The viaLibri website requires cookies to work properly. You can find more information in our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy.

Displayed below are some selected recent viaLibri matches for books published in 1701

        Lagrimas Amantes de la Excellentissima Ciudad de Barcelona ... en las Magnificas Exequias, que celebrò á las Amadas, y Venerables memorias de su difunto Rey y Señor, Don Carlos II

      Juan Pablo Marti for Francisco Barnola Barcelona: Juan Pablo Marti for Francisco Barnola, 1701. Scarce first edition of this curious funeral fête for Carlos II, generally regarded by posterity as the most stupid and ineffective of the Hapsburg kings of Spain, whose reign (1665-1700) saw the utter dismemberment of the kingdom by Louis XIV.Needless to say, this is not how he is regarded in this account of the funeral proceedings by the Jesuit Rocaberti, which in addition to the standard description of the public ceremonies and the unusually large catafalque (pictured), contains one feature we have never encountered in a funeral publication: some of the orations, laments, hymns and other literary texts are arrayed in calligrams, labyrinths and other graphically striking configurations. For example, the text of a Latin distich Mors rapuit Carolum (“Death has snatched Charles”) has been scrambled in a diamond-shaped pattern. * Palau 271,658; De Backer Sommervogel VI.1928.1.. 4to. [19.8 x 14.5 cm], (12) ff., 272 pp., (14) ff., 8 folding plates (that of the catafalque oversized & signed Francisco Gazan after Jos. Vives), and 1 printed in red and black. Bound in contemporary flexible vellum, title stenciled on spine in a neat hand. Ownership inscription of Juan Ant. de Figueras on front end leaf; some foxing and small, light waterstain on title and in upper margin of scattered leaves; some repairs to blank upper margin of approximately 15 leaves. Otherwise good.

      [Bookseller: Martayan Lan, Inc. ]
 1.   Check availability:     ABAA     Link/Print  


        MEMOIRES OF THE REIGNE OF KING CHARLES I, WITH A CONTINUATION TO THE

      1701. WARWICK, Sir Philip. MEMOIRES OF THE REIGNE OF KING CHARLES I, WITH A CONTINUATION TO THE HAPPY RESTAURATION OF KING CHARLES II. London: Ri. Chiswell, 1701. [12] pp. + 437 pp. + 3 pp. publisher's advertisements. 8vo., paneled/speckled calf, raised bands, gilt leather spine label (missing second label). Joints cracked, boards quite worn at corners, 2 inch calf piece missing from top of rear board. Three engravings, of the author, Charles I and Charles II, all with minimal foxing to margins. Laid in is an engraving of Oliver Cromwell by Vertue after Cooper, trimmed in the margin and tipped in on another sheet of paper (probably from another book). Former owner's gift inscription on front flyleaf, dated 1917. Text clean, complete.

      [Bookseller: Boston Book Company]
 2.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  


        Die Alten Jüdischen Heiligthümer, Gottes-dienste und Gewohnheiten, für Augen gestellet, in einer ausführlichen Beschreibung des gantzen Levitischen Priesterthums, und fünff unterschiedenen Büchern: Es handelt deren I. Von der Stiffts-Hütten ... II. Von dem Tempel, so wol dem ersten als dem andern ... III. Von den Hohen- und andern Priestern ... IV. Von den Leviten, deren Ursprung, und Aemtern ... V. Von dem täglichen Gottes-dienst der alten Hebräer, in und ausser der Stiffts-Hütte und Tempel; dero Wochen- Monat- und Jahr-Festen ... sorgsamst ausgearbeitet durch Johannem Lundium. Treuen Diener am Wort Gottes zu Tundern im Hertzogthum Schleßwig ... Samt einem Vorbericht (Tit.) Hn. Henrici Muhlii ... Hoch-Fürstl. Hollst. Gottorff. General-Superint. Ober-Hoff-Predigern, Kirchen-Raht und Probsten

