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Displayed below are some selected recent viaLibri matches for books published in 1603

        Bravnsvicensis et Lvnebvrgensis dvcatvvm vera dekubat. Norimberg. Agri, Fidissima descrip. 1590. (Lunenburg Heath in northern Braunschweig and Nuremberg in Upper Bavaria with the areas around it.)

      Antwerp 1603 - Two maps on a single sheet, believed to be from the 1603 Latin edition of the Theatrum Orbis Terrarum. Original hand coloring. Sheet size: 17 7/8 x 22 1/2".

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries of Philadelphia, PA]
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        Anatomia & Medicina Equorum Nova, Das ist/ Neuweß Roßbuch ? oder (vo(n) der Pferden Anatomy / ....

      . Frankfurt, Becker für Fischers Erben, 1603, Folio, (12), 275, (6) pp.; (10), 307, (14), (1) pp., mit 64 ganzseitigen Holzschnitten, im Lederband über Holzdeckeln im Stil der Zeit mit Blindprägung, Rückentitel und Schließen; feines Exemplar.. Extrem seltene erste Deutsche Ausgabe in der Üebersetzung von Peter Uffenbach (1566-1635) ! - - Carlo Ruini: Anatomia & Medicina Equorum Nova, Das ist/ Neuweß Roßbuch? oder vo[n] der Pferden Anatomy/ Natur/ Cur/ Pflegung unnd Heylung/ Zwey außerlesene Bücher : In welchen nicht allein die starcke Glieder/ Beine/ Mäuse unnd Adern deß gantzen Leibs der Pferde/ sondern auch allerley denselben zufallende accidentia, Kranck- Schwachheiten unnd Gebrechen ... gelehret und gewiesen werden / Auß deß Edlen unnd Vesten Caroli Ruini von Bononia, Italianischer Edition ... ins Teutsch gebracht/ Durch Petrum Uffenbach .... & - - Von allen und jeden Kranckheiten und Gebrechen der Pferde - - Ruinis Anatomia gilt als das erste Werk der wissenschaftlichen Veterinärmedizin und überhaupt das erste Werk, das sich abgesehen vom Menschen mit nur einer Spezies beschäftigt. Es ist von besonderer Wichtigkeit, da man glaubte die ersten Spuren einer Kenntnis des Blutkreislaufes gefunden zu haben. - "First book devoted exclusively to the structure of a single species other than man. Besides being one of the foundation-stones of modern veterinary medicine, it contains a description of the lesser circulation. The admirable plates are by some authorities attributed to Leonardo" (Garrison/M. 285). - - Durchgehen etwas gebräunt bzw. braunfleckig, Titel verstärkt und im Bug angesetzt, ferner minimale fachgerechte Restaurierungen von Einrissen, Abrissen usw.. - - Ein sehr schönes Exemplar dieses sehr seltenen Werkes. - - -Wellcome I, 5624; Garrison/M. 285 (EA 1598); Nissen ZBI 3517; Graesse VI, 191; ADB 39, 134 (Uffenbach). - - "In 1598 Carlo Ruini, a senator of Bologna, completed his great work on the anatomy and diseases of the horse, and is thus the author of the first comprehensive monograph on the anatomy of an animal. Practically nothing is known of the life of this remarkable man - except that he was possibly murdered. He was born c. 1530 and died on February 2 or 3, 1598 - about a month before his work was published. - - One plate is dated 1590, which would indicate that the book had been in preparation for some years. Bayon has recently revived the suggestion that Ruini may be credited with the text, but that the figures are those drawn by Leonardo to illustrate his own projected treatise on the anatomy of the horse. No evidence can be produced for the latter statement, which is inconsistent with the well-grounded belief that Leonardo never wrote such a treatise, nor, assuming that Ruini's woodcuts are reasonable reproductions of the original drawings, would any historian of art recognize in them the craftsmanship of Leonardo. It is true that the last figure of the superficial muscles of the horse in Book V is well posed and discovers some artistic feeling, but it has not the subtlety of the art of Leonardo. Moreover, it is impossible to avoid the conclusion that Ruini's work is the direct and logical outcome of the Vesalian tradition, since it resembles, if it does not equal, the masterpiece of the founder of anatomy in almost every detail. 'It is instructive to trace the parallel between these two works. In both cases we observe a steady resolve to exhaust the anatomy of one type, and to avoid digressions by the way. Ruini's treatise, as we should expect from the cumbrous nature of his subject, is the more topographical, but so far as possible he works through the animal system by system in the same patient and exhaustive manner. We know the anxiety of Vesalius to secure the most perfect illustrations available at the time, how he employed a pupil of " the divine Titian " to prepare the drawings for the wood engravings, and indulged a capricious and not always amiable fancy of throwing his figures into expressive attitudes and supplying them with a panoramic background. In all this, provided we exclude the pirated figures engraved on copper which have not the artistic merit of the original woodcuts, Ruini is his close but not altogether successful imitator. Both anatomists suffered from persistent and flagrant plagiarism. It is often said that this was a custom but not a crime in the seventeenth century, in spite of the fact that the practice was frequently condemned, and in many cases bitterly resented. Thus shortly before his death in 1691 Robert Boyle proposed to the Council of the Royal Society " that a proper person might be found out to discover plagiarys, and to assert inventions [discoveries] to their proper authors " - a proposal assented to by the Society but apparently not acted upon.1 In 1694 Cowper was complaining of the scarcity of original works and the prevalence of copying and stealing, but in 1698 he had become a plagiarist himself, and was stigmatized by his victim as a robber and highwayman. - - Snape's anatomy of the horse, first published in 1683, is based on Ruini. None the less its author claimed the honours of a pioneer, for, he savs, none had gone before or showed him the way Ruini's name is not even mentioned, although Snape's plates are close copies of Ruini's figures, notwithstanding his assertion that he has " by a curious draught or delineation represented to you such observations as are made in true dissections ". One of his plates representing the entire skeleton has, he claims, been " drawn exactly by one that I keep standing in a Press ", but it is difficult to believe that this skeleton in the cupboard could have been as unlike a horse as Ruini's figure which Snape has copied. In another of Snape's plates the only original feature is the addition of a superfluous dragon-fly to the background, nor can we excuse the subtle dissimulation which warns us " not to trust too much to these copies, as I may call them, without practising upon the original body itself ". It is worth noting that Snape himself was plagiarized, and so ad infinitum. - - A French plagiarist of Ruini was Saunier (1734), who had the effrontery to label his plates " Dessine dappres Natture ", and claimed in the preface that they represented the life-work of himself and his son, and were prepared at the cost of incessant study and great expense. These transactions, and the early literature of biology is full of them, recall the indignant rhetoric of Robert Knox : " As to the hack compilers their course is simple : they first deny the Doctrine to be true ; when this becomes untenable they deny that it is new ; and they finish by engrossing the whole in their next compilations, omitting carefully the name of the author ". He might have added a fourth chapter to this tale of obliquity, in which the discovery is attributed to another worker.- For some time now we have borne with numerous and determined attempts to deprive Harvey of the discovery of the circulation of the blood. On one of these attempts Daremberg makes the following satirical comment : "I have been singularly disappointed ", he says, " to see such an imposing array of citations brought into the service of an indefensible cause, and to learn that of all the ancient and modern writers it is Harvey who has played the smallest part in the discovery of the circulation !" - - In addition to the unwelcome attentions of the plagiarist Ruini's work has not escaped the more insidious activities of prejudiced commentators. According to one of them Ruini did not write the Anatomy, another does not believe that he wrote the Diseases, and a third accuses him of stealing the illustrations. These charges, which, if sustained, would dispossess Ruini of any share in his own work, may or may not be true, but this much we can say -there is no evidence in support of any of them. Criticism of this type provokes the reflection that, if these spurious anticipations of classic discoveries justified the interpretation now put upon them, their fate was singularly and invariably unfortunate, for at the time they were written they convinced no one. Only when the facts have been firmly established by others are the merits of th...

