleries' inventory have exquisite original color. The vastly superior quality of original color can be clearly differentiated from new color by its smooth and even appearance. The inks have noticeably deeper, richer tones. The difference can also be seen in the lovely surface "sheen" that results from the application of gum arabic when the lithograph was first pulled. The hand coloring of engravings and lithographs reached its zenith in the 19th Century. Works that still display their original color are more rewarding to view, and will better hold their value in the years to come.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
 11.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  


        Bastard or Grey Plover, Squatarola cinerea

      London 1832 - John Gould (1804-1881). A selection from Birds of Europe, published in London 1832-1837, printed by C. Hullmandel. Lithograph with original hand-coloring measuring 14 ½” x 21 ½”. Lithograph accompanied by corresponding natural history description written by John Gould. Condition: Very good. John Gould was without question the most prolific natural history artist of the nineteenth century. He worked during a period of intense fascination with discoveries in natural history, especially regarding knowledge of the wildlife of exotic lands. Gould shared the romantic enthusiasm of his time for such subjects, as well as the popular impulse to catalogue exotic wildlife. He combined his passion for natural history with outstanding scientific, artistic, and entrepreneurial talents. Drawing on these abilities, he embarked on a series of projects that would eventually make him the leading publisher of ornithological illustrations in Victorian Britain. The preparatory drawings that he produced were passed on for completion to skilled illustrators, most notably his wife, Elizabeth, and Edward Lear. The plates which resulted from such partnerships were a splendid fusion of art and science, with a scope that remains unsurpassed. Stunning and at the same time highly accurate, Gould's illustrations linked beauty to science, and science to beauty, in and an unprecedented manner. Gould’s unparalleled career spanned five decades, and he produced a monumental series of books of birds throughout the world. Gould planned the Birds of Europe in an effort to redress the imbalance between the study of local and foreign ornithology. In his preface he stated his mission: “the Birds of Europe, in which we are, or ought to be, most interested, have not received that degree of attention which they naturally demand. The present work has been undertaken to supply that deficiency.” Gould portrayed birds native to Europe in a manner that had only been thought appropriate for the colorful species of distant places. In this way he managed to draw much popular interest back to native birds, which were suddenly considered equally beautiful to exotic species. Rich, vibrant color is an important attribute of the best 19th Century prints. Many prints by John Gould found on the market today have modern color that affects both the appearance and the value of these great works. John Gould died in 1881 still actively illustrating and producing fine bird books. His stock of unsold copies, unbound text and plates in various states, lithographic stones, drawings and paintings, amounted to nearly three tons. Many of the uncolored pulls from his monumental "Birds of Europe" have been re-colored in the last thirty years, and these are often found on the market. Fortunately, the difference between original and modern color can be discerned by looking carefully at the print. When modern color is applied to 180 year old paper, the application is inconsistent; the cellulose of the aged paper has begun to breakdown and can no longer evenly absorb the watercolors, resulting in a splotchy uneven appearance All of the Gould bird prints in Arader Galleries' inventory have exquisite original color. The vastly superior quality of original color can be clearly differentiated from new color by its smooth and even appearance. The inks have noticeably deeper, richer tones. The difference can also be seen in the lovely surface "sheen" that results from the application of gum arabic when the lithograph was first pulled. The hand coloring of engravings and lithographs reached its zenith in the 19th Century. Works that still display their original color are more rewarding to view, and will better hold their value in the years to come.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
 12.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  


        Red-Throated Diver. Colymbus septentrionalis

      London 1832 - John Gould (1804-1881). A selection from Birds of Europe, published in London 1832-1837, printed by C. Hullmandel. Lithograph with original hand-coloring measuring 14 ½” x 21 ½”. Condition: Very good. John Gould was without question the most prolific natural history artist of the nineteenth century. He worked during a period of intense fascination with discoveries in natural history, especially regarding knowledge of the wildlife of exotic lands. Gould shared the romantic enthusiasm of his time for such subjects, as well as the popular impulse to catalogue exotic wildlife. He combined his passion for natural history with outstanding scientific, artistic, and entrepreneurial talents. Drawing on these abilities, he embarked on a series of projects that would eventually make him the leading publisher of ornithological illustrations in Victorian Britain. The preparatory drawings that he produced were passed on for completion to skilled illustrators, most notably his wife, Elizabeth, and Edward Lear. The plates which resulted from such partnerships were a splendid fusion of art and science, with a scope that remains unsurpassed. Stunning and at the same time highly accurate, Gould's illustrations linked beauty to science, and science to beauty, in and an unprecedented manner. Gould’s unparalleled career spanned five decades, and he produced a monumental series of books of birds throughout the world. Gould planned the Birds of Europe in an effort to redress the imbalance between the study of local and foreign ornithology. In his preface he stated his mission: “the Birds of Europe, in which we are, or ought to be, most interested, have not received that degree of attention which they naturally demand. The present work has been undertaken to supply that deficiency.” Gould portrayed birds native to Europe in a manner that had only been thought appropriate for the colorful species of distant places. In this way he managed to draw much popular interest back to native birds, which were suddenly considered equally beautiful to exotic species. Rich, vibrant color is an important attribute of the best 19th Century prints. Many prints by John Gould found on the market today have modern color that affects both the appearance and the value of these great works. John Gould died in 1881 still actively illustrating and producing fine bird books. His stock of unsold copies, unbound text and plates in various states, lithographic stones, drawings and paintings, amounted to nearly three tons. Many of the uncolored pulls from his monumental "Birds of Europe" have been re-colored in the last thirty years, and these are often found on the market. Fortunately, the difference between original and modern color can be discerned by looking carefully at the print. When modern color is applied to 180 year old paper, the application is inconsistent; the cellulose of the aged paper has begun to breakdown and can no longer evenly absorb the watercolors, resulting in a splotchy uneven appearance All of the Gould bird prints in Arader Galleries' inventory have exquisite original color. The vastly superior quality of original color can be clearly differentiated from new color by its smooth and even appearance. The inks have noticeably deeper, richer tones. The difference can also be seen in the lovely surface "sheen" that results from the application of gum arabic when the lithograph was first pulled. The hand coloring of engravings and lithographs reached its zenith in the 19th Century. Works that still display their original color are more rewarding to view, and will better hold their value in the years to come.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
 13.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  


