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Displayed below are some selected recent viaLibri matches for books published in 1609

        LE SECOND LIVRE, IOURNAL OU COMPTOIR, CONTENANT LE VRAY DISCOURS ET NARRATION HISTORIQUE

      Amsterdam: Cornille Nicolas, 1609.. Two parts. 22,[8] leaves (second part with its own titlepage). Folio. Modern three-quarter morocco and marbled boards, spine gilt. A few leaves with worm tracks expertly repaired. Very good. Second French edition, following the first French edition of 1601, of this important voyages narrative, describing the initial Dutch exploration and expansion to the East Indies, a significant element in a global commercial enterprise which was to develop throughout the 17th-century. Van Neck, who represented the Verre Company, commanded three ships which were part of the first successful Dutch trading voyage to the region. The other two ships were commanded by Wybrand Van Warwijck and Jacob Van Heemskerk. Van Neck's vessel became separated from the other two after rounding the Cape of Good Hope, and the three did not reunite again until his arrival in Java in late December 1598. Unlike his Dutch predecessor Cornelis Houtman, who three years earlier had seized the port of Bantam, Van Neck dealt diplomatically with the natives. "Rather than rejecting the inflated prices asked by the local ruler, he offered to pay over the odds in order to cement a lasting relationship...Van Neck's was the most profitable of the pre-VOC [Dutch East India Company] voyages. Despite the apparently high price paid for spices, he netted a profit of 300 per cent on his overall costs. In 1601, fourteen fleets comprising sixty- five ships sailed for the East Indies, but by that time competition between rival Dutch operators, as well as with the Portuguese, had inflated prices and none were as successful as Van Neck's first enterprise" - Howgego. While focused on activity in the East Indies, European Americana notes that the text includes references to Brazil and tobacco from the West Indies. The second part of this 1609 French edition (which has its own titlepage), is an eight-page appendix of words spoken in Java and Malay, includes word lists in French (printed in roman type), Malay (in italic type), and Javanese (in civilité). EUROPEAN AMERICANA 609/93. TIELE 786. TIELE-MULLER 129. HOWGEGO N13. JCB (3)II:64.

      [Bookseller: William Reese Company - Americana]
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        NOVA FRANCIA: OR THE DESCRIPTION OF THAT PART OF NEW FRANCE, WHICH IS ONE CONTINENT WITH VIRGINIA. DESCRIBED IN THE THREE LATE VOYAGES AND PLANTATION MADE BY MONSIEUR DE MONTS, MONSIEUR DU PONT-GRAUÉ, AND MONSIEUR DE POUTRINCOURT, INTO THE COUNTRIE

