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Displayed below are some selected recent viaLibri matches for books published in 1542
2012-02-10 16:05:52
ARNONO Joannes (De).
Venetiis: Per Melchiorem Sessa, 1542. Venetiis: Per Melchiorem Sessa. (500, DIRITTO, RARO). (cm 16,2) Bella mz. pergamena antica, piatti con antifonario rosso e nero, cc. 228, carattere rotondo, capilettera ornati, marca tipogr. in xilogr. in fine. Dedica a Fabrizio e Camillo Jesualdo, datata 1534. Edizione assolutamente rara. Manca a tutta la bibliogr. da noi consultata, compreso BM. STC., Adams, e Sapori "Antichi testi giuridici". Antiche firme "Ex libris" al frontis e alcune chiose coeve ai margini, altrimenti bell'esemplare fresco e nitido, solo qualche lieve fiorit. marginale. Il CENSUS Nazionale, ICCU, registra solo 11 copie nelle biblioteche italiane.[f50] . buono. Rilegato. 1542.
Bookseller: LIBRI ANTICHI E RARI FRANCESCO&CLAUDIA [AREZZO, Italy]
2012-01-30 11:26:55
FUCHS, Leonhard.
Basel: Michael Isingrin, 1542. FIRST EDITION of Fuchs's celebrated herbal. This work effected a revolution in the natural sciences comparable to that of Copernicus in astronomy and Vesalius in anatomy, both of which were published the following year, 1543. It was part of the pioneering effort of Fuchs, Brunfels and Bock that earned them the title of the "German fathers of botany". All three partook of a reforming zeal, partially religious in origin, to correct botanical knowledge, which had mostly been in the hands of itinerant and illiterate herbalists. To effect this reform accurate illustration and identification was the first requirement and it was to this task that Fuchs addressed himself. Fuchs employed the best artists then available in Basel: Albrecht Meyer did the drawings, Heinrich Füllmaurer transferred them to the woodblocks, and they were cut by Veit Rudolph Speckle. All three are depicted in the book, the first time that book illustrators are themselves portrayed and named. These illustrations set a new standard for botanical depiction and were some of the most influential in botanical history, being copied for innumerable works well into the 18th century. Some forty species are illustrated for the first time, including several American plants such as maize and the pumpkin. The herbals of Brunfels and Fuchs "have rightly been ascribed importance in the history of botany, and for two reasons. In the first place they established the requisites of botanical illustration -- verisimilitude in form and habit, and accuracy of significant detail... Secondly they provi … [Click Below for Full Description]
Bookseller: Nigel Phillips [United Kingdom]
2012-01-10 16:12:17
Cicero. (Marcus Tullius Cicero) [106-43 BC].
In Officina Venturinum Roffinellum, Venetiis (Venice): 1542., 1542. ff. [20], CCLX [i.e. 520 p.]. Numerous errors in paging. Interesting printer's device on title page. Six large wood engraved illustrations within decorative frames. It is interesting to note that one leaf (CCVIII) shows clearly a piece of dropped type. The first and last leaves are somewhat stained and worn, but aside from a few old repairs most of the text is reasonably clean and attractive. All of the woodcuts are in fine state. All edges marbled. Later half leather binding; boards detached. Marcus Tullius Cicero's (106-43 BC) texts for : Laelius de Amicitia; Cato maior de senectute; and Paradoxa are set within double column gloss commentaries by: Josse Badius Ascensius (1462-1535); Ognibene Bonisoli (ca. 1412-1474); Martino Filetico (ca. 1430-1490); Pietro Marso (d. 1511); and Francesco Maturanzio (d. 1518). Rare. Of this edition we have located only one copy in the U.S. and just two others world wide. Index Aureliensis - 138.248. VERY RARE EARLY ILLUSTRATED CICERO. **PRICE JUST REDUCED! CHEST 2/1. Hardcover. Very Good.
Bookseller: FAMILY ALBUM, ABAA [Kinzers, PA, U.S.A.]
2011-12-29 17:33:24
Joao III. (1502-1557), König von Portugal.
o. O. [Lissabon], o.J. [1542].. Portugiesische Handschrift auf Papier, 6 SS auf 4 Bll., c. 30,5 x 20,5 cm. Falt und Knickstellen, mit Einrissen an den Faltungen. Stärker wasserfleckig entlang der Faltungen.. An seinen Chanceler-mor (Kanzler) Dr. Gaspar de Carvalho, dem er in aller Ausführlichkeit mitteilt, in welcher Weise er für den Königssohn D. Duarte, erwählten Erzbischof von Braga, Besitz vom Erzbistum nehmen soll. So habe er u.a. das Kathedralkapitel und dessen Dignitäre darüber zu informieren, anhand mitgeführter schriftlicher königlicher Anweisungen. Des weiteren soll er auch die weltlichen Amtsträger in Braga über die neuen Machtverhältnisse in ihrem Erzbistum in Kenntnis setzen und schließlich die Publikation der Amtsübernahme durch Duarte veranlassen. Außerdem möge er genaue Auskünfte über die Einkünfte der Erzdiözese einholen. - D. Duarte (1521-1543), ein unehelicher, aber hochbegabter Sohn des Königs, wurde 1542 auf Betreiben von Joao III. zum neuen Erzbischof von Braga bestellt, verstarb aber bereits im Folgejahr im Alter von 22 Jahren. - Historisch höchst bedeutendes Dokument zur Geschichte des wenig bekannten Duarte von Portugal, wie auch hinsichtlich seines Informationswertes bezüglich des konkreten Ablaufs der Amtsübernahme von (Erz)bistümern im damaligen Portugal.
Bookseller: Versandantiquariat manuscryptum - Dr. In
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2011-09-08 11:22:36
Crasso, Padovano
[Venice]:: Apd signu S. Bernardini,. [1542 ?].. Bound in 4s. 1st edition. Unpaginated, though 118 pp. Index at rear. Last page blank.. Period full vellum with title hand-inked to spine. Yapp fore-edges. Stubs for cloth ties [2 each to front & rear covers].. Some expected soiling to vellum, with spine a bit darkened. Old,. faint stain to lower corner of textblock. Withal, a VG+ copy.. Price is for this one volume containing this work, and De ECCLESIASTICA REPUBLICA, 1543 [TavBooks ID #35545]. . Title page printer's vignette depicting Saints Peter and Paul.
Bookseller: Tavistock Books, ABAA
2011-09-08 11:22:36
Crasso, Padovano
[Venice]: Apd signu S. Bernardini, 1542. 1st edition. Period full vellum with title hand-inked to spine. Yapp fore-edges. Stubs for cloth ties [2 each to front & rear covers]. Some expected soiling to vellum, with spine a bit darkened. Old, faint stain to lower corner of textblock. Withal, a VG+ copy.. Unpaginated, though 118 pp. Index at rear. Last page blank. Title page printer's vignette depicting Saints Peter and Paul. Bound in 4s. Price is for this one volume containing this work, and De ECCLESIASTICA REPUBLICA, 1543 [TavBooks ID #35545].
Bookseller: Tavistock Books, ABAA [U.S.A.]
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2011-08-27 03:10:34
QUINTILIAN
Parisiis, Ex officina Rob. Stephani Typographi Regii, 1542. Large 8vo, 223 x 156 mms., pp. 551 [but 669 with quite a few errors in pagination, 552 - 600 Index, 601 Colophon [Excudebat Rob. Stephanus Hebraicarum et Latinarum literarum typographus regius, Parisiis Ann. M. D. XLII. IIII. non. Mart.], 602 blank], collating A-2Y, printer's device engraved by Geoffrey Tory on title-page, late 17th century panelled calf, marbled end-papers; joints cracked and tender, top and base of spine chipped, corners worn, bookseller's small label, "J. Moodie Miller, Lindsay Place, Edinburgh" on upper margin of rear paste-down end-paper. Copac notes that this is "Basically a reimpression of the Simon de Colin edition of 1541." Renouard, A. A.: Annales de l'imprimerie des Estiennes, p.53, no. 9
Bookseller: John Price Antiquarian Books, ABA, ILAB [LONDON, United Kingdom]
2010-12-06 00:00:00
GIANNOTTI Donato
Full-page woodcut diagram of the Sala del Consiglio in the Doge's palace.Sm. 8vo. 102, [1]ff. (lacks final blank). Modern vellum over paste-boards.