        Darstellung der k. k. Haupt- und Residenzstadt Wien. 3 Abtheilungen (in 3 Bdn.).

      Wien, Mechitaristen 1832.. 8°. VI S. (Titelei), Ss. 7-308 (I. Abt.); 302 S. (II. Abt.); 291(1) S., 6 n. num. Bll. (Erläuterungen zu den Ansichten), LIX(1) S. (Register). Mit zus. 16 (dav. 7 mehrf. gef.) Taf. in Kupferst. (vorw. Leitner sc.). Schlichte Leinenbände d. Zeit mit Rückengoldprägung. Rücken geblichen.. Nebehay/W. III, 679; Wurzbach XXXII, 349; Gugitz III, 120821; Slg. Eckl IV, 577; Slg. Mayer 422. Vollständiges Exemplar der klassischen Wien-Topographie. - Die Tafeln sind teils Veduten der schönsten Straßen und Plätze Wiens, teils sind es - von den Basteien aus gesehene - sechs Panorama-Ansichten "nach der Natur aufgenommen und gezeichnet von J. Wett", die zusammen ein geschlossenes Rundpanorama Wiens bilden.

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Löcker]
 14.   Check availability:     ZVAB     Link/Print  


        Hybrid Grouse - Tetrao hybridus

      London 1832 - This splendid hand-colored, folio size lthograph from John Gould's (1804-1881)monumental book "Birds of Europe" is in excellent condition, measures 14 ½” x 21 ½” and magnificently displays the author's scientific skill and attention to detail. John Gould was without question the most prolific natural history artist of the nineteenth century. He worked during a period of intense fascination with discoveries in natural history, especially regarding knowledge of the wildlife of exotic lands. Gould shared the romantic enthusiasm of his time for such subjects, as well as the popular impulse to catalog exotic wildlife. He combined his passion for natural history with outstanding scientific, artistic, and entrepreneurial talents. Drawing on these abilities, he embarked on a series of projects that would eventually make him the leading publisher of ornithological illustrations in Victorian Britain. Gould’s unparalleled career spanned five decades, and he produced a monumental series of books of birds throughout the world. Gould planned the Birds of Europe in an effort to redress the imbalance between the study of local and foreign ornithology. In his preface he stated his mission: “the Birds of Europe, in which we are, or ought to be, most interested, have not received that degree of attention which they naturally demand. The present work has been undertaken to supply that deficiency.” Gould portrayed birds native to Europe in a manner that had only been thought appropriate for the colorful species of distant places. In this way he managed to draw much popular interest back to native birds, which were suddenly considered equally beautiful to exotic species. Rich, vibrant color is an important attribute of the best 19th Century prints. Many prints by John Gould found on the market today have modern color that affects both the appearance and the value of these great works. John Gould died in 1881 still actively illustrating and producing fine bird books. His stock of unsold copies, unbound text and plates in various states, lithographic stones, drawings and paintings, amounted to nearly three tons. Many of the uncolored pulls from his monumental "Birds of Europe" have been recolored in the last thirty years, and these are often found on the market. Fortunately, the difference between original and modern color can be discerned by looking carefully at the print. When modern color is applied to 180 year old paper, the application is inconsistent; the cellulose of the aged paper has begun to breakdown and can no longer evenly absorb the watercolors, resulting in a splotchy uneven appearance All of the Gould bird prints in Arader Galleries' inventory have exquisite original color. The vastly superior quality of original color can be clearly differentiated from new color by its smooth and even appearance. The inks have noticeably deeper, richer tones. The difference can also be seen in the lovely surface "sheen" that results from the application of gum arabic when the lithograph was first pulled. The hand coloring of engravings and lithographs reached its zenith in the 19th Century. Works that still display their original color are more rewarding to view, and will better hold their value in the years to come.***If you frame up this item with Arader Galleries you can take a 50% discount off the listed price of this work of art.***

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
 15.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  


        Devonshire & Cornwall Illustrated, from Original Drawings By Thomas Allom, W.H. Bartlett, &c. With Historical and Topographical Descriptions

      London: H & R. Fisher; & P. Jackson, 1832. (ii); (iv); (5)-106; (5)-48 pages. General title-page, 2 engraved frontispieces, 2 county maps with vignettes, 2 engraved title-pages with vignettes, 138 steel engraved views. Modern bookplate. Contemporary nice quality half calf. The COLERIDGE family copy, signed Jas. Geo. Coleridge, Manor House, Ottery St. Mary .... important association copy. First Edit. Near Fine. 4to.