      London: [Eliot's Court Press] for George Bishop, 1609.. [16],307pp. plus folding engraved map (9 1/4 x 19 1/4 inches). Small quarto. Modern dark green morocco, gilt boards and spine, a.e.g., gilt dentelles. Bound by Sangorski and Sutcliffe. Upper outer joint slightly tender. Bookplates of Boies Penrose on front pastedown ("Ex Libris Boies Penrose II") and front free endpaper ("Old East India House Ex Libris Boies Penrose"). Slight age-toning throughout. First leaf (blank save for a single fleuron) in facsimile, a few small repairs to titlepage and first two preliminary leaves (affecting a few letters). Repaired minor tear across lower border of map. A very good copy. The rare first English edition of this premier source for the history of Canada, published the same year as the French first edition, complete with the first contemporary and detailed map of Canada. Lescarbot was a French writer and lawyer who spent the winter of 1606-7 at Port Royal, Acadia. He gives accounts of early French voyages and discoveries in America such as those of Villegagnon to Brazil, Verrazzano, Ribaut and Laudonnière to Florida, Champlain, sieurs de Poutrincourt and de Monts, Cartier, and Roberval. Also included is much information concerning the Indian tribes, especially those of northeastern Canada, to whom the second book in this English edition is devoted. Much of the material Lescarbot collected himself, interviewing members of the early expeditions and recording his own observations and experiences. Field, in describing the first French edition, states: "His descriptions of Indian Life and peculiarities are very interesting, an account both of their fidelity, and from being among the first authentic relations, we have of them after Cartier." As with so many important works on American published in English in this era, the author, translator, and scholar Richard Hakluyt played a role in the publication of the English edition of Lescarbot. The translator Pierre Erondelle states in the introduction that Hakluyt had asked him to translate the work both to describe Canada and also "for the particular use of this nation, to the end that comparing the goodness of lands of the northern parts herein mentioned with that of Virginia, which...must be far better by reason it stands more southerly nearer to the sun; greater encouragement may be given to prosecute that generous and goodly action." Thus accounts of Canada, in Hakluyt's reckoning, would enhance the promotional materials of the Virginia Company, then being published in London. The large map, "Figure de la Terre Neuue, Grand Riviere de Canada, et Côtes de l'Ocean en la Novvelle France," was also issued with the first French edition, and is considered the most accurate cartographic representation of the area at the time. "The map extends up the St. Lawrence River as far as the Indian village Hochelaga, or Montreal as we know it. The first trading post in Canada, founded in 1600 at Tadousac, is shown at the mouth of the R. de Saguenay and just next to that is the River Lesquemin mistakenly named in reverse. Kebec is shown here for the first time on a printed map in its Micmac form, meaning the narrows of the river" - Burden. The rare English translation of an early significant history of Canada, with the most accurate contemporary map of the region. EUROPEAN AMERICANA 609/68. SABIN 40175. CHURCH 341. VAIL 16. HARRISSE NOUVELLE FRANCE 19. BORBA DE MORAES, pp.406-7. FIELD 916. STC 15491. SCHWARTZ & EHRENBERG, pp.88-90. BURDEN 157 (map). McCORKLE, NEW ENGLAND IN EARLY PRINTED MAPS 609.1 (map). PAYNE, RICHARD HAKLUYT, 22.

      [Bookseller: William Reese Company - Americana]
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        Nova Francia: or the description of that part of New France, which is one continent with Virginia. Described in the three late voyages and plantation made by Monsieur de Monts, Monsieur du Pont-Grané, and Monsieur de Poutrincourt, into the countries called by the French men La Cadie, lying to the Southwest of Cape Breton. Together with an excellent severall treatie of all the commodities of the said countries, and manners of the natural inhabitants of the same. Translated out of French into English by P[ierre] E[rondelle]

      London: [Eliot's Court Press for] George Bishop, 1609. Small quarto. (7 x 5 1/8 inches). 1 folding engraved map. (First leaf [blank save for a single fleuron] in fascimile, a few small expert repairs to the title and first two preliminary leaves, affecting a few letters, repaired small tear across lower blank border of map). Modern dark green morocco gilt by Sangorski & Sutcliffe, covers and spine gilt, gilt turn-ins, gilt edges (upper outer joint slightly tender). The Boise Penrose copy of the rare first English edition of this highly important source for the history of Canada, published the same year as the French first edition, complete with the first and most accurate contemporary map of Canada. The rare first English edition of this premier source for the history of Canada, published the same year as the French first edition, complete with the first contemporary and detailed map of Canada. Lescarbot was a French writer and lawyer who spent the winter of 1606-7 at Port Royal, Acadia. He gives accounts of early French voyages and discoveries in America such as those of Villegagnon to Brazil, Verrazzano, Ribaut and Laudonnière to Florida, Champlain, sieurs de Poutrincourt and de Monts, Cartier, and Roberval. Also included is much information concerning the Indian tribes, especially those of northeastern Canada, to whom the second book in this English edition is devoted. Much of the material Lescarbot collected himself, interviewing members of the early expeditions and recording his own observations and experiences. Field, in describing the first French edition, states: "His descriptions of Indian Life and peculiarities are very interesting, an account both of their fidelity, and from being among the first authentic relations, we have of them after Cartier." As with so many important works on American published in English in this era, the author, translator, and scholar Richard Hakluyt played a role in the publication of the English edition of Lescarbot. The translator Pierre Erondelle states in the introduction that Hakluyt had asked him to translate the work both to describe Canada and also "for the particular use of this nation, to the end that comparing the goodness of lands of the northern parts herein mentioned with that of Virginia, which...must be far better by reason it stands more southerly nearer to the sun; greater encouragement may be given to prosecute that generous and goodly action." Thus accounts of Canada, in Hakluyt's reckoning, would enhance the promotional materials of the Virginia Company, then being published in London. The large map, "Figure de la Terre Neuue, Grand Riviere de Canada, et Côtes de l'Ocean en la Novvelle France," was also issued with the first French edition, and is considered the most accurate cartographic representation of the area at the time. "The map extends up the St. Lawrence River as far as the Indian village Hochelaga, or Montreal as we know it. The first trading post in Canada, founded in 1600 at Tadousac, is shown at the mouth of the R. de Saguenay and just next to that is the River Lesquemin mistakenly named in reverse. Kebec is shown here for the first time on a printed map in its Micmac form, meaning the narrows of the river" (Burden) European Americana 609/68; Sabin 40175; Church 341; Vail 16; Harrisse Nouvelle France 19; Borba de Moraes 406-7; Field 916; STC 15491; Schwartz & Ehrenberg, pp.88-90; cf. Burden 157 (map); cf. McCorkle, New England in Early Printed Maps 609.1 (map).