      Hamburg, Liebernickel 1701. 34 cm. (42), 1090, (136) Seiten mit Frontisp., Porträt, 38 (4 ausfaltbar) Kupfertafeln von J. W. Michaelis und mehreren Textholzschn. Halblederband im Stil der Zeit mit Rückenschild und Rückenvergoldung - ADB 19, 637 - Fürst II, 274 - Lipperheide 1965 Bb 3 (2. Ausgabe 1704) - Erste von Muhl herausgegebene Ausgabe. "Umfassendes Werk über die jüdischen Altertümer, das noch nicht seinen Wert verloren hat" (ADB). Behandelt in 5 Büchern die Stiftshütte, den Tempel, die Hohenpriester, die Leviten und den täglichen Gottesdienst der alten Hebräer. Die Kupfer mit Darstellung von Kultgegenständen, Plänen, Münzen, Tracht der Pharisäer, Gebetsriemen, etc. Johann Lund (auch: Johannes Lundius), Diakon an der Christkirche in Tondern, wurde als "vir eruditus, laboriosus et in hebraica antiquitate versatissimus" charakterisiert (ADB). Gelegentlich leicht stockfleckig und Unterstreichungen im Text, 1 Faltkupfer im Falz restauriert, Vorsätze erneuert, Frontispiz und Porträt aufgezogen -

      [Bookseller: Wenner Antiquariat]
 3.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  


        Pharmacopoeia Extemporanea: sive Praescriptorum Sylloge. In qua Remediorum Elegantium & Efficacium, Paradigmata ad omnes fere Medendi Intentiones accommodata candide proponuntur. Una Cum Viribus, Operandi ratione, & Dosibus annexis

      Londini : Sam. Smith & Benj. Walford, 1701 Scarce first edition with remedies set out alphabetically and a listing of ailments at the rear. Unpaginated. Dr. Thomas Fuller (1654-1734) was born in Sussex. He was admitted to the Royal College of Physicians in 1679 and became an MD in 1681, establishing himself in Sevenoaks. In new red buckram binding with new endpapers. The original text is all present. What might have been the original fep is preserved but is browned and ragged. The title page has some browning at the edges. The text is generally clean but there is browning to page edges and this becomes more general in the final leaves at the rear of the book. The 2 blank leaves after the index of ailments are very browned and have ragged edges. Small light book - please enquire if you would like us to assess postage at cost.

      [Bookseller: E C Books]
 4.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  


        THE SCHOOL OF RECREATION, or A Guide To The Most Ingenious Exercises... of FIREWORKS,

      London, printed for H. Rhodes, 1701.. Hunting, Riding, Racing, Fireworks, Military Discipline, The Science Of Defence (sword fencing), Hawking, Tennis, Bowling, Ringing, Singing, Cock Fighting, Fowling, Angling. THIRD EDITION, 1701. 12mo, approximately 145 x 90 mm, 5¾ x 3½ inches, engraved frontispiece, showing six different recreations, musical notation in the text, pages: [vi], 1-182 plus [14] of adverts, bound in full contemporary speckled sheep, rebacked, double blind rules to edges of covers, new endpapers. Spine darkened, slight rubbing and scuffing to binding, tiny round piece of leather missing on top cover, corners worn with card tips just showing, frontispiece has tip of lower corner missing, occasional tiny closed tear to edges, all pages have pale age-browning, otherwise a very good copy. See; Chris Philip, A Bibliography of Firework Books, page 74; Westwood and Satchell, Bibliotheca Piscatoria, A Catalogue of Books on Angling, page110; (the fencing section is not listed in Thimm, Bibliography of Fencing and Duelling); John Resler Swift, Bibliotheca Accipitaria II A catalogue of Books Ancient and Modern Relating to Falconry, page 163; Schwerdt, A Catalogue of Books Relating to Hunting, Hawking and Shooting, Volume 4, page 49. MORE IMAGES ATTACHED TO THIS LISTING.

