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Displayed below are some selected recent viaLibri matches for books published in 1646


         Europa Prima Pars Terræ in Forma Virginis.

      1646 - Brunswick: Emmeran Kirchnern, 1646, German text edition. 260 x 360mm. Trimmed to plate at sides, as issued. A very uncommon copper-engraved version of Bünting's fantasy map depicting Europe as a Virgin Queen, with crown, orb and sceptre. Iberia forms her head and crown; Denmark her right arm; Italy her left arm with Sicily an orb in her hand; Greece, the Balkans and Russia her skirts; and Bohemia a medallion on a chain around her neck. The map was published in Bünting's 'Itinerarium Sacræ Scriptura', a commentary on the bible written as a travel book, first published 1581. The work also contains a map of the World as a cloverleaf and Asia as Pegasus the winged horse. Although the title and text under the map are in Latin, the text on verso is German.

      [Bookseller: Altea Antique Maps]
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         Monachium regi suecorum certis contitionibus deditur

      Artist: Merian Matthäus ca ; issued in: Frankfurt on Main; date: ca1646 - - technic: Copper print; - colorit:; - condition: Very good; - size (in cm): 23,5 x 32,5; - description: Map shows the city of Munich when king Gustav Adolf of Sweden is entering the city and receiving the city key; - vita of the artist: Matthäus Merian (1593 ? 1650) , born in Basel, learned the art of copperplate engraving in Zurich and subsequently worked and studied in Strasbourg, Nancy, and Paris, before returning to Basel in 1615. The following year he moved to Frankfurt, Germany where he worked for the publisher Johann Theodor de Bry. He married his daughter, Maria Magdalena 1617. In 1620 they moved back to Basel, only to return three years later to Frankfurt, where Merian took over the publishing house of his father-in-law after de Bry's death in 1623. In 1626 he became a citizen of Frankfurt and could henceforth work as an independent publisher. He is the father of Maria Sibylla Merian, who later published her the famous and wellknown studies of flowers, insects and butterflies.

      [Bookseller: Antique Sommer& Sapunaru KG]
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         Japponiae Nova & Accurata descriptio Per R.P. Antonium Franciscum Cardim Societatis Jesu Ad Elogia Japponica.

      1646 - Rome: Typis Heredum Corbelletti, 1646. 275 x 405mm. Small cracks in centre fold repaired. A very uncommon map, published in Cardim's 'Fasciculus e Japponicis floribus, suo adhuc madentibus sanguine', an illustrated history of the martydoms in Japan from 1597 to 1640. A 36-point key lists the Jesuit properties in Japan and a vignette ship illustrates the landing of St Francis Xavier, a co-founder of the Jesuits) on Japan,15th August 1549. Cardim (1596-1659), a Portuguese Jesuit, travelled to Goa, Vietnam and China between 1618 to 1638. After a period back in Europe, during which time he wrote this book, he set sail for the East again in 1649. After a ship wreck off Mozambique he arrived in Goa in 1650. In 1653 he was captured by Dutch privateers who kept him prisoner for over two years. He died in Macao, aged 63, never having visited Japan. HUBBARD: 21.

      [Bookseller: Altea Antique Maps]
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         Cataluña desengañada, dscursos políticos de.

      Nápoles, Egidio Longo 1646 - 4º menor (19,1 x 13,8 cm.) 10 h. inc. frontis alegórico grabado al cobre, 470 p., 11 h. de índice. Pergamino de época algo dañado en el plano posterior. Palau, 278030: "A pesar de ser el autor natural del Principado de Cataluña, en esta obra arremete contra su patria y defiende a Castilla". Salvá, 3163: "Muñoz y Romero y Nicolás Antonio llaman a este autor Alejandro Domingo de Ros, en mi ejemplar no consta el nombre de Domingo ni por la portada ni por los preliminares. Obra escrita contra la rebelión de Cataluña y llena de noticias muy interesantes sobre los sucesos del principado durante la revolución." El autor ofrece un testimonio vivo –y al vivo– de quien fue espectador de uno de los más luctuosos sucesos: El Corpus de sangre de 1640. Políticamente el autor fue un realista (españolista le dirían hoy), que no dejó de ser catalán, amante de su tierra, entristecido –y avergonzado– por lo sucedido. Desde el exilio publicó este discurso político dirigido a los patricios catalanes para que descabalgasen de sus ambiciones y no reincidiesen en errores semejantes. Página 333 arrancada, conservando tan sólo la parte inferior izquierda. Punto de polilla en el margen superior del frontis [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Delirium Books · Susana Bardón]
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         Die wunderlichen Begebenheiten Deß Vnbekandten Philosophi, In Such- und Findung deß Steins der Weisen. In vier Bücher eingetheilet: In deren letztern so deutlich und klar geredet wird / wie man denselben machen soll / daß noch niemahls mit solcher Auffrichtigkeit davon geredet worden. Aus dem Frantzösischen in Teutsche übersetzt von Johannes Langen.- [ANGEBUNDEN:] Chymisches Zwey-Blat / Das ist Zwey vortreffliche Chymische Tractätlein: Das erste / Eröffneter Eingang zu deß Königs verschlossenem Pallaste Anonymi Philalethæ. Das ander / Von dem Stein der Weisen / wie man den recht bereiten soll / Fratris Ferrarii Monachi. Beyde zum ersten mahl ins Teutsch übersetzet von Johann Langen.

      143 S. / 94 S. 1 Bl., 72 S. bei beiden der Titel in Schwarz u. Rot, Kl.-8, Pergament d. Zt. mit handschrftl. Rückentext Zwei von Johannes Langen übersetzte u. im selben Verlag erschienene Alchemie-Werke in einem Band. - Zu Belin: VD17 3:001019M Ferguson II, 556 Duveen S.65 (Anm.) Ferchl S.592. Seltene erste deutsche Ausgabe von "Les Aventures du Philosophe inconnu, en la recherche et linvention de la Pièrre Philosophale", das zuerst 1646 in Paris erschien war. Vgl. J. Neu 379 Ferchl S.34 u. Duveen S.65: "Not in the Young collection [...] Caillet (I,925) informs us that this curious and rare work was written by Abbé Belin who was notorious under Henri III and IV for his lengthy and fruitless searches for the Philosophers Stone which embittered him and caused him to write this interesting satire aimed at the alchemists. Belin was a benedictine monk and Bishop of Belly." Ferguson sieht allerdings Belins Verfasserschaft nicht als gesichert an. -- Zum angebundenen Titel: VD17 23:641853M Brüning 2284 Ferguson II,7f Kopp II,338. Frühe Ausgabe der Langeschen Übertragung von Eirenäus Philalethes (bzw. Th. Vaughn) "Introitus apertus ad occlusum regis Palatium" (1667) u. eines weiteren Textes nach einer unbekannten (fingierten?) Vorlage. Ferguson erwähnt noch eine Ausgabe Hamburg 1672. -- Über den Übersetzer Johann Langen ist nur bekannt, dass er ein aus Schlesien stammender Mediziner war u. in Hamburg lebte. - Einband berieben, bestossen u. etwas fleckig beide Innendeckel mit Besitzervermerken u. Anmerkungen Titel fleckig u. leimschattig (Exlibris "Hugo Schneider Berlin" verso) Seiten gebräunt u. tlw. fleckig einige Unterstreichungen u. Anmerkungen von alter Hand, sonst ein gutes Expl.

      [Bookseller: Versandantiquariat Hans-Jürgen Lange]
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         Asia Secunda pars Terræ in Forma Pegasi.

      1646 - Brunswick: Emmeran Kirchnern, 1646, German text edition. 260 x 360mm. Narrow lateral margins. A very uncommon copper-engraved version of Bünting's fantasy map depicting Asia as Pegasus, the winged horse, originally published as a woodcut. The head is Turkey and Armenia, the wings Scythia and Tartary, forelegs Arabia, hind legs India and the Malay Peninsula. The map was published in Bünting's 'Itinerarium Sacræ Scriptura', a commentary on the bible written as a travel book, first published 1581. The work also contains a map of the World as a cloverleaf and Europe as the Virgin Mary. Although the title and text under the map are in Latin, the text on verso is German.

      [Bookseller: Altea Antique Maps]
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         Surrey Described and Divided into Hundreds.

      1646 - London: William Humble, 1646. Coloured. 385 x 510mm. Unprinted top left corner border filled with mss. One of the most decorative early maps of Surrey, engraved by Jodocus Hondius in 1610. Inset elevations of Richmond and Nonsuch Palaces, armorials, a compass rose and strapwork decorations add to its attractiveness. By the time this edition was published the copper printing plate had been damaged, with the top left corner broken off.

      [Bookseller: Altea Antique Maps]
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         Ars Magna Lucis et Umbrae; In decem Libros digesta.