Bookseller: Maggs Bros. Ltd. [U.K.]
2010-10-31 01:12:18
MÜNSTER, Sebastian (1488-1552)
[Basel: Heinrich Petri in the 'Geographia Universalis', 1542. Woodcut map, in excellent condition. The first state of the earliest reasonably obtainable map to focus on the depiction of the entire continent of Africa, and a veritable masterpiece of Renaissance cartographyThis highly important map represents the earliest reasonably obtainable map to depict the entire continent of Africa. Africa XVIII, Nova Tabula , is a fantastic visual synergy of archaic imagination and recent exploration. The overall shape of the continent is quite well defined, having been extensively explored by the Portuguese since the time of Prince Henry the Navigator in the mid-fifteenth-century, a point highlighted by the appearance of a caravel in the lower part of the map. Africa's various kingdoms are denoted by pictorial symbols of a crown and sceptre. Following Ptolemaic tradition, the Nile has its source in a series of lakes that lie at the foot of the mysterious Mountains of the Moon. The land around the Cape of Good Hope in South Africa is embellished by the appearance of an elephant, and exotic parrots occupy trees in Angola. Most amusingly, near the coast of east Africa, the "Monoculi," or one-eyed man imagined by Classical writers sits in wait for some hypothetical European visitor.Münster was a brilliant polymath and one of the most important intellectuals of the Renaissance era. Educated at Tübingen, his surviving college notebooks, Kollegienbuch , reveal a mind of insatiable curiosity, especially with regards to cosmography. Münster later became a professor of Hebrew … [Click Below for Full Description]
Bookseller: Donald Heald Rare Books [US]
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2010-10-21 08:58:48
Leonhart Fuchs
Basel 1542 - Herbals are books containing the names and descriptions of plants and their medicinal properties. The herbal had declined during the Middle Ages, western European herbals of that era were based on the works of classical authors, in particular Pedanios Dioscorides, the ancient Greek writer who was the father of medical botany. This would change with the publication of Leonhart Fuchs’ illustrated herbal De historia stirpium commentarii insigne. The plan and organization of the herbal was entirely original with Fuchs, although the work did include some material derived from his Classical predecessors. Fuchs’ De historia stirpium represented an impressive first step from medieval superstition to modern botany. Leonhart Fuchs, a German doctor of medicine, deplored the terrible state of medical practice during his lifetime. Most doctors of his time relied on information from illiterate apothecaries, whom were, in turn, depending upon the peasants who gathered roots and herbs for them. Fuchs realized that patients could easily be poisoned rather than cured because of improper identification of plants. Therefore he compiled this herbal to improve the German pharmacopoeia with a reference of accurate illustrations and identifications of medicinal herbs in both German and Latin. The result was a book of great splendor, without equal among sixteenth-century herbals. It is illustrated with 511 hand-colored woodcut figures, all original and depicted from life. Fuchs looked to living plants for his illustrations, a departure from common practice at that time, but t … [Click Below for Full Description]
Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco
2010-05-01 23:10:40
VERGILIUS MARO, Publius
Venice: Giunta [the Heirs of Lucantonio Giunta, January], 1542., 1542. folio. ff. [8], 475, [1]. ff. 4-5 present in duplicate. title in red & black with in architectural woodcut border. 23 woodcuts in the text (some full and half-page; some signed 'L'). woodcut printer's device on verso of last leaf. woodcut initials. old vellum, rebacked with part of spine mounted (covers very worn but solid, a few leaves embrowned, occasional marginal stains & soiling, edges of last leaves tatty, some wormholes in last (repaired) & first few leaves affecting some letters & small portion of title border, several old library rubberstamps on verso of title & on verso of last leaf). Mortimer describes a 1544 Giunta edition utilizing the same woodcut border, but illustrated with a fuller complement of woodcuts - 115 as opposed to the 23 found in the present edition. The Giunta woodcuts, first published in 1515, were copied from Johann Grúninger's Strasbourg edition of 1502. Not all of the cuts appeared in all of the Giunta editions. Adams V485. cfMortimer, Harvard Italian 16th Century Books, 525.. Signed by Author(s).
Bookseller: D & E Lake Ltd. (ABAC, ILAB)
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2010-05-01 08:43:09
SVETONIUS TR. GAIUS (SUETONIUS)
Basileae: In Fine: Basileae, Henricum Petrum, Mense Martio. 1542. [Classici-Prima edizione] (cm. 14,7) bella piena pergamena originale, titolo calligrafato e tracce di lacci, tagli di testa e di piede con leggera cesellatura a secco. Minimi ottimi restauri.-- cc. 40 nn., pp. 1371 + 1 p. con la marca tipografica. Bellissimo frontis incorniciato da ricca bordura xilografica figurata con putti e figure mitologiche. Carattere rotondo e corsivo molto elegante, capolettera figurati. Prefazione di Angelo Poliziano. Prima edizione in piccolo formato segnalata dal Graesse come pregiata, col celebre commento del M.A. Sabellico. Erasmo da Rotterdam è presente nelle annotazioni come nelle precedenti edizioni assieme a G.B. Egnatius e altri. Insignificante tarletto alla cerniera di 20 carte interne, lontano dal testo. Alcuni lievi aloni alle prime e ultime carte, alcuni nomi oscurati per censura ma leggibili. Peraltro esemplare molto bello, fresco e nitido. * Adams S 2040; * Bm. Stc. German 842; * Graesse VI 521-522: "Cette ed a ètè soignèe par Hier. Gemusaeus".[f49] . buono. Rilegato. Prima Edizione in Piccolo Formato. 1542.
Bookseller: LIBRI ANTICHI E RARI FRANCESCO&CLAUDIA [AREZZO, Italy]
2010-04-23 06:40:55
POLYBIUS (POLIBIO)
Lugduni: Seb. Gryphium, 1542. Lugduni: Seb. Gryphium. [PRIMA EDIZIONE] (cm. 18) bella piena pergamena originale con unghie e tracce di lacci, titolo calligrafato al dorso.-- pp. 447. Marca tipografica all' inizio e in fine, carattere corsivo italico elegantissimo. Prima edizione coll' interpretazione di Nicolaus Perottus (1429-1480) citata dall' HOFFMAN, riprodotta poi nel 1548 e 1554 identicamente. Molto rara, manca all' ADAMS e al BM. STC. FRENCH. Esemplare molto bello nitido e genuino. BAUDRIER "BIBLIOGR. LYONNAISE" VIII 170; HOFFMAN III 272.[f41] . ottimo. Rilegato. 1542.