      [Bookseller: Roger Middleton]
 5.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  


        [Composite Atlas

      Paris or Amsterdam: n.d, maps dated: 1701-1739]. 2 volumes, folio. (21 1/2 x 16 1/2 inches). 1p. manuscript list of contents in French in each volume. 98 engraved maps, charts or town plans (3 folding, 95 double-page, 96 hand-coloured in outline). Contemporary calf gilt, covers panelled in gilt with fillets, a decorative roll and dog-tooth rolls, decorative cornerpieces made up from various small tools, spines gilt in eight compartments with raised bands, red morocco lettering-piece in the second compartment, the other compartments with repeat decoration in gilt. A very fine example of a composite atlas of the highest quality, made up entirely of maps by Guillaume de L'Isle: one of the greatest cartographers of his age. De L'Isle was the son of a cartographer and pupil of Jean Dominique Cassini, who, among other important contributions, aligned the study of astronomy with the study of geography. Under Cassini's direction, observations were made from locations all over the world that enabled longitudinal calculations to be made with much greater accuracy. De L'Isle carried on this exacting work with remarkable dedication and integrity, constantly revising and improving his maps. While precision was his primary goal, his maps are invariably elegant and attractive. He has often been cited as the first truly scientific cartographer, and his maps were widely copied by the commercial ateliers of Paris, Amsterdam, and the rest of Europe. He was elected to the French Academy of Science in 1702 and in 1718 was named "Premier Geographe du Roi," a title created especially for him. In addition to a fine world map and four hemispheric world maps, this atlas also includes nine maps of American interest, four of which are further described here: 1. Carte d'Amerique. [vol.II, map 8]. Considered one of de l'Isle's finest maps, the chart is one of the most accurate depictions of North and South America of the period. In de L'Isle's elegant map North and South America are shown on a large enough scale that western Europe and Africa are included. The map includes the rectification of South America's eastern coast line, correcting a map of South America whose Chilean-Argentinean peninsula swung to the west. The map also includes a Prime Meridian declared by Louis XIII, but not adopted; and Pope Alexander VI's Line of Demarcation that divided the world (outside of Europe) between Portugal and Spain. Finally, it should be noted that de L'Isle resisted the temptation to depict California as an island, which was being done by many mapmakers of the period. 2. Carte du Canada ou de la Nouvelle France. [vol.I, map 27]. This was the first printed map to name Detroit, at the time of its original issue in 1703. It was a painstaking incorporation of all the geographical material available, including some quite fictitious information concerning the origins of the Mississippi. The depictions of Hudson Bay, Labrador, Greenland and Baffin Bay are remarkably good. Schwartz and Ehrenberg, p.141. 3. Carte de la Louisiane et du Cours du Mississipi. [vol.I, map 28]. This is the first edition, second state, the first map to show New Orleans. It is one of the most important maps of America ever made. The first accurate depiction of the watershed of the Mississippi River; the first map to name Texas (as "Mission de los Teijas") In addition, de L'Isle has included the routes of several early and contemporary explorers, such as De Soto, La Salle, and Saint Denis. Because de L'Isle was geographer to the King, his maps were regarded as quasi-official documents that reflected the opinions of the French government, the boundaries that he laid down for French Louisiana caused great alarm in both London and Madrid. De L'Isle shows Louisiana extending as far west as the Pecos River, thereby claiming Texas as part of that French colony, while restricting the British to the eastern slope of the Appalachian Mountains. The map was originally published in June 1718, and did not show New Orleans, founded in that same summer. When word of the establishment of the city reached France, de L'Isle revised the map and added New Orleans. This map in the second state is the first to show that important American city. Cumming, British Maps, pp. 6-12; Cumming, Southeast in Early Maps, entry 170 and pp. 21-24; Cumming &c., Exploration of North America, pp. 35-54; McCorkle, America Emergent, entry 20; Schwartz & Ehrenberg, Mapping of America, p. 146. 4. Carte du Mexique et de la Floride. [vol.I, map 29]. By 1703, when de L'Isle had prepared his new map of Mexico and Florida, much new information on the area had become available since Coronelli's effort fifteen years before. Firsthand reports from the survivors of Lasalle's expedition, as well as from the French explorers and colonizers of the Gulf region like Bienville and d'Iberville, were carefully studied. De L'Isle's chart was the first printed map to accurately`portray the course and mouth of the Mississippi River. He correctly depicted the Great Lakes region, as well as the many English settlements along the East Coast. He also carefully set down the explorations of d'Iberville and his men on the Gulf Coast and the lower reaches of the Mississippi and Red River, and the Indian villages in East Texas where the Spanish constructed their missions and presidios. Texas and Oklahoma were portrayed as part of "Floride" then a French possession, which was later changed to Louisiana. James C. Martin, Maps of Texas and the Southwest, 1513-1900 p.93; Bryan & Hanak Texas in Maps 10; Cumming, Southeast in Early Maps, 137; Alfred E. Lemmom and others (editors) Charting Louisiana p.39; Phillips Atlases 533; Schwartz & Ehrenberg, Mapping of America, p.137; Wagner, The Cartography of the Northwest Coast of America 474; Wheat, Mapping the Transmississippi West 84.