      Rome: Hermann Scheus (printed by Lodovico Grignani), 1646. Rome:: Hermann Scheus (printed by Lodovico Grignani), 1646., 1646. Two volumes bound in one. 4to. [xl], 494; [ii], 495-935, [xv] pp. †3 silked (both sides). Large engraved half-title by Pierre Miotte, 38 plates [1 plate (facing p.562 = four small charts of the constellations) supplied in facsimile] (including 6 folding pls., 1 large double-page folding pl., 2 folding tables), numerous woodcuts throughout, initial letters. Original full blind-stamped pigskin, two brass clasps, manuscript title, recent endleaves; ink stain (p. 142), minor stain lower margin p.851 affecting adjacent leaves, ink correction of single letter on pp. 864, 865, written in margins, pl. facing p. 550 remargined at top, closed tears to plates facing pp. 552, 785, paper-flaw hole at p. 564 (minor effect to table) and p. 681 (effecting two lines), tear 1 inch from gutter due to natural shape of paper (p. 701), occasional foxing. Some early ownership annotations to half-title ["A.Rdo. P. Joe Baptista Schwanari … vitam emptoris"?] and title ["Ad Cubiculum Collegii Viennae 1654 / Prof[essor]: Matheseos, Soc[ieta]. tis Jesu, Catalogo inscriptus / Bibliotheca Ducumburgensis"?]. Near fine. FIRST EDITION OF KIRCHER'S "GREAT ART OF LIGHT AND SHADOW" & FIRST APPEARANCE OF THE AUTHOR'S MAGIC LANTERN INVENTION. First Edition of one of the most important of Kircher's encyclopedic scientific works, and some say his rarest. The book contains the first description of the Camera Obscura; deals with astronomy and astrology, gnomics, optics, catoptrics, etc. It also contains a very interesting chapter entitled: "De mira rerum naturalium constitutione per microscopium investiganda." He notes that vinegar and milk abound with an innumerable multitude of worms and that there are innumerable creeping animalcules in putrid material, which can be seen only by the microscope, and that blood in febrile patients contains worms. "He concludes with the description a rude sketch of his microscope, which was presented to him by Giovanni Carlo Cardinal Medici. These observations of Kircher antedate those of Hooke by nearly 20 years, those of Leeuwenhoek by 28 years." – Clendening Medical Library, Kircher Exhibit Catalogue, Kansas City, Kansas, 1958, pp. 5-6. "Natural magic was not exclusively an applied art. It encompassed the study and explanation of occult natural powers, as well as their manipulation. In the Ars Magna Lucis et Umbrae of 1646, Kircher distinguished two parts of natural magic, effective and contemplative. Contemplative natural magic he defined as "a certain secret and abstruse wisdom about those things inwardly concealed in the arcane majesty of Nature, parts of which have been touched on by Aristotle and Theophrastus … and by many others who have contemplated the occult miracles of Nature." - David Stolzenberg, "The Connoisseur of Magic," The Great Art of Knowing, p. 54. "The Ars Magna Lucis et Umbrae ('The great art of light and shadow', 1646 and 1671) … treats of eclipses, comets, and astrological influences, also of phosphorescence, colour, optics, sundials and magic lanterns. Although Kircher does speak towards the end of the metaphorical light of knowledge and the uncreated light of God, his major concern is with the heavenly bodies, and especially with their relation to timekeeping. He gives the first printed picture of Saturn, whose rings he seems to have perceived as two small ellipses flanking the planet, and of Jupiter with two versions of its markings as he saw them through a telescope in Bologna in 1643. From these he deduces that the planets are not perfectly spherical, nor self-luminous. Long before that he had seen sunspots, which he explained as clouds of smoke-like matter, and had even detected similar exhalations from the moon…" – Joscelyn Godwin, Athanasius Kircher, (1979), p. 73. Martin Quigley, in his Magic Shadows, devotes most of his introduction and chapter VI to "Kircher's 100th Art." The Ars Magna, 1646, and Kircher's great contributions to science and learning are discussed in detail. PROVENANCE: Joannes Baptista Schwanari; … professor of mathematics of the Vienna Jesuit College, ca.1654; Bibliotheca Ducumburgensis. Three persons seem possible: Paulus Guldin (1577-1643), professor in Vienna 1627 until 1629?. [or] -- Laurentius Kintoff (b. 1597, d. ?), professor of mathematics in Vienna 1629 until 1635? [or] -- Carolus Sinnich (1608-1680), professor of mathematics 1635 until 1662. Of these, Sinnich seems the favorite. The other inscription, "A R[everen]do P[atre] Jo[ann]e Baptista Sch" has not been identified (nor read properly!). REFERENCES: Brunet III, 666; Caillet, Manuel bibliographique des Sciences … II, 360.5770; Clendening Medical Library, Kircher Exhibit Catalogue, Kansas City, Kansas, (1958), 5.4; De Backer, Bibliothèque des écrivains de la compagnie de Jésus, (1853-61), I, 423-24.7; Graesse IV, 21; Linda Hall Library, Jesuit Science in the Age of Galileo, 10; Haskell F. Norman 1216; Sommervogel, Bibliothèque de la Compagnie de Jésus, IV, col. l 1048, no. 6; BYU; Brian L. Merrill, Athanasius Kircher (1602-1680) Jesuit Scholar; an exhibition… (1989), no. 7; Wellcome, III, p. 394. See: E. Newton Harvey, A History of Luminescence, pp. 103-6; Stanford University, The Great Art of Knowing, p.150.

      [Bookseller: Jeff Weber Rare Books ]
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         Tractatus de Furtis, In Quo Contrectationum Alienarumque Rerum

      1646. A Scarce Treatise on Theft Bonifacio, Giovanni [1547-1635]. Tractatus de Furtis, In Quo Contrectationum Alienarumque Rerum Occupationum Materia Universa Examinatur, Complures Leges Venetae Commemorantur Quidque in Praxi Observandum Sit Demonstratur; Iudicibus, Advocatis, Atque Adeo Omnibus Legum Studiosis Utilissimus & Incundissimus, Quorum Usui Textum ab Allegationibus, Characterum Diversitate Distinximus. Cum Summariis ac Indice Rerum Verborumque Copiosissimo. Frankfurt: Typis Iohannis Friderici Weissii Apud Petrum Hauboldum, 1646. [viii], 550. [48] pp. Octavo (6" x 4"). Later speckled vellum, raised bands and lettering piece to spine. Light rubbing to extremities, corner slightly bumped, owner bookplate to front pastedown. Woodcut title-page device, head-piece and tail-piece. Moderate toning to text, somewhat heavier in places, some leaves have dampstining and light foxing, owner signature dated 1718 in tiny hand to foot of title page. A nice copy of a scarce title. $1,250. * Third and final edition. This treatise on theft in Roman and civil law, a topic that includes rape, adultery, fraud and piracy, was first published in 1599. The author was a Venetian, but his text was aimed at a pan-European audience. All editions of this work are scarce. OCLC locates 1 copy of this title in North America at the Library of Congress, which has a copy of the third edition. Verzeichnis der im Deutschen Sprachraum Erschienenen Drucke des 17. Jahrhunderts 3:621453H.

      [Bookseller: The Lawbook Exchange, Ltd.]
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         Selectarum Iuris Conclusionum in Sacro Regio Sardiniensi Praetorio digestarum, & decisarum centuria. Accedunt quatuor indices.

      Officina Iacobi Gaffari sumpt. Io. Dominici Bove, Neapoli 1646 - In-folio (322x210mm), pp. (28), 364, (40), legatura coeva piena pergamena rigida con titolo calligrafato verticalmente in antico su dorso a 5 nervi. Altro titolo calligrafato in antico al taglio di piede. Frontespizio in rosso e nero con impresa tipografica (allusiva al nome di Giovanni Domenico Bove) con un bove entro cornice figurata con motto entro cartiglio Serius ut gravius. Testo entro filetto tipografico, fregi tipografici in xilografia. Qualche sporadico lavoro di tarlo. Antica firma parzialmente cassata al frontespizio. Ottima copia. Prima edizione, assai rara, di questa raccolta di decisioni giuridiche della Sardegna curate dal Magistrato della Reale Udienza Dexart (Cagliari, 1590-Catanzaro, 1650), fra i più illustri giuristi dell'antica storia insulare. A Napoli attese, inoltre, alla stesura definitiva e alla pubblicazione del suo secondo importante volume: Selectarum iuris conclusionum in sacro regio Sardiniensi praetorio digestarum et decisarum centuria, Neapoli 1646. Si tratta di una raccolta di cento decisioni su importanti questioni giuridiche di diritto comune e di diritto patrio, di argomento prevalentemente civilistico, pronunciate dalla Reale Udienza di Cagliari nel periodo in cui il Dexart era giudice. In un latino piano e scorrevole egli vi commentò le decisioni con un ricchissimo apparato critico di note e di erudite delucidazioni, mostrando ancora una volta una profonda padronanza del diritto e una vasta conoscenza della legislazione del suo tempo. La Reale Udienza sarda fu un organismo che - come avvenne altrove con il Senato regio di Torino, la Rota fiorentina, la Rota civile e criminale di Genova, e con lo stesso Sacro Regio Consiglio di Napoli - favorì la crescita di una scuola giuridica locale e la formazione di una accreditata giurisprudenza di diritto comune con coloritura regionale, ma pure, al tempo stesso, con impronta cosmopolitica. Ciò spiega l'interesse che le Selectarum iuris conclusionum suscitarono presso i giuristi contemporanei, sia italiani, come Giovanni Girolamo De Filippo, reggente del Supremo Consiglio d'Italia, Giovanni Battista De Luca, Giuseppe Romani, sia spagnoli, come Miguel de Cortiada e Cristobal Crespi de Valdaura, vicecancelliere del Supremo Consiglio d'Aragona. (Antonello Mattone in Dizionario Biografico degli Italiani, volume 39, 1991). Ciasca, 6039. Prunas Tola, Dizionario biografico degli uomini illustri di Sardegna, II, pp. 42 e sgg. (con osservazioni assai elogiative sul rigore e l'importanza dell'opera). Latino [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Gilibert Libreria Antiquaria (ILAB-LILA)]
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         Johannis Piscatoris Commentarii in omnes libros Veteris Testamenti. 4 Bände in 2 Büchern. Quibus continentur I. Analysis logica singulorum librorum & capitum. II. Scholia in singula capita. III. Observationes locorum doctrinae è singulis capitibus. Omnia haec recens ab authore recognita.

      6 Blatt, 562 Seiten, 591 Seiten 440, 514 Seiten. 22 x 36 cm, Pergamenteinband. Von guter Erhaltung.Der von Sebastian Furck gestochene Titel nennt 1646 als Erscheinungsjahr, der typographische Titel (mit einem Titelholzschnitt, wie jeder der vier Bandtitel) 1643. Das Titelblatt des zweiten Bandes mit einer handschriftlichen Ergänzung, den Inhalt betreffend (Libri duo regum). Das erste Buch mit den Bänden I und II über fünf Bünde, mit geprägtem sowie mit handschriftlichem Rückentitel. Der Einbandbezug mit kleineren Beschabungen / Fehlstellen. Der Rücken am Fuß mit einem kleinen Einriss. Das zweite Buch mit den Bänden III und IV mit handschriftlichem Rückentitel. Der Pergamentbezug bei beiden Deckeln am Kopf gelöst. Das Titelblatt mit handschriftlichem Besitzeintrag alter Hand, verso handschriftliche Notizen zum Inhalt. Papier durchgehend gebräunt.