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat für Medizin - Fritz-Dieter S]
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        Japanese Watercolor of Iris - No. 32

      Japan - Japanese Watercolor of Iris Watercolor on paper 19th Century 21” x 17” framed In ancient times Japan had no calendar, and farmers relied on seasonal changes in nature to guide them in growing rice. At the end of winter, the appearance of the cherry blossom marked the end of the hunting season, and the beginning of the rice growing season. In late spring, the iris bloom announced the beginning of the rainy season, when the rice would be transplanted to the fields. Over time, these wild irises were transplanted into Japanese gardens, and have been cultivated in Japan for over 500 years. During the Edo period in Japan (1603-1868) there was a renaissance of iris cultivation, when many years of peace allowed the art and science of botany and horticulture to flourish. In the beginning of Edo Period, when the ruling class of shoguns and daimyos built their castles and mansions, they created many excursion-style gardens, in which people could walk around the garden. The iris or Hanashobu was, and still is, a common flower to see in Japanese gardens as it can be grown in water (ponds or marshes), it’s blooming period in May and its simple and refined beauty. This simple, elegant flower is of high importance in Japanese culture, and has attached to it much symbolic meaning. The iris flower was thought to ward off evil spirits, and is a symbol of masculine success. It’s long, narrow blades of the leaves resemble the sharp blades of the sword, and for many centuries it has been a custom to place iris leaves in a boy’s bath to give him a “martial” spirit. The iris is associated with Boy’s Day (Tango-no-Sekku), also called the Iris Festival, which is a day where families honor their ambitions for their male children (this was changed to be called Children’s Day in 1948. Additionally, the iris was used for medicinal purposes such as detoxification, stomach medicine and to improve blood circulation. Japanese Woodblock of Iris; 19th Century; 21” x 17” framed; In ancient times Japan had no calendar, and farmers relied on seasonal changes in nature to guide them in growing rice. At the end of winter, the appearance of the cherry blossom marked the end of the hunting season, and the beginning of the rice growing season. In late spring, the iris bloom announced the beginning of the rainy season, when the rice would be transplanted to the fields. Over time, these wild irises were transplanted into Japanese gardens, and have been cultivated in Japan for over 500 years. During the Edo period in Japan (1603-1868) there was a renaissance of iris cultivation, when many years of peace allowed the art and science of botany and horticulture to flourish. In the beginning of Edo Period, when the ruling class of shoguns and daimyos built their castles and mansions, they created many excursion-style gardens, in which people could walk around the garden. The iris or Hanashobu was, and still is, a common flower to see in Japanese gardens as it can be grown in water (ponds or marshes), it’s blooming period in May and its simple and refined beauty. This simple, elegant flower is of high importance in Japanese culture, and has attached to it much symbolic meaning. The iris flower was thought to ward off evil spirits, and is a symbol of masculine success. It’s long, narrow blades of the leaves resemble the sharp blades of the sword, and for many centuries it has been a custom to place iris leaves in a boy’s bath to give him a “martial” spirit. The iris is associated with Boy’s Day (Tango-no-Sekku), also called the Iris Festival, which is a day where families honor their ambitions for their male children (this was changed to be called Children’s Day in 1948. Additionally, the iris was used for medicinal purposes such as detoxification, stomach medicine and to improve blood circulation.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
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        Japanese Watercolor of Iris - No. 30