      [Bookseller: Donald Heald Rare Books]
 6.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  


        Most Delectable History of Reynard the Fox, The

      1701. Early English Edition of the Reynard Fables[REYNARD THE FOX]. The Most Delectable History of Reynard the Fox. Newly Corrected and Purged, from all grossness in Phrase and Matter. Augmented and Enlarged with sundry Excellent Morals and Expositions upon every several Chapter. To which may now be added a Second Part of the said History: As also the Shifts of Reynardine the Son of Reynard the Fox, Together with his Life and Death, &c. London: Printed by T. Ilive, for Edward Brewster, 1701.[Bound together with:][REYNARD THE FOX]. The Most Pleasant and Delightful History of Reynard the Fox. The Second Part. Containing Much Matter of Pleasure and Content. Written For the Delight of young Men, Pleasure of the Aged, and Profit of all. To which is added many Excellent Morals. London: Printed by A.M. and R.R. for Edward Brewster, 1681.[And:][REYNARD THE FOX]. The Shifts of Reynardine The Son of Reynard the Fox, Or a Pleasant History of His Life and Death. Full of Variety, &c. And may fitly be applied to the Late Times. Now Published for the Reformation of Mens Manners. London: Printed by T.J. for Edward Brewster, and Thomas Passenger, 1684.Three parts in one small quarto volume (7 5/16 x 5 9/16 inches; 186 x 141 mm.). [156], [2, table of contents], [2, publisher’s advertisements]; [111], [1, publisher’s advertisements]; [8], 160 pp. Mostly black letter, with titles and side notes in roman letter. Sixty-two woodcuts in the first part, printed from thirty-nine blocks, and fifteen woodcuts in the second part, five repeated, all repeats from the first part. Most cuts signed “E.B.” (Edward Brewster). Woodcut on C1 recto (Part I) printed upside down.Contemporary sprinkled sheep. Covers ruled and decoratively tooled in blind, spine decoratively tooled in gilt in compartments with two red morocco gilt lettering labels. Minor restoration to covers. Some browning, occasional light dampstaining and soiling. Part I with tiny puncture marks in the lower blank margin through gathering I, just touching one letter in the imprint on the title-page, six small holes in I3 and one tiny hole in I4, causing loss of a couple of letters. Part III with paper flaw in the upper blank corner of A3 and A4, tiny tear (1/4 inch) in the lower blank margin of F4, and paper flaw in the lower blank corner of I2, none affecting text. Armorial bookplate of Gloucester on front free endpaper. Bookplate of Hugh Cecil Lowther, 5th Earl of Lonsdale (1857-1944) on front pastedown (his sale, 12 July 1937, lot 445). An excellent copy. Housed in a quarter morocco clamshell box.Reynard the Fox, “hero of several medieval European cycles of versified animal tales that satirize contemporary human society. Though Reynard is sly, amoral, cowardly, and self-seeking, he is still a sympathetic hero whose cunning is a necessity for survival. He symbolizes the triumph of craft over brute strength, usually personified by Isengrim, the greedy and dull-witted wolf. Some of cyclic stories collected around him, such as those telling of the wolf or bear fishing with his tail through a hole in the ice, are found throughout the world; others, like that of the sick lion cured by the wolf’s skin, are derived from Greco-Roman sources. The cycle arose in the area between Flanders and Germany in the 10th and 11th centuries when clerks began to forge Latin beast epics out of popular tales… The main literary tradition of Reynard the Fox descends from the extant French ‘branches’ of the Roman de Renart (about 30 in number, nearly 40,000 lines of verse). The facetious portrayal of rustic life, the camel as a papal legate speaking broken French, the animals riding on horses and recounting elaborate dreams all suggest the atmosphere of 13th-century France” (Merriam-Webster’s Encyclopedia of Literature).“Caxton’s immediate successors as printers of the Historye of Reynart the Foxe, Wynkyn de Worde and Richard Pynson, both published illustrated editions using the same woodcuts. Although neither a de Worde nor a Pynson edition survives intact, there are fragments, and there is circumstantial evidence to show that a Wynkyn de Worde edition of about 1495 (or earlier) was illustrated by a series of 43 woodcuts…apparently newly made for that edition…The earliest nearly complete fully illustrated History of Reynard the Fox to come down to us probably dates from the period 1560-1586. It survives in a unique copy…sometimes described as the ‘Anonymous’ edition because it lacks the first few and the last