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Displayed below are some selected recent viaLibri matches for books published in 1812

        Map of the United States Exhibiting the Post Roads, the situations, connexions [sic.] & distances of post-offices, stage roads, counties, & principal rivers

      Washington, D.C. [engraved in Philadelphia by Francis Shallus] 1812 - A monumental American map: this issue the first to be published following Louisiana statehood and in glorious full contemporary coloring. The decade following the ratification of the Constitution was marked by enormous growth in the new nation. Perhaps the greatest reflection of that development was in the Post Office. In 1792 at the time of the creation of the Post Office, the nation included 6000 miles of post roads and 195 post offices; by 1800, just eight years later, there were 21,000 miles of post roads (a 250% increase) and 903 post offices (a 360% increase). "From the beginning, the postal system needed to be visually profiled in detail. Accurate 'working' maps were needed for planning and operating mail routes, setting pickup-and-delivery schedules, assisting postal workers in post offices and distribution centers in sorting, establishing new post offices, negotiating contracts with carriers, and educating Washington politicians responsible for overseeing the Post Office . The task of creating the maps necessary to manage the rapidly growing U.S. postal system was assumed by Abraham Bradley" (Caldwell & Buehler). Bradley, born in Litchfield, CT and trained as a lawyer, initially served as the clerk to first Postmaster General Timothy Pickering. Among his duties was to compile information concerning the various routes of the nation. By the time Joseph Habersham became the second Postmaster General in 1795, Bradley, who was retained as the clerk, seems to have been well on his way to producing his great cartographic achievement. Synthesizing information from both published maps (including Buell, McMurray, Carlton, Arrowsmith and Hutchins) as well as information drawn from surveys undertaken for the Post Office, Bradley published the first edition of his map in 1796. That map, on a scale of 1:2,400,000, depicted the country as far west as the Mississippi, showing the location of 450 post offices and their respective routes and including a large table titled "Progress of the Mail on the Main Line" at the lower right. Three distinct issues of the 1796 edition have been identified, published between 1796 and 1800 (Wheat and Brun 128-130); additionally the northeast sheet only of the map seems to have been issued separately in 1796, constituting a fourth issue. The differences between the issues is largely in the number of post offices shown as well as the changing geo-political landscape, i.e. the changing boundaries of existing states or the addition of new territories. "Bradley's 1796 map was soon rendered obsolete. The postal system had grown from about 450 post offices as shown on Bradley's 1796 map to 1,405 post offices in 1804. More importantly, the 1803 purchase of more than 800,000 square miles of the French Louisiana Territory had markedly expanded the country. On August 29, 1803, Bradley wrote to President Jefferson, 'The great alterations which have taken place in the U.S. since my map was first published have rendered it of little use & I have for sometime suspended the sale.' A full depiction of the expanded United States and the inclusion of its hundreds of new post offices were essential for future system planning and route contracting . The new map was designed on a larger scale and with greater dimensions than the 1796 map to accommodate wider geographic coverage and a denser postal network. In fact, at 98 cm x 132 cm on four sheets, it has over 50% more surface area. The expanded coverage encompasses the newly acquired Louisiana Territory as far as 19 degrees west of Washington, but the sparsely settled northern extremities of the United States (the Lake Superior country, for example) are not shown. The geography of the Great Lakes is more accurately portrayed and far more detail is shown in the West than on the 1796 map. The nation's expansion is indicated not only by the Louisiana Territory and its subsequent division into the Orleans Territory and the District of Louisiana (1804), but also by the new Mi [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Donald A. Heald Rare Books (ABAA)]
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        Pineapple] Smooth Leaved Green Antigua Pine

      G. Brookshaw, [London] 1812 - A fine image from Brookshaw's masterpiece "Pomona Britannica; or, A Collection of the Most Esteemed Fruits," the finest work on fruit and flowers ever produced. Its breathtaking images display a level of technical virtuosity and beauty that distinguish this magnificent aquatint as a true work of art. Brookshaw published this seminal botanical study late in his career, at first publishing it in parts and then as a complete edition in 1812. The fact that this outstanding work took ten years to complete is evident in the quality of its images and the care with which Brookshaw executed each individual picture. 'Pomona Britannica' was produced as a visual record of the best available varieties of fruit in an attempt to encourage gardeners to experiment with growing fruit, and illustrates examples found in the Royal gardens at Hampton Court, Kensington Gardens, and the private gardens of the Prince of Wales in Blackheath. 'Pomona Britannica' differs from other botanical works in its dark aquatinted backgrounds and its stylized compositions. By using aquatint to create a contrasting background, Brookshaw manages to produce a truly dramatic effect. His use of stylized composition distinguishes his pictures from the dry scientific illustrations found in other botanical studies and creates an exceptionally beautiful visual experience. 'Pomona Britannica' is not only a didactic study, it is a masterpiece of illustration in which every picture is a testament to the artist's talent and ingenuity. Cf. Dunthorne 50; cf. Great Flower Books (1990) p. 81; cf. Nissen BBI 244; cf. Sandra Raphael An Oak Spring Pomona 40a. Aquatint engraving, with some stipple, printed in colours and finished by hand. In excellent condition. Image size: 17 7/8 x 12 7/8 inches. Reproduction gilt frame. [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Donald A. Heald Rare Books (ABAA)]
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        Collection of Haitian Presidential autographs, comprising autograph and partly printed documents on executive stationery, signed by eleven Presidents of the Republic of Haiti from Alexandre Pétion to Philippe Sudre Dartiguenave