      [Bookseller: Donald Heald Rare Books]
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        THE TRUE AND PERFECT DESCRIPTION OF THREE VOYAGES, SO STRANGE AND WOONDERFULL, THAT THE LIKE HATH NEVER BEEN HEARD OF BEFORE; DONE AND PERFORMED THREE YEARES, ONE AFTER THE OTHER...AND HOW THAT IN THE LAST VOYAGE, THE SHIPPE WAS SO INCLOSED BY THE ICE, TH

      London: T. Pavier, 1609.. [81] leaves. Titlepage and dedication leaf in excellent facsimile. Small quarto. 19th-century dyed calf, tooled in blind. Some shelfwear. Leaves a bit tanned. Text trimmed close, occasionally touching a running headline or a sidenote. Upper outer corner of final text leaf repaired, tear in lower portion of leaf Q repaired, obscuring a few letters of text. The text was washed when rebound, lightening early manuscript notes. Overall very good, despite the facsimile leaves. The rare first English edition, first printed in Dutch, Latin, and French editions in 1598, of this primary source for early Arctic exploration, a classic collection of three Dutch northern voyages during 1594-97. Veer's narrative of a shipwreck off Nova Zembla and a terrible winter in which a number of the crew froze to death and many others were eaten by polar bears is a remarkable narrative of heroism in exploration. William Barents' narrative, as hair-raising as that of Veer, records his quest for a northeast passage to Asia. Barents (ca. 1550-97), one of the greatest arctic navigators, was accompanied on the first two expeditions by Jan Huyghen van Linschoten, famous for his voyage to the East. During the first voyage of 1594, the coast of Nova Zembla was successfully explored right up to its northernmost point. The second voyage of 1595 proved a failure when pack ice blocked the passage of the ships between the Straits of Vaigatz and the mainland as late as the summer months, the result of an especially harsh arctic winter. The third voyage, of 1596-97, which takes up the greater part of the volume, ranks as one of the greatest in the history of polar exploration. The expedition sailed in a northerly direction, discovering Bear Island and Spitzbergen. Unable to proceed further north because of pack ice, Barents changed to an easterly course, finally cruising the northern tip of Nova Zembla, where his ship was wrecked by ice. It was at this point that the expedition achieved the first recorded overwintering in the polar region. The survivors escaped the Arctic in June 1597 by sailing down the coast of Nova Zembla in two open boats and crossing the White Sea en route to Lapland, a voyage of some 1600 miles. "[T]he ships advanced well to the north of Scandinavia, sighting Veere Island for the first time. Continuing further north as far as 80 degrees 11 minutes, the expedition sighted [Spitsbergen], which they coasted in a southerly direction. This was probably the first sighting of the islands of Spitsbergen, although there is some evidence of their discovery by Icelandic navigators..." - Howgego. This first English edition was translated by William Phillip (at the urging of Richard Hakluyt), and was printed by Thomas Pavier, best known for his editions of Shakespeare quartos. STC and European Americana together locate a total of only ten copies. Rare, and an important early northern voyage collection. The only other copy to appear on the market in modern times is the Boies Penrose-Frank Streeter copy, which sold at the latter's sale in 2007 for $50,400. EUROPEAN AMERICANA 609/127. SABIN 98738. STC 24628. TIELE-MULLER 99. JCB (3)II:67-68. ROSENBACH 19:784. BELL V47. HOWGEGO H55.