few pages were we would expect to find the name of the printer and the place of publication. It contains 39 of the 43 Wynkyn de Worde cuts. To judge by their worn state…they had been much used since they were first made. This Anonymous edition also contains a series of 19 smaller, artistically inferior pictures…They too are quite worn and may date from soon after the earliest illustrated editions…I have ascribed this Anonymous edition to the period 1560-1586. It is therefore just possible that it is either the lost William Powell edition of 1560-1561 or the lost Edward Allde edition of 1586, for both of these are mentioned in the Stationer’s Register, but neither survives” (Kenneth Varty, Reynard, Renart, Reinaert and Other Foxes in Medieval England: The Iconographic Evidence (Amsterdam: 1999), pp. 98-99).“From William Caxton’s first edition (1481) to Thomas Gaultier’s only edition (1550), the story is divided into 43 chapters. This may explain why the Wynkyn de Worde picture cycle contained 43 vertical cuts, though in fact some chapters were not illustrated, and some were illustrated with more than one picture. In the period before the appearance of the Anonymous edition we know…of only three illustrated editions: the one by Wynkyn de Worde sometime before or in 1495 and the other by him c. 1515; and the one by Richard Pynson somewhere between 1501 and 155. In the Anonymous edition (between 1560 and 1585) the story is divided into 58 chapters. This may account for the frequent repetition of the vertical cuts (as space-fillers) and even for the introduction and occasional repetition of the smaller horizontal cuts. For most of the seventeenth century, the story (now short-titled The Most Delectable History of Reynard the Fox) is divided into 25 chapters, but this does not result in any noticeable reduction in the number of cuts used of either the vertical or the horizontal kind, nor in the introduction of new illustrative material. In short, the same cuts go on in much the same order (apart from space-filler repetitions) illustrating the same episodes. The first seventeenth-century edition to continue this picture cycle tradition is Edward Allde’s (1620) followed by Elizabeth Allde’s (1629). It continues in the two editions published in 1640 by Richard Oulton, one for John Slater and the other for John Wright; also in the editions published by Jane Bell in 1650, 1654, and 1656; and in the first edition published by Edward Brewster in 1662. By this date the Wynkyn de Worde blocks had become so worn and damaged that it is not surprising to discover a totally new set closely modelled on them and on the sixteenth-century horizontals, and that this set should appear in an edition made for the publisher who last owned the de Worde blocks; that is, in Edward Brewster’s second edition in 1671 of The most Delectable History of Reynard the Fox…The forty different cuts which illustrate this edition all prominently display his initials EB. He published further illustrated editions in 1676, 1681, 1694, and 1701. In 1671 Brewster gave a new lease of life to the old picture cycle, and in 1672 he grafted new life onto the old story with A Continuation, Or Second Part Of The Most Pleasant and Delightful History of Reynard the Fox…In due course, this new story about Reynard was to attract new illustrations, but in this volume Brewster makes do with a sprinkling of fifteen cuts from his new cycle bearing the initials EB, and he uses them again in his 1676 edition of the old story (now called Part One) and in his 1681 edition of both Part One and Part Two.…In 1684 Brewster marketed a further sequel to this Continuation. Since Reynard was dead the chief role in this new story is given to one of his sons, the one called Reynardine. It is entitled The Shifts of Renardine The Son of Reynard the Fox…Edward Brewster was not the only late seventeenth-century publisher of the Beast Epic to feel the need to renew it. His contemporary John Shurley (sometimes spelled Shirley) also felt that need, and in 1681 he published his Most Delightful History of Reynard the Fox in Heroic Verse…Unlike other, earlier renovations of the story, it was never reprinted, perhaps because the verse form was unpopular and because the illustrations were poor and few” (Varty, pp. 254-257).Brunet IV, cols. 1228-1229. Lowndes, p. 2076. Varty (Appendix Three: “A Short-Title List of All Extant Illustrated Histories of Reynard the Fox from Wynkyn de Worde (c. 1495) to A. Soulby (c. 1800) which are kept in United Kingdom libraries based on H. Menke, Bibliotheca Reinardiana”) 24, 18, and 21. Wing S3512 (Part II) and S3436 (Part III).