      [Bookseller: Roger Collicott Books]
 16.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  


        Friedrich der Große. Eine Lebensgeschichte. Vier Bände mit Urkundenbüchern

      Nauck'sche Buchhandlung, 1832. Erstausgabe in vier Bänden: In der Nauckschen Buchhandlung, 1832-34, OriginalHalbleder, gold. Rückentitel, marmor. Überzug (Lederecken), 8° oktav, roter Ganzschnitt. 1. Band: 5 Bll 487 S.+ Urkundenbuch 3 Bll 242 S. / 2. Band: 3 Bll 467 S.+ Urkundenbuch 3 Bll 241 S. / 3. Band: 3 Bll 580 S.+ Urkundenbuch 2 Bll 290 S. / 4. Band: X 500 S.+ Urkundenbuch 2 Bll 307 S.9 Bücher/4 Bände: 1es Buch. Friedrichs des Grossen Jugendjahre bis zu seiner Thronbesteigung. 2es Buch. Friedrich der zweite als Ko?nig von seiner Thronbesteigung bis zum Dresdener Frieden. 3es Buch. Ko?nig Friedrich als Landesvater und als Mensch. Vom Dresdener Frieden bis zum siebenja?hrigen Kriege; 4es Buch. Friedrich der Grosse im siebenja?hrigen Kriege; 5es Buch. Friedrich der Grosse nach dem siebenja?hrigen Kriege als Landesvater; 6es Buch. Friedrich der Grosse in seinen spa?teren politischen und landesva?terlichen Sorgen; 7es Buch. Friedrich Lebensende; 8es Buch. Statistische Uebersicht; 9es Buch. "Oeuvres de Fre?de?ric II a? Berlin chez Voss et Decker, 1788-1789, 25 vol. gr. in-8°..."Buchrückenleder u. Titelvergoldung gut erhalten, dort kaum Berieb (zur Stehkante hin lediglich aufgehellte Stellen - siehe Photobeispiel), Ornamentschmuckvergoldg. teilw. verloren, Buchdeckel mit Beriebspuren auf d. Überzug, Buchdeckelecken mit leichten Stoßspuren, Bindung aller vier Bände stabil, Bibliotheksstempel auf d. Innentitelblättern, in Bd 2 u. 3 zudem jew. auf d. Innenseite des Buchdeckels Bibliothekstempel, weiter keine Stempel, Einträge o.ä., Vorsätze, stellenw. zu d. Rändern od. i.d. Ecken leimschattig, Bd 2, 3 u. 4 nur minim. od. gar nicht stockfleckig, Bd 3 mit einem Flecken auf d. Vorsatz, Knickspur bis S. 18, Bd 1 v. Vorsatz u. Innentitel durchgängig (zu d. Blatträndern od. z. Oberkante hin) braun- bzw. stockfleckig (Lesbarkeit an keiner Stelle beeinträchtigt), dennoch gute Exemplare..

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat-Sandbuckel]
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        Richter, Adrian Ludwig. - "Malerische Ansichten aus den Umgebungen von Rom".