Bookseller: LIBRI ANTICHI E RARI FRANCESCO&CLAUDIA [AREZZO, Italy]
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2010-04-11 16:39:22
Fullmaurer Heinrich; Albrecht Mayer; Veyt Rudolff Speckle
Italy: Priuli Verlucca. New;. Hardcover. <p>Cover valuable in imitation with seven nerves reinforcement in the back and impressions on dry dishes. Inserito in elegante cofanetto identico alla copertina. Posted in elegant box identical to cover. 898 pagine in folio (cm 28,5x35). 898 pages in folio (28.5 cm x35). In collaborazione con Aboca Museum In collaboration with Aboca Museum</p><p>From one of the Fathers of botany 'restorer of art to heal in Europe comes this first edition in 1542 for the types of Michael Isingrin Basel,' editio isingriniana. Le sue caratteristiche sono le seguenti: 898 pagine in folio , 517 tavole xilografiche, 343 "stirpi" cioè specie, 125 termini di glossario, indice analitico in greco, latino, tedesco e di voci di spezieria. Its characteristics are as follows: 898 pages in folio, 517 tables xilografiche, 343 "races" that is, species, 125 glossary of terms, index in greek, Latin, German and items spezieria. Tale capolavoro è conservato nella biblioteca di Aboca Museum. This masterpiece is kept in the library of Aboca Museum. Furono così celebri per secoli l'Autore e la sua opera che in molte lingue oggi il nome "fucsia" identifica la pianta, I cui fiori sono di quel colore, scoperta nel 1703 a Santo Domingo e dedicata da allora proprio al Leonhart Fuchs. They were so famous for centuries the author and his work that in many languages today the name 'fuchsia' identifies the plant, whose flowers are of that color, discovered in 1703 in Santo Domingo and dedicated by then just Leonhart Fuchs. </p><p>Aboca Museum Editions, which h … [Click Below for Full Description]
Bookseller: New Boston Fine and Rare Books
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2010-02-25 11:01:01
Leonhart Fuchs
Basel. Herbals are books containing the names and descriptions of plants and their medicinal properties. The herbal had declined during the Middle Ages, western European herbals of that era were based on the works of classical authors, in particular Pedanios Dioscorides, the ancient Greek writer who was the father of medical botany. This would change with the publication of Leonhart Fuchs’ illustrated herbal De historia stirpium commentarii insigne. The plan and organization of the herbal was entirely original with Fuchs, although the work did include some material derived from his Classical predecessors. Fuchs’De historia stirpium represented an impressive first step from medieval superstition to modern botany. Leonhart Fuchs, a German doctor of medicine, deplored the terrible state of medical practice during his lifetime. Most doctors of his time relied on information from illiterate apothecaries, whom were, in turn, depending upon the peasants who gathered roots and herbs for them. Fuchs realized that patients could easily be poisoned rather than cured because of improper identification of plants. Therefore he compiled this herbal to improve the German pharmacopoeia with a reference of accurate illustrations and identifications of medicinal herbs in both German and Latin. The result was a book of great splendor, without equal among sixteenth-century herbals. It is illustrated with 511 hand-colored woodcut figures, all original and depicted from life. Fuchs looked to living plants for his illustrations, a departure from common practice at that time, but then “improved” th … [Click Below for Full Description]
Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco [San Francisco, CA, U.S.A.]
2010-02-25 11:01:01
Leonhart Fuchs
Basel. Herbals are books containing the names and descriptions of plants and their medicinal properties. The herbal had declined during the Middle Ages, western European herbals of that era were based on the works of classical authors, in particular Pedanios Dioscorides, the ancient Greek writer who was the father of medical botany. This would change with the publication of Leonhart Fuchs’ illustrated herbal De historia stirpium commentarii insigne. The plan and organization of the herbal was entirely original with Fuchs, although the work did include some material derived from his Classical predecessors. Fuchs’ De historia stirpium represented an impressive first step from medieval superstition to modern botany. Leonhart Fuchs, a German doctor of medicine, deplored the terrible state of medical practice during his lifetime. Most doctors of his time relied on information from illiterate apothecaries, whom were, in turn, depending upon the peasants who gathered roots and herbs for them. Fuchs realized that patients could easily be poisoned rather than cured because of improper identification of plants. Therefore he compiled this herbal to improve the German pharmacopoeia with a reference of accurate illustrations and identifications of medicinal herbs in both German and Latin. The result was a book of great splendor, without equal among sixteenth-century herbals. It is illustrated with 511 hand-colored woodcut figures, all original and depicted from life. Fuchs looked to living plants for his illustrations, a departure from common practice at that time, but then “improved” t … [Click Below for Full Description]
Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco [San Francisco, CA, U.S.A.]
2010-02-25 11:01:01
Leonhart Fuchs
Basel. Herbals are books containing the names and descriptions of plants and their medicinal properties. The herbal had declined during the Middle Ages, western European herbals of that era were based on the works of classical authors, in particular Pedanios Dioscorides, the ancient Greek writer who was the father of medical botany. This would change with the publication of Leonhart Fuchs’ illustrated herbal De historia stirpium commentarii insigne. The plan and organization of the herbal was entirely original with Fuchs, although the work did include some material derived from his Classical predecessors. Fuchs’ De historia stirpium represented an impressive first step from medieval superstition to modern botany. Leonhart Fuchs, a German doctor of medicine, deplored the terrible state of medical practice during his lifetime. Most doctors of his time relied on information from illiterate apothecaries, whom were, in turn, depending upon the peasants who gathered roots and herbs for them. Fuchs realized that patients could easily be poisoned rather than cured because of improper identification of plants. Therefore he compiled this herbal to improve the German pharmacopoeia with a reference of accurate illustrations and identifications of medicinal herbs in both German and Latin. The result was a book of great splendor, without equal among sixteenth-century herbals. It is illustrated with 511 hand-colored woodcut figures, all original and depicted from life. Fuchs looked to living plants for his illustrations, a departure from common practice at that time, but then “improved” t … [Click Below for Full Description]
Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco [San Francisco, CA, U.S.A.]
2010-02-25 11:01:01
Leonhart Fuchs
Basel. Herbals are books containing the names and descriptions of plants and their medicinal properties. The herbal had declined during the Middle Ages, western European herbals of that era were based on the works of classical authors, in particular Pedanios Dioscorides, the ancient Greek writer who was the father of medical botany. This would change with the publication of Leonhart Fuchs’ illustrated herbal De historia stirpium commentarii insigne. The plan and organization of the herbal was entirely original with Fuchs, although the work did include some material derived from his Classical predecessors. Fuchs’De historia stirpium represented an impressive first step from medieval superstition to modern botany. Leonhart Fuchs, a German doctor of medicine, deplored the terrible state of medical practice during his lifetime. Most doctors of his time relied on information from illiterate apothecaries, whom were, in turn, depending upon the peasants who gathered roots and herbs for them. Fuchs realized that patients could easily be poisoned rather than cured because of improper identification of plants. Therefore he compiled this herbal to improve the German pharmacopoeia with a reference of accurate illustrations and identifications of medicinal herbs in both German and Latin. The result was a book of great splendor, without equal among sixteenth-century herbals. It is illustrated with 511 hand-colored woodcut figures, all original and depicted from life. Fuchs looked to living plants for his illustrations, a departure from common practice at that time, but then “improved” th … [Click Below for Full Description]
Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco [San Francisco, CA, U.S.A.]
2010-02-25 11:01:01
Leonhart Fuchs
Basel. Herbals are books containing the names and descriptions of plants and their medicinal properties. The herbal had declined during the Middle Ages, western European herbals of that era were based on the works of classical authors, in particular Pedanios Dioscorides, the ancient Greek writer who was the father of medical botany. This would change with the publication of Leonhart Fuchs’ illustrated herbal De historia stirpium commentarii insigne. The plan and organization of the herbal was entirely original with Fuchs, although the work did include some material derived from his Classical predecessors. Fuchs’De historia stirpium represented an impressive first step from medieval superstition to modern botany. Leonhart Fuchs, a German doctor of medicine, deplored the terrible state of medical practice during his lifetime. Most doctors of his time relied on information from illiterate apothecaries, whom were, in turn, depending upon the peasants who gathered roots and herbs for them. Fuchs realized that patients could easily be poisoned rather than cured because of improper identification of plants. Therefore he compiled this herbal to improve the German pharmacopoeia with a reference of accurate illustrations and identifications of medicinal herbs in both German and Latin. The result was a book of great splendor, without equal among sixteenth-century herbals. It is illustrated with 511 hand-colored woodcut figures, all original and depicted from life. Fuchs looked to living plants for his illustrations, a departure from common practice at that time, but then “improved” th … [Click Below for Full Description]
Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco [San Francisco, CA, U.S.A.]
2010-02-25 11:01:01
Leonhart Fuchs
Basel. Herbals are books containing the names and descriptions of plants and their medicinal properties. The herbal had declined during the Middle Ages, western European herbals of that era were based on the works of classical authors, in particular Pedanios Dioscorides, the ancient Greek writer who was the father of medical botany. This would change with the publication of Leonhart Fuchs’ illustrated herbal De historia stirpium commentarii insigne. The plan and organization of the herbal was entirely original with Fuchs, although the work did include some material derived from his Classical predecessors. Fuchs’De historia stirpium represented an impressive first step from medieval superstition to modern botany. Leonhart Fuchs, a German doctor of medicine, deplored the terrible state of medical practice during his lifetime. Most doctors of his time relied on information from illiterate apothecaries, whom were, in turn, depending upon the peasants who gathered roots and herbs for them. Fuchs realized that patients could easily be poisoned rather than cured because of improper identification of plants. Therefore he compiled this herbal to improve the German pharmacopoeia with a reference of accurate illustrations and identifications of medicinal herbs in both German and Latin. The result was a book of great splendor, without equal among sixteenth-century herbals. It is illustrated with 511 hand-colored woodcut figures, all original and depicted from life. Fuchs looked to living plants for his illustrations, a departure from common practice at that time, but then “improved” th … [Click Below for Full Description]
Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco [San Francisco, CA, U.S.A.]