      [Bookseller: David Brass Rare Books, Inc.]
 7.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  


        DISQUISITIO DE CHIROTHECARUM USU & ABUSU. In qua Varii ritus, varia jura, & symbola illarum fuse exhibentur, lectu jucundissima & in bonum publicum edita.

      In-24 gr. (mm. 128x79), p. pergam. coeva, pp. (24),144. Interessante e curiosa operina sull?uso e l?abuso dei guanti, considerati dal punto di vista legale, rituale, sociale (per esempio, in caso di duello). "Prima ed unica edizione". Cfr. Brunet,IV,61. ?Jean Nicolai, savant et laborieux philologue né dans la Saxe (vers 1660-1708). Il fut nommé, en 1700, professor d?antiquités à l?academie de Tubingue. Ce savant a laissé un grand nombre d?ouvrages, recherchés et curieux, qu?attestent une immense lecture et une vaste érudition?. Biographie Universelle,XXXI, pp. 227-28. Esemplare uniformemente arrossato.

      [Bookseller: Libreria Antiquaria Malavasi]
 8.   Check availability:     maremagnum.com     Link/Print  


        Most Delectable History of Reynard the Fox, The

      1701. Early English Edition of the Reynard Fables[REYNARD THE FOX]. The Most Delectable History of Reynard the Fox. Newly Corrected and Purged, from all grossness in Phrase and Matter. Augmented and Enlarged with sundry Excellent Morals and Expositions upon every several Chapter. To which may now be added a Second Part of the said History: As also the Shifts of Reynardine the Son of Reynard the Fox, Together with his Life and Death, &c. London: Printed by T. Ilive, for Edward Brewster, 1701.[Bound together with:][REYNARD THE FOX]. The Most Pleasant and Delightful History of Reynard the Fox. The Second Part. Containing Much Matter of Pleasure and Content. Written For the Delight of young Men, Pleasure of the Aged, and Profit of all. To which is added many Excellent Morals. London: Printed by A.M. and R.R. for Edward Brewster, 1681.[And:][REYNARD THE FOX]. The Shifts of Reynardine The Son of Reynard the Fox, Or a Pleasant History of His Life and Death. Full of Variety, &c. And may fitly be applied to the Late Times. Now Published for the Reformation of Mens Manners. London: Printed by T.J. for Edward Brewster, and Thomas Passenger, 1684.Three parts in one small quarto volume (7 5/16 x 5 9/16 inches; 186 x 141 mm.). [156], [2, table of contents], [2, publisher’s advertisements]; [111], [1, publisher’s advertisements]; [8], 160 pp. Mostly black letter, with titles and side notes in roman letter. Sixty-two woodcuts in the first part, printed from thirty-nine blocks, and fifteen woodcuts in the second part, five repeated, all repeats from the first part. Most cuts signed “E.B.” (Edward Brewster). Woodcut on C1 recto (Part I) printed upside down.Contemporary sprinkled sheep. Covers ruled and decoratively tooled in blind, spine decoratively tooled in gilt in compartments with two red morocco gilt lettering labels. Minor restoration to covers. Some browning, occasional light dampstaining and soiling. Part I with tiny puncture marks in the lower blank margin through gathering I, just touching one letter in the imprint on the title-page, six small holes in I3 and one tiny hole in I4, causing loss of a couple of letters. Part III with paper flaw in the upper blank corner of A3 and A4, tiny tear (1/4 inch) in the lower blank margin of F4, and paper flaw in the lower blank corner of I2, none affecting text. Armorial bookplate of Gloucester on front free endpaper. Bookplate of Hugh Cecil Lowther, 5th Earl of Lonsdale (1857-1944) on front