      Leipzig, C. G. Börner, 1832. Radierung / Strichätzung, 1831/1832. Von Adrian Ludwig Richter. 15,5 x 20 cm (Platten) / 22,5 x 28,5 cm (Blätter). Hoff-Budde 210-215. Hoff 171-176. Aus: Radierungen von Ludwig Richter II. Heft. VI. Bll. Malerische Ansichten aus den Umgebungen von Rom (Leipzig: C. G. Börner 1832). - Jeweils in der Platte signiert bzw. monogrammiert, mittig unterhalb der Darstellung betitelt. Unten links jeweils in der Platte Trockenstempel des Leipziger Verlegers C.G. Börner. Die Platten jeweils oben rechts nummeriert 1-6. - Die Sammlung umfasst die Blätter "Osteria", "Monte Circello", "Rocca di Mezzo", "Olevano", "Ponte Salaro" und "Castel Gandolfo". - Reizende romantische Arbeiten deutscher Italiensehnsucht des frühen 19. Jahrhunderts. - Selten. - Ohne den Verlagsumschlag. Papier insbesondere an den Blattkanten schwach gebräunt. Blatt Nr. 3 (Rocca di Mezzo) mit kleinem Eselsohr links unten. Ingesamt dem Alter entsprechend guter Erhaltungszustand. Adrian Ludwig Richter (1803 Dresden - 1884 Dresden). Bedeutender Maler, Zeichner und Grafiker der deutschen Romantik und des Biedermeier. Sohn des Zeichners und Kupferstechers Carl August Richter. Nach der Schulzeit begann er 1815 als Lehrling seines Vaters, studierte daneben an der Kunstakademie in Dresden. 1820/21 begleitete er den russischen Fürst Narischkin als Zeichner auf einer Reise nach Paris. 1823-26 reiste er nach Italien, wo er unter anderen mit Joseph Anton Koch und Julius Schnorr von Carolsfeld zusammentraf. Dies prägte seine idealistisch-harmonische Landschaftsauffassung. 1828-35 lehrte er an der Zeichenschule der Porzellanmanufaktur in Meißen, wo Gottfried Pulian zu seinen Schülern zählte. 1826 wurde er als Lehrer für Lasndschaftsmalerei an die Dresdner Kunstakademie berufen. Für die Reihe ?Das malerische und romantische Deutschland? des Leipziger Verlegers Georg Wigand schuf er die Ansichten für die Bände zu Harz, Franken und Riesengebirge. In den späten 1830er Jahren begann er mit Holzschnitt-Illustrationen für Bücher, die ihn unter einem größeren Laienpublikum in Deutschland bekannt machten. Schließlich wurde er zum Professor für Landschaftsmalerei in Dresden ernannt. 1873 musste er aufgrund eines Augenleidens mit dem Malen aufhören und schied 1876 aus der Kunstakademie in Dresden aus..

      [Bookseller: Galerie Himmel]
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        Manuscript with Drawings - Butterflies from Around the World

      England, 1832. United Kingdom, circa 1832. A meticulous manuscript journal of lepidoptery containing 95 exquisite coloured ink drawings of butterfly and moth specimens, citing observations made and then only recently published by naturalist Thomas Brown, a work of unprecedented scope on the subject. 174 pages including index; some integral blanks between the three sections. Watermarked leafs with occasional floral embossed stamp to corners. 18mo. Original purpose-made calf binding with ornate tooling, marbled endpapers, four raised bands and label to spine reading "Book of Butterflies - Brown." Volume measures 10 x 14 cm. Drawings range in size, the largest measuring approximately 6 x 7 cm and the smallest 3,5 x 2 cm. Corners bumped, otherwise in very good condition, a most pleasing journal with stellar artistic renderings. The writer of this volume is unknown, though he or she is a skilled artist with an evident interest in natural history. With access to the authoritative work on butterflies, then the only one of its kind, the first edition now being extremely scarce, this journal contains 95 illustrations rendered with exceptional likeness and striking colours. Each drawing is captioned with its common English name, its Latin name, and primary habitat. Only the Pivot sphinx moth is identified but not drawn. Specimens examined are as far reaching as Suriname, Amboyna in Indonesia, the East Indies, Cochinchina (Vietnam), the Americas - especially Suriname in South America, Africa, China and Siberia. A select number of specimens, those most curious, rare, or of special interest to the writer/artist, are also accompanied by concise descriptions. The volume begins with notes on the "Classification of Lepidopterous Insects" and concludes with a table of contents. Some of the most curious and colourful specimens are found in this journal, including: • The Death's-head Hawkmoth named for its distinctly eerie markings on the thorax resembling a human skull, a genus which had only been identified in 1809 by German entomologist J.H. Laspeyres • The Chinese Silkworm moth native to and fundamental to China • The Oriental Emperor of China • The Hector Torjan of India • The Imperial Trojan of Amboyna (Maluku) with its 7 inch wingspan • The distinct spotted Phlegia of Suriname • The Silver Striped yellow genus of the United Kingdom • The Hummingbird Hawk moth (Macroglossum stellatarum) which actually hovers in midair while they feed on nectar from flowers • The Wandering Moth or Phalaena Erota of Suriname, recorded as "A very rare species" • The female Hortman moth of Anglesea in Australia • The Dark Crimson Underwing moth (Catocala sponsa) • The Friendly moth or Phalaena Amica of Africa, also note as "Very Rare" • The Hebe Tiger Moth of Germany with its striking marbled appearance • The Bright Moth or Phalaena Flavia attributed to Siberia (distinctly similar to the Yellow Tiger Moth or Arctia flavia) An elegant, high quality custom binding houses the work, the artist's choice of tooling being most fitting with floral vines. Several leafs are also imprinted with an embossed stamp of a rose. The label recognizing Thomas Brown suggests respect, possibly for a colleague in the same industry. The first edition of "The Book of Butterflies, Sphinges, and Moths..." published in 1832, on which this journal is based, contained 96 engravings, and was the first work devoted solely to the butterfly family. Captain Thomas Brown (1785-1862) was a British naturalist and malacologist, born in Perth, Scotland. After his military service, he wrote several natural history books, a few dealing with conchology, also, "The Book of butterflies, Sphinges, and Mths" and "The Taxidermist's Manual." He also made the illustrations for a well known book on American ornithology by Alexander Wilson and Charles Lucien Bonaparte (1831-1835). Brown was a fellow of the Linnean Society, a member of the Wernerian, Kirwanian and Phrenological Societies, and president of the Physical Society. Material from his books was used by United States naturalist Thomas Wyatt for his book Manual of Conchology. In 1840 he became curator of the Manchester Museum for twenty-two years. A species of sea snail, a marine gastropod, was named after him: Zebina browniana d'Orbigny, 1842. The first edition of Thomas Brown's work was published in Edinburgh and London, 1832, titled, "The Book of Butterflies, Sphinges, and Moths: illustrated by ninety-six engravings, coloured after nature." A second and expanded edition appeared in 1834, "The Book of Butterflies, Sphinges, and Moths: illustrated by one hundred and forty-four engravings, coloured after nature." . Very Good.