      Japan - Japanese Watercolor of Iris Watercolor on paper 19th Century 21” x 17” framed In ancient times Japan had no calendar, and farmers relied on seasonal changes in nature to guide them in growing rice. At the end of winter, the appearance of the cherry blossom marked the end of the hunting season, and the beginning of the rice growing season. In late spring, the iris bloom announced the beginning of the rainy season, when the rice would be transplanted to the fields. Over time, these wild irises were transplanted into Japanese gardens, and have been cultivated in Japan for over 500 years. During the Edo period in Japan (1603-1868) there was a renaissance of iris cultivation, when many years of peace allowed the art and science of botany and horticulture to flourish. In the beginning of Edo Period, when the ruling class of shoguns and daimyos built their castles and mansions, they created many excursion-style gardens, in which people could walk around the garden. The iris or Hanashobu was, and still is, a common flower to see in Japanese gardens as it can be grown in water (ponds or marshes), it’s blooming period in May and its simple and refined beauty. This simple, elegant flower is of high importance in Japanese culture, and has attached to it much symbolic meaning. The iris flower was thought to ward off evil spirits, and is a symbol of masculine success. It’s long, narrow blades of the leaves resemble the sharp blades of the sword, and for many centuries it has been a custom to place iris leaves in a boy’s bath to give him a “martial” spirit. The iris is associated with Boy’s Day (Tango-no-Sekku), also called the Iris Festival, which is a day where families honor their ambitions for their male children (this was changed to be called Children’s Day in 1948. Additionally, the iris was used for medicinal purposes such as detoxification, stomach medicine and to improve blood circulation. Japanese Woodblock of Iris; 19th Century; 21” x 17” framed; In ancient times Japan had no calendar, and farmers relied on seasonal changes in nature to guide them in growing rice. At the end of winter, the appearance of the cherry blossom marked the end of the hunting season, and the beginning of the rice growing season. In late spring, the iris bloom announced the beginning of the rainy season, when the rice would be transplanted to the fields. Over time, these wild irises were transplanted into Japanese gardens, and have been cultivated in Japan for over 500 years. During the Edo period in Japan (1603-1868) there was a renaissance of iris cultivation, when many years of peace allowed the art and science of botany and horticulture to flourish. In the beginning of Edo Period, when the ruling class of shoguns and daimyos built their castles and mansions, they created many excursion-style gardens, in which people could walk around the garden. The iris or Hanashobu was, and still is, a common flower to see in Japanese gardens as it can be grown in water (ponds or marshes), it’s blooming period in May and its simple and refined beauty. This simple, elegant flower is of high importance in Japanese culture, and has attached to it much symbolic meaning. The iris flower was thought to ward off evil spirits, and is a symbol of masculine success. It’s long, narrow blades of the leaves resemble the sharp blades of the sword, and for many centuries it has been a custom to place iris leaves in a boy’s bath to give him a “martial” spirit. The iris is associated with Boy’s Day (Tango-no-Sekku), also called the Iris Festival, which is a day where families honor their ambitions for their male children (this was changed to be called Children’s Day in 1948. Additionally, the iris was used for medicinal purposes such as detoxification, stomach medicine and to improve blood circulation.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
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        Japanese Watercolor of Iris - No. 16

      - Japanese Watercolor of Iris Watercolor on paper 19th Century 21” x 17” framed In ancient times Japan had no calendar, and farmers relied on seasonal changes in nature to guide them in growing rice. At the end of winter, the appearance of the cherry blossom marked the end of the hunting season, and the beginning of the rice growing season. In late spring, the iris bloom announced the beginning of the rainy season, when the rice would be transplanted to the fields. Over time, these wild irises were transplanted into Japanese gardens, and have been cultivated in Japan for over 500 years. During the Edo period in Japan (1603-1868) there was a renaissance of iris cultivation, when many years of peace allowed the art and science of botany and horticulture to flourish. In the beginning of Edo Period, when the ruling class of shoguns and daimyos built their castles and mansions, they created many excursion-style gardens, in which people could walk around the garden. The iris or Hanashobu was, and still is, a common flower to see in Japanese gardens as it can be grown in water (ponds or marshes), it’s blooming period in May and its simple and refined beauty. This simple, elegant flower is of high importance in Japanese culture, and has attached to it much symbolic meaning. The iris flower was thought to ward off evil spirits, and is a symbol of masculine success. It’s long, narrow blades of the leaves resemble the sharp blades of the sword, and for many centuries it has been a custom to place iris leaves in a boy’s bath to give him a “martial” spirit. The iris is associated with Boy’s Day (Tango-no-Sekku), also called the Iris Festival, which is a day where families honor their ambitions for their male children (this was changed to be called Children’s Day in 1948. Additionally, the iris was used for medicinal purposes such as detoxification, stomach medicine and to improve blood circulation. Japanese Woodblock of Iris; 19th Century; 21” x 17” framed; In ancient times Japan had no calendar, and farmers relied on seasonal changes in nature to guide them in growing rice. At the end of winter, the appearance of the cherry blossom marked the end of the hunting season, and the beginning of the rice growing season. In late spring, the iris bloom announced the beginning of the rainy season, when the rice would be transplanted to the fields. Over time, these wild irises were transplanted into Japanese gardens, and have been cultivated in Japan for over 500 years. During the Edo period in Japan (1603-1868) there was a renaissance of iris cultivation, when many years of peace allowed the art and science of botany and horticulture to flourish. In the beginning of Edo Period, when the ruling class of shoguns and daimyos built their castles and mansions, they created many excursion-style gardens, in which people could walk around the garden. The iris or Hanashobu was, and still is, a common flower to see in Japanese gardens as it can be grown in water (ponds or marshes), it’s blooming period in May and its simple and refined beauty. This simple, elegant flower is of high importance in Japanese culture, and has attached to it much symbolic meaning. The iris flower was thought to ward off evil spirits, and is a symbol of masculine success. It’s long, narrow blades of the leaves resemble the sharp blades of the sword, and for many centuries it has been a custom to place iris leaves in a boy’s bath to give him a “martial” spirit. The iris is associated with Boy’s Day (Tango-no-Sekku), also called the Iris Festival, which is a day where families honor their ambitions for their male children (this was changed to be called Children’s Day in 1948. Additionally, the iris was used for medicinal purposes such as detoxification, stomach medicine and to improve blood circulation.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
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        Japanese Watercolor of Iris - No. 18

