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Displayed below are some selected recent viaLibri matches for books published in 1475

        Livre de Trésor [Book of Treasure]; decorated late medieval manuscript in French on paper

      DECORATED LATE MEDIEVAL MANUSCRIPT IN FRENCH ON PAPER, Western France (Brittany?), c. 1475-1500. 264 x 200-204 mm. 179 folios, watermarks in Briquet, complete (collation, i10, ii-xii12 xiii10 xiv-xv12 xvi3 [of 4; 4 canceled with no loss of text]), quire signatures, horizontal catchwords, parchment reinforcement strips pasted in the inside and sometimes the outside of each quire, written in a French gothic cursive script in 28 to 52 long lines (justification, 209-222 x 141-153 mm.), frame-ruled in brown or red ink, guide letters for initials, red rubrics, majuscules stroked in red, names of cited authorities written or underlined in red, one- to three-line plain initials alternately in red and blue, four-line plain red initial (f. 103v), three-line red and blue parted initial (f. 53), four four-to five-line red and blue parted initials with pen decoration in red and blue (ff. 11, 82, 142v, 169v), corrections in scribe?'s hand, marginal annotation in another hand (f. 110). BINDING: Eighteenth-century mottled sheep blind-tooled and -stamped with an armorial medallion, over pasteboards, spine with four double bands and shelfmark ?"250?" painted in white. TEXT: This manuscript contains a copy of the first known vernacular encyclopedia, written by Brunetto Latini, the Florentine writer and politician known for his mentorship of Dante Alighieri. Written in French during a period in which Brunetto was exiled to France on account of his political affiliations, this encyclopedia follows the Latin compilations of earlier medieval encyclopedists in its indebtedness to a range of authorities, many of them classical. Brunetto divided Trésor into three books, one focused on wisdom, one on ethics, and one on rhetoric. The work?'s contemporary focus, its framing by Brunetto, and his choice to write in the vernacular all underscore the fact that, unlike many early encyclopedists, he was not writing for a chiefly scholarly audience, but to be read more widely and, in all likelihood, pragmatically. For all that it circulated widely during the Middle Ages, copies of this text are relatively are in the United States and on the market. PROVENANCE: Evidence of script and watermarks points to this book?'s production in Brittany in the late fifteenth century. Though many Trésor manuscripts are expensive and often illuminated productions, the emphasis in this copy seems to be more on function than form. The manuscript remained in Brittany into the eighteenth century, the date of the present binding that includes the arms of the Goyon-Matignon family, an old Norman/Breton noble family dating back at least to the twelfth century and residing in Brittany. Belonged to Count Guglielmo Libri-Carucci dalla Sommaia (1802-1869), Italian mathematician, bibliophile, and notorious book thief; sold by Libri in 1855. Belonged to Prince Baldassarre Boncompagni (1821-1894), Italian historian of mathematics and physics and book collector, who acquired it in Libri?'s sale; his MS 250. Belonged to Henri Gallice (1854-1930) of Épernay, director of Perrier-Jouët and book collector. Belonged to Marcel Jeanson (1885-1942), French industrialist and bibliophile, who acquired the complete library of Henri Gallice in the 1930s. Belonged to Joost R. Ritman (1941-), Amsterdam, the Dutch businessman, distinguished collector of art and books, and founder of the Bibliotheca Philosophica Hermetica; his bookplate, ?"Philosophia Hermetica?" on the inside front cover. CONDITION: Corner of f. 1 missing with loss of text, outer edges of ff. 76-79 have been restored neatly, some marginal wormholes in the opening quires, some staining and other signs of use, but overall in fine condition. Full description and photographs available (TM 780).