      [Bookseller: Krull GmbH]
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         Commentarii in omnes libros Veteris Testamenti : antehac aliquoties separatim editi : nunc verò in unum volumen collecti : quibus continentur I. Analysis logica singulorum librorum & capitum. II. Scholia in singula capita. III. Observationes locorum doctrinae è singulis capitibus : omnia haec recens ab authore recognita : quibus accessit praefatio continens hortationem ad studium Sacrae Scripturae. 4 volumes bound in 2 (Complete)

      Herbornae Nassoviorum (Herborn, Germany): NP, 1646. Hardcover. f to vg. Folio (15 x 9"). [12], 562 (ie 462), [2], 591, [1]pp (Vol. 1); 440, 514pp (vol. 2). Contemporary blind-stamped vellum, with handwritten title to spines. Engraved main title in volume 1 by Sebastian Furck. Each volume has its separate title page. Vols. 1-2 dated 1643; v. 3, 1644; v. 4, 1645. Decorative head-, tailpieces and initials. Johannes Piscator's commentaries on the entire Old Testament were originally published between 1612 and 1618. With the text of the Old Testament in the translations of Johannes Immanuel Tremellius and Franciscus Junius (published in 1579), and of Piscator. The first two volumes contained in the first book: - Vol. 1: Genesis-Deuteronomium - Vol. 2: Liber Josuae-Liber Estherae The last two volumes contained in the second book: - Vol. 3: Liber Jobi-Canticum canticorum - Vol. 4: Esaias-Malachias Complete four volumes bound in two. First volume with some abrasion to vellum at upper margin of binding. Both bindings partly soiled / darkened. Previous owner's inscription on inside of each front cover. Ex-library copy with bookplate on inside of each front cover, stamp with reference number on main title (Vol. 1), and title page of third part (Vol. 2). Moderate and sporadic foxing and offsetting throughout. Text in Latin. Bindings in overall fair (Vol. 1) to good (Vol. 2), interior in good to very good condition. About the author: Johannes Piscator (1546-1625) was a German Reformed theologian, known as a Bible translator and textbook writer. His significance for theology was his opposition to the doctrine of the active obedience of Christ. "Whoever denies that Christ was subject to the law, denies that he was man." If the imputation of the active obedience were sufficient man would be free from obedience as well as from the curse. From being an advocate of supralapsarianism in the most extreme form, as in his controversy with Conrad Vorstius, Piscator became a pronounced Arminian. (From Wikipedia).

      [Bookseller: Eric Chaim Kline - Bookseller ]
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         Antique book-6 Prints-TRAVEL ACCOUNT-van Waerwyck-Weert-SRI LANKA-Commelin-1646

      - Complete set of 6 plates accompanied by the full text of 88 pages (half of page 85/86 missing). 1: Map of Sao Tome and Principe. With compass rose, scale and ship on the ocean - 2: Annobon Island taken and raided by the Dutch - 3: The horrible justice in Achin / Atjeh, Indonesia. With ships for the coast - 4: Miracles performed by a magician during de Weerdt encounter with the king of Kandy Vimala Dharma Surya. - 5: The murder of Vice-Admiral Sebaldt de Weert and his men by the King Vimala Dharma Surya of Candy / Ceylon / Sri Lanka - 6: The King of Aceh / Adjeh, Inonesia surrounded by 5 female guards. Original copper engravings on a vellin type paper. Description: This set of extremely rare prints / copperplate engravings plus full text are titled: 'Historische Verhael Vande Reyse inde Oost-Indien, met 15 Schepen voor Reeckeninghe vande vereenichde Gheoctroyeerde Oost-Indische Compagnie onder het beleydt van den Vroomen ende Manhaften Wybrandt van Waerwijck . (Story of the voyage to the East Indies with 15 ships for the VOC under Admiral Wybrandt van Waerwijck and Vice-Admiral Sebaldt de Weert.), which was part of the monumental work by Isaac Commelin (1598-1676) on VOC voyages: 'Begin ende voortgangh van de Vereenighde Nederlantsche Geoctroyeerde Oost-Indische Companie.', published by Joannes Janssonius, Amsterdam, 1646.Artists and Engravers: It is known that Sebald de Weert made at least one other important sea voyage, which would be his last. In 1602, the Dutch East India Company (VOC), sent three ships under now Vice Admiral Sebald de Weert and Admiral Wijbrand van Warwijck with de Weert heading for Java, Sumatra, Ceylon and the Spice Islands. Warwyck was to split off once in Asia and visit China's coasts and establish trading posts, or “factories” as they were called in the day. Sebald de Weert was sent to Ceylon officially by Admiral Wijbrand van Warwijck to follow through on implementing van Spilbergen's negotiation outcomes. De Weert had official Dutch backing with an offer to help Vimala Dharma Surya's Kandy based forces. It had been decided that the Kandy troops and Dutch forces would launch a joint offensive on the Portuguese. The mission went awry months later at a banquet dinner in May/June 1603 at Batticaloa. At the banquet many of the Dutch crew had apparently been rowdy and were misbehaving disrespectfully toward the hosts which was upsetting to the Kandyans. The king, Vimala Dharma Surya, was pressured by a quite drunken Vice Admiral De Weert to board the Dutch ship with him. Mistrusting the foreign party's intent as for such pressure could mean a hostile manoeuver and could be seen as a potentially direct threat to his life and rule, Vimala Dharma Surya became suspicious of De Weert's intentions and refused to go aboard. Vice Admiral de Weert, being drunk and unruly, insulted the king for his refusal. Vimala Dharma Surya then attempted to imprison de Weert and the Dutchman resisted vigorously. Vice Admiral de Weert was immediately killed as well as all of the unruly Dutch crew. Condition: Good. General age related toning and foxing, some creasing and minor soiling. Minor marginal damp staining. A few worm holes in the margins. Plate 3 has a restored tear in the lower margin extending 1 cm into image. Storage location: D1-4 The overall size is ca. 9.6 x 7.5 inch. The image size is ca. 8.1 x 5.3 inch. The overall size is ca. 24.5 x 19 cm. The image size is ca. 20.5 x 13.5 cm.

      [Bookseller: ThePrintsCollector]
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         A Looking-Glasse for Sope-Patentees:

      4to., title printed within typographical border, 8pp., final page rather soiled else a very good untrimmed copy, now bound in 20th century calf gilt and labelled.Publisher: London, printed in the yearYear: 1646Edition: First edition.

      [Bookseller: John Drury Rare Books]
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         \"Wahre Bildnuß der Statt Maintz, sambt den neuen Schantzen, Anno 1633\". Gesamtansicht über den Rhein.

       Kupferstich von Merian, 1646, 20,5 x 63 cm (von zwei Platten gedruckt). Fauser 8325; Stopp Nr. 24. - \"Die schönste und wichtigste Ansicht des 17. Jahrhunderts\". Abzug von der unten links gesprungenen Kupferplatte mit Abdruck des Sprungs in der Darstellung. - Im Ganzen leicht gebräunt. Gerahmt. Versand D: 6,00 EUR Rheinland-Pfalz - Saarland

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Bierl]
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         Gesamtansicht, "Treveris Trier".

      - Kupferstich v. Merian, 1646, 21,3 x 34

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Nikolaus Struck]
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         A collection of fifteen Civil War tracts by, or relating to John Lilburne (plus another, defective).

      1646-1653 1646 - Several contemporary annotations, e.g. Thomas Prince ?a sensible man he was, tho' he had a tincture (as appears by the conclusion of this) of the enthusiasm which prevailed at that time? The hand-numbering of some pages indicates that, at an earlier date, they formed part of a larger collection of tracts. 4to. Some old rather faint waterstaining & occasional browning. Bound in early 19th century full calf, with blind tooled & gilt lettered spine, worn at head. Manuscript contents leaf dating from the 19th century, modern bookplate. John Lilburne, the 'Leveller', was born in 1615. He was not a lawyer, but his courage and passion for justice established key reforms in the criminal law which are now among our most cherished liberties. In his early 20s, Lilburne was brought before the Star Chamber accused of 'sending of factious and seditious libels out of Holland into England' When questioned he refused to answer, saying: 'I know it is warrantable by the law of God, and I think by the law of the land, that I may stand on my just defence, and not answer your interrogatories, and that my accusers ought to be brought face to face, to justify what they accuse me of' He was whipped and pilloried, but he persisted in claiming his right to remain silent and to hear and challenge the evidence against him. In 1641 he was vindicated by the House of Commons [but later] however, he accused the Commons of reviving the practices of the Star Chamber when he was arrested for publishing pamphlets advocating religious toleration and attacking suppression of dissent. Again he refused to answer incriminating questions, condemned the secrecy of the proceedings, and cited the authority of Magna Carta. He also refused to kneel before the House of Lords ? the first to reject this humiliating practice. Lilburne described the Levellers as 'the middle sort of people' and 'the hobnails, clouted shoes, the private soldiers, the leather and woollen aprons and the laborious and industrious people of England' He had massive support among Cromwell's New Model Army, in which Cromwell had made him a colonel. With others he produced the first draft of a written constitution ? the 'Agreement of the People' [But] Lilburne fell out with the increasingly despotic Cromwell and was put on trial at Guildhall for high treason in 1649. Again he challenged an unfair process. He refused to plead without seeing the indictment against him and without legal advice, neither of which were at that time routinely allowed. As before, he refused to answer incriminating questions. By sheer force of argument he persuaded the court to give in to his demands. The jury declared him not guilty. The report of the trial ends: ' immediately the whole multitude of people in the hall, for joy of the Prisoner's acquittal, gave such a loud and unanimous shout as is believed was never heard in Guildhall, which lasted for about half an hour without intermission: which made the judges for fear turn pale and hang down their heads' [ref: Geoffrey Bindman, The Guardian, December 2010.] 1. The Picture of the Councell of State, held forth to the free people of England. The second edition, with many large additions by the Authours themselves. Printed in the Yeer. [2], 54pp. 1649. This copy collates as the first edition, but with the second edition titlepage; a variant not noted in ESTC R10562. 2. The Peoples Prerogative and Priviledges, asserted and vindicated, (against all tyranny whatsoever.) By law and reason. Being a collection of the marrow and soule of Magna Charta, and of all the most principall statutes made ever since to this present yeare, 1647. Printed in the yeare . [8], 76, [4]pp. 1647 [i.e 1648]. ESTC R202741. 3. A Preparative to an Hue and Cry after Sir Arthur Haslerig, (a late Member of the forcibly dissolved House of Commons, and now the present wicked, bloody, and tyrannicall governor of Newcastle upon Ti [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

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         Ars magna lucis et umbrae in decem libros digesta: Quibus admirandae lucis et umbrae in mundo, atque adeò universa natura, vires effectus[que] uti nova, ita varia novorum reconditiorum[que] speciminum exhibitione, ad varios mortalium usus, panduntur.