      - Japanese Watercolor of Iris Watercolor on paper 19th Century 21” x 17” framed In ancient times Japan had no calendar, and farmers relied on seasonal changes in nature to guide them in growing rice. At the end of winter, the appearance of the cherry blossom marked the end of the hunting season, and the beginning of the rice growing season. In late spring, the iris bloom announced the beginning of the rainy season, when the rice would be transplanted to the fields. Over time, these wild irises were transplanted into Japanese gardens, and have been cultivated in Japan for over 500 years. During the Edo period in Japan (1603-1868) there was a renaissance of iris cultivation, when many years of peace allowed the art and science of botany and horticulture to flourish. In the beginning of Edo Period, when the ruling class of shoguns and daimyos built their castles and mansions, they created many excursion-style gardens, in which people could walk around the garden. The iris or Hanashobu was, and still is, a common flower to see in Japanese gardens as it can be grown in water (ponds or marshes), it’s blooming period in May and its simple and refined beauty. This simple, elegant flower is of high importance in Japanese culture, and has attached to it much symbolic meaning. The iris flower was thought to ward off evil spirits, and is a symbol of masculine success. It’s long, narrow blades of the leaves resemble the sharp blades of the sword, and for many centuries it has been a custom to place iris leaves in a boy’s bath to give him a “martial” spirit. The iris is associated with Boy’s Day (Tango-no-Sekku), also called the Iris Festival, which is a day where families honor their ambitions for their male children (this was changed to be called Children’s Day in 1948. Additionally, the iris was used for medicinal purposes such as detoxification, stomach medicine and to improve blood circulation. Japanese Woodblock of Iris; 19th Century; 21” x 17” framed; In ancient times Japan had no calendar, and farmers relied on seasonal changes in nature to guide them in growing rice. At the end of winter, the appearance of the cherry blossom marked the end of the hunting season, and the beginning of the rice growing season. In late spring, the iris bloom announced the beginning of the rainy season, when the rice would be transplanted to the fields. Over time, these wild irises were transplanted into Japanese gardens, and have been cultivated in Japan for over 500 years. During the Edo period in Japan (1603-1868) there was a renaissance of iris cultivation, when many years of peace allowed the art and science of botany and horticulture to flourish. In the beginning of Edo Period, when the ruling class of shoguns and daimyos built their castles and mansions, they created many excursion-style gardens, in which people could walk around the garden. The iris or Hanashobu was, and still is, a common flower to see in Japanese gardens as it can be grown in water (ponds or marshes), it’s blooming period in May and its simple and refined beauty. This simple, elegant flower is of high importance in Japanese culture, and has attached to it much symbolic meaning. The iris flower was thought to ward off evil spirits, and is a symbol of masculine success. It’s long, narrow blades of the leaves resemble the sharp blades of the sword, and for many centuries it has been a custom to place iris leaves in a boy’s bath to give him a “martial” spirit. The iris is associated with Boy’s Day (Tango-no-Sekku), also called the Iris Festival, which is a day where families honor their ambitions for their male children (this was changed to be called Children’s Day in 1948. Additionally, the iris was used for medicinal purposes such as detoxification, stomach medicine and to improve blood circulation.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
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        Japanese Watercolor of Iris - No. 9

      - Japanese Watercolor of Iris Watercolor on paper 19th Century 21” x 17” framed In ancient times Japan had no calendar, and farmers relied on seasonal changes in nature to guide them in growing rice. At the end of winter, the appearance of the cherry blossom marked the end of the hunting season, and the beginning of the rice growing season. In late spring, the iris bloom announced the beginning of the rainy season, when the rice would be transplanted to the fields. Over time, these wild irises were transplanted into Japanese gardens, and have been cultivated in Japan for over 500 years. During the Edo period in Japan (1603-1868) there was a renaissance of iris cultivation, when many years of peace allowed the art and science of botany and horticulture to flourish. In the beginning of Edo Period, when the ruling class of shoguns and daimyos built their castles and mansions, they created many excursion-style gardens, in which people could walk around the garden. The iris or Hanashobu was, and still is, a common flower to see in Japanese gardens as it can be grown in water (ponds or marshes), it’s blooming period in May and its simple and refined beauty. This simple, elegant flower is of high importance in Japanese culture, and has attached to it much symbolic meaning. The iris flower was thought to ward off evil spirits, and is a symbol of masculine success. It’s long, narrow blades of the leaves resemble the sharp blades of the sword, and for many centuries it has been a custom to place iris leaves in a boy’s bath to give him a “martial” spirit. The iris is associated with Boy’s Day (Tango-no-Sekku), also called the Iris Festival, which is a day where families honor their ambitions for their male children (this was changed to be called Children’s Day in 1948. Additionally, the iris was used for medicinal purposes such as detoxification, stomach medicine and to improve blood circulation. Japanese Woodblock of Iris; 19th Century; 21” x 17” framed; In ancient times Japan had no calendar, and farmers relied on seasonal changes in nature to guide them in growing rice. At the end of winter, the appearance of the cherry blossom marked the end of the hunting season, and the beginning of the rice growing season. In late spring, the iris bloom announced the beginning of the rainy season, when the rice would be transplanted to the fields. Over time, these wild irises were transplanted into Japanese gardens, and have been cultivated in Japan for over 500 years. During the Edo period in Japan (1603-1868) there was a renaissance of iris cultivation, when many years of peace allowed the art and science of botany and horticulture to flourish. In the beginning of Edo Period, when the ruling class of shoguns and daimyos built their castles and mansions, they created many excursion-style gardens, in which people could walk around the garden. The iris or Hanashobu was, and still is, a common flower to see in Japanese gardens as it can be grown in water (ponds or marshes), it’s blooming period in May and its simple and refined beauty. This simple, elegant flower is of high importance in Japanese culture, and has attached to it much symbolic meaning. The iris flower was thought to ward off evil spirits, and is a symbol of masculine success. It’s long, narrow blades of the leaves resemble the sharp blades of the sword, and for many centuries it has been a custom to place iris leaves in a boy’s bath to give him a “martial” spirit. The iris is associated with Boy’s Day (Tango-no-Sekku), also called the Iris Festival, which is a day where families honor their ambitions for their male children (this was changed to be called Children’s Day in 1948. Additionally, the iris was used for medicinal purposes such as detoxification, stomach medicine and to improve blood circulation.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
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        Paradoxe sur l'incertitude, vanite & abus des sciences. Traduite en Francois, du latin de Henry Corneille Agr.

      o. O., Vlg. 1603.. 12°. 12 Bll., 390 num. Bll. Mit Iniatialen. Pmt. d. Zt. Mit hs. Rückentit. Innendeckel u. Tit. m. Anmerk. v. alter Hand. 1. Bl. (preface) m. Eckabriß u. geringem Textverlust (halbe Zeile).. vgl. Brunet I, 114; Graesse I, 45 (beide Ausg. v. 1605); VD17 12:130416T; Wellcome I, 84 - Mutmaßlicher Übersetzer: Louis Turquet de Mayerne. Im selben Jahr erschien eine Ausgabe mit 737 Seiten. Die vorliegende Ausgabe ist foliiert und gegenüber der paginierten die Seltenere. Die EA war 1582 erschienen. Heinrich (Henricus) Cornelius Agrippa von Nettesheim (1486-1535), war ein deutscher Universalgelehrter, Theologe, Jurist, Arzt und Philosoph. Er zählt in seiner Auseinandersetzung mit Magie, Religion, Astrologie, Naturphilosophie und mit seinen Beiträgen zur Religionsphilosophie zu den bedeutenden Gelehrten seiner Zeit.