      [Bookseller: Voyager Press Rare Books & Manuscripts, ]
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        The Angling Excursions of Gregory Greendrake, Esq. in the Counties of Wicklow, Meath, Westmeath, Longford, and Cavan, with Additions by Geoffrey Greydrake, Esq., Dedicated to "All Honest Brothers of the Angle."

      Grant and Bolton, Dublin, 1832, Half-Leather/cloth Boards, Book Condition: Very Good, Dust Jacket Condition: N/A, Fourth EditionHardback. 112mm x 180mm tall. Pp vi, 313 + Erratum slip, engraved frontispiece plate and a map. * A previous owner has made a note in pencil on the verso of the front free endpaper, identifying the two pseudonymous Authors as Henry Brereton Cody and Thomas Ettingsall, but it must be said that Westwood and Satchell state the first named of these to be instead J. Coad, erstwhile Editor of the Dublin Warder. Light rubs to edges and corners and some internal foxing, otherwise very good, in half green calf/gilt-ruled, green cloth-covered boards/gilt decorated spine with five gilt-decorated panels, raised bands, and gilt-on-red leather title-label/marbled endpapers and all edges gilt.

      [Bookseller: Christopher Baron]
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        Eigenh. Brief mit U.

      Posen, 21. August 1832.. 2 SS. auf Doppelblatt. Gr.-4to. Mit eh. Adresse (Faltbrief).. An Raimund Haertel (geb. 1810) vom Musikverlag Breitkopf & Haertel: "Auf unsere mündliche Unterredung bei Ihrer Anwesenheit in Berlin mich beziehend, bin ich so frei, Ihnen anbei ein Heft von 6 Liedern zu übersenden. Das Lied Hop, hop, hop [!] mein Kindchen', welches bei Ihnen in meinem op. 6 einstimmig erschienen ist, befindet sich hierin unter Nro. 3 mit Klavierbegleitung, wie wir verabredeten, da die Leute es so oft mit Begl[eitung] verlangt haben. Was das Honorar betrifft, so stelle ich Ihnen den billigen Preis von 1 Louisd'or für den Druckbogen. In Betracht dessen nun, daß das Lied N. 3 nur ein Arrangement ist (welches ich gerne gratis gemacht haben will) so wollen wir es von der Bogenzahl abrechnen und wird dann der übrige Theil des Manuscripts mindestens 4 Druckbogen füllen [...] Seit meinem letzten Schreiben an Sie, mit welchem ich mir die Freiheit nahm, Ihnen den Klavierauszug meines Te Deum's zur Ansicht zu schicken, bin ich hier in Posen (zum Besuch bei meinem Vater) und habe mich so gut unterhalten, wie es möglich ist; ich habe hier eine Messe geschrieben, welche an diesem Sonntag den 26t. im hiesigen Dom, dessen Einweihungsfest gefeiert wird, aufgeführt wird und dann will ich wieder nach Berlin zurück, um mein Te Deum aufzuführen. Den Klavierauszug bitte ich Sie nach Berlin an G. Bethge zu remittiren [...]". - Otto Nicolai war Schüler von Carl Friedrich Zelter und kam über Rom nach Wien, wo er als Kapellmeister am Kärntnertortheater wirkte. Nach einem erneuten Italienaufenthalt wurde er als Nachfolger Conradin Kreutzers Hofkapellmeister; 1842 begründete er die Philharmonischen Konzerte, in deren Rahmen er 1843 eine vielbeachtete Aufführung von Beethovens 9. Symphonie gab. 1847 übersiedelte er nach Berlin, wo er im Jahr darauf die Leitung des Domchors und die Kapellmeisterstelle an der Kgl. Oper übernahm. Mit seiner komischen Oper "Die lustigen Weiber von Windsor" begründete er "den komischen Typus der deutschen romantischen Oper" (DBE). - Ohne die erwähnte Beilage. - Papierbedingt etwas gebräunt; mit stärkeren Läsuren und kleineren Einrissen am linken und rechten Rand; Bl. 2 mit kl. Ausschnitt durch Siegelbruch (keine Textberührung und alt hinterlegt).