      Sumptibus Hermanni Scheus, ex typographia Ludovici Grignani, Rome 1646 - First edition of Kircher?s principal contribution to optics, treating light, shadow, colour, refraction, projection, distortion and luminescence, and providing early descriptions of the camera obscura and magic lantern. The work also includes some of the earliest observations with a microscope, preceding those of Hooke and van Leeuwenhoek by two decades. ?The first published account of the illumination and projection of images appeared in the first edition of Athanasius Kircher?s Ars magna lucis et umbrae (1646)? (Bud & Warner, p. 365). ?The use of mirrors to project secret messages into dark spaces was taken up in the seventeenth century by Athanasius Kircher, who, though he ridiculed the extravagant claims of Agrippa, described methods for projecting texts using both sunlight and candles, with the aid of both flat and concave mirrors, and a convex lens. Kircher described this art as ?Catoptric Steganography?, and if we are to believe that the magic lantern anticipated the slide-show, Kircher?s Catoptric Steganography was the early modern version of the Powerpoint presentation? (Lefèvre, p. 44). ?Kircher?s theory of colour was at root Aristotelian and Aguilonian in type ? Kircher has amplified the Aguilonian scheme by introducing the mixtures of the ?median colours? with black and white, but the basic pattern is identical, relying upon the white and black poles between which come yellow, red and blue together with the three ?composites?, orange, green and purple ? Kircher had come tantalisingly close to the later system of primary and secondary colours. All that was required was the elimination of white and black as ?colours? ? though this was not easy given their place in the Aristotelian order of things? (Kemp, pp. 280-1). ?Understanding the nature of light was one of the central questions of natural philosophy in the mid-seventeenth century, as was the phenomenon of magnetism ? Kircher?s virtue was to recognize the significance of these questions. He attempted to collect all the relevant information and began to analyse it. While his conclusions often seemed flawed to the most critical and knowledgeable readers at the time, they nonetheless mined his books for useful data and specific insights that they might incorporate into their own natural philosophies? (DSB). This is a complete copy of a work often found lacking plates, or without the separate title to the second volume.The full title of the work may be translated, ?The Great Art of Light and Shadow, divided into ten books, in which the admirable powers and effects of light and shade are propounded in new and varied experiments and in recondite ways, for the diverse uses of mankind.? It was composed shortly after Kircher?s principal work on magnetism, Magnes, sive de Arte Magnetica (1641), in which he argued that magnetism was the principal force organizing and controlling nature, including optical phenomena. ?The title in Latin, Ars magna lucis et umbrae, was intended as a play on words: ?We say ?Magna? on account of a kind of hidden allusion to the magnet,? Kircher wrote in his introductory pages, meaning that the title could also be read as ?The Magnetic Art of Light and Shadow? (Glassie, p. 115).?In his introduction to the book Kircher wrote that the idea of producing a study on optics came to him a few years before when the Emperor [Ferdinand III] put to him some questions about light and shadow. He had written out his answers and then, with the encouragement, as well as the essential financial backing of many friends, he had decided to expand those answers into a full treatise ? [Kircher] follow[ed] the introduction with some laudatory poems and epigrams, with himself as the subject. The poems were by James Alan Gibbs, Kircher?s English medical friend, and the epigrams by A. F. Fayenus, Doctor of Laws and professor at the Academy of Avignon.?In the tradition of the Schoolmen, Kircher began the main section of the book with a series of definitions. He explained t

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         De Jure Belli ac Pacis Libri Tres, In quibus jus Naturae & Gentium, item juris publici praecipua explicantur. Editio Nova cum Annontatis Auctoris, Ex postrema ejus ante obitum cura multo nunc auctior [etc.]. Ter Meulen & Diermanse 572

      The last edition upon which Grotius was to work, published posthumously and including matter he had deemed prudent to exclude from previous editions, this the text chosen by the Carnegie Endowment as the basis for its edition in the 20th century. Modern blind tooled calf, some light browning, else a very good, crisp copy, with the title page printed in red and black. Apud Iohannem Blaev, Amsterdami, 1646.

      [Bookseller: Meyer Boswell Books, Inc.]
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         6 Rare Antique Prints-TUBAN-JAVA-INDONESIA-ELEPHANT-KING-GAME-Neck-Commelin-1646

      - Plate 4-9: Plate 4: 'Afteeckninge hoe de Coningh van Tuban de Hollanders op strandt te ghemoedt quam.' (View of how the King of Tuban came towards the Dutch on the beach.) Plates 5-6: Views of the kings's elephants, roosters, dogs, parrots. Plate 7: The Kings ducks and the housing of his wives. Plate 8: The King's bed and cages with turtle doves. Plate 9: The King's horse stables. Tuban is a town located on the north coast of Java, in Tuban Regency, approximately 100 km west of Surabaya, the capital of East Java. Rare. Original etching/engraving on a verge type hand laid paper. Anonymous. Condition: Good given age. General age related toning and light staining. Please study scan carefully. The overall size is ca. 9.8 x 7.5 inch. The image size is ca. 8.3 x 5.5 inch. The overall size is ca. 25 x 19 cm. The image size is ca. 21 x 14 cm.

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         Assertor Gallicus, contra vindicias Hispanicas Ioannis Iacobi Chiffletii: seu historica disceptatio qua arcana regia, politica, genealogica Hispanica confutantur, Francica stabiliuntur.Parisiis, ex typographia Regia, 1646.

      Parisiis, ex typographia Regia 1646 - Pp. (24) 272 (12). Unito a: DOMINICY MARC ANTOINE. Assertor Gallici, circa Salicae legis intellectum, mens explicata. Pp. 19 (1). Due parti in un volume di cm. 25. Stemma reale al frontespizio, alcuni bei capilettera, numerosi finalini e bellissime testatine, il tutto finemente inciso in rame. Legatura coeva in piena pergamena molle con titoli ms. al dorso. Antiche note di possesso al frontespizio. Sporadiche e trascurabili fioriture/arrossature. Bell'esemplare ad ampi margini. Marc Antoine Dominicy (1605-1650), giureconsulto nativo di Cahors, fu nominato consigliere e storiografo del Re dopo l'iniziale esperienza di procuratore presso la corte di Cahors. Questa importante opera fu scritta a difesa della dinastia capetingia dalle pretese spagnole sulla corona di Francia. La seconda parte, più strettamente giuridica, è dedicata al commento della Lex Salica, codice fatto redigere da Clodoveo I re dei Franchi intorno al 510. Rara edizione originale. Cfr. Iccu; Kvk. [Attributes: Hard Cover]

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         De Jure Belli ac Pacis Libri Tres, In quibus jus Naturae & Gentium, item juris publici praecipua explicantur. Editio Nova cum Annontatis Auctoris, Ex postrema ejus ante obitum cura multo nunc auctior [etc.]. Ter Meulen & Diermanse 572

      Amsterdami: Apud Iohannem Blaev, 1646. Modern blind tooled calf, some light browning, else a very good, crisp copy, with the title page printed in red and black The last edition upon which Grotius was to work, published posthumously and including matter he had deemed prudent to exclude from previous editions, this the text chosen by the Carnegie Endowment as the basis for its edition in the 20th century

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         LONDON’. Large panorama of London from Whitehall to St. Katharine's Docks, taken from the South Bank. Printed from two plates and joined.

      Matthaeus Merian ca. 1646 - 21x69cm. Uncoloured. Very good condition. Explanations from 1 - 43 below and two coats of arms in the skies.

      [Bookseller: Garwood & Voigt]
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         1646 Thomas Jefferson Library 1st ed Topicks on Laws of England Clayton Politics

      London : Printed by R.L. for William Leake, 1646. First edition. - 1646 Thomas Jefferson Library 1st ed Topicks on Laws of England Clayton Politics A collection of English laws by John Clayton. This work is filled with 167 laws pertaining to money exchange, taxation, tithes, mortgages, accepting grants, finding a sufficient jury for court, marital laws, and more. Each entry includes notes and examples. This book was dedicated to Oliver Cromwell and written with a Puritan focus on the law. This book was in the Thomas Jefferson library. (Sowerby). Item number: #1462 Price: $750 CLAYTON, John Topicks in the laws of England. Containing media, apt for argument, and resolution of law cases: also an exposition of severall words, not touched by former glossaries. London : Printed by R.L. for William Leake, 1646. First edition. Details: • Collation complete with all pages: 138p o Signatures: A¹ B-IK • Binding: Leather; tight & secure • References: Wing C 4612; ESTC R 30912; Sowerby 2094; • Language: English • Size: ~5.5in X 4in (14cm x 10cm) Our Guarantee: Very Fast. Very Safe. Free Shipping Worldwide. Customer satisfaction is our priority! Notify us with 7 days of receiving, and we will offer a full refund without reservation! 1462 Photos available upon request. [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

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         Hantoniae Comitatus Cum Bercheria. Original Double-Sided Antique Engraved Hand-Coloured Map of Hampshire.

      Amsterdam, Johannen Janssonium, 1646. Framed size 27 x 23 inches. Engraved surface approx 21 x 17 inches. Double-glazed In black and gold wood frame with ivory mount behind glass. In very good condition. Vertical centre crease. Some minor darkening and a couple of very minor spots around edges. Bright, vivid colouring. Else a very bright, clean map. Hand colouring. With a description on Verso 'Attrebatii', 'Bark-Shire.'

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         Ars magna lucis et umbrae in decem libros digesta: Quibus admirandae lucis et umbrae in mundo, atque adeò universa natura, vires effectus[que] uti nova, ita varia novorum reconditiorum[que] speciminum exhibitione, ad varios mortalium usus, panduntur.