2010-02-25 11:01:01
Leonhart Fuchs
Basel. Herbals are books containing the names and descriptions of plants and their medicinal properties. The herbal had declined during the Middle Ages, western European herbals of that era were based on the works of classical authors, in particular Pedanios Dioscorides, the ancient Greek writer who was the father of medical botany. This would change with the publication of Leonhart Fuchs’ illustrated herbal De historia stirpium commentarii insigne. The plan and organization of the herbal was entirely original with Fuchs, although the work did include some material derived from his Classical predecessors. Fuchs’De historia stirpium represented an impressive first step from medieval superstition to modern botany. Leonhart Fuchs, a German doctor of medicine, deplored the terrible state of medical practice during his lifetime. Most doctors of his time relied on information from illiterate apothecaries, whom were, in turn, depending upon the peasants who gathered roots and herbs for them. Fuchs realized that patients could easily be poisoned rather than cured because of improper identification of plants. Therefore he compiled this herbal to improve the German pharmacopoeia with a reference of accurate illustrations and identifications of medicinal herbs in both German and Latin. The result was a book of great splendor, without equal among sixteenth-century herbals. It is illustrated with 511 hand-colored woodcut figures, all original and depicted from life. Fuchs looked to living plants for his illustrations, a departure from common practice at that time, but then “improved” th … [Click Below for Full Description]
Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco [San Francisco, CA, U.S.A.]
2010-02-25 11:01:01
Leonhart Fuchs
Basel. Herbals are books containing the names and descriptions of plants and their medicinal properties. The herbal had declined during the Middle Ages, western European herbals of that era were based on the works of classical authors, in particular Pedanios Dioscorides, the ancient Greek writer who was the father of medical botany. This would change with the publication of Leonhart Fuchs’ illustrated herbal De historia stirpium commentarii insigne. The plan and organization of the herbal was entirely original with Fuchs, although the work did include some material derived from his Classical predecessors. Fuchs’ De historia stirpium represented an impressive first step from medieval superstition to modern botany. Leonhart Fuchs, a German doctor of medicine, deplored the terrible state of medical practice during his lifetime. Most doctors of his time relied on information from illiterate apothecaries, whom were, in turn, depending upon the peasants who gathered roots and herbs for them. Fuchs realized that patients could easily be poisoned rather than cured because of improper identification of plants. Therefore he compiled this herbal to improve the German pharmacopoeia with a reference of accurate illustrations and identifications of medicinal herbs in both German and Latin. The result was a book of great splendor, without equal among sixteenth-century herbals. It is illustrated with 511 hand-colored woodcut figures, all original and depicted from life. Fuchs looked to living plants for his illustrations, a departure from common practice at that time, but then “improved” t … [Click Below for Full Description]
Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco [San Francisco, CA, U.S.A.]
2010-02-25 11:01:01
Leonhart Fuchs
Basel. Herbals are books containing the names and descriptions of plants and their medicinal properties. The herbal had declined during the Middle Ages, western European herbals of that era were based on the works of classical authors, in particular Pedanios Dioscorides, the ancient Greek writer who was the father of medical botany. This would change with the publication of Leonhart Fuchs’ illustrated herbal De historia stirpium commentarii insigne. The plan and organization of the herbal was entirely original with Fuchs, although the work did include some material derived from his Classical predecessors. Fuchs’De historia stirpium represented an impressive first step from medieval superstition to modern botany. Leonhart Fuchs, a German doctor of medicine, deplored the terrible state of medical practice during his lifetime. Most doctors of his time relied on information from illiterate apothecaries, whom were, in turn, depending upon the peasants who gathered roots and herbs for them. Fuchs realized that patients could easily be poisoned rather than cured because of improper identification of plants. Therefore he compiled this herbal to improve the German pharmacopoeia with a reference of accurate illustrations and identifications of medicinal herbs in both German and Latin. The result was a book of great splendor, without equal among sixteenth-century herbals. It is illustrated with 511 hand-colored woodcut figures, all original and depicted from life. Fuchs looked to living plants for his illustrations, a departure from common practice at that time, but then “improved” th … [Click Below for Full Description]
Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco [San Francisco, CA, U.S.A.]
2010-02-25 11:01:01
Leonhart Fuchs
Basel. Herbals are books containing the names and descriptions of plants and their medicinal properties. The herbal had declined during the Middle Ages, western European herbals of that era were based on the works of classical authors, in particular Pedanios Dioscorides, the ancient Greek writer who was the father of medical botany. This would change with the publication of Leonhart Fuchs’ illustrated herbal De historia stirpium commentarii insigne. The plan and organization of the herbal was entirely original with Fuchs, although the work did include some material derived from his Classical predecessors. Fuchs’De historia stirpium represented an impressive first step from medieval superstition to modern botany. Leonhart Fuchs, a German doctor of medicine, deplored the terrible state of medical practice during his lifetime. Most doctors of his time relied on information from illiterate apothecaries, whom were, in turn, depending upon the peasants who gathered roots and herbs for them. Fuchs realized that patients could easily be poisoned rather than cured because of improper identification of plants. Therefore he compiled this herbal to improve the German pharmacopoeia with a reference of accurate illustrations and identifications of medicinal herbs in both German and Latin. The result was a book of great splendor, without equal among sixteenth-century herbals. It is illustrated with 511 hand-colored woodcut figures, all original and depicted from life. Fuchs looked to living plants for his illustrations, a departure from common practice at that time, but then “improved” th … [Click Below for Full Description]
Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco [San Francisco, CA, U.S.A.]
2010-02-25 11:01:01
Leonhart Fuchs
Basel. Herbals are books containing the names and descriptions of plants and their medicinal properties. The herbal had declined during the Middle Ages, western European herbals of that era were based on the works of classical authors, in particular Pedanios Dioscorides, the ancient Greek writer who was the father of medical botany. This would change with the publication of Leonhart Fuchs’ illustrated herbal De historia stirpium commentarii insigne. The plan and organization of the herbal was entirely original with Fuchs, although the work did include some material derived from his Classical predecessors. Fuchs’De historia stirpium represented an impressive first step from medieval superstition to modern botany. Leonhart Fuchs, a German doctor of medicine, deplored the terrible state of medical practice during his lifetime. Most doctors of his time relied on information from illiterate apothecaries, whom were, in turn, depending upon the peasants who gathered roots and herbs for them. Fuchs realized that patients could easily be poisoned rather than cured because of improper identification of plants. Therefore he compiled this herbal to improve the German pharmacopoeia with a reference of accurate illustrations and identifications of medicinal herbs in both German and Latin. The result was a book of great splendor, without equal among sixteenth-century herbals. It is illustrated with 511 hand-colored woodcut figures, all original and depicted from life. Fuchs looked to living plants for his illustrations, a departure from common practice at that time, but then “improved” th … [Click Below for Full Description]
Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco [San Francisco, CA, U.S.A.]
2010-02-25 11:01:01
Leonhart Fuchs
Basel. Herbals are books containing the names and descriptions of plants and their medicinal properties. The herbal had declined during the Middle Ages, western European herbals of that era were based on the works of classical authors, in particular Pedanios Dioscorides, the ancient Greek writer who was the father of medical botany. This would change with the publication of Leonhart Fuchs’ illustrated herbal De historia stirpium commentarii insigne. The plan and organization of the herbal was entirely original with Fuchs, although the work did include some material derived from his Classical predecessors. Fuchs’ De historia stirpium represented an impressive first step from medieval superstition to modern botany. Leonhart Fuchs, a German doctor of medicine, deplored the terrible state of medical practice during his lifetime. Most doctors of his time relied on information from illiterate apothecaries, whom were, in turn, depending upon the peasants who gathered roots and herbs for them. Fuchs realized that patients could easily be poisoned rather than cured because of improper identification of plants. Therefore he compiled this herbal to improve the German pharmacopoeia with a reference of accurate illustrations and identifications of medicinal herbs in both German and Latin. The result was a book of great splendor, without equal among sixteenth-century herbals. It is illustrated with 511 hand-colored woodcut figures, all original and depicted from life. Fuchs looked to living plants for his illustrations, a departure from common practice at that time, but then “improved” t … [Click Below for Full Description]
Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco [San Francisco, CA, U.S.A.]