      [Bookseller: Kotte Autographs GmbH]
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        Nouveaux éléments de médecine opératoire, accompagnés d'un atlas de 20 planches in-quarto, représentant les principaux procédés opératoires et un grand nombre d'instruments de chirurgie. ATLAS

      H. Dumont, Bruxelles 1832 - EDITION ORIGINALE. Atlas SEUL. In-4 relié, 20pp. d'explications, 20 planches lithographiées sous serpentes. Note: le relieur a placé la planche 20 (organes sexuels de la femme) entre les 15 et 16; les pages d'explication sont placées entre les planches. Reliure demi-basane verte. Plats frottés, bords et coins émoussés. Des rousseurs, notamment sur les serpentes: les planches sont bien conservées. [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: PRISCA]
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        2 eigenh. Ausschnitte mit U.

      O. O. u. D.. 1 S. 44:132 bzw. 32:103 mm, alt auf Trägerkarton montiert (qu.-8vo). Die Verso-S. mit einem eh. musikalischen Albumblatt mit Widmung und U. seiner Tochter Marie (1832-1916). Dresden, 22. Dezember 1895. 1S. Qu.-kl.-8vo.. "Spielend hast Du's überwunden | Und so den Kern der Schönheit aufgefunden, | Im Können nur liegt das Ideal | Und nicht in mühevollem Ringen". - Marie Wiecks Albumblatt mit acht Takten in zwei zweizeiligen, mit "Rebus" überschriebenen Systemen, ist Frau Bertha Chalaupka v. Sternwall gewidmet. - Friedrich Wiecks Ausschnitte an den Rändern unregelmäßig beschnitten und mit mehreren Montagespuren, Marie Wiecks Albumblatt etwas fleckig und eingerissen sowie gleichfalls mit kleineren Montagespuren.

      [Bookseller: Kotte Autographs GmbH]
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        Sumario de las antigüedades romanas que hay en España, en especial las pertenecientes á las Bellas Artes.

      Madrid, Imprenta de D. Miguel de Burgos, 1832 - -21,5 x 30,5 cm.- , 2 hs. + 538 págs. Magnífica encuadernación en plena piel, pasta española, con nervios y tejuelos. (Ejemplar muy limpio.) [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Berceo (Libros Antiguos)]
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        Sumario de las antigüedades romanas que hay en España, especialmente las pertenecientes a las Bellas Artes.

      - M., Miguel de Burgos, 1832, 33 x 23 cm., hol. piel nueva, 2 h. + XXVIII págs. + 2 h. + 538 págs. (Ejemplar con grandes márgenes, con leves taladros en ellos). ARQUEOLOGÍA ROMA

      [Bookseller: Librería Anticuaria Antonio Mateos]
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        Marktplatz mit Rathaus, links Brunnen mit Frauen.

      . Kol. Lithographie auf China von Samuel Prout, 1832, 29 x 42 cm.. Schöne Ansicht von der Hand des beliebten englischen Lithographen.

      [Bookseller: Peter Bierl Buch- & Kunstantiquariat]
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        The British Dominions in North America;

      London: Longman, Rees, Orme, Brown, Green, and Longman,, 1832. or, a Topographical and Statistical Description of the Provinces of Lower and Upper Canada, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, the Islands of Newfoundland, Prince Edward, and Cape Breton. Including Considerations on Land-Granting and Emigration. To which are annexed, Statistical Tables and Tables of Distances, &c. [with] A Topographical Dictionary of the Province of Lower Canada. 3 volumes, quarto (275 x 217 mm). Near contemporary dark green half calf, raised bands to spines, titles and pine cone patterns to compartments gilt, geometric pattern to cloth in blind, marbled edges, dark green endpapers. Frontispiece and lithographic half-title to both Volumes I and II, 16 plates, one of which is folding, 3 tables on 4 plates, 10 plans, and one folding map. Modern bookseller's ticket to front pastedowns, near contemporary ownership inscription of William Griffith to verso of front free endpapers. Extremities slightly bumped and a touch worn in places, boards slightly soiled, dampstain along bottom edge of rear board of Volume II, inner hinges gently cracked but firm, mild offsetting from ownership inscription and some plates, light browning and occasional dampstaining to margins of plates, small chips to margins of some plates, pale foxing throughout Volumes II and III, mainly to margins. Otherwise a very good set. First edition of this major early work on the history and development of Canada. Joseph Bouchette (1774-1841) was a Canadian militia officer and loyalist who qualified as a surveyor in early 1791. He initially gained fame in 1815 by publishing an extensive map and catalogue of Canada. This was an early synthesis of information on the region and Bouchette received a gold medal from the Royal Society for the Encouragement of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce. The present work, Bouchette's second publication, is far more detailed and comprehensive and was the result of several years' research in the late 1820s.

      [Bookseller: Peter Harrington]
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        Sir Edward Seaward¿s Narrative of His Shipwreck, and Consequent Discovery of Certain Islands In The Caribbean Sea; With a Detail of Many Extraordinary and Highly Interesting events In His Life, From The Year 1733-1749. As Written in His Own Diary.