      Rome: Sumptibus Hermanni Scheus, ex typographia Ludovici Grignani, 1646. First edition of Kircher's principal contribution to optics, treating light, shadow, colour, refraction, projection, distortion and luminescence, and providing early descriptions of the camera obscura and magic lantern. The work also includes some of the earliest observations with a microscope, preceding those of Hooke and van Leeuwenhoek by two decades. "The first published account of the illumination and projection of images appeared in the first edition of Athanasius Kircher's Ars magna lucis et umbrae (1646)" (Bud & Warner, p. 365). "The use of mirrors to project secret messages into dark spaces was taken up in the seventeenth century by Athanasius Kircher, who, though he ridiculed the extravagant claims of Agrippa, described methods for projecting texts using both sunlight and candles, with the aid of both flat and concave mirrors, and a convex lens. Kircher described this art as "Catoptric Steganography", and if we are to believe that the magic lantern anticipated the slide-show, Kircher's Catoptric Steganography was the early modern version of the Powerpoint presentation" (Lefèvre, p. 44). "Kircher's theory of colour was at root Aristotelian and Aguilonian in type ... Kircher has amplified the Aguilonian scheme by introducing the mixtures of the 'median colours' with black and white, but the basic pattern is identical, relying upon the white and black poles between which come yellow, red and blue together with the three 'composites', orange, green and purple ... Kircher had come tantalisingly close to the later system of primary and secondary colours. All that was required was the elimination of white and black as 'colours' - though this was not easy given their place in the Aristotelian order of things" (Kemp, pp. 280-1). "Understanding the nature of light was one of the central questions of natural philosophy in the mid-seventeenth century, as was the phenomenon of magnetism ... Kircher's virtue was to recognize the significance of these questions. He attempted to collect all the relevant information and began to analyse it. While his conclusions often seemed flawed to the most critical and knowledgeable readers at the time, they nonetheless mined his books for useful data and specific insights that they might incorporate into their own natural philosophies" (DSB). This is a complete copy of a work often found lacking plates, or without the separate title to the second volume. The full title of the work may be translated, "The Great Art of Light and Shadow, divided into ten books, in which the admirable powers and effects of light and shade are propounded in new and varied experiments and in recondite ways, for the diverse uses of mankind." It was composed shortly after Kircher's principal work on magnetism, Magnes, sive de Arte Magnetica (1641), in which he argued that magnetism was the principal force organizing and controlling nature, including optical phenomena. "The title in Latin, Ars magna lucis et umbrae, was intended as a play on words: "We say 'Magna' on account of a kind of hidden allusion to the magnet," Kircher wrote in his introductory pages, meaning that the title could also be read as "The Magnetic Art of Light and Shadow" (Glassie, p. 115). "In his introduction to the book Kircher wrote that the idea of producing a study on optics came to him a few years before when the Emperor [Ferdinand III] put to him some questions about light and shadow. He had written out his answers and then, with the encouragement, as well as the essential financial backing of many friends, he had decided to expand those answers into a full treatise ... [Kircher] follow[ed] the introduction with some laudatory poems and epigrams, with himself as the subject. The poems were by James Alan Gibbs, Kircher's English medical friend, and the epigrams by A. F. Fayenus, Doctor of Laws and professor at the Academy of Avignon. "In the tradition of the Schoolmen, Kircher began the main section of the book with a series of definitions. He explained the meaning of "Ars Sciagnomica" (of shadows), "Ars Chromocritica" (of colours), and so on before dealing with "Photosophia," or the science of light. The sun, he wrote, as the first of all the lights, had to be considered before any other source of light. Rather surprisingly, instead of describing, as one might have expected, the glory and the power of the sun, he began by treating of its "defects", the sunspots. He recalled the time when he first observed them, in 1625, but gives credit for priority of discovery to Galileo, Scheiner and other astronomers who had preceded his observations by many years. The sun, he wrote, is like a great ocean of fire, showing disturbances and ebullations on its surface, a mass of burning, bubbling matter, producing light and heat, and affecting life on earth in various ways. He illustrated this section with a half-page plate showing a band of sunspots along the equatorial region of the sun's face ... "Even though the moon, Kircher continued, is merely a secondary light, acting as a reflecting surface for the rays of the sun with no light of its own, it nevertheless also has an effect on the earth in many ways. The moon modifies the light it reflects, and thus, for example, causes the tidal motion of the ocean. Kircher was here referring to his theory of the "flux and reflux" of the sea, in which the tides were said to be due to the "nitrous quality" given to the waters by the light reflected from the surface of the moon. The pure light of the sun is first contaminated by nitrous effluvia in its brief contact with the moon, and it then conveys these effluvia to earth. "Kircher considered that the reason why the moon has such an influence on earth was the fact that the two planets are very similar. Aristotle was wrong in saying that the moon, like the other heavenly bodies, was made of the unchanging quintessence, the fifth element. On the contrary, Kircher continued, "the moon is a rough-surfaced body, very like the earth in appearance, as is proved by the many observations which have been made by members of the Academy of the Lincei in Rome" [such as Galileo] .... He described what he had seen through the telescope, mountains, areas that appear to be seas and lakes, and so he concluded "the moon, like our planet, is composed of the elements of earth and water." "Kircher had a great deal more to say about the light of the planets, the rings of Jupiter, and other such heavenly bodies. From them, he returned to earth and to a study of terrestrial fire. He defined this as "air ignited by the violent collision of two bodies, which by the heat thus generated causes inflammable substances to burst into flame." He supported this view by referring to the igniting of tinder by sparks produced by striking a flint against a piece of iron, and also to the way in which certain tribes in South America make fire by spinning a stick in a groove cut in another piece of wood ... "It was in this section that Kircher treated of "Animal Light" in a passage that was to receive favourable comment from later writers. He discussed the light of fireflies, which he had studied while in Malta. He had collected a considerable number of these insects, which were abundant on the island, and had studied them with particular care. He noted that the light they emitted was coloured like that of burning sulphur, and that they seemed to have voluntary control of the flashes. The light he compared to the phosphorescence of decaying wood or of the scales of certain fishes which he had observed in the Mediterranean ... Kircher had also at one time during his stay in the south of France examined certain zoophytes such as jellyfish. These also emit a phosphorescent glow in the dark. He explained this phenomenon from the teleological point of view, that the ability to produce light is given by nature to these creatures so that they can seek food in the dark far under the surface of the sea, and also use it as a means of frightening off their enemies. "Some stones, he continued, have a somewhat similar property. The best known of these is the Bolognian stone, the phosphor which had been first discovered and described by Cascariolo early in the seventeenth century. Kircher had discovered a similar mineral during his explorations and had purified it by calcination in a furnace. His product, after exposure to sunlight, glowed like coal, but gradually this light faded. It could be restored by exposing it to sunlight once more. His explanation for this was that the stone absorbed from the sunlight "a most subtile vapour which is capable of producing light." This study anticipated by forty years the well-known investigations by Robert Boyle of "aerial noctilucia" (fireflies) and "icy noctilucia" (phosphorous). "From a consideration of fire, Kircher passed on to the study of the nature of colour. He rejected the view, which he attributed to Pythagoras, that colour is nothing more than the appearance of the surface of things. He preferred the theory that colour is the movement of the diaphanous medium which has been illuminated and thus light is actually distinct from the colour it produces. "Kircher held that the rainbow is produced by the light of the sun passing from one medium to another, from air into a raindrop, where it is refracted, reflected and then passed out again to reach the eye. In this he followed the generally accepted explanation of the primary rainbow given by Marc Antonio de Dominis and by René Descartes. But he had his own explanation of why different colours are formed by these refractions and reflections. Pure light of the sun is "debilitated" by its passage through the raindrop, and thus the various colours are really due to contamination of white light. According to Kircher, pure light produces the colour white, and its absence is blackness. In between these two extremes are three colours, yellow, red and purple, produced by the contamination or debilitation of sunlight which results from its passage from air to another medium. All the other colours are mixtures of whiteness and blackness and of the three intermediate colours ... "Kircher applied his theory of the formation of colour to explain the strange properties of the Mexican wood known as "Lignum Nephriticum". The wood had originally been used in the preparation of a decoction for the treatment of kidney disease or nephritis (hence its name) but it had also been found to have remarkable fluorescent properties. Its source was "Eysenhardtia polystadia", the "palo dulce" tree of Mexico, and had been brought to Europe by missionaries some years before. To Kircher it was known by its Mexican names of "Coatl" and "Tlapazathi", and he greatly treasured a piece which had been given to him by a missionary friend. When water was put into a bowl which had been carved from this wood it became tinged with a bluish colour which later turned to purple. Kircher found that if some of the wood were ground into a powder and was sprinkled into water, the water was also tinged with colour. However, on standing the powder lost its power to affect the water in this way. He had presented a cup made from the wood to the Emperor, who treasured it as a great rarity. Though Kircher did not attempt to go into the real nature of this phenomenon, and contented himself by referring the reader to his theory of the formation of colour for an explanation, this section on "Lignum Nephriticum" is of importance. As E. Newton Harvey has noted in his History of Luminescence, it is one of the earliest published accounts of natural fluorescence. "In the following sections Kircher treated at length of colour in minerals, plants and animals. These chapters give evidence of his enormous industry and the breadth of his interests ... Among the animals he discussed at some length was the chameleon. A Franciscan missionary had brought him one of these little creatures from Palestine in 1639 and Kircher examined it very carefully. He discovered that many of the claims that had been made about it were false, or at least greatly exaggerated. It was however true, he found, that the chameleon can change colour to suit its background, green on green and white on white and so on. According to Kircher these changes of colour were "voluntary", for when the animal finally died, it no longer reacted to changes in background colour. Perhaps its ability, Kircher surmised, could be compared to the changes that take place in the fact of a man, who blushes when embarrassed, turns red when angry and pale when afraid. "In Book Two Kircher treated of what he called "Actinobolismus" or radiation. He discussed the transmission of light in straight lines, giving general geometrical propositions on the projection of light from a point source. He quoted with approval Kepler's description of the projection of an image, such as is seen in the famous "camera obscura", which is also discussed by John Baptist della Porta. He described in detail his own development of the same device, with an apology that "though the experiment is well known, yet I will enlarge on it here since it explains what I wish to say." A small hole, he wrote, is made in the shutter of a darkened room, and a little lens, such as that used as a magnifying glass, is fitted into the hole. A white card is placed at a suitable distance from the lens, and "whatever is outside the window is seen depicted on the card, with its true colours, only differing from reality in its size and disposition" ... "From the subject of the projection of light, it was an easy step for Kircher to that of the propagation of sound. He compared the echo with the transmission and reflection of light. He also described some acoustic instruments he had designed. One of these instruments was to be the subject of a controversy between him and Sir Samuel Morland, Fellow of the Royal Society of London, some years later. This was his reconstruction of "the horn of Alexander the Great, which the Emperor used to call his army together in battle" ... "Kircher finally returned from sound to vision, with a chapter on the structure of the eye. He had been introduced to this subject by a skilled anatomist who had taught him how to perform dissections and examinations. These showed him that the eye was like a lens, with a screen behind it on to which the image was projected, somewhat as happened in the "camera obscura." He explained how to see this for oneself. "Take the eye of a bull or of any large animal, or even of a man if the occasion arises. Wash it well and remove the outer, thicker layers, and then set it in a screen in a darkened place ... (it will be seen) that the image of objects placed in front of the eye pass through the crystalline humours right into the interior, with their true colours and shape which are there accurately and faithfully reproduced. As if they were drawn with a brush." "In an interesting passage Kircher described aftervision, the image that remains in the eye after we have stared at an object for some time and then looked in the dark. The object is still seen, but in changing colours, because Kircher explained, the formation of an image in the eye is like the effect of sunlight on a phosphor stone. Light is absorbed by the stone, and so it glows in the dark, but gradually the glow fades as the light leaves the stone. And so it is with the image retained in the eye, it is bright at first, but gradually it fades and its colour changes, because colour, as had been explained earlier, is due to the debilitation of light. "The eye then, is like a crystal globe in which images of external objects can be received, as is the case with the great globe which Father Christopher Scheiner had once presented to Archduke Maximilian of Austria. When vision is correct, the crystalline lens focuses the image sharply on the retina, as does the globe on its inner surface. But if the lens does not function correctly, the image is blurred. This is the case with short-sighted people, in which the lens fails to focus sharply on the retina. "This theory of vision provided a more satisfactory account of the function of the eye than did that of Alhazen which was believed by many at that time. As Kircher himself admitted, his theory owed much to Kepler and Scheiner and even to Porta's "camera obscura." However he had tested the theory for himself, even, it would appear, experimenting with the human eye. He had noted how the crystalline lens refracts light rays to form converging cones whose vertices lie on the retina. Even his view, that some physical change which can be compared to phosphorescence takes place in the retina and so may account for aftervision, is not entirely out of keeping with our modern view in which light energy is transmuted into chemical energy in the retina ... "The following four books of his treatise contain many chapters on methods of designing and constructing sundials. Kircher always was interested in the design of such devices, and a great deal of his time must have been spent in the workshop directing the construction of his "Horographia Babylonio-Italica", his great "Pyramidal Sundial", his "Botanical Clocks", and many other strange dials and clocks which are mainly of antiquarian interest today. The construction of such instruments was a popular occupation in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries and many books describing various designs and techniques had been written by his contemporaries. These designs of Kircher and many of his fellow dial makers were intended to delight the eye and cause wonderment, rather than solve the real problem of time-keeping which Huygens and Hooke were to take so seriously. For until a reliable, universal timepiece had been invented, the great question of how to navigate correctly at sea and to compute longitude with accuracy could not be solved. In an age when voyages of exploration were so important this was indeed a serious problem. "Kircher did, however, give some of his attention to this problem, and he described an instrument which, he claimed, was the answer to mariners' prayers. Many have tried, he wrote, to devise such an instrument for the accurate measurement of longitude. They had based their attempts on theories of magnetic variation, on observations of the eclipse of the moons of Jupiter, on the position of sunspots and the mountains of the moon, but all with little success. But with the instrument he had invented, his "Horologium Catholicum" or universal clock, the problem could be solved. This clock had actually been designed originally for another purpose, as a sort of Jesuitical timepiece, "which could tell the time everywhere, but especially in the Colleges of the Society of Jesus, scattered throughout the world", but it could be applied to other uses. "Kircher's idea was more or less based on a method suggested by Galileo. This was that if the moment of some astronomical event, such as the eclipse of the moons of Jupiter, could be predicted with the help of tables in some standard time related to a fixed degree of longitude, then a person in some other part of the world, observing the same event in terms of local time, could readily calculate the longitude of the place where he made his observations. Kircher wrote, "we intend to describe how a clock can be made which will tell the time in any part of the world, but especially in the various Jesuit Colleges. This cannot be done without a knowledge of longitudes, and to find these I have spent a great deal of time in study. I have used information supplied to me by Jesuit mathematicians who made observations of eclipses in Europe, Eastern India, China, Peru, Brazil, Canada and Mexico, and used these to determine longitudes. Knowing the difference between the time when an eclipse was observed, for example in Nanking in China, from that of the same eclipse observed at Goa in India, Mozambique in Africa, Pernambuco in Brazil and in several other stations, it was possible, though not without difficulty, to calculate the longitudes of each of these places, as well as of other places lying between them. Using this information, then, we were able to construct the timepiece for the whole Jesuit order." "We may pass very briefly through some of the following sections of the treatise, merely picking out some points of particular interest. One such section is that in which Kircher claimed to have calculated the thickness of the atmosphere by measuring the refraction of sunlight in air. The figure he arrived at was about 43,000 paces but, he adds, this was on a plain, for as you rise above sea level the thickness of the atmosphere decreases. Moreover, in cold regions air condenses and forms a thinner layer, while in the tropics it rarefies and the atmosphere rises. This passage would not have displeased Blaise Pascal who, in 1648 had his brother-in-law Périer perform the famous experiment with a barometer on the Puy-de-Dôme in Auvergne in which he demonstrated that atmospheric pressure was less on the summit than at the base of the mountain. Of course, Kircher and Pascal would have disagreed on the interpretation of this finding, for the Jesuit denied that the mercury in a barometer was supported by the weight of the atmosphere. "The title Kircher gave to the last part, Book Ten, of his treatise was "Magia Lucis et Umbrae." Here he let himself go, delighting to describe and illustrate the fascinating instruments and devices "in which the little known powers of light and shadow are put to diverse uses" ... Kircher actually used them to introduce a very important section of his treatise which he entitled "Dioptrics, or concerning lenses of pantoscopes and telescopes and their various forms and applications" ... He described how lenses must be placed in the tube to make, for example, a microscope. A single lens, if well made, will make a satisfactory instrument, but it is much better if two lenses are employed. "Thus can be made a microscope which will amplify a fly into an elephant and a flea into a camel." An instrument of this kind was what he used in many of his investigations. Of the result of his observations he wrote, "Who would have believed, had he not used a microscope, that vinegar and milk abound with an innumerable multitude of worms ... that leaves of plants are made up of tiny filaments, those of the Castor Oil Plant contain a collection of star-like bodies ... you will observe that each plant produces its own peculiar animals by the putrefaction of its humours, as from a pullulating seed bed." What a pity Kircher did not devote a whole book to the results of his microscopical investigations, which preceded those of Robert Hooke and Anthony van Leeuwenhoek by so many years. "Kircher followed his treatment of lenses with a discussion of mirrors ... Here he goes into details of "burning mirrors", such as those said to have been made by Archimedes at Syracuse and used by him to destroy a fleet" (Reilly, pp. 72-86). "The book's ten-part structure, as Kircher explained it, connected to the ten-stringed harmony of the Greek instrument the decachord. This in turn represented the well-ordered harmony of nature, and the Decalogue, or Ten Commandments, and the Pythagorean notion of the number ten as the number of the universe and perfection, as well as the Sefirot, the ten emanations of God, by which, according to Kabbalah, the universe was created. "For just as the wise men of the Hebrews claim a world built from ten rays of divinity," Kircher wrote in his preface, "so we completed ten separate themes or books, as it were, ten books in ten parted rays, the world of light and shadow, that is, our art"" (Glassie, p. 116). The remarkable engraved frontispiece summarizes elegantly Kircher's efforts of linking hermetic elements to Christian concepts, and his views on the metaphysics of light. Angels form an arc under the central light, which is YHWH, the Hebrew letters for God. Daylight is the source of direct light, refracted light, and light reflected by night (on the right). Divine authority, a hand writing a book that absorbs light directly from the source of all light, oversees the daylight, and it is a little higher than Reason, the hand writing a book above the night, which receives a more modest eye's light. Below daylight is Profane Authority, which receives only a lantern's light; below Reason is Sense, which points to an image produced by a telescope. Emperor Ferdinand enters the picture as one of Kircher's patrons. Norman 1216 (recording 38 plates, incomplete?); Becker 219 (39 plates); Vagnetti EIIIb42; Merrill, Athanasius Kircher 7 (erroneous collation); Linda Hall Library, Jesuit Science, 10; Bud & Warner, Instruments of Science, 1998; Glassie, A Man of Misconceptions, 2012; Kemp, Science of Art, 1992; Lefèvre, Inside the Camera Obscura - Optics and Art under the Spell of the Projected Image, 2007; Reilly, Studia Kircheriana, 1974. Two volumes in one, folio (299 x 202 mm), pp. [xl] (engraved frontispiece, letterpress title, four-page dedication to Archduke Ferdinand (1633-1654), son of Ferdinand III, Holy Roman Emperor (1608-1657), two-page preface by Ferdinand III, six-page preface by the author, 21 pages of table of contents, two pages of poems in praise of the author and one page of privileges), 370 [i.e., 470], including engraved frontispiece signed P. Miotte (vol. 1); [2, separate title-page], 471-568, 567-935, [15, index and errata] (vol. 2), with 40 engraved plates (35 numbered, 5 unnumbered, of which one is large and folding). Several hundred woodcut diagrams and illustrations in text, a few white on black. Contemporary vellum, manuscript lettering to spine, spine with some wormholes, occasional light spotting but in general a very clean and crisp copy.