      [Bookseller: William Reese Company - Americana]
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        BIBLIA HEBRAICA eorundem latina interpretatio Xantis Ariae Montani...& aliorum..ad Hebraicam dictionem diligentissime expense. Accesserunt Libri Graece scripti, qui vocantur Apocryphi. + Novum Testamentum Graecum, cum vulgata interpretatione Latina Graeci contextus lineis inserta

      Geneva., de la Rouiere., 1609. 37 x 25 cms, (xxvii), 184 + 283 + 84 + 203 pages + (vii), 186, + 203 pages. Fly leaves, Full calf, 17th century, decorated spine. top of spine restaurated. Old owners name; John Taylor. Exlibris ; P.A. Kasteel, gouverneur van de Ned. Antillen. Copy, complete, in good condition. . Old Testament; hebrew, interlinear latin translations. New Testament, Apocryphi; greek, interlinear latin translations. Geneva edition after the Antwerp edition of 1572/1581. KEYWORDS: Biblia

      [Bookseller: antiquariaat de rijzende zon]
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        The Faerie Queene, Disposed into XII Bookes, Fashioning Twelve Morall Vertues

      London - Mathew Lownes, 1609 Book. Very Good. Hardcover. An extremely rare copy of Spenser's epic poem. This is the first folio edition or second actual edition andthe first publication containing the incomplete seventh book. Printed by H. L. (Humphrey Lownes) for Mathew Lownes. With woodcut vignette titlesfor the first and second parts, printer's devices, initials, decorative head and tail pieces and ornaments throughout. Second part also dated 1609. Please note, pages 345-348, two leaves,are missing otherwise collated complete. Issue points: page 8 is numbered as 10, page 311 labelled as 31. Edmund Spenser (15521599), poet and administrator in Ireland. Spenser's Shepheardes Calender was a popular work and was reprinted in 1581, 1586, 1591, and 1597, demonstrating that Spenser did make an impact as our new poet. Spenser had clearly been working hard on his poetry, even though he had published next to nothing since his initial success with The Shepheardes Calender. The Faerie Queene was a new departure in the history of English poetry, being a combination of Italian romance, classical epic, and native English styles, principally derived from Chaucer. Spenser signalled this by inventing a new stanza (which has come to be known as the Spenserian stanza), a hybrid form adopted from the Scots poetry of James I, rhyme royal, and Italian ottava rima. It contained nine lines, the first eight being pentameters and the last line an alexandrine, and employed the rhyme scheme ababbcbcc. It was accompanied by seventeen dedicatory sonnets to a variety of figures. The poem has survived as a long fragment of six completed books, each of twelve cantos, of lengths varying from forty to eighty stanzas. A further fragment of a seventh book, published after Spenser's death, consisted of two complete cantos and two stanzas from a third. Scholars are divided on the question of the extant nature of the poem, some concluding that Spenser never really intended to complete it, others that had he lived longer all twelve books would have emerged. Equally the relationship between the Two cantos of Mutabilitie and the rest of the poem has not been satisfactorily resolved, some regarding these as a key to the whole work, others reading them as a minor episode not fully worked through. DNBThe Faerie Queene is considered Edmund Spenser's masterpiece, despite being unfinished. The first three books was published in 1590, and a second instalment of books four to six was published in 1596. Spenser died in 1599, unable to complete his planned twelve books, or even to finish the seventh book. The Faerie Queene is notable for its form: it was the first work written in Spenserian stanza and is one of the longest poems in the English language. Spenser's language in The Faerie Queene is deliberately archaic. It is an allegorical work, written in praise of Queen Elizabeth I, and dedicated to her. In a completely allegorical context, the poem follows several knights in an examination of several virtues. In Spenser's A Letter of the Authors, he states that the entire epic poem is cloudily enwrapped in allegorical devises, and that the aim of publishing The Faerie Queene was to fashion a gentleman or noble person in virtuous and gentle discipline. The Faerie Queene found political favour with Elizabeth I and was consequently a success, to the extent that it became Spenser's defining work. The poem found such favour with the monarch that Spenser was granted a pension for life amounting to 50 pounds a year. The poem celebrates, memorializes, and critiques the Tudor dynasty (of which Elizabeth was a part), much in the tradition of Virgil's Aeneid's celebration of Augustus Caesar's Rome. The poem is deeply allegorical and allusive: many prominent Elizabethans could have found themselvesor one anotherpartially represented by one or more of Spenser's figures. Elizabeth herself is the most prominent example: she appears most prominently in her guise as Gloriana, the Faerie Queene herself; but also in Books III and IV as the virgin Bel.