      [Bookseller: Burgverlag Buchhandelsges.mb.H.]
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        Testamenti Veteris Biblia Sacra, sive Libri Canonici priscae Judaeorum ecclesiae a Deo traditi, Latini recens ex Hebraeo sacti, brevibusq,Scholiis illustrati ab Immanuele Tremmellio, & Francisco Junio. Accesserunt libri qui vulgo dicuntur Apocryphi, Latine redditi, & Notis quibusdam aucti a Francisco Junio. Multo omnes quam ante emendatius editi & aucti locis innumeris: quibus etiam adjunximus Novi Testamenti libros ex sermone Syro ab eodem Tremellio, & ex Graeco a Theodoro Beza in Latinum versos, Notisque itidem illustratos. Quarta cura Francisci Junii ante obitum. Cum Indice ad Notas V.T. triplice, Hebraeo, Graeco & Latino.

      Hanover, Wechelianis, apud Claudium Marnium & hæredes Joannis Aubrii 1603. "(12) 177 p., (3) 292, 74 folia., (4) 448 (16) p.Opnieuw gebonden Leer met ribben en stempels, Folio (Titelpagina iets gekreukt, verder een fraai exemplaar in een stevige ""van Gent"" band met de kanttekeningen/vertalingen van Junius, Tremellius en Beza)".

      [Bookseller: Antiquariaat De Roo]
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        Historia Animalium (I-V). All published, bound in 3 volumes. Folio (375 x 245mm). Contemporary blind-stamped pigskin over wooden boards.

      (I:) Gessner, C. Historiae animalium liber primus de Quadrupedibus viviparis... Editio secunda novis iconibus... Francofurti, In bibliopolio Cambieriano, 1603. Folio. pp. (40), 967, with woodcut on title and about 82 woodcuts in the text. /(II:) Gessner, C. Historiae animalium liber II. qui est de Quadrupedibus oviparis... Francofurdi, Ex officina typographica Ioannis Wecheli, impensis Roberti Cambieri, 1587. Folio. pp. (6), (2, blank), 119, with woodcut on title and 43 woodcuts in the text. /(III:) Gessner, C. Historiae animalium liber III qui est de avium natura... Francofurdi, Ex officina typographica Ioannis Wecheli, impensis Roberti Cambieri, 1585. Folio. pp. (12), 806, (26), with woodcut on title and 217 woodcuts in the text. /(IV:) Gessner, C. Historiae Animalium liber IIII. qui est de piscium & aquatilium animantium natura. Cum iconibus singulorum ad vivum expressis. Continentur in hoc volumine, Gulielmi Rondeletii & Petri Belonii Cenomani de aquatilium singulis scripta. Tiguri (Zürich), Apud C. Froschoverum, 1558. Folio. pp. (40), 1297, (i), with woodcut printer's device and 737 woodcuts in the text. /(V:) Gessner, C. Historiae animalium lib. V. qui est de serpentium natura... historiae insectorum libellus, qui est de scorpione... Tiguri (Zürich), In officina Froschoviana, 1587. Leaves (6), 85, 1 blank, 11, with woodcut printer's device on title and 31 woodcuts in the text. A complete copy of Gessner's zoological works 'considered the basis of modern zoology' in the first or second edition, attractively bound in 3 uniform contemporary bindings. In the present set the 'De Piscium' and the 'De Serpentium' are in the first edition, the other 3 are in the second edition. The work was first published in Latin from 1551 on, appearing in 5 volumes, the last and rarest of all was published posthumously. It is the foremost purely zoological work of the Renaissance period and based on the author's extensive journeys throughout Europe as well as on his immense knowledge of previously published literature. Its influence on science of the succeeding age was considerable. In each part Gessner describes one animal after the other on the lines of Pliny, but with far greater knowledge based on his own experience and criticism.//There are many paging errors in the first volume 'de Quadrupedibus viviparis' see Wellisch A 23.2. The second volume concerns amphibians. The third volume on birds has name indexes in 10 languages. In his 'Liber IV qui est de Piscium & Aquatilium' Gessner 'discussed and illustrated many molluscs' (Dance p. 18). The work deals with fishes and other aquatic animals. Volume V 'this part on snakes, was published posthumously by Gessner's friends Carron and Wolf from his notes. Gessner had also planned a sixth part, on insects, but only his notes on the scorpion remained and were appended to this volume with a separate title page' (Wellisch p. 65).//The woodcuts were cut after paintings by Lukas Schan, some of which survived as part of the Felix Platter collection in the Basle University Library. They contain the first naturalistic representations of the animal kingdom, and effectively herald the birth of the zoological book illustration. They are archetypes of much subsequent animal illustrations even into the 18th century. Complete copies of Gesner's zoological works are very rare. An exceptionally fresh and well-preserved copy with just a few leaves with some marginal minor damp staining.//Provenance: With the armorial bookplates of Schloss Nordkirch, one of the most splendid castles in Westphalia called 'the Versailles of Westphalia'. This splendid 'Wasserschloss' was one of the residences of the Prince Bischop of Munster, Friedrich Christian von Plettenberg.//Wellisch A23.2; A 24.2; A 25.2; A 26.1; A 27.1./Nissen ZBI, 1549, 1550, 1553, 1556 & Nissen IVB.

      [Bookseller: Antiquariaat JUNK B.V. (Natural History]
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        Relaçam annual das cosas que fizeram os padres da Companhia de Iesus na India, & Japão nos annos de 600. & 601.

      Evora Manoel de Lyra 1603. - Rare first edition and the first and rarest of this series of Portuguese-language reports from missions overseas, with a decided emphasis on Asia. [Attributes: First Edition]

      [Bookseller: Martayan Lan, Inc]
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        Maris Pacifici, (quod vulgo Mar del Zur) cum regionaribus circumiacentibus, insulisque in eodem passim sparsis, novissima descripto.