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         De Jure Belli ac Pacis Libri Tres, In quibus jus Naturae & Gentium, item juris publici praecipua explicantur. Editio Nova cum Annontatis Auctoris, Ex postrema ejus ante obitum cura multo nunc auctior [etc.]. Ter Meulen & Diermanse 572

      Apud Iohannem Blaev, Amsterdami 1646 - Modern blind tooled calf, some light browning, else a very good, crisp copy, with the title page printed in red and black The last edition upon which Grotius was to work, published posthumously and including matter he had deemed prudent to exclude from previous editions, this the text chosen by the Carnegie Endowment as the basis for its edition in the 20th century

      [Bookseller: Meyer Boswell Books, Inc., member ABAA]
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         Gulden-Spiegel, Ofte, Opweckinghe tot Christelijcke Deuchden.[with] Thamars-Ontschakingh, of, de verdoolde liefde van Amnon

      Arent Jansz Chalon, Hoorn 1646 - Contemporary overlapping vellum, modest discoloration and soiling, but sound. Spine darkened, remains of labels, bookplate on pastedown and endpaper. Two works in one, the second unpaginated and dated 1647 on the separate title; printed in a mix of black letter and Roman type faces. (8), 252, (60)pp. The first edition of a popular and much reprinted book of moral tales about violence. 15 engravings in the first work, 3 in the second (and a vignette on the title) and an extra engraved title to Gulden-Spiegel. As here, it was often paired with Mayvogel's life of Amnon (apparently present here in the second edition, first published in 1646). No other copies of the first edition located in OCLC or auction records. Size: Octavo (8vo). Quantity Available: 1. Shipped Weight: Under 1 kilo. Category: Philosophy; Antiquarian & Rare. Inventory No: 046444. [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Pazzo Books (ABAA-ILAB)]
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         Canterburies doome. Or the first part of a compleat history of the commitment, charge, tryall, condemnation, execution of William Laud late arch-bishop of Canterbury.