      [Bookseller: Les Enluminures ]
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        Sermones quadragesimales [Lenten sermons]; decorated manuscript on paper and parchment

      DECORATED MANUSCRIPT IN LATIN AND ITALIAN ON PAPER AND PARCHMENT, Italy (Florence, Naples, or Fabriano?), c. 1475-1525 (probably before c. 1500). 215 x 145 mm. 378 folios, watermarks in Briquet (collation, i-vi20 vii14 viii24 ix-xix20), quire signatures and catchwords, written by multiple scribes in formal gothic cursiva and gothico-antiqua scripts on 38 long lines (justification, 155-160 x 93 mm.), ruled in ink with full-length vertical bounding lines, red rubrics, capitals sometimes highlighted in red or yellow, two- and three-line initials in red or blue, though occasionally unfilled or filled in later in black ink, six-line red initial decorated with elaborate purple penwork stretching down the length of the inner margin on f. 1. BINDING: Later binding of tan sheepskin over pasteboard, spine decorated with gold fillets, a small white circular library sticker marked with ?"MS?" at the foot of the spine, marbled endleaves and pastedowns. TEXT: The Lenten sermons of Cherubino da Spoleto (1414-1494), here in a carefully written, very legible copy, cover topics ranging from the defense of the faith to condemnations of clerical simony to elaborate denunciations of fornication and the ?"vanities of women.?" Cherubino da Spoleto joined the Franciscan Order in 1432, where he distinguished himself as a preacher of great learning and elegance. Like many Franciscans of his time, he was heavily influenced by the sermons of Bernardino of Siena (1380-1444). Active as an itinerant preacher between 1441 and his death in 1484, he was one of the best-known Franciscan preachers of his age. This is an important manuscript since it includes almost the complete sermon cycle. These sermons were previously known in only a single complete copy, manuscripts with excerpts, and printed editions of 1502 and 1511. There is no modern critical edition or mdoern study of these sermons. PROVENANCE: Evidence of the script and watermark supports an origin in Italy, c. 1475-1525, almost certainly before c. 1500 and possibly in Florence, Naples, or Fabriano. A library stamp with a small fleur-de-lys and text, now mostly illegible, appears in the outer bottom margin of f. 1. The manuscript was deaccessioned, with the stamp of the Redemptorists, a society of missionary priests, of France on the recto of the second flyleaf. CONDITION: Binding shows some superficial damage to the leather and final verso, f. 378v, shows some damage by insects and wear, but otherwise in good condition. Full description and photographs available (TM 681).

      [Bookseller: Les Enluminures ]
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        Il primo libro d'architettura, ... Le premier livre d'architecture ..., mis en langue Francoyse, par Jehan Martin.Including: Il secondo libro di perspettia ... Le second livre de perspective, ... mis en langue Francoise par Jehan Martin. With: (2) SERLIO, Sebastiano. Il terzo libro, nel qual si figurano, e descrivono le antiquita di Roma, e le altre che sono in Italia, e fuori de Italia. Venice, "1544" (colophon: Pietro de Nicolini da Sabbio for Marchione Sessa, 1551). With over 100 mostly full-page woodcut plans, elevations, sections, views and details of classical Roman architecture. (3) SERLIO, Sebastiano. Regole generali di architettura, sopra le cinque maniere de gli edifici cioe, Thoscano, Dorico, Ionico, Corinthio, e Composito, con gli essempi de l'antiquita, che per la maggior parte concordano con la dottrina di Vitruvio. Venice, (colophon: Pietro de Nicolini da Sabbio for Marchione Sessa, 1551). With numerous woodcut plans, details and especially elevations showing the five orders of columns and doors, gates, facades, etc. using them, as well as full-page woodcuts showing ornamental panel designs for ceilings and floors, garden plans, coat of arms, etc. (4) SERLIO, Sebastiano. Quinto libro d'architettura ..., nel quale se tratta de diverse forme de tempii sacri secondo il costume Christiano, & al modo antico. Traduict en Francois par Jan Martin.Paris, Michel de Vascosan, 1547. With 29 large and full-page woodcut plans, elevations and sections showing temples, both Christian and classical. Gold-tooled mottled calf (ca. 1700); re-backed and restored, with most of the original backstrip laid down.