      [Bookseller: Rooke Books]
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        "Figvre de la terre nevve, grand riviere de Canada, et cotes de l'ocean en la Novvelle France" from Histoire de la Nouvelle France

      Paris, 1609. THE FIRST DETAILED MAP DEVOTED TO CANADA Copper-plate engraving: 73/4" x 171/2" References: Philip D. Burden, The Mapping of North America: A List of Printed Maps 1511-1670 (Rickmansworth, 1996), 193. This is the 1609 English edition of the first map devoted to Canada, and constituted the most accurate mapping of the area in existence up until that time. Quite significantly, Marc Lescarbot's 1609 map of New France pre-dated Samuel de Champlain's more recognizable one by three years. Lescarbot's chart was originally produced to accompany the book entitled, Histoire de la Nouvelle France. This text was, in turn, intended to encourage French settlement to the New World. Lescarbot was a Protestant lawyer who lived in New France for over a year. He participated in the famed French expedition, whose members included Samuel de Champlain, that founded Port Royal, Nova Scotia in 1606. Champlain left Lescarbot in charge of Port Royal when the legendary French voyager embarked on his second expedition of New England. Lescarbot's map beautifully illustrates the St. Lawrence River's reach into the former Indian village Hochelaga, or present-day Montreal. It also indicates the location of Tadousac, which in 1600 became the first European trading post ever to be established in Canada. Tadousac is located in the map at the mouth of the R. de Saguenay and adjacent to the River Lesquemin, which is mistakenly named in reverse. "Kebec" is also featured for the first time on a printed map in its Micmac forming, meaning the narrows of the river. Lescarbot carefully relied on Chaplain's manuscripts in order to produce this map.. Book.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries]
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        Historion tà sozomena (Greek). Historiarum libri qui supersunt. Isaacus Casaubonus ex antiquis libris emendavit, Latine vertit, & Commentariis illustravit. Æneæ (Aineios) vetustissimi Tactici, Commentarius De toleranda obsidione. Is. Casaubonus primus vulgavit, Latinam interpretationem ac Notas adiecit. Ad Henricum IIII. Franc. et Navarr. Regem Christianissimum.

      (Paris/ Hanover), Typis Wechelianis apud Claudium Marnium & hæredes Iohannis Aubrii, 1609. Folio. Cont. full vellum w. small blindstamped ornamentations on boards. On front-board in gold: "CFF 1648." All edges gilt and blindtoolesd. Title-page in Greek and Latin, in red and black. Printer's device on title-page. Woodcut initials and woodcut vignettes. Good copy, printed in two columns. (2), 47, (11), 1080, (32 -Index), 151 pp.. Greek and Latin text. First edition with variant-title-leaf. Brunet IV:789, Graesse V:394, Dibdin p. 350: "A most excellent edition; the merits of which have been long known to the literary world. The preface, in the opinion of the late Dr. Joseph Warton, "is one of the finest ever written... Some copies of this work bear the subscription "Hanov. 1609: Typis Wechelianis:" but they are excactly the same as the above Parisian edition. Drouart, who was Casaubon's printer at Paris, sent some copies Wechsel, who thought himself entitled to circulate them in Germany with his own name, as printer, in the subscription of the title-page

      [Bookseller: Lynge & Søn A/S]
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        Disquisitio physiologica de pilis.