      London, Printed by J. Macock for M. Spark 1646 - Folio. Modern 3/4 leather over marbled boards. Engraved frontispiece, 565 pp., index. Lacking errata leaf and both portraits of Laud and Prynne. Tanning to pages. Frontis, title page soiled. Occasional marginal staining and soiling. Wing P3917. [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Sequitur Books]
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         1646 RARE Diaeteticon Nonnius Diet Food Prep WINE Fish Hygiene & Health Medicine

      Antverpiae : Ex officina Petri Belleri, 1646. - 1646 RARE Diaeteticon Nonnius Diet Food Prep WINE Fish Hygiene & Health Medicine A rare 17th-century medical book designed to be an aid in dietetics and gastronomy by Ludovicus Nonnius. Nonnius was a Belgian physician who is considered to be the founder of dietetics as a medical field. His study on dietetics in ‘Diaeteticon’ (1627) was the culmination of his work and was the first systematic study of how food effects health and hygiene. ‘Diaeteticon’ is divided into four main sections, each of which focuses on a different type of food and its effects on health • Principles of nutrition – types of breads, benefits of fruits and vegetables, preservation properties of salt • Treatment of meat, specifically pork, and how much should be eaten and prepared • Treatment of food from the sea and river – fish • Treatment of drinks – water, wine, beer; whether rainwater is safe to drink; how much safer wine is to drink that water Nonnius claimed that mineral water had healing powers, specifically in healing kidney stones and recommended drinking spa-water as a remedy. While many of Nonnius’s health assumptions are considered antiquated, his hypotheses and research on mineral water and fish consumption are still accurate and used today. Item number: #1435 Price: $1250 NONNIUS, Ludovicus Lvdovici Nonni . Diæteticon sive De re cibaria libri IV. Nvnc primvm lvcem vidit. Antverpiae : Ex officina Petri Belleri, 1646. Details: • Collation complete with all pages: [24], 526, [2] • Binding: Leather; tight & secure • References: Palau 196870; • Language: Latin • Size: ~8in X 6.5in (20cm x 16.5cm) Our Guarantee: Very Fast. Very Safe. Free Shipping Worldwide. Customer satisfaction is our priority! Notify us with 7 days of receiving, and we will offer a full refund without reservation! 1435 Photos available upon request. [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Schilb Antiquarian]
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         Gulden-Spiegel, Ofte, Opweckinghe tot Christelijcke Deuchden...[with] Thamars-Ontschakingh, of, de verdoolde liefde van Amnon

      Hoorn: Arent Jansz Chalon, 1646. First Edition. Hardcover (Vellum). Very Good Condition. Contemporary overlapping vellum, modest discoloration and soiling, but sound. Spine darkened, remains of labels, bookplate on pastedown and endpaper. Two works in one, the second unpaginated and dated 1647 on the separate title; printed in a mix of black letter and Roman type faces. (8), 252, (60)pp. The first edition of a popular and much reprinted book of moral tales about violence. 15 engravings in the first work, 3 in the second (and a vignette on the title) and an extra engraved title to Gulden-Spiegel. As here, it was often paired with Mayvogel's life of Amnon (apparently present here in the second edition, first published in 1646). No other copies of the first edition located in OCLC or auction records. Size: Octavo (8vo). Quantity Available: 1. Shipped Weight: Under 1 kilo. Category: Philosophy; Antiquarian & Rare. Inventory No: 046444.

      [Bookseller: Pazzo Books ]
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         Lincolnia Comitatus Anglis Lyncolne Shire.

      J. Janssonius 1646-66, Amsterdam - Copper-engraving, handcolored in outline, when published. In excellent condition, full margins as published.

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Reinhold Berg eK]
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         Britannia prout divisa fuit temporibus ANGLO-SAXONUM, praefertim durante illorum HEPTARCHIA

      Amsterdam c.1646 - Black and white engraved map (approx. 42.5 x 53cm). With German and Latin text on the verso. The map is based upon Blaeu's map of 1645, but can be readily distinguished from Blaeu's map by the addition of 2 compass roses, rhumb lines and sailing ships. The two sets of vignettes on either side of the map were first incorporated by Speed in his Heptarchy map of 1611 and show the British Isles at the time of the Anglo-Saxon Heptarchy; the seven ancient kingdoms of Kent, the South Saxons, West Saxons, East Saxons, Northumberland, East Anglia and Mercia. The historical map is embellished with border panels depicting the seven Kings in full battle dress & armour, and with scenes illustrating the conversion of each of the seven kingdoms to Christianity in wake of St. Augustine's arrival in England in the year 597 AD. The vignettes have been completely redone by a Dutch engraver and are in the grand style of contemporary Dutch paintings. A VERY GOOD IMPRESSION.

      [Bookseller: Chaucer Bookshop ABA ILAB]
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         Göttinnen und Satyren begrüßen tanzend und musizierend die Ankunft der Hesperiden mit den ersten Zitrusfrüchten auf einem von Pferden gezogenen Muschelwagen an der Meeresküste Kampaniens mit rauchendem Vesuv. Großer Kupferstich von Greuter nach einem Gemälde von Lanfranco bei Pater Ferrari 1646

      großer Original-Kupferstich von Greuter (in der Platte auf einem Tontopf signiert) nach einem Gemälde von Giovanni Lanfranco (in der Platte signiert als "Eques Jo. Lanfr.") auf großem rückseitig unbedrucktem Büttenblatt mit dekorativ abgesetztem Plattenrand und großem Wasserzeichen, Plattengröße ca. 31 x 22,5 cm, Blattgröße ca. 39 x 26,5 cm, im breiten Blattrand außerhalb des Plattenrandes etwas Alterspatina, ansonsten sauber und bemerkenswert gut erhalten, sehr selten und für uns anderenorts antiquarisch nicht nachweisbar - Pater Ferrari war 1646 der erste, der die berühmten "goldenen Äpfel der Hesperiden", die Hercules alias Heraklid in einer seiner zwölf Aufgaben zu stehlen hatte, mit Zitrusfrüchten gleichsetzte und deshalb den botanischen Namen "Hesperides" für Zitrusfrüchte vorschlug. Diese Interpretation macht insofern Sinn, als der Garten der Hesperiden, der in der griechischen Mythologie schon immer am äußersten westlichen Ende der den Griechen bekannten Welt gesehen wurde, heute mit einer der Kanarischen Inseln identifiziert wird. Dort wachsen nicht nur Limonen und Orangen, sondern es existieren auch Nachkommen urzeitlicher Riesenechsen, die hinter dem griechischen Mythos des Drachen "Ladon" stehen könnten, der den "Apfelbaum" der Hesperiden zu bewachen hatte.

      [Bookseller: historicArt Antiquariat & Kunsthandlung]
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         Begin Ende Voortgangh van de Vereenighde Nederlantsche Geoctroyeerde Oost Indische Compagnie Amsterdam

      Third edition. 21 parts in 2 vols. Two extra engraved titlepages, two large folding maps, plus 228 other maps & plates. Oblong 4to. Contemporary calf, recased, rubbed, engraved title & one plate in vol. I mounted, minor marginal losses & tears to four plates, with repairs to tears & folds of 3 plates, large inkstain to one leaf of vol. I. [Amsterdam,

      [Bookseller: Maggs Bros. Ltd.]
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         Opera quae extant omnia... Beigebunden: Severinus, De efficaci medicina. Lib. III. 2 in 1 Bd.

      Frankfurt, pp.J. Beyer, 1646, 2, 11 Bl., 1044 pp., 10 + 7 Bl., 297 pp., 7 Bl., 19 Ku.stich., mehr als 200 Holzschn., 2 gravierte Titelseiten, Pergamentband der Zeit eininge kleine Wurmgänge meist im marginalen Rand. Schönes Exemplar. VATER DER DEUTSCHEN CHIRURGIE - ERSTE GESAMTAUSGABE MIT KUPFERN VON MATTH. MERIAN "Fabry von Hilden berichtet erstmals, daß Herzwunden heilen können"F.W.Hehrlein. Erste Gesamtausgabe der Werke des Fabricius Hildanus. Das angebundene Werk von Severino ebenfalls in erster Ausgabe. Wilhem Fabry von Hilden (1560 - 1634) war unbestritten der Erste unter den Chirurgen des 17. Jahrhunderts. Er war es, der die deutsche Chirurgie zuerst zu Ehren gebracht hat. Mit Recht wird er der "der deutsche Paré" genannt. Er vereinte die Eigenschaften eines ausgezeichneten Chirurgen mit jenen eines ebenso tüchtigen Arztes, bei gleichzeitiger, umfassender Bildung. Jahrzehntelang war er einer der bedeutendsten Consilarii im ganzen Deutschen Reich. Fabry stammt ursprünglich aus Hilden bei Düsseldorf. Er beendete sein Leben als Stadtarzt in Bern. -- Die vorliegende erste Gesamtausgabe der Schriften des Fabry wurde noch 1633, ein Jahr vor seinem Tode vom Autor selbst zum Druck vorbereitet, jedoch erst 1646 von Beyer posthum herausgebracht. Zu den Kupfern von Merian siehe Wüthrich II, Nr.16. First edition of the complete works of the 'Father of German Surgery'. Fabry was the first to advocate amputations above the gangrenous of injured parts. He is accredited with the first amputation of the thigh and was the first to remove a gallstone from a living patient. Fabry described a procedure for the treatment of fracture-dislocations of the cervical spine. He had considerable mechanical ingenuity and deviced many pieces of apparatus and instruments. M.A. Severino (1580-1656) of Naples, was a famous anatomist and surgeon. He introduced a mixture of ice and snow for freezing to produce surgical anaesthesia, and perform a number of tracheotomies during an epedemic of diphtheria. Heirs of Hippocrates 247 Krivatsy 3842 Parkinson & Lumb 798 Waller 2908 + 8888 Wellcome III, p.4.