      Most Port-au-Prince, 1812-1916. (HAITI) Chiefly 4to, one broadside folio. 20 items, single sheet printed letterhead or partly printed documents, accomplished in ink dated and signed, with two printed broadsides. Some toning or soiling and marginal chipping (large broadside split along fold), overall very good . An outstanding collection of Haitian material comprising items signed by 11 presidents: 1) ALEXANDRE PETION, president of Haiti 1807-1818. Autograph document signed "Pétion" as president, 6 April 1812, a laissez passer for Mr Douglass, on government business, and noting his white horse "which it is forbidden for whomsoever to touch under any pretext." 2) JEAN-PIERRE BOYER, president of Haiti 1818-1843. Autograph financial document signed "Boyer" as Commander-in-Chief of Port-au-Prince, 30 November 1817, a receipt for 185 gourdes. 3) FABRE GEFFRARD, president of Haiti 1859-1867. Manuscript letter signed "Geffrard" as President, 3 December 1860, ordering his secretary of state to pay General Simon Sam (see no. 7 below) the sum of 2,165 gourdes. 4) NISSAGE SAGET, president of Haiti 1870-1874. Manuscript letter signed "Nissage Saget" as President, 11 October 1870, requesting a report on the state of the Arsenal at Cap-Haitien (cellophane tape repair to verso at signature). 5) MICHEL DOMINGUE, president of Haiti 1874-1878. a) Manuscript letter signed "Domingue" as general and provisional commander of the département du Sud, 14 September 1868, promoting second lieutenant Hyppolite (see no. 6 below) to full lieutenant; Partly printed document, signed "Domingue" as president of the Etat Meridional d'Haiti, 25 January 1869, promoting Prosper Faure to the rank of générale de division; Manuscript letter, signed "Domingue" as president of Haiti, 11 December 1874, acknowledging receipt of dispatches from the interim secretary of war. 6) FLORVIL HIPPOLYTE, president of Haiti 1889-1896. Manuscript letter signed "F Hyppolite" as générale de division, 14 July 1875, concerning troop inspections; Manuscript letter signed "F Hyppolite" as president, 27 January 1896, concerning an appointment to the local police. 7) TIRESIAS AUGUSTIN SIMON SAM, president of Haiti 1896-1902. Manuscript letter, signed "T A S Sam" as president, 12 August 1898, to the secretary of the interior, endorsing a recommendation for a police appointment. 8) FRANÇOIS ANTOINE SIMON, president of Haiti 1908-1911. Manuscript letter signed "F.A. Simon" as générale de division, honorary aide de camp to the President, etc., 16 July 1896, to President Tiresias Augustin Simon Sam, concerning a recommendation for Camille Jean-François, acting police commissioner in the Cayes district; Typewritten letter, Signed "F.A. Simon" as president, 15 March 1909, conveying a military commission. 9) CINCINNATUS LECONTE, president of Haiti 1911-1912. Manuscript letter, Signed "Ctus Leconte" as president, 13 June 1912, concerning a request for police officers' uniforms; Printed broadside, presidential decree dated 16 August 1911, naming the members of his cabinet. 10) MICHEL ORESTE, president of Haiti 1913-1914. Typewritten letter, Signed "Michel Oreste" as president, 4 July 1913, concerning a commercial license for the representative of the Hamburg America Line. 11) PHILIPPE SUDRE DARTIGUENAVE, president of Haiti 1915-1922. Typewritten letter, signed "Dartiguenave" as president, 1 April 1916, concerning a widow's pension. With four additional Haitian items: Partly printed receipt for import duties paid by Capt Taylor of the American brig Pegasus, 6 November 1827, signed Lavartida, on letterhead of the National Treasury of Santo-Domingo; Printed broadside with vignette headed "Liberté ou la Mort", decree of the provisional government concerning the rental of properties held by the nation, 10 May 1843, following the overthrow of president Boyer; Autograph letter from générale de division Antoine Jeanty 27 November 1880, to the secretary of war; Partly printed consular document, Amsterdam, 16 December 1929, concerning bills and manifests for a cargo ship. An impressive and representative collection of Haitian leadership from the earliest years of the Republic's independence through the U.S. invasion of 1915

      [Bookseller: James Cummins Bookseller]
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        Grapes] Royal Muscadine Grape

      G. Brookshaw, [London] 1812 - A fine image from Brookshaw's masterpiece: 'Pomona Britannica; or, A Collection of the Most Esteemed Fruits'. George Brookshaw's 'Pomona Britannica' is the finest work on fruit and flowers ever produced. Its breathtaking images display a level of technical virtuosity and beauty that distinguish this magnificent work as a true work of art. As a retired cabinetmaker, Brookshaw produced his seminal botanical study late in his career, at first publishing it in parts and then as a complete edition in 1812. The fact that this outstanding work took ten years to complete is evident in the quality of its images and the care with which Brookshaw executed each individual picture. 'Pomona Britannica' was produced as a visual record of the best available varieties of fruit in an attempt to encourage gardeners to experiment with growing fruit, and illustrates examples found in the Royal gardens at Hampton Court, Kensington Gardens, and the private gardens of the Prince of Wales in Blackheath. 'Pomona Britannica' differs from other botanical works in its dark aquatinted backgrounds and its stylized compositions. By using aquatint to create a contrasting background, Brookshaw manages to produce a truly dramatic effect. His use of stylized composition distinguishes his pictures from the dry scientific illustrations found in other botanical studies and creates an exceptionally beautiful visual experience. 'Pomona Britannica' is not only a didactic study, it is a masterpiece of illustration in which every picture is a testament to the artist's talent and ingenuity. Cf. Dunthorne 50; cf. Great Flower Books (1990) p. 81; cf. Nissen BBI 244; cf. Sandra Raphael An Oak Spring Pomona 40a. Aquatint engraving, with some stipple, printed in colours and finished by hand.

      [Bookseller: Donald A. Heald Rare Books (ABAA)]
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