      BAL 2966, eds. 15 & 23 (ad 1 & 4), 2971, books 3-4 (ad 2-3); Berlin Kat. 2557 (ad 3), 2563 (ad 1), 2565 (ad 4); Fowler 303 (ad 1), 311 (ad 2), 316 (ad 3), 321 (ad 4); Mortimer (French) 152 (ad 1 & 4). The first 5 books (all that appeared in the author's lifetime) of a monumental work of Renaissance architecture by Sebastiano Serlio (1475-1554), with 3 books in their first editions (bilingual French and Italian), and the 2 that had been published earlier in their third editions (in Italian), all extensively and very beautifully illustrated with numerous detailed woodcuts.Ad 1: First edition of books I and II, published at Paris in Italian and French while Serlio was working as one of the architects of François I's palace at Fontainebleau near Paris. Book I is devoted to geometry as the scientific basis for art and architecture. Book II teaches perspective drawing and its principles. Besides the illustrations on these subjects in general, it includes perspective views of theatrical scenery. This makes the book the first published account of modern theatre practice.Ad 2: The third Italian edition of book III, describing and depicting antiquities in Rome and elsewhere in Italy. It illustrates not only classical Roman buildings, but also a large number of designs from the Vatican workshop, as well as buildings erected by Bramante and Raphael at Rome, by Peruzzi at Naples, etc.Ad 3: The third Italian edition of book IV, using the woodcuts of the first (1537) and the second (1542) editions. Book IV had been the first book printed, so it covers the five orders of columns, basic for all architectural plans and designs. It is the most beautifully illustrated of the five books, with many full-page illustrations, both of whole buildings and splendid details.Ad 4: First edition of book V, published at Paris in French and Italian. It covers the planning and designing of temples and churches. Its fine scrollwork title border was copied by Pieter Cocke van Aalst for books II and V of the Dutch editions published at Antwerp in 1553.Serlio probably began work on his an all-encompassing illustrated text book on architecture in the 1530s, to be completed in 7 books, but he had published only the present 5 at his death in 1554 (book VII appeared 21 years later and book VI 422 years later!). Book IV appeared first, in 1537. Book III followed in 1540, books I-II in 1545 and book V in 1547. Jacopo Strada at Frankfurt published the posthumous book VII in 1575, and book VI remained in manuscript until modern times.With some manuscript notes and a few skillful pen drawings in the open areas of blank pages, but also some scribbling or a panel filled in with a sepia or grey wash in 2 or 3 woodcuts. Four leaves in book III show stains of an unidentified origin, but the book is otherwise in good condition and has generous margins, with occasional minor stains, marginal tears or thumbing. The leather of the binding is badly damaged, in part from the chemicals used to mottle it, and it has been re-backed and restored.

      [Bookseller: ASHER Rare Books (Since 1830)]
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        Legenda Aurea, deutsch. Winterteil. Blatt "Von Sant Gregorio" am Pult lesend. (GWM 11352, H 9970, Schramm III, 331)

      Augsburg: Johann Bämler 20 März Type 1a 2 1475 - Einspaltiges, 29-zeiliges O-Inkunabelblatt mit einem koloriertem Holzschnitt (7,5 x 6,8 cm) des Sankt Gregor, Kl. Sammlerstempel (JS) im Rand, Reste von Papiermontagestreifen und kl. Handschriftlicher Seitenzahl von alter Hand (415), festes Papier im Innenrand etwas beschnitten, Blattgröße: 18,6 x 26,9 cm. Incunabula text woodcut leaf. Selten und in schönem Altkolorit. Der italienische Prediger und Schriftsteller Jacobus de Voragine (Viraggio) aus dem heutigen Varazze bei Genua lebte von 1230 - 1298. Der Dominikaner Jacobus de Voragine fügte aus der Bibel, den Apokryphen, verschiedenen Akten sowie überlieferten Geschichten, die Lebensgeschichten der Heiligen zur Legenda Aurea. Das Werk in volkstümlicher lateinischer Sprache geschrieben, wurde zum populärsten religiösen Volksbuch des Mittelalter.