      [Bookseller: MedicusBooks.Com]
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         Lacus Lemanni Locorumque Circumiacentium Accuratissima descriptio. Auctore Govlartio Genevensi.

      Janssonius Joan 1646-57, Amsterdam - Copper engraving, hand colored in outline and wash. Latin text edition. In excellent condition.

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Reinhold Berg eK]
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         Tractatus de Furtis, In Quo Contrectationum Alienarumque Rerum.

      1646 - A Scarce Treatise on Theft Bonifacio, Giovanni [1547-1635]. Tractatus de Furtis, In Quo Contrectationum Alienarumque Rerum Occupationum Materia Universa Examinatur, Complures Leges Venetae Commemorantur Quidque in Praxi Observandum Sit Demonstratur; Iudicibus, Advocatis, Atque Adeo Omnibus Legum Studiosis Utilissimus & Incundissimus, Quorum Usui Textum ab Allegationibus, Characterum Diversitate Distinximus. Cum Summariis ac Indice Rerum Verborumque Copiosissimo. Frankfurt: Typis Iohannis Friderici Weissii Apud Petrum Hauboldum, 1646. [viii], 550. [48] pp. Octavo (6" x 4"). Later speckled vellum, raised bands and lettering piece to spine. Light rubbing to extremities, corner slightly bumped, owner bookplate to front pastedown. Woodcut title-page device, head-piece and tail-piece. Moderate toning to text, somewhat heavier in places, some leaves have dampstining and light foxing, owner signature dated 1718 in tiny hand to foot of title page. A nice copy of a scarce title. $1,250. * Third and final edition. This treatise on theft in Roman and civil law, a topic that includes rape, adultery, fraud and piracy, was first published in 1599. The author was a Venetian, but his text was aimed at a pan-European audience. All editions of this work are scarce. OCLC locates 1 copy of this title in North America at the Library of Congress, which has a copy of the third edition. Verzeichnis der im Deutschen Sprachraum Erschienenen Drucke des 17. Jahrhunderts 3:621453H.

      [Bookseller: The Lawbook Exchange, Ltd., ABAA ILAB]
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         La Bataille De Nordlingen Donee Le Troisiesme Iovr D'Aovst 1645. entre les armées du tres Chrestien Louys 14 Roy de France et de Nauarre. d'Anguyen, Prince du sang, Pair de France Gouuerneur pour sa Maiesté en ses Prouinces de Champagne et Brie. et l'Imperiale et Bauraroise Commandée par les Generaux Gléen et Mercy. Ordre De La Bataille De Nordlingen Par le Sr. de Baeulieu Ingenieur Ordinaire du Roy 1646.', Commandée par Monseigneur le Duc d'Anguyen, Prince du sang, Pair de France Gouuerneur pour sa Maiesté en ses Prouinces de Champagne et Brie. et l'Imperiale et Bauraroise Commandée par les Generaux Gléen et Mercy. Ordre De La Bataille De Nordlingen Par le Sr. de Baeulieu Ingenieur Ordinaire du Roy 1646.'.

      - Kupferstich v. Cochin aus Les glorieuses conquêtes de Louis le Grand b. Sébastien Pontault de Beaulieu, dat. 1645, 116 x 88,5 Prachtvoller Kupferstich aus "Les glorieuses conquestes, de Louis le Grand roy de France et de Navarre dediées au roy Tome premier". - Kupferstich von 4 Platten gedruckt. - In der Blattmitte links Gesamtansicht von Dinkelsbühl, rechts Gesamtansicht von Nördlingen. - Der obere Teil des Blattes zeigt die Schlacht bei Alerheim mit Vogelschauansichten der Orte Löpsingen, Nördlingen, Fessenheim, Wörnitzostheim, Appetshofen und Grosselfingen. - Darüber großes gestochenes Portrait von Louis de Bourbon. - Der untere Teil des Blattes zeigt den Ort und Schloß Alerheim, den Wennen-Berg und Heroldingen mit Darstellungen der Schlachtenordnung der verschiedenen Beteiligten. - Beide Blätter mit gestochener tableauartiger Umrandung.

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Norbert Haas]
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         Gesamtansicht über die Isar; im Vordergrund Gustav Adolph mit Gefolge ('Monachium Regi Suecorum Certis Conditionibus Deditur.').

      - Kupferstich aus Merians Theatrum Europaeum, 1646, 23,5 x 33 Fauser, Repertorium älterer Topographie. Druckgraphik von 1486 bis 1750, 9267.

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Norbert Haas]
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         Les oeuvres

      Original collective edition containing some original pieces. One of the few copies containing the two epistles of Bois-Robert and Scarron (most copies contain less preliminary leaves). Portrait frontispiece of the author designed and engraved by Petrus by Daret; thumbnail of title, brand printer in the title page. Velin flexible full time. Smooth back silent. Light spots on the top plate. To work on the preliminary leaves, after the first two layers in bottom margin; although confined to the margins, many lace in the middle of preliminary leaves. Also of note, a gallery to the table and thus the last pages of text, still low margin. Some spots and yellowed. This edition was largely prepared by the author himself, understands the value of his work and of his approaching end (deceased in 1646), it has 268 rooms, including 173 unpublished. Some pieces that had appeared in anthologies are not included in this integral. François Maynard is one of the names Pricipals poetry of the first half of the seventeenth, alongside Malherbe, Racan Viau, Regnier. Disciple of Malherbe, his poetry is distinguished by the clarity of his style and regularity of his verses; there emerges also a certain melancholy. --- Please note that the translation in english is done automatically, we apologize if the formulas are inaccurate. Contact us for any information! Chez Augustin Courbé à Paris 1646 in-4 (17x22,5cm) (16) (16) 384pp. relié

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        Begin Ende Voortgangh van de Vereenighde Nederlantsche Geoctroyeerde Oost-Indische Compagnie. Amsterdam.

      1646]. 1646 - Third edition. 21 parts in 2 vols. Two extra engraved titlepages, two large folding maps, plus 228 other maps & plates. Oblong 4to. Contemporary calf, recased, rubbed, engraved title & one plate in vol. I mounted, minor marginal losses & tears to four plates, with repairs to tears & folds of 3 plates, large inkstain to one leaf of vol. I. [Amsterdam, The third and best edition of this important collection of voyages made on behalf of the East India Company. Increasingly scarce, this attractive set is in the original Dutch binding. The cornerstone of any research on early Dutch voyages, it contains a wealth of important material relating to the history of early Pacific exploration, as well as the development of the East Indies. The work includes important early voyages to the Philippines, China and Japan and, as many of the voyages came from the East, there is a good deal of information on the Straits of Magellan. Furthermore, it is noteworthy for including some of the only contemporary information on the voyages of the Duyfken. Skippered by Willem Janz, it made the first authenticated European sighting of Australia in 1605. Its preface, by Commelin, contains a summary of Dutch voyages to the East Indies undertaken before 1631. Beautifully illustrated, it contains a wonderful assemblage of maps and plates of native peoples, hunting techniques (including for penguins and polar bears), Dutch camps and settlements, forts, South American ports, battle scenes, animals, trees, fruits, and other natural resources. The voyages are as follows (of these, numbers 6-9, 11-15, 17, 20 and 21 appear here for the first time): Vol. I: Engraved title, title-leaf, 11 leaves (introduction), 5 leaves of registers and errata. 1) Voyages to the North (Nova Zembla etc.) by G. de Veer. 71pp. Twenty-six plates and six maps. 2) First voyage to the East Indies by Cornelius Houtman. 112pp. Forty-four plates and five maps. 3) Voyage to the East Indies by Jac. Cornelisz van Neck and Wybrand van Warwijck (1598-1600). 56pp. Twenty-four plates and two maps. 4) Voyage to the East Indies via the Straits of Magellan by Seb. de Weerd (description by Bar. Jansz). 31pp. Eight plates. 5) Voyage round the world by Olivier van Noord (1598-1601). 56pp. Twenty plates and four maps. 6) Voyage to the East Indies by Pieter Both (1599-1601) (description by P. van Craerden). 20pp. 7) Second voyage to the East Indies by Jac. van Neck (1600-2) (description by Roelof Roelofsz). 51pp. Four plates. 8) First voyage by Steven vander Hagen to the East Indies (1599-1601) (description by J.S. van der Goude), and voyages by Corn. Pietersz., G. Senegal and J. van Heemskerck. 31pp. 9) Voyage to the East Indies by Wolphert Harmansz (1601-3) and by van Warwijck and de Weerd (description by C. van Veen). 27pp. 10) First voyage to the East Indies by Joris van Spilbergen (1601-4). 62pp. Eight plates and two maps. 11) Voyage to the East Indies by Wybr. van Warwijck and Seb. de Weerd (1602-7). 88pp. Five plates and one map. Volume 2: Engraved title, title-leaf, map of the East Indies. 12) Second voyage to the East Indies by Stev. vander Hagen. 91pp. Thirteen plates. 13) Voyage to the East Indies and China by C. Matelief (1605-8). 191pp. Eleven plates. 14) Voyage to the East Indies by Paulus van Caerden (1606-8). 48pp. 15) Voyage to the East Indies, China and the Philippines by P.W. Verhjeven (1607-12) (description by J. de Moelre and J. le Febvre). 214pp. One plate. 16) Voyage to the East Indies by Pieter vanden Broecke (1606-30). 110pp. Twelve plates. 17) Description of the Indies by Johan van Twist, Batavia, 1638. Title-leaf, 112pp. 18) Second voyage to the Moluccas via the Straits of Magellan by J.v. Spilbergen; voyage to the Australian regions by W. Schouten and Jacob le Maire (1615-17). 118pp. Twenty-one plates and five maps (including the large folding world map and folding map of the East Indies). 19) Voyage round the World by Jacques L'Heremite (1623-26). 79pp. One plate and four maps. 20

      [Bookseller: Maggs Bros. Ltd ABA, ILAB, PBFA, BA]
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