      . Antwerp: Jan Baptist Vrients, 1603. - Single sheet, (17 ¾ x 23 ½ inches). EXCEPTIONALLY FINE engraved map of the Pacific Ocean, the title in an elaborate mannerist strapwork and allegorical cartouche upper right and the imprint in the lower left, the ocean decorated with ships all with hand-color in full (evenly browned, two older tape repairs to verso, one or two pale stains). THE FIRST PRINTED MAP TO BE DEVOTED TO THE PACIFIC OCEAN AND TO SHOW AN EARLY DEPICTION OF THE WEST COAST OF AMERICA. 1603 Latin edition, first published in 1570. Van den Broecke estimates this edition to have been printed in a run of 300 copies only. This map, from the 1603 Antwerp edition with text in Latin on the verso, was one of the most important that appeared in Abraham Ortelius's "Theatrum orbis terrarium." Entitled "Maris Pacifici" - "Ocean of Tranquility" - it was the first printed map to be devoted to the Pacific Ocean, and also includes an early depiction of the west coast of North America, Japan and New Guinea. Nova Hispania (Mexico) and the California peninsula are shown quite accurately for the time. Primarily, however, the map celebrates the achievements of Magellan, the first to traverse the Pacific Ocean and to discover the strait at the southern tip of South America that would come to be named in his honor. Magellan's ship "Victoria" is depicted in the Pacific along with a celebratory Latin inscription. The map is unusually centered on the Pacific itself rather than on any landmass, thus showing the ocean in its entirety as it stretches from Asia to America. This deceptively simple compositional strategy emphasizes the vastness of the Pacific while stressing the magnitude of Magellan's achievement as the first to circumnavigate the globe. Ortelius derived much of the Pacific cartography from the map published in 1589 by his associate, the map engraver Frans Hogenberg, though Ortelius introduced a considerably narrower and more correct North America at the latitude of the Tropic of Cancer than Hogenberg. Although the plate bears the date of 1589, "Maris Pacifici" was first published in Ortelius's 1590 "Additamentum," an appendix to his atlas, and was then included in future editions of the "Theatrum." Ortelius "was very bold to attempt to map what was perhaps the least-known part of the world. He must have realized, however, that the Pacific was increasing in stature as a commercial route to Asia. The long-hoped-for northwest passage had not been found, and mariners avoided the Portuguese-controlled South African voyage to Asia. The ocean became the focus of much sixteenth century exploration. "The symbol of that exploration was Ferdinand Magellan's ship Victoria; on the map it is at sea, having just passed through the strait that bears his name. Magellan became the first European mariner to sail from the Atlantic Ocean to the Pacific, and his voyage revealed much about the Pacific Ocean more was known about the west coast of America and the Pacific after Sir Francis Drake's circumnavigation (1577-1580), when he explored America's west coast and named it New Albion. Ortelius followed Drake's voyage with keen interest, corresponded with Gerard Mercator about it, and incorporated as much as he could from Drake's discoveries onto 'Maris Pacifici' - the Gulf of California takes on an entirely new shape and the Rio Grande is introduced for the first time on a printed map "Along the lower part of the map is 'Terra Australia,' not an early form of Australia, but a large phantom continent that the early mapmakers believed balanced the weight of Europe and Asia. When Magellan sailed around South America, he believed he was following the coastline of the northern tip of Terra Australis. Like other sixteenth-century map-makers, Ortelius incorporated this enormous continent into his map of the Pacific Ocean" (Cohen). Van den Broecke Ort12. For more information about this book, or a warm welcome to see it and other books in our library at 72nd Street, NYC, please contact Megan Scauri,

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries]
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        Summa Sti. Raymundi de Peniafort Barcinonensis...de poenitentia, et matrimonio

      Rome: Joannis Tallini. 1603. First. First edition. Folio. Early half vellum and parchment, title inked on spine. Stains discolor the bottom margins and gutters of text, small hole, and old paper repair on last leaf of text, otherwise a sound and very tight good copy. Uncommon. .

      [Bookseller: Between the Covers- Rare Books, Inc. ABA]
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        Francisci Bencii e Societate Iesu Orationes & Carmina, cum disputatione de stylo et scriptione. Editio quarta. Cui prater multa poëmata, accessit Oratio de morte & rebus gestis Illustriss. Principis Alexandri Farnesii Ducis Parmensis.

      Lyon: Lugduni, apud Ioan Pillehotte, 1603. - 12vo.; 475 pp. Taladro de polilla que afecta la mitad de una linea entre las páginas 57 y 135, afectando palabras. Encuadernación de época en piel, con lomera ornada y tejuelo. Ligero desgaste en cofia. Plauto Benci, en el siglo, fué discípulo y amigo íntimo de Marc-Antoine Muret, quien le legaría su biblioteca y manuscritos. Ingresó en la Compañía de Jesús en 1570, siendo enviado a la India, donde aprendió sánscrito y tradujo por primera vez al latín el "Bhagavad Gita". Retornado a Italia, enseñó retórica en el Colegio Romano de los jesuitas, alcanzando gran notoriedad como orador, poeta y autor de obras teatrales escolares latinas. Fue "avvisato e levato" por su su estrecha relación con algunos alumnos, especialmente Giulio Cesare Stella, autor de "La Columbeida", publicada y difundida a instancia suya. Mantuvo tambien una estrecha amistad con Justo Lipsio, de la que ha permanecido un brillantísimo epistolario.

      [Bookseller: Hesperia Libros]
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        Summa Sancti Raymundi de Peniafort barcinonensis De Poenitentia et Matrimonio. Cum glossis Ioannis de Friburgo. Nunc primum in lucem edita.

      Roma: Romae, sumptibus Ioannis Tallini, 1603. - Folio; bella portada grabada por C.A. Boccaferrus, 11 hojas, 584 páginas, 12 hojas. Encuadernación de época, en piel sobre tabla, con gofrados en seco.

      [Bookseller: Hesperia Libros]
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        Buchaviae, sive Fuldensis Ditionis Typus. Wolfgango Regr: will autore.1574/Waldeccensis Comitatus Descriptio Accuratissima (Fulda/Waldeck)

      Antwerp 1603 - From the Theatrum Orbis Terrarum. Two maps on one plate. Original hand color. Sheet size: 17 3/8 x 21 5/8". Inventory#: p227pmat.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries of Philadelphia, PA]
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        New Reformierte Landts-Ordnung der Fürstlichen Grafschafft Tyrol, wie die auß Landts-Fürstlichem Befelch, im 1603. Jar / umbgedruckt worden. bound with:. Ordnung und Reformation Gueter Policey, In Irer Durchleuchtigkait Fürstlichen Graffschafft Tyrol

      Innsbruck Daniel Paur 1603 - 2 volumes in 1. small 4to. engraved title-page with portrait of Archduke Ferdinand. pagination from A to Zz iii and A to H ii. 20th-century 'antique' style half-leather binding . marbled paper boards. some staining to the pages, but not affecting the clarity of the text. several outbreaks of worm damage, mostly not too severe, but to some extent encroaching into the text. 027 018 039 [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: McLaren Books Ltd., ABA, PBFA, ILAB]
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        Della Locuzione Volgarizato da Pier Segni Accademico della Crusca Detto L'Agghiacciato. Con postille al testo, ed esempli Foscani, conformati a' Greci. Al Sereniss. Signore, il Sig. Don Cosimo Medici, Principe di Toscana, suo Signore.