      [Bookseller: Versandantiquariat Christine Laist]
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        Illuminated Manuscript: Coronation of the Virgin Mary

      France: np. 1st Edition. Very Good. Beautiful 15th-century leaf from a French Book of Hours with large miniature of the Coronation of Mary. On recto: Miniature of the Virgin kneeling before the enthroned God the Father, with an angel holding the crown of Mary. Behind them is a canopy. Miniature measures 100 mm x 65 mm (3.9 x 2.6 inches). The image is surrounded by a foliate border with red, blue, and pink flowers with green leaves; border also contains blue and gold acanthus leaves and penwork along left margin. One triple-line illuminated initial (the letter "C") in burnished gold and red with white details. One single-line initial in burnished gold and blue. The text, in gold-brown Latin gothic script, is from Psalm 84:5. On verso: 20 lines of text in gold-brown Latin gothic script on vellum. One double-line illuminated initial in burnished gold and blue with white details. 11 single-line illuminated initials in burnished gold and red/blue with white details. The text is from Psalm 69:2 and Psalm 128. Northern France (probably Normandy): c. 1475. Size: 155 mm x 105 mm (6.1 x 4.1 inches). Some residue on extreme margin of verso; very minor tiny bits of flecking. In decorative wood frame. The text in Latin: On recto (Psalmus 84:5): Converte nos Deus salutaris noster: et averte iram tuam a nobis. On verso: Psalmus 69:2: Deus in adiutorium meum intende: Domine ad adiuvandum me festina. Psalmus 128: Sæpe expugnaverunt me a iuventute mea: etenim non potuerunt mihi. Supra dorsum meum fabricaverunt peccatores: prolongaverunt iniquitatem suam. Dominus iustus concidit cervices peccatorum: Confundantur et convertantur retrorsum omnes, qui oderunt Sion. Fiant sicut fÅ“num tectorum: quod priusquam evellatur, exaruit: De quo non implevit manum suam qui metit, et sinum suum qui manipulos colligit. Et non dixerunt qui præteribant: Benedictio Domini super vos: benediximus vobis in nomine Domini. English translation: On recto (Psalm 84:5): Convert us, O God, our Savior, and turn your anger away from us. On verso: Psalm 69.2: O God, reach out to help me. O Lord, hasten to assist me. Psalm 128: They have often fought against me from my youth, yet they could not prevail over me. The sinners have made fabrications behind my back. They have prolonged their iniquity. The just Lord will cut the necks of sinners. Let all those who hate Zion be confounded and turned backwards. Let them be like grass on the rooftops, which withers before it can be pulled up: With it, he who reaps does not fill his hand and he who gathers sheaves does not fill his bosom. And those who were passing by have not said to them: "The blessing of the Lord be upon you. We have blessed you in the name of the Lord.

      [Bookseller: The Manhattan Rare Book Company]
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        Illuminated Manuscript Leaves: Psalms 8 and 18