pastedown (his sale, 12 July 1937, lot 445). An excellent copy. Housed in a quarter morocco clamshell box.Reynard the Fox, “hero of several medieval European cycles of versified animal tales that satirize contemporary human society. Though Reynard is sly, amoral, cowardly, and self-seeking, he is still a sympathetic hero whose cunning is a necessity for survival. He symbolizes the triumph of craft over brute strength, usually personified by Isengrim, the greedy and dull-witted wolf. Some of cyclic stories collected around him, such as those telling of the wolf or bear fishing with his tail through a hole in the ice, are found throughout the world; others, like that of the sick lion cured by the wolf’s skin, are derived from Greco-Roman sources. The cycle arose in the area between Flanders and Germany in the 10th and 11th centuries when clerks began to forge Latin beast epics out of popular tales… The main literary tradition of Reynard the Fox descends from the extant French ‘branches’ of the Roman de Renart (about 30 in number, nearly 40,000 lines of verse). The facetious portrayal of rustic life, the camel as a papal legate speaking broken French, the animals riding on horses and recounting elaborate dreams all suggest the atmosphere of 13th-century France” (Merriam-Webster’s Encyclopedia of Literature).“Caxton’s immediate successors as printers of the Historye of Reynart the Foxe, Wynkyn de Worde and Richard Pynson, both published illustrated editions using the same woodcuts. Although neither a de Worde nor a Pynson edition survives intact, there are fragments, and there is circumstantial evidence to show that a Wynkyn de Worde edition of about 1495 (or earlier) was illustrated by a series of 43 woodcuts…apparently newly made for that edition…The earliest nearly complete fully illustrated History of Reynard the Fox to come down to us probably dates from the period 1560-1586. It survives in a unique copy…sometimes described as the ‘Anonymous’ edition because it lacks the first few and the last few pages were we would expect to find the name of the printer and the place of publication. It contains 39 of the 43 Wynkyn de Worde cuts. To judge by their worn state…they had been much used since they were first made. This Anonymous edition also contains a series of 19 smaller, artistically inferior pictures…They too are quite worn and may date from soon after the earliest illustrated editions…I have ascribed this Anonymous edition to the period 1560-1586. It is therefore just possible that it is either the lost William Powell edition of 1560-1561 or the lost Edward Allde edition of 1586, for both of these are mentioned in the Stationer’s Register, but neither survives” (Kenneth Varty, Reynard, Renart, Reinaert and Other Foxes in Medieval England: The Iconographic Evidence (Amsterdam: 1999), pp. 98-99).“From William Caxton’s first edition (1481) to Thomas Gaultier’s only edition (1550), the story is divided into 43 chapters. This may explain why the Wynkyn de Worde picture cycle contained 43 vertical cuts, though in fact some chapters were not illustrated, and some were illustrated with more than one picture. In the period before the appearance of the Anonymous edition we know…of only three illustrated editions: the one by Wynkyn de Worde sometime before or in 1495 and the other by him c. 1515; and the one by Richard Pynson somewhere between 1501 and 155. In the Anonymous edition (between 1560 and 1585) the story is divided into 58 chapters. This may account for the frequent