2010-02-25 11:01:01
Leonhart Fuchs
Basel. Herbals are books containing the names and descriptions of plants and their medicinal properties. The herbal had declined during the Middle Ages, western European herbals of that era were based on the works of classical authors, in particular Pedanios Dioscorides, the ancient Greek writer who was the father of medical botany. This would change with the publication of Leonhart Fuchs’ illustrated herbal De historia stirpium commentarii insigne. The plan and organization of the herbal was entirely original with Fuchs, although the work did include some material derived from his Classical predecessors. Fuchs’De historia stirpium represented an impressive first step from medieval superstition to modern botany. Leonhart Fuchs, a German doctor of medicine, deplored the terrible state of medical practice during his lifetime. Most doctors of his time relied on information from illiterate apothecaries, whom were, in turn, depending upon the peasants who gathered roots and herbs for them. Fuchs realized that patients could easily be poisoned rather than cured because of improper identification of plants. Therefore he compiled this herbal to improve the German pharmacopoeia with a reference of accurate illustrations and identifications of medicinal herbs in both German and Latin. The result was a book of great splendor, without equal among sixteenth-century herbals. It is illustrated with 511 hand-colored woodcut figures, all original and depicted from life. Fuchs looked to living plants for his illustrations, a departure from common practice at that time, but then “improved” th … [Click Below for Full Description]
Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco [San Francisco, CA, U.S.A.]
2010-02-25 11:01:01
Leonhart Fuchs
Basel. Herbals are books containing the names and descriptions of plants and their medicinal properties. The herbal had declined during the Middle Ages, western European herbals of that era were based on the works of classical authors, in particular Pedanios Dioscorides, the ancient Greek writer who was the father of medical botany. This would change with the publication of Leonhart Fuchs’ illustrated herbal De historia stirpium commentarii insigne. The plan and organization of the herbal was entirely original with Fuchs, although the work did include some material derived from his Classical predecessors. Fuchs’ De historia stirpium represented an impressive first step from medieval superstition to modern botany. Leonhart Fuchs, a German doctor of medicine, deplored the terrible state of medical practice during his lifetime. Most doctors of his time relied on information from illiterate apothecaries, whom were, in turn, depending upon the peasants who gathered roots and herbs for them. Fuchs realized that patients could easily be poisoned rather than cured because of improper identification of plants. Therefore he compiled this herbal to improve the German pharmacopoeia with a reference of accurate illustrations and identifications of medicinal herbs in both German and Latin. The result was a book of great splendor, without equal among sixteenth-century herbals. It is illustrated with 511 hand-colored woodcut figures, all original and depicted from life. Fuchs looked to living plants for his illustrations, a departure from common practice at that time, but then “improved” t … [Click Below for Full Description]
Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco [San Francisco, CA, U.S.A.]
2010-02-25 11:01:01
Leonhart Fuchs
Basel. Herbals are books containing the names and descriptions of plants and their medicinal properties. The herbal had declined during the Middle Ages, western European herbals of that era were based on the works of classical authors, in particular Pedanios Dioscorides, the ancient Greek writer who was the father of medical botany. This would change with the publication of Leonhart Fuchs’ illustrated herbal De historia stirpium commentarii insigne. The plan and organization of the herbal was entirely original with Fuchs, although the work did include some material derived from his Classical predecessors. Fuchs’De historia stirpium represented an impressive first step from medieval superstition to modern botany. Leonhart Fuchs, a German doctor of medicine, deplored the terrible state of medical practice during his lifetime. Most doctors of his time relied on information from illiterate apothecaries, whom were, in turn, depending upon the peasants who gathered roots and herbs for them. Fuchs realized that patients could easily be poisoned rather than cured because of improper identification of plants. Therefore he compiled this herbal to improve the German pharmacopoeia with a reference of accurate illustrations and identifications of medicinal herbs in both German and Latin. The result was a book of great splendor, without equal among sixteenth-century herbals. It is illustrated with 511 hand-colored woodcut figures, all original and depicted from life. Fuchs looked to living plants for his illustrations, a departure from common practice at that time, but then “improved” th … [Click Below for Full Description]
Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco [San Francisco, CA, U.S.A.]
2010-02-25 11:01:01
Leonhart Fuchs
Basel. Herbals are books containing the names and descriptions of plants and their medicinal properties. The herbal had declined during the Middle Ages, western European herbals of that era were based on the works of classical authors, in particular Pedanios Dioscorides, the ancient Greek writer who was the father of medical botany. This would change with the publication of Leonhart Fuchs’ illustrated herbal De historia stirpium commentarii insigne. The plan and organization of the herbal was entirely original with Fuchs, although the work did include some material derived from his Classical predecessors. Fuchs’De historia stirpium represented an impressive first step from medieval superstition to modern botany. Leonhart Fuchs, a German doctor of medicine, deplored the terrible state of medical practice during his lifetime. Most doctors of his time relied on information from illiterate apothecaries, whom were, in turn, depending upon the peasants who gathered roots and herbs for them. Fuchs realized that patients could easily be poisoned rather than cured because of improper identification of plants. Therefore he compiled this herbal to improve the German pharmacopoeia with a reference of accurate illustrations and identifications of medicinal herbs in both German and Latin. The result was a book of great splendor, without equal among sixteenth-century herbals. It is illustrated with 511 hand-colored woodcut figures, all original and depicted from life. Fuchs looked to living plants for his illustrations, a departure from common practice at that time, but then “improved” th … [Click Below for Full Description]
Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco [San Francisco, CA, U.S.A.]
2010-02-25 11:01:01
Leonhart Fuchs
Basel. Herbals are books containing the names and descriptions of plants and their medicinal properties. The herbal had declined during the Middle Ages, western European herbals of that era were based on the works of classical authors, in particular Pedanios Dioscorides, the ancient Greek writer who was the father of medical botany. This would change with the publication of Leonhart Fuchs’ illustrated herbal De historia stirpium commentarii insigne. The plan and organization of the herbal was entirely original with Fuchs, although the work did include some material derived from his Classical predecessors. Fuchs’De historia stirpium represented an impressive first step from medieval superstition to modern botany. Leonhart Fuchs, a German doctor of medicine, deplored the terrible state of medical practice during his lifetime. Most doctors of his time relied on information from illiterate apothecaries, whom were, in turn, depending upon the peasants who gathered roots and herbs for them. Fuchs realized that patients could easily be poisoned rather than cured because of improper identification of plants. Therefore he compiled this herbal to improve the German pharmacopoeia with a reference of accurate illustrations and identifications of medicinal herbs in both German and Latin. The result was a book of great splendor, without equal among sixteenth-century herbals. It is illustrated with 511 hand-colored woodcut figures, all original and depicted from life. Fuchs looked to living plants for his illustrations, a departure from common practice at that time, but then “improved” th … [Click Below for Full Description]
Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco [San Francisco, CA, U.S.A.]
2010-02-25 11:01:01
Leonhart Fuchs
Basel. Herbals are books containing the names and descriptions of plants and their medicinal properties. The herbal had declined during the Middle Ages, western European herbals of that era were based on the works of classical authors, in particular Pedanios Dioscorides, the ancient Greek writer who was the father of medical botany. This would change with the publication of Leonhart Fuchs’ illustrated herbal De historia stirpium commentarii insigne. The plan and organization of the herbal was entirely original with Fuchs, although the work did include some material derived from his Classical predecessors. Fuchs’ De historia stirpium represented an impressive first step from medieval superstition to modern botany. Leonhart Fuchs, a German doctor of medicine, deplored the terrible state of medical practice during his lifetime. Most doctors of his time relied on information from illiterate apothecaries, whom were, in turn, depending upon the peasants who gathered roots and herbs for them. Fuchs realized that patients could easily be poisoned rather than cured because of improper identification of plants. Therefore he compiled this herbal to improve the German pharmacopoeia with a reference of accurate illustrations and identifications of medicinal herbs in both German and Latin. The result was a book of great splendor, without equal among sixteenth-century herbals. It is illustrated with 511 hand-colored woodcut figures, all original and depicted from life. Fuchs looked to living plants for his illustrations, a departure from common practice at that time, but then “improved” t … [Click Below for Full Description]
Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco [San Francisco, CA, U.S.A.]