      Longman, Rees, Orme, Brown, Green & Longman, Paternoster-Row, London 1832 - Hardcover, bound in blue half morocco, with marbled boards. Spine gilt with four raised bands and blind decoration in compartments. Green morocco gilt title in 2nd compartment and gilt volume numerals to 4th compartment. Vignette on title page in each volume. Vol I: xv, 344pp, 12 chapters. Front free end paper and fly leaf missing. Vol II: viii, 359pp, 9 chapters. Vol III: vii, 341pp, 13 chapters. Minor foxing throughout all three volumes. Slight wear to extremities. Some but very little rubbing to boards. All bindings tight and strong. In very good + condition, very clean inside and out. [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Stonechat Editions]
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        D’ESTE Famiglie celebri italiane.

      Milano, Ferrario, 1832. In-folio, bross. azzurra rifatta, 17 doppie tavole di testo e un grande stemma miniato + 9 tavole a doppia pag. di illustrazioni, inc. in rame, di cui 4 colorate d?'epoca, inclusa una carta geografica degli Stati Estensi. Cfr. Ferrante Boschetti, 36. Ingialliture al margine bianco di alcune ill., peraltro ben conservato.

      [Bookseller: Libreria Malavasi sas]
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        Rock Ptarmigan - Lagopus rupestris

      London 1832 - This splendid hand-colored, folio size lthograph from John Gould's (1804-1881)monumental book "Birds of Europe" is in excellent condition, measures 14 ½” x 21 ½” and magnificently displays the author's scientific skill and attention to detail. John Gould was without question the most prolific natural history artist of the nineteenth century. He worked during a period of intense fascination with discoveries in natural history, especially regarding knowledge of the wildlife of exotic lands. Gould shared the romantic enthusiasm of his time for such subjects, as well as the popular impulse to catalog exotic wildlife. He combined his passion for natural history with outstanding scientific, artistic, and entrepreneurial talents. Drawing on these abilities, he embarked on a series of projects that would eventually make him the leading publisher of ornithological illustrations in Victorian Britain. Gould’s unparalleled career spanned five decades, and he produced a monumental series of books of birds throughout the world. Gould planned the Birds of Europe in an effort to redress the imbalance between the study of local and foreign ornithology. In his preface he stated his mission: “the Birds of Europe, in which we are, or ought to be, most interested, have not received that degree of attention which they naturally demand. The present work has been undertaken to supply that deficiency.” Gould portrayed birds native to Europe in a manner that had only been thought appropriate for the colorful species of distant places. In this way he managed to draw much popular interest back to native birds, which were suddenly considered equally beautiful to exotic species. Rich, vibrant color is an important attribute of the best 19th Century prints. Many prints by John Gould found on the market today have modern color that affects both the appearance and the value of these great works. John Gould died in 1881 still actively illustrating and producing fine bird books. His stock of unsold copies, unbound text and plates in various states, lithographic stones, drawings and paintings, amounted to nearly three tons. Many of the uncolored pulls from his monumental "Birds of Europe" have been recolored in the last thirty years, and these are often found on the market. Fortunately, the difference between original and modern color can be discerned by looking carefully at the print. When modern color is applied to 180 year old paper, the application is inconsistent; the cellulose of the aged paper has begun to breakdown and can no longer evenly absorb the watercolors, resulting in a splotchy uneven appearance All of the Gould bird prints in Arader Galleries' inventory have exquisite original color. The vastly superior quality of original color can be clearly differentiated from new color by its smooth and even appearance. The inks have noticeably deeper, richer tones. The difference can also be seen in the lovely surface "sheen" that results from the application of gum arabic when the lithograph was first pulled. The hand coloring of engravings and lithographs reached its zenith in the 19th Century. Works that still display their original color are more rewarding to view, and will better hold their value in the years to come.***If you frame up this item with Arader Galleries you can take a 50% discount off the listed price of this work of art.***

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
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        Album de sept vues des ruines de l'intérieur de la citadlle d'Anvers. Dessinées physiquement d'après nature, immédiatement après sa réddition en décembre 1832

      Anvers (Antwerpen), Vandennest 1832 - Seltenes und komplettes Ansichtenwerk über die Zitadelle von Antwerpen und deren zerstörte Gebäude und Festungswerke nach dem Bombardement und der Eroberung durch die Franzosen unter dem Oberbefehl des Maréchal Gérard im Dezember 1832. - Die großformatigen Ansichten zeigen den Eingang zur Zitadelle und die Kirche der Zitadelle, das Pulvermagazin, die Artilleriekaserne, das Tor zur Artilleriekaserne, die große u. die kleine Infanteriekaserne und die Bastion. - Rare et complète oeuvre de sept vues des ruines de l'intérieur de la citadlle d'Anvers avec sept lithographies teintées. - Vollrandig, nur wenig gebräunt, jedoch schwach wasserrandig. Umschlag randrissig. - Seulement un peu mouillé Lithogr. Titel, 7 lithograph. braungetönteTafeln von M. Ropoll fils ainé Lithogr. Original-Umschlag, Imperial-Folio [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Buch & Kunst Antiquariat Flotow GmbH]
 31.   Check availability:     IberLibro     Link/Print  