      In Firenze Nella Stamperia di Cosimo Giunti 1603 - FIRST EDITION of this translation. Small 4to, 205 x 148 mms., pp. [viiii], 280, contemporary vellum, letter in ink on spine, paste-down end-papers with notes in an 18th century hand; front hinge cracked, exposing spine, binding a little soiled. The orator Demetrius of Phaleron (c. 350 B. C. - c. 280 B. C.) was one of the most prolific authors of antiquity, noted in particular for his historical works and those on rhetoric. De Elocutione was first published in 1588, edited by A. P. Manutius. The translator here is Pier Segni, with numerous annotations to the text. The attribution of this work on style to Demetrius has been disputed and is sometimes attributed to an unknown writer in the second century A. D. Most libraries, however, catalogue the work under Demetrius' name. [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: John Price Antiquarian Books, ABA, ILAB]
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        Pratica d' aritmetica, e geometria, nuovam. posta in luce dal Rev. P.L. Forestani da Pescia.nella quale si dimostra un vero e facilissimo modo da risolver ogni sorta di ragioni da misurar tutte le superficie terrene, e corpi regolari da misurar con l' aspetto le distanze, l' altezze e le profondità, con il modo di levar le piante senza bussola.opera veramente non men' utile che necessaria a gli studiosi di tali scienze.

      Georgio Varisco, Venetia 1603 - [Agrimensura] (cm. 20,5) Bella piena pergamena originale, bel titolo calligrafato al dorso. cc.10nn., cc.344, cc.2, (con marca tipografica ed ultima bianca). Molte illustrazioni in xilografia n.t. di strumenti, schemi, figure ecc. Edizione originale molto rara e importante. Riccardi I 478: "opera interessantissima per la storia dell'aritmetica, ampiamente sviluppata ed applicata anche alla mercatanzia; e per quella della geometria pratica, trovandovisi la descrizione e l'uso degli strumenti allora conosciuti, fra i quali sono notevoli quelli che ora direbbersi di celerimensura". Cat. libri 2878:"This work is so scarce that it has escaped professor de morgan. It contains solution of several indeterminate problems.Amongst the Authors quoted by Forestani we find Galigai, Calandi, Lazzizio, Pagani, ecc." Vecchiolieve resturo al margine bianco del frontis ma esemplare molto bello e nitido. * Parenti prime edizioni 237; *Choix 6632; *Sotheran primo sopplimento 1149; *Brunet II 1341; *Graesse II 615.[f61] [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: LIBRI ANTICHI E RARI FRANCESCO&CLAUDIA]
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        Tipus Orbis Terrarum. [World Map]

      Valladolid. 1603 - Mounted size: 520 x 645 mm. Good condition. Light staining and strengthened at folds. Copperplate engraving. A wonderfully decorative and impressive general world map, based on the earlier 1570 map by the famous Abraham Ortelius. The ornate strapwork that surrounds the map is mannerist in style, and the seas are full of sea monsters, flying fish and galleons. The (then) four known continents of the world are engraved in each of the four coners of the map. The lettering within the map is Spanish, as the map comes from a Spanish translation of Giovanni's Botero's earlier work. Published in the "Relaciones Universales del Mondo.". Shirley: The Mapping of The World; Plate 192, entry 242.

      [Bookseller: Peter Harrington. ABA member]
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        RELACIONES UNIVERSALES DEL MUNDO de Iuan Botero Benes, Primera y Segunda Parte, Traduzidas a isntancia de don Antonio Lopez Calatayud . por el licenciado Diego de Aguiarsu Alcaldemayor. Dirigido a don Francisco de Sandoval y Roxas, Duque de Lerma.

      Hered. Diego Fdz.Cordova, Valladolid 1603 - 27x19'5, 4h (port. con escudo heráldico del Duque de Lerma, con manchas), 24f, 207f (1ª parte), 1f (nombre a pluma), 104f (2ª parte; faltan ff. 105-110, 5 mapas). Perg. muy det, páginas tostadas, corto de márgenes, polilla (afecta mínimamente). "- "Pero a mí paréceme cierto cosa inestimable que con tal brevedad, tan fácilmente, se pueda ver aquí el sitio de todo el universo, la disposición de las tierras, la profundidad de los mares, islas, y ríos, y lo más digno de saberse en ellos"." 1603

      [Bookseller: Escalinata, librería]
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        Triangulum (The Triangle)

      Augsburg 1603 - Hand-colored copper-plate engraving heightened with gold leaf. Sheet size: 13 1/4 x 17 3/4". Inventory#: p465pmat.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries of Philadelphia, PA]
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        A Grouping of Constellations

      Augsburg 1603 - Hand-colored copper-plate engraving heightened with gold leaf. Sheet size: 12 x 15 1/2". Inventory#:p527pmat.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries of Philadelphia, PA]
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        Coeli Inferioris Austrina

      Augsburg 1603 - Hand-colored copper-plate engraving heightened with gold leaf. Sheet size: 13 1/4 x 17 3/4". Inventory#: p481pmat.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries of Philadelphia, PA]
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        The Churchwardens' Accounts of St. Michael's in Bedwardine, Worcester from 1536 To 1603

      1603, 1896 Book. Very Good. Hardcover. First edition. Transcribed, edited and printed for the Worcestershire Historical Society, with an introduction by John Amphlett of Clent. First edition. This account includes a list of Churchwardens and the accounts overall reflects not only many aspects of the parish to which they relate, but also to the history of the country, with regards to its ecclesiastical affairs. Also to which are prefixed the Churchwardens' accounts of the Church of St. Helen, Worcester, for the years 1519 and 1520, with an introduction by The Rev. A. S. Porter, Vicar of Claines, and Hon. Canon of Worcester. Bound by T. Owen and Son with binder's label to front pastedown. Condition: In a half calf binding with cloth covered boards. Externally, sound but with wear to extremities and evidence of library label to spine. Internally, firmly bound. Bright but with slight spotting, mostly to first and last few pages. With a small closed tear to title page. Ex-library copy with blindstamping to title page, ink stamp and inscription to verso of title page and a further ink stamp to page xxxix. Overall: GOOD.