2010-02-25 11:01:01
Leonhart Fuchs
Basel 1542 - Herbals are books containing the names and descriptions of plants and their medicinal properties. The herbal had declined during the Middle Ages, western European herbals of that era were based on the works of classical authors, in particular Pedanios Dioscorides, the ancient Greek writer who was the father of medical botany. This would change with the publication of Leonhart Fuchs’ illustrated herbal De historia stirpium commentarii insigne. The plan and organization of the herbal was entirely original with Fuchs, although the work did include some material derived from his Classical predecessors. Fuchs’ De historia stirpium represented an impressive first step from medieval superstition to modern botany. Leonhart Fuchs, a German doctor of medicine, deplored the terrible state of medical practice during his lifetime. Most doctors of his time relied on information from illiterate apothecaries, whom were, in turn, depending upon the peasants who gathered roots and herbs for them. Fuchs realized that patients could easily be poisoned rather than cured because of improper identification of plants. Therefore he compiled this herbal to improve the German pharmacopoeia with a reference of accurate illustrations and identifications of medicinal herbs in both German and Latin. The result was a book of great splendor, without equal among sixteenth-century herbals. It is illustrated with 511 hand-colored woodcut figures, all original and depicted from life. Fuchs looked to living plants for his illustrations, a departure from common practice at that time, but t … [Click Below for Full Description]
Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco
2010-02-20 21:07:47
Zhao Li
Huna Fine Arts Pbulishing House. paperback. New. Ship out in 2 business day, And Fast shipping, Free Tracking number will be provided after the shipment.Language: Chinese. The book contains one volume of 4 million words and 3.000 pictures. The collected literature and oil paintings cross a long period from 1542 to 2000. The literature includes over 200 documents of about 3.5 million words. the memorabilia part is about 0.3 million words. and the summary part 0.2 million. Besides a large number of valuable old photos. there are also oil paintings from more than 2.000 artists. illustrations of the pictures. names of works. painters. time. size.... Satisfaction guaranteed,or money back.
Bookseller: cninternationalseller
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2010-02-19 02:40:47
Leonhart Fuchs
Basel 1542 - Herbals are books containing the names and descriptions of plants and their medicinal properties. The herbal had declined during the Middle Ages, western European herbals of that era were based on the works of classical authors, in particular Pedanios Dioscorides, the ancient Greek writer who was the father of medical botany. This would change with the publication of Leonhart Fuchs’ illustrated herbal De historia stirpium commentarii insigne. The plan and organization of the herbal was entirely original with Fuchs, although the work did include some material derived from his Classical predecessors. Fuchs’ De historia stirpium represented an impressive first step from medieval superstition to modern botany. Leonhart Fuchs, a German doctor of medicine, deplored the terrible state of medical practice during his lifetime. Most doctors of his time relied on information from illiterate apothecaries, whom were, in turn, depending upon the peasants who gathered roots and herbs for them. Fuchs realized that patients could easily be poisoned rather than cured because of improper identification of plants. Therefore he compiled this herbal to improve the German pharmacopoeia with a reference of accurate illustrations and identifications of medicinal herbs in both German and Latin. The result was a book of great splendor, without equal among sixteenth-century herbals. It is illustrated with 511 hand-colored woodcut figures, all original and depicted from life. Fuchs looked to living plants for his illustrations, a departure from common practice at that time, but t … [Click Below for Full Description]
Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco
2010-02-19 02:40:47
Leonhart Fuchs
Basel. Herbals are books containing the names and descriptions of plants and their medicinal properties. The herbal had declined during the Middle Ages, western European herbals of that era were based on the works of classical authors, in particular Pedanios Dioscorides, the ancient Greek writer who was the father of medical botany. This would change with the publication of Leonhart Fuchs’ illustrated herbal De historia stirpium commentarii insigne. The plan and organization of the herbal was entirely original with Fuchs, although the work did include some material derived from his Classical predecessors. Fuchs’De historia stirpium represented an impressive first step from medieval superstition to modern botany. Leonhart Fuchs, a German doctor of medicine, deplored the terrible state of medical practice during his lifetime. Most doctors of his time relied on information from illiterate apothecaries, whom were, in turn, depending upon the peasants who gathered roots and herbs for them. Fuchs realized that patients could easily be poisoned rather than cured because of improper identification of plants. Therefore he compiled this herbal to improve the German pharmacopoeia with a reference of accurate illustrations and identifications of medicinal herbs in both German and Latin. The result was a book of great splendor, without equal among sixteenth-century herbals. It is illustrated with 511 hand-colored woodcut figures, all original and depicted from life. Fuchs looked to living plants for his illustrations, a departure from common practice at that time, but then “improved” th … [Click Below for Full Description]
Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco [San Francisco, CA, U.S.A.]
2010-02-19 02:40:47
Leonhart Fuchs
Basel. Herbals are books containing the names and descriptions of plants and their medicinal properties. The herbal had declined during the Middle Ages, western European herbals of that era were based on the works of classical authors, in particular Pedanios Dioscorides, the ancient Greek writer who was the father of medical botany. This would change with the publication of Leonhart Fuchs’ illustrated herbal De historia stirpium commentarii insigne. The plan and organization of the herbal was entirely original with Fuchs, although the work did include some material derived from his Classical predecessors. Fuchs’ De historia stirpium represented an impressive first step from medieval superstition to modern botany. Leonhart Fuchs, a German doctor of medicine, deplored the terrible state of medical practice during his lifetime. Most doctors of his time relied on information from illiterate apothecaries, whom were, in turn, depending upon the peasants who gathered roots and herbs for them. Fuchs realized that patients could easily be poisoned rather than cured because of improper identification of plants. Therefore he compiled this herbal to improve the German pharmacopoeia with a reference of accurate illustrations and identifications of medicinal herbs in both German and Latin. The result was a book of great splendor, without equal among sixteenth-century herbals. It is illustrated with 511 hand-colored woodcut figures, all original and depicted from life. Fuchs looked to living plants for his illustrations, a departure from common practice at that time, but then “improved” t … [Click Below for Full Description]
Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco [San Francisco, CA, U.S.A.]
2010-02-19 02:40:47
Leonhart Fuchs
Basel. Herbals are books containing the names and descriptions of plants and their medicinal properties. The herbal had declined during the Middle Ages, western European herbals of that era were based on the works of classical authors, in particular Pedanios Dioscorides, the ancient Greek writer who was the father of medical botany. This would change with the publication of Leonhart Fuchs’ illustrated herbal De historia stirpium commentarii insigne. The plan and organization of the herbal was entirely original with Fuchs, although the work did include some material derived from his Classical predecessors. Fuchs’De historia stirpium represented an impressive first step from medieval superstition to modern botany. Leonhart Fuchs, a German doctor of medicine, deplored the terrible state of medical practice during his lifetime. Most doctors of his time relied on information from illiterate apothecaries, whom were, in turn, depending upon the peasants who gathered roots and herbs for them. Fuchs realized that patients could easily be poisoned rather than cured because of improper identification of plants. Therefore he compiled this herbal to improve the German pharmacopoeia with a reference of accurate illustrations and identifications of medicinal herbs in both German and Latin. The result was a book of great splendor, without equal among sixteenth-century herbals. It is illustrated with 511 hand-colored woodcut figures, all original and depicted from life. Fuchs looked to living plants for his illustrations, a departure from common practice at that time, but then “improved” th … [Click Below for Full Description]
Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco [San Francisco, CA, U.S.A.]