repetition of the vertical cuts (as space-fillers) and even for the introduction and occasional repetition of the smaller horizontal cuts. For most of the seventeenth century, the story (now short-titled The Most Delectable History of Reynard the Fox) is divided into 25 chapters, but this does not result in any noticeable reduction in the number of cuts used of either the vertical or the horizontal kind, nor in the introduction of new illustrative material. In short, the same cuts go on in much the same order (apart from space-filler repetitions) illustrating the same episodes. The first seventeenth-century edition to continue this picture cycle tradition is Edward Allde’s (1620) followed by Elizabeth Allde’s (1629). It continues in the two editions published in 1640 by Richard Oulton, one for John Slater and the other for John Wright; also in the editions published by Jane Bell in 1650, 1654, and 1656; and in the first edition published by Edward Brewster in 1662. By this date the Wynkyn de Worde blocks had become so worn and damaged that it is not surprising to discover a totally new set closely modelled on them and on the sixteenth-century horizontals, and that this set should appear in an edition made for the publisher who last owned the de Worde blocks; that is, in Edward Brewster’s second edition in 1671 of The most Delectable History of Reynard the Fox…The forty different cuts which illustrate this edition all prominently display his initials EB. He published further illustrated editions in 1676, 1681, 1694, and 1701. In 1671 Brewster gave a new lease of life to the old picture cycle, and in 1672 he grafted new life onto the old story with A Continuation, Or Second Part Of The Most Pleasant and Delightful History of Reynard the Fox…In due course, this new story about Reynard was to attract new illustrations, but in this volume Brewster makes do with a sprinkling of fifteen cuts from his new cycle bearing the initials EB, and he uses them again in his 1676 edition of the old story (now called Part One) and in his 1681 edition of both Part One and Part Two.…In 1684 Brewster marketed a further sequel to this Continuation. Since Reynard was dead the chief role in this new story is given to one of his sons, the one called Reynardine. It is entitled The Shifts of Renardine The Son of Reynard the Fox…Edward Brewster was not the only late seventeenth-century publisher of the Beast Epic to feel the need to renew it. His contemporary John Shurley (sometimes spelled Shirley) also felt that need, and in 1681 he published his Most Delightful History of Reynard the Fox in Heroic Verse…Unlike other, earlier renovations of the story, it was never reprinted, perhaps because the verse form was unpopular and because the illustrations were poor and few” (Varty, pp. 254-257).Brunet IV, cols. 1228-1229. Lowndes, p. 2076. Varty (Appendix Three: “A Short-Title List of All Extant Illustrated Histories of Reynard the Fox from Wynkyn de Worde (c. 1495) to A. Soulby (c. 1800) which are kept in United Kingdom libraries based on H. Menke, Bibliotheca Reinardiana”) 24, 18, and 21. Wing S3512 (Part II) and S3436 (Part III).

      [Bookseller: David Brass Rare Books, Inc. ]
 9.   Check availability:     ABAA     Link/Print  

______________________________________________________________________________


      Home     Wants Manager     Library Search     562 Years   Links     Contact      Search Help      Terms of Service      Privacy     


Copyright © 2018 viaLibri™ Limited. All rights reserved.