      8°. 8 n.n. Bl., 280 S., 11 n.n. Bl. Pergamentband der Zeit. Krivatsy 11700. - Hirsch-H. V, 515. - Interessante medizinische Schrift über den Haarwuchs, Haarausfall und Haarfarbe. Vom Verfasser scheint nur bekannt zu sein, dass er aus Tours (und nicht wie bei Hirsch aus Tournon) stammte und dort als Arzt tätig war. - Durchgehend etwas stockfleckig und gebräunt. Buchblock im Innenfalz gebrochen. - Sehr selten.

      [Bookseller: EOS Buchantiquariat Benz]
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        De Distillatione Lib. IX. Quibus certa methodo, multiplicique artificio, penitioribus naturae arcanis detectis, cuiuslibet mixti in propria elementa resolutio, perfecte docetur.Rome: Ex Typographia Reu, Camerae Apostolicae, 1608. First edition.

      A very fine copy of "the most comprehensive view of the applications of distillation of the period" (Norman). "This book is as rare as beautiful. Ferguson, speaking of the reimpression (Strassburg, 1609), says that 'the Roman edition is a much finer book.' (Duveen). <br/><br/> "Porta published in 1608 at Rome a work on distillation, its methods, apparatus and applications, which is of interest as giving a more comprehensive view of the application of distillation in the sixteenth century than is found in any other work of the period." (Stillman, The Story of Early Chemistry, pp. 350-51).<br/><br/> "The first and longest, and the most fully illustrated, of the nine books deals with different forms of stills. Porta describes various forms of distilling apparatus for various uses including the preparation of essential oils, on which Forbes says he is a very good authority having had occasion to observe the industry in Naples. Porta was the first to give yeilds from different materials. He also deals with various stills designed to produce different strengths of alcohol, all with air cooled condensers; one still is heated by the sun. In the same spirit as his <i>Physiognomonia</i> and <i>Phytognomonica</i>, in one section he compares the stills and their functions with animals. Hot things require a still with a short thick neck, just as nature has given 'angry and furious creatures' like the bear and the lion short strong necks. After this preliminary treatise on stills, the other 8 books give more specific details of the preparation of perfumes and the distillation of essential oils; resins; and woods; and the extraction of virtues of substances, such as <i>aqua vita essential</i>, that is alcohol. <br/><br/> "The fine author portrait by Giacomo Lauro or Iacobus Laurus (active c. 1583-c.1645) shows Porta aged 64 surrounded by motifs referring to his various studies: physiognomy, astrology, geometry, optics, fortification, cryptography and distilling." (Roger Gaskell). <br/><br/> "There were four printings in Rome in 1608, all from different settings of type (see Wellcome), but no priority has been established." (Neville).<br/><br/> Norman 1725; Honeyman 2521; Neville 323; Duveen 481; Ferguson II:216; Partington II:24; Stillman 360; Wellcome I:5211.. 4to: 215 x 155 mm, pp. [20] 154 [6], contemporary limp vellum with manuscript title to spine, old inscription and stamp to title, some very light spotting and staining to some leaves, but a very fine unretsored copy. Rare in such good condition

      [Bookseller: Sophia Rare Books]
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        Regiam Majestatem Scotiae, Veteres Leges et Constitutiones, Ex Archivis Publicis, Et Antiquis Libris Manuscriptis Collectae [etc.]

      The first edition in Latin of what has recently been termed "the principal treatise of medieval Scots law", gathered together with other important Scots legal sources, the use of which over the centuries through the 15th continues to be debated. Contemporary vellum, quite worn, yet a usable copy. Excudebat Thomas Finlason, Edinburgh, 1609.

      [Bookseller:  Meyer Boswell Books, Inc.]
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