        Three Toed Woodpecker - Picus tridactylus

      London 1832 - This splendid hand-colored, folio size lithograph from John Gould's (1804-1881) monumental work "Birds of Europe" is in excellent condition, measures 14 ½” x 21 ½” and magnificently displays the author's scientific skill and attention to detail. John Gould was without question the most prolific natural history artist of the nineteenth century. He worked during a period of intense fascination with discoveries in natural history, especially regarding knowledge of the wildlife of exotic lands. Gould shared the romantic enthusiasm of his time for such subjects, as well as the popular impulse to catalog exotic wildlife. He combined his passion for natural history with outstanding scientific, artistic, and entrepreneurial talents. Drawing on these abilities, he embarked on a series of projects that would eventually make him the leading publisher of ornithological illustrations in Victorian Britain. Gould’s unparalleled career spanned five decades, and he produced a monumental series of books of birds throughout the world. Gould planned the Birds of Europe in an effort to redress the imbalance between the study of local and foreign ornithology. In his preface he stated his mission: “the Birds of Europe, in which we are, or ought to be, most interested, have not received that degree of attention which they naturally demand. The present work has been undertaken to supply that deficiency.” Gould portrayed birds native to Europe in a manner that had only been thought appropriate for the colorful species of distant places. In this way he managed to draw much popular interest back to native birds, which were suddenly considered equally beautiful to exotic species. Rich, vibrant color is an important attribute of the best 19th Century prints. Many prints by John Gould found on the market today have modern color that affects both the appearance and the value of these great works. John Gould died in 1881 still actively illustrating and producing fine bird books. His stock of unsold copies, unbound text and plates in various states, lithographic stones, drawings and paintings, amounted to nearly three tons. Many of the uncolored pulls from his monumental "Birds of Europe" have been recolored in the last thirty years, and these are often found on the market. Fortunately, the difference between original and modern color can be discerned by looking carefully at the print. When modern color is applied to 180 year old paper, the application is inconsistent; the cellulose of the aged paper has begun to breakdown and can no longer evenly absorb the watercolors, resulting in a splotchy uneven appearance All of the Gould bird prints in Arader Galleries' inventory have exquisite original color. The vastly superior quality of original color can be clearly differentiated from new color by its smooth and even appearance. The inks have noticeably deeper, richer tones. The difference can also be seen in the lovely surface "sheen" that results from the application of gum arabic when the lithograph was first pulled. The hand coloring of engravings and lithographs reached its zenith in the 19th Century. Works that still display their original color are more rewarding to view, and will better hold their value in the years to come.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
 32.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  


        ICONOGRAFIA DELLA FAUNA ITALICA PER LE QUATTRO CLASSI DEGLI ANIMALI VERTEBRATI

      Roma, Tipografia Salviucci, 1832-1841. In-folio (mm. 380x264), 3 voll., mz. pelle coeva con ang., decoraz. e tit. oro al dorso. - Il vol. I, dedicato a "Mammiferi e Uccelli", è cosi' composto: "Mammiferi", 10 cc.nn. (frontesp., Indice, Prefaz., Introduz.), 24 tavv., 65 cc.nn. di descrizione delle 44 specie illustrate - "Uccelli", 10 cc.nn. (Introduz.), 24 tavv. + 57 cc.nn. di descrizione delle 35 specie illustrate. - Vol. II: "Amfibi", 5 cc.nn. (frontesp., Indice, Introduz.), 54 tavv. + 130 cc.nn. di descrizione delle 60 specie illustrate. - Vol. III: "Pesci", 12 cc.nn. (frontesp., Indice, Introduz.), 78 tavv. + 263 (su 266) cc.nn. di descrizione delle 181 specie illustrate. "Mancano 3 cc." al testo della specie "Torpedo narce". Complessivamente l?'opera è illustrata da 180 splendide litografie, di preciso disegno e finissima coloritura a mano. La tavole, incise da Battistelli, Rosa, Santarella e Wieller, sono tratte per lo più da disegni di Carlo Ruspi e Pietro Quattrocchi e forniscono una panoramica, fino a quel momento la più completa, dei vertebrati italiani. In questo grandioso progetto di riesame delle numerose descrizioni della fauna regionale italiana già esistenti, si trovano elencate circa un migliaio delle quindicimila specie di vertebrati presenti in Italia, essendo state scelte quelle più rappresentative della classe, o meno note alla letteratura zoologica ufficiale, o affatto sconosciute. "Edizione originale" di questa celebrata e rara opera. Cfr. Ceresoli, p. 101 - Zimmer, p. 66 - Nissen DIV,118. Nel ns. esemplare il vol. III con alone al margine inferiore bianco del testo che fortunatamente intacca in modo insignificante alcune tavv. Complessivamente solo le pagine di testo portano qualche lieve fioritura, mentre le tavole sono fresche e molto ben conservate. "Carlo Luciano Bonaparte (Principe di Canino e Musignano), nato a Parigi nel 1803, in seguito alla caduta di Napoleone I di cui era nipote, dopo un breve soggiorno in America fissò a Roma la sua residenza e si dedicò agli studi scientifici. E' considerato un ornitologo di fama mondiale. Mori' a Parigi nel 1857". P.a.r. .

      [Bookseller: Libreria Malavasi sas]
 33.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  

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