      [Bookseller: Rooke Books]
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        Vitoria y triunfo de Iesu Christo, y libro en que se escriven los Hechos y milagros que hizo en el mundo este Señor y Dios nuestro, doctrina que predicó, preceptos, y consejos que dio: conforme a como lo refieren sus Evangelistas, y declaran diversos Doctores. Ponense conceptos y pensamientos graves, exemplos, y sucessos maravillosos, consideraciones y contemplaciones piadosas.

      - Madrid, Luis Sánchez, 1603, 31 x 21,5 cm., pergamino, 10 h. incluso retrato grabado en madera a toda página a la vuelta de la sexta hoja de preliminares + 560 folios + 4 h.

      [Bookseller: Librería Anticuaria Antonio Mateos]
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        I:) Le triomphe de la constance. Où sont descriptes les amours de Cloridon et de Melliflore. Dediées à la royne. - (II:) Hierusalem assiegée. Où est descrite la deliurance de Sophronie, et d'Olinde: ensemble les amours d'Hermine, de Clorinde, et de Tancrede, á l'imitation du S. Torquato Tasso. Derniere edition reveue corrigé et de beaucoup augmentée (III:) Les amours de Filandre et de Marizée

      Lyon, Thibaud Ancelin 1603 - Cf. Brunet IV, 41, 1, 3 et 4. - Très rares romans de ce célèbre romancier francais. - L'édition originale de ces trois romans: ( Les amours de Filandre , Marseille, 1598, Hierusalem assiegée , Paris 1599, Le triomphe de la constance, Paris, 1601). - L'auteur, un aristocrate français, était un romancier, traducteur, épistologiste et moraliste de la fin du XIVe siècle et du début du suivant, il fut le secrétaire de Henri II de Bourbon, prince de Condé (jusqu'à 1606 environ), puis passa au service de Henri IV de France comme « secrétaire de la chambre du roi ». Ses premières « amours », courtes œuvres d'amour tragique, sont proches des contes tragiques de l'italien Matteo Bandelo. - Antoine de Nervèze (c. 1570 - after 1622) is representative of a younger generation following on the literary developments of French novelists Nicolas de Montreux and Béroalde de Verville, and he is often associated with the sentimental novels (or amours ) published during the reign of Henry IV. - Bel et propre exemplaire, seulement le parchemain du plat supérieur peu tacheté / A clean and fine copy , bound in a decorative contemporary vellum with gilt stamped 106 feuilles numérotées., 4 feuilles (3 blanches); 6 feuilles, 96 feuilles numérotées avec 10 gravures sur bois; 47 feuilles numérotées., 1 feuille blanche. Les 3 titres avec des marques d'imprimeur Parchemin contemporain, dos orné, les deux plats avec un supralibros (dos orné), doré sur tranches, 8° [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Buch & Kunst Antiquariat Flotow GmbH]
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        Theatrum orbis terrarum

      Jan Baptist Vrients, Antwerp 1603 - Contemporary red morocco, covers bordered and panelled in gilt and blind, covers with a large central design in gilt, expertly rebacked to style, spine in seven compartments with raised bands, ruled in gilt on either side of each band, compartments with a repeat decoration in gilt (expert restoration at board edges) A very rare example of Ortelius's Renaissance masterwork: the first true atlas, here with full contemporary hand colouring. The colouring in this copy is without doubt the finest that we have ever seen. This Latin edition published by Jan Baptist Vrients is one of the most complete issues of the 'Theatrum Orbis' and includes both the 'Parergon' and 'Nomenclator.' The Theatrum. of Abraham Ortelius was one of the most brilliant and innovative of all Renaissance books. It was the first true atlas in the modern sense of the word, and as such, it introduced an entirely new and standardized method for the study of geography. For the first time in one volume, all parts of the globe were treated in a comprehensive and uniform manner, and thus it presented as complete a picture as was then possible of the whole world. Ortelius published editions of his atlas not only in Latin, the traditional language of the scholarly elite, but in the six major European vernaculars: German, Dutch, French, Italian, English and Spanish. The Theatrum was therefore equally at home in the library of a scholar in Paris, a country gentleman in Kent, or a merchant in Grenada. This widespread dissemination had profound results in an age when geographical knowledge was in a rudimentary state: the information laid out in the Theatrum became the universally accepted vision of the world. Another strategy used to make the atlas more accessible to the public was the inclusion of beautiful embellishments in the popular mannerist style, thus appealing to contemporary aesthetic tastes, and aligning the Theatrum with the other great artistic accomplishments of the age. In speaking of the maps in the Theatrum , the noted art historian, James A. Welu comments on "their richness of ornamentation, [they are] a combination of science and art that has rarely been surpassed in the history of mapmaking . Ortelius's Theatrum is known for its numerous decorative cartouches, which undoubtedly added to the atlas's long popularity" ( Art and Cartography , pp. 145-146). Ortelius played a pivotal role in disseminating the revelations of the important explorations and cartographical works of his time. The enthusiasm he and his colleagues felt for their task is suggested in the quote from Cicero at the bottom of the world map map, which may be loosely translated: "How can human affairs be taken seriously by one who contemplates the great world and all eternity?" Further, the Theatrum was the first major printed work of any kind to include scholarly citations of authorities (i.e. the original mapmakers), thus introducing for the first time the concept of footnoting to Western scholarship. Ortelius further included a massive appendix (the Parergon ), consisting of a detailed classical atlas, to appeal to Renaissance Europe's fascination with the ancient world. In its comprehensive coverage of the world, the uniform excellence of its maps, the standardized style and format, the extensive use of the vernacular for marketing, its scholarly citations, and massive classical appendix, the Theatrum Orbis Terrarum of Abraham Ortelius had no precedent. Cf. Burden 64 (map of the Americas) & 74 (map of the Pacific); cf. Shirley 158 (world map); van der Krogt Koeman III, 31:053; c.f. Printing and the Mind of Man 91. (18 7/16 x 12 inches). Mounted on guards throughout. With full period hand-colouring throughout. Hand-coloured engraved allegorical general title, with full-page engraving of the arms Philip II of Spain on the verso, engraved full-page memorial to Ortelius incorporating a small circular portrait of him, full-page engraved portrait of Ortelius, hand-colored engraved section-tit [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Donald A. Heald Rare Books (ABAA)]
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