2010-02-19 02:40:47
Leonhart Fuchs
Basel. Herbals are books containing the names and descriptions of plants and their medicinal properties. The herbal had declined during the Middle Ages, western European herbals of that era were based on the works of classical authors, in particular Pedanios Dioscorides, the ancient Greek writer who was the father of medical botany. This would change with the publication of Leonhart Fuchs’ illustrated herbal De historia stirpium commentarii insigne. The plan and organization of the herbal was entirely original with Fuchs, although the work did include some material derived from his Classical predecessors. Fuchs’De historia stirpium represented an impressive first step from medieval superstition to modern botany. Leonhart Fuchs, a German doctor of medicine, deplored the terrible state of medical practice during his lifetime. Most doctors of his time relied on information from illiterate apothecaries, whom were, in turn, depending upon the peasants who gathered roots and herbs for them. Fuchs realized that patients could easily be poisoned rather than cured because of improper identification of plants. Therefore he compiled this herbal to improve the German pharmacopoeia with a reference of accurate illustrations and identifications of medicinal herbs in both German and Latin. The result was a book of great splendor, without equal among sixteenth-century herbals. It is illustrated with 511 hand-colored woodcut figures, all original and depicted from life. Fuchs looked to living plants for his illustrations, a departure from common practice at that time, but then “improved” th … [Click Below for Full Description]
Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco [San Francisco, CA, U.S.A.]
2010-02-19 02:40:47
Leonhart Fuchs
Basel. Herbals are books containing the names and descriptions of plants and their medicinal properties. The herbal had declined during the Middle Ages, western European herbals of that era were based on the works of classical authors, in particular Pedanios Dioscorides, the ancient Greek writer who was the father of medical botany. This would change with the publication of Leonhart Fuchs’ illustrated herbal De historia stirpium commentarii insigne. The plan and organization of the herbal was entirely original with Fuchs, although the work did include some material derived from his Classical predecessors. Fuchs’ De historia stirpium represented an impressive first step from medieval superstition to modern botany. Leonhart Fuchs, a German doctor of medicine, deplored the terrible state of medical practice during his lifetime. Most doctors of his time relied on information from illiterate apothecaries, whom were, in turn, depending upon the peasants who gathered roots and herbs for them. Fuchs realized that patients could easily be poisoned rather than cured because of improper identification of plants. Therefore he compiled this herbal to improve the German pharmacopoeia with a reference of accurate illustrations and identifications of medicinal herbs in both German and Latin. The result was a book of great splendor, without equal among sixteenth-century herbals. It is illustrated with 511 hand-colored woodcut figures, all original and depicted from life. Fuchs looked to living plants for his illustrations, a departure from common practice at that time, but then “improved” t … [Click Below for Full Description]
Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco [San Francisco, CA, U.S.A.]
2010-02-19 02:40:47
Leonhart Fuchs
Basel. Herbals are books containing the names and descriptions of plants and their medicinal properties. The herbal had declined during the Middle Ages, western European herbals of that era were based on the works of classical authors, in particular Pedanios Dioscorides, the ancient Greek writer who was the father of medical botany. This would change with the publication of Leonhart Fuchs’ illustrated herbal De historia stirpium commentarii insigne. The plan and organization of the herbal was entirely original with Fuchs, although the work did include some material derived from his Classical predecessors. Fuchs’ De historia stirpium represented an impressive first step from medieval superstition to modern botany. Leonhart Fuchs, a German doctor of medicine, deplored the terrible state of medical practice during his lifetime. Most doctors of his time relied on information from illiterate apothecaries, whom were, in turn, depending upon the peasants who gathered roots and herbs for them. Fuchs realized that patients could easily be poisoned rather than cured because of improper identification of plants. Therefore he compiled this herbal to improve the German pharmacopoeia with a reference of accurate illustrations and identifications of medicinal herbs in both German and Latin. The result was a book of great splendor, without equal among sixteenth-century herbals. It is illustrated with 511 hand-colored woodcut figures, all original and depicted from life. Fuchs looked to living plants for his illustrations, a departure from common practice at that time, but then “improved” t … [Click Below for Full Description]
Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco [San Francisco, CA, U.S.A.]
2010-02-19 02:40:47
Leonhart Fuchs
Basel. Herbals are books containing the names and descriptions of plants and their medicinal properties. The herbal had declined during the Middle Ages, western European herbals of that era were based on the works of classical authors, in particular Pedanios Dioscorides, the ancient Greek writer who was the father of medical botany. This would change with the publication of Leonhart Fuchs’ illustrated herbal De historia stirpium commentarii insigne. The plan and organization of the herbal was entirely original with Fuchs, although the work did include some material derived from his Classical predecessors. Fuchs’De historia stirpium represented an impressive first step from medieval superstition to modern botany. Leonhart Fuchs, a German doctor of medicine, deplored the terrible state of medical practice during his lifetime. Most doctors of his time relied on information from illiterate apothecaries, whom were, in turn, depending upon the peasants who gathered roots and herbs for them. Fuchs realized that patients could easily be poisoned rather than cured because of improper identification of plants. Therefore he compiled this herbal to improve the German pharmacopoeia with a reference of accurate illustrations and identifications of medicinal herbs in both German and Latin. The result was a book of great splendor, without equal among sixteenth-century herbals. It is illustrated with 511 hand-colored woodcut figures, all original and depicted from life. Fuchs looked to living plants for his illustrations, a departure from common practice at that time, but then “improved” th … [Click Below for Full Description]
Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco [San Francisco, CA, U.S.A.]
2010-02-19 02:40:47
Leonhart Fuchs
Basel. Herbals are books containing the names and descriptions of plants and their medicinal properties. The herbal had declined during the Middle Ages, western European herbals of that era were based on the works of classical authors, in particular Pedanios Dioscorides, the ancient Greek writer who was the father of medical botany. This would change with the publication of Leonhart Fuchs’ illustrated herbal De historia stirpium commentarii insigne. The plan and organization of the herbal was entirely original with Fuchs, although the work did include some material derived from his Classical predecessors. Fuchs’ De historia stirpium represented an impressive first step from medieval superstition to modern botany. Leonhart Fuchs, a German doctor of medicine, deplored the terrible state of medical practice during his lifetime. Most doctors of his time relied on information from illiterate apothecaries, whom were, in turn, depending upon the peasants who gathered roots and herbs for them. Fuchs realized that patients could easily be poisoned rather than cured because of improper identification of plants. Therefore he compiled this herbal to improve the German pharmacopoeia with a reference of accurate illustrations and identifications of medicinal herbs in both German and Latin. The result was a book of great splendor, without equal among sixteenth-century herbals. It is illustrated with 511 hand-colored woodcut figures, all original and depicted from life. Fuchs looked to living plants for his illustrations, a departure from common practice at that time, but then “improved” t … [Click Below for Full Description]
Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco [San Francisco, CA, U.S.A.]
2010-02-19 02:40:47
Leonhart Fuchs
Basel. Herbals are books containing the names and descriptions of plants and their medicinal properties. The herbal had declined during the Middle Ages, western European herbals of that era were based on the works of classical authors, in particular Pedanios Dioscorides, the ancient Greek writer who was the father of medical botany. This would change with the publication of Leonhart Fuchs’ illustrated herbal De historia stirpium commentarii insigne. The plan and organization of the herbal was entirely original with Fuchs, although the work did include some material derived from his Classical predecessors. Fuchs’De historia stirpium represented an impressive first step from medieval superstition to modern botany. Leonhart Fuchs, a German doctor of medicine, deplored the terrible state of medical practice during his lifetime. Most doctors of his time relied on information from illiterate apothecaries, whom were, in turn, depending upon the peasants who gathered roots and herbs for them. Fuchs realized that patients could easily be poisoned rather than cured because of improper identification of plants. Therefore he compiled this herbal to improve the German pharmacopoeia with a reference of accurate illustrations and identifications of medicinal herbs in both German and Latin. The result was a book of great splendor, without equal among sixteenth-century herbals. It is illustrated with 511 hand-colored woodcut figures, all original and depicted from life. Fuchs looked to living plants for his illustrations, a departure from common practice at that time, but then “improved” th … [Click Below for Full Description]
Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco [San Francisco, CA, U.S.A.]
2010-02-15 19:19:23
Leonhart Fuchs
Basel. Herbals are books containing the names and descriptions of plants and their medicinal properties. The herbal had declined during the Middle Ages, western European herbals of that era were based on the works of classical authors, in particular Pedanios Dioscorides, the ancient Greek writer who was the father of medical botany. This would change with the publication of Leonhart Fuchs’ illustrated herbal De historia stirpium commentarii insigne. The plan and organization of the herbal was entirely original with Fuchs, although the work did include some material derived from his Classical predecessors. Fuchs’ De historia stirpium represented an impressive first step from medieval superstition to modern botany. Leonhart Fuchs, a German doctor of medicine, deplored the terrible state of medical practice during his lifetime. Most doctors of his time relied on information from illiterate apothecaries, whom were, in turn, depending upon the peasants who gathered roots and herbs for them. Fuchs realized that patients could easily be poisoned rather than cured because of improper identification of plants. Therefore he compiled this herbal to improve the German pharmacopoeia with a reference of accurate illustrations and identifications of medicinal herbs in both German and Latin. The result was a book of great splendor, without equal among sixteenth-century herbals. It is illustrated with 511 hand-colored woodcut figures, all original and depicted from life. Fuchs looked to living plants for his illustrations, a departure from common practice at that time, but then “improved” t … [Click Below for Full Description]
Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco [San Francisco, CA, U.S.A.]
2010-02-15 19:19:23
Leonhart Fuchs
Basel. Herbals are books containing the names and descriptions of plants and their medicinal properties. The herbal had declined during the Middle Ages, western European herbals of that era were based on the works of classical authors, in particular Pedanios Dioscorides, the ancient Greek writer who was the father of medical botany. This would change with the publication of Leonhart Fuchs’ illustrated herbal De historia stirpium commentarii insigne. The plan and organization of the herbal was entirely original with Fuchs, although the work did include some material derived from his Classical predecessors. Fuchs’ De historia stirpium represented an impressive first step from medieval superstition to modern botany. Leonhart Fuchs, a German doctor of medicine, deplored the terrible state of medical practice during his lifetime. Most doctors of his time relied on information from illiterate apothecaries, whom were, in turn, depending upon the peasants who gathered roots and herbs for them. Fuchs realized that patients could easily be poisoned rather than cured because of improper identification of plants. Therefore he compiled this herbal to improve the German pharmacopoeia with a reference of accurate illustrations and identifications of medicinal herbs in both German and Latin. The result was a book of great splendor, without equal among sixteenth-century herbals. It is illustrated with 511 hand-colored woodcut figures, all original and depicted from life. Fuchs looked to living plants for his illustrations, a departure from common practice at that time, but then “improved” t … [Click Below for Full Description]
Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco [San Francisco, CA, U.S.A.]
2010-02-15 19:19:23
Leonhart Fuchs
Basel. Herbals are books containing the names and descriptions of plants and their medicinal properties. The herbal had declined during the Middle Ages, western European herbals of that era were based on the works of classical authors, in particular Pedanios Dioscorides, the ancient Greek writer who was the father of medical botany. This would change with the publication of Leonhart Fuchs’ illustrated herbal De historia stirpium commentarii insigne. The plan and organization of the herbal was entirely original with Fuchs, although the work did include some material derived from his Classical predecessors. Fuchs’De historia stirpium represented an impressive first step from medieval superstition to modern botany. Leonhart Fuchs, a German doctor of medicine, deplored the terrible state of medical practice during his lifetime. Most doctors of his time relied on information from illiterate apothecaries, whom were, in turn, depending upon the peasants who gathered roots and herbs for them. Fuchs realized that patients could easily be poisoned rather than cured because of improper identification of plants. Therefore he compiled this herbal to improve the German pharmacopoeia with a reference of accurate illustrations and identifications of medicinal herbs in both German and Latin. The result was a book of great splendor, without equal among sixteenth-century herbals. It is illustrated with 511 hand-colored woodcut figures, all original and depicted from life. Fuchs looked to living plants for his illustrations, a departure from common practice at that time, but then “improved” th … [Click Below for Full Description]
Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco [San Francisco, CA, U.S.A.]
2010-01-07 14:06:17
Leonhart Fuchs
Basel. Herbals are books containing the names and descriptions of plants and their medicinal properties. The herbal had declined during the Middle Ages, western European herbals of that era were based on the works of classical authors, in particular Pedanios Dioscorides, the ancient Greek writer who was the father of medical botany. This would change with the publication of Leonhart Fuchs’ illustrated herbal De historia stirpium commentarii insigne. The plan and organization of the herbal was entirely original with Fuchs, although the work did include some material derived from his Classical predecessors. Fuchs’De historia stirpium represented an impressive first step from medieval superstition to modern botany. Leonhart Fuchs, a German doctor of medicine, deplored the terrible state of medical practice during his lifetime. Most doctors of his time relied on information from illiterate apothecaries, whom were, in turn, depending upon the peasants who gathered roots and herbs for them. Fuchs realized that patients could easily be poisoned rather than cured because of improper identification of plants. Therefore he compiled this herbal to improve the German pharmacopoeia with a reference of accurate illustrations and identifications of medicinal herbs in both German and Latin. The result was a book of great splendor, without equal among sixteenth-century herbals. It is illustrated with 511 hand-colored woodcut figures, all original and depicted from life. Fuchs looked to living plants for his illustrations, a departure from common practice at that time, but then “improved” th … [Click Below for Full Description]
Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco [San Francisco, CA, U.S.A.]
2009-11-19 15:28:11
Leonhart Fuchs
Basel. Herbals are books containing the names and descriptions of plants and their medicinal properties. The herbal had declined during the Middle Ages, western European herbals of that era were based on the works of classical authors, in particular Pedanios Dioscorides, the ancient Greek writer who was the father of medical botany. This would change with the publication of Leonhart Fuchs’ illustrated herbal De historia stirpium commentarii insigne. The plan and organization of the herbal was entirely original with Fuchs, although the work did include some material derived from his Classical predecessors. Fuchs’De historia stirpium represented an impressive first step from medieval superstition to modern botany. Leonhart Fuchs, a German doctor of medicine, deplored the terrible state of medical practice during his lifetime. Most doctors of his time relied on information from illiterate apothecaries, whom were, in turn, depending upon the peasants who gathered roots and herbs for them. Fuchs realized that patients could easily be poisoned rather than cured because of improper identification of plants. Therefore he compiled this herbal to improve the German pharmacopoeia with a reference of accurate illustrations and identifications of medicinal herbs in both German and Latin. The result was a book of great splendor, without equal among sixteenth-century herbals. It is illustrated with 511 hand-colored woodcut figures, all original and depicted from life. Fuchs looked to living plants for his illustrations, a departure from common practice at that time, but then “improved” th … [Click Below for Full Description]
Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco [San Francisco, CA, U.S.A.]
2009-11-19 15:28:11
Leonhart Fuchs
Basel. Herbals are books containing the names and descriptions of plants and their medicinal properties. The herbal had declined during the Middle Ages, western European herbals of that era were based on the works of classical authors, in particular Pedanios Dioscorides, the ancient Greek writer who was the father of medical botany. This would change with the publication of Leonhart Fuchs’ illustrated herbal De historia stirpium commentarii insigne. The plan and organization of the herbal was entirely original with Fuchs, although the work did include some material derived from his Classical predecessors. Fuchs’De historia stirpium represented an impressive first step from medieval superstition to modern botany. Leonhart Fuchs, a German doctor of medicine, deplored the terrible state of medical practice during his lifetime. Most doctors of his time relied on information from illiterate apothecaries, whom were, in turn, depending upon the peasants who gathered roots and herbs for them. Fuchs realized that patients could easily be poisoned rather than cured because of improper identification of plants. Therefore he compiled this herbal to improve the German pharmacopoeia with a reference of accurate illustrations and identifications of medicinal herbs in both German and Latin. The result was a book of great splendor, without equal among sixteenth-century herbals. It is illustrated with 511 hand-colored woodcut figures, all original and depicted from life. Fuchs looked to living plants for his illustrations, a departure from common practice at that time, but then “improved” th … [Click Below for Full Description]
Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco [San Francisco, CA, U.S.A.]
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