      France: np. 1st Edition. No Binding. Fine. Two late 15th century leaves on vellum, with numerous initials and floral borders on recto and verso of each. Contains Psalm 8 in its entirety as well as part of Psalm 18. 16 lines of text on recto and verso of both leaves. Text written in Latin gothic script with brown ink on vellum. With a total (all sides) of 20 single-line and 2 double-line initials painted in gold with red and blue borders. Contains the complete text of Psalm 8 along with the beginning of Psalm 18 from the Latin Book of Hours. Lovely thorn leaf foliate border on each side in gold with orange, blue, and green fruits and flowers. Paris, France: c. 1475. Leaf Size: 223 x 163 mm (8.8 x 6.4 in). Fine, bright, leaves with extremely large margins. Text (in part) in Latin (Psalm 8): Domine, Dominus noster, quam admirabile est nomen tuum in universa terra… Quoniam videbo cælos tuos, opera digitorum tuorum, lunam et stellas quæ tu fundasti. Quid est homo, quod memor es ejus?… Minuisti eum paulominus ab angelis; gloria et honore coronasti eum; et constituisti eum superopera manuum tuarum. Omnia subjecisti sub pedibus ejus, oves et boves universas, insuper et pecora campi… English Translation: O Lord, our Master, how the majesty of thy name fills all the earth… I look up at those heavens of thine, the work of thy hands, at the moon and the stars, which thou hast set in their places; what is man that thou shouldst remember him?… Thou hast placed him only a little below the angels, crowning him with glory and honour, and bidding him rule over the works of thy hands. Thou hast put them all under his dominion, the sheep and the cattle, and the wild beasts besides… Text in Latin (Psalm 18): Non sunt loquelae, neque sermones, quorum non audiantur voces eorum. In omnem terram exivit sonus eorum, et in fines orbis terrae verba eorum. In sole posuit tabernaculum suum; et ipse tamquam sponsus procedens de thalamo suo. Exultavit ut gigas ad currendam viam. A summo caelo egressio eius; et occursus eius usque ad summum eius, nec est qui abscondat a calore eius. Lex Domini immaculata, convertens animas, testimonium Domini fidele, sapientiam praestans parvulis. English Translation: There are no discourses, nor speeches, of which the voices are not heard. Their sound has gone out to the entire world, and their words have gone to the ends of the circle of the earth. He has put his tabernacle in the sun, and the sun like a bridegroom going forth from his bedroom. He rejoices like a giant to run the way. His going forth is from the highest sky, and his going around is right to its top, and there is no one who hides from his heat. The law of the Lord is without blemish, converting souls, and the testimony of the Lord is faithful, giving wisdom to the small ones.

      [Bookseller: The Manhattan Rare Book Company]
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        Dialogus qui vocatur Scrutinium Scripturarum...(Accedit:) Samuel Rabbi. Epistola ad Rabbi Isaac. (Colophon:)

      Dialogus qui vocatur Scrutinium Scripturarum...(Accedit:) Samuel Rabbi. Epistola ad Rabbi Isaac. (Colophon:). Paolus de Sancta Maria. Hoc opus impressit rerum scrutinia Schallus Johannes doctor artis Apollinee anno domini 1475. (Mantua, Johannes Schall germanus). In - folio, pergamena moderna uso antico. (250 ff.) n.n. Car. gotico, tipo 539 (Burger), 38 - 39 linee. Esemplare ben conservato, a parte insignificanti forellini di tarlo negli ultimi ff. Uno dei primi libri stampati a mantova e la prima edizione dello Schall, secondo tipografo di questa città. Esemplare della prima tiratura non contenente l' Epistola ad Rabbi Isaac che fu aggiunta in seguito (cfr. Oates, 2586). Rarissimo. H. - C., 10765. Proctor, 6898. B.M.C., VII, 933. Polain, 3011. I.G.I., 7328. Oates, 2586.

      [Bookseller: Brighenti libri esauriti e rari]
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        De Civitate Dei

      1475. AUGUSTINE, Saint. De Civitate Dei. 305 ff. of 306 (missing final blank). [a-b8 c-z10 A-G10 H10 (-H10, final blank)], with three blanks (ff. 1, 16, 305). 46 lines, gothic type (2:84) printed double-column, roman headline (4:110). Folio, 286 x 202 mm, bound in contemporary Venetian calf over wooden boards paneled and tooled in blind using a large floral arabesque roll and a smaller interior roll of cords framing a central Islamic-style motif of five knotted lozenges; spine with raised bands separating four compartments blind-tooled in a lattice pattern with pointelle decoration, later paper label; three of four clasps partially intact on front board (traces of four clasps, now lost, on rear board). Venice: Nicolas Jenson, 1475. Second Venetian Edition of Saint Augustine's City of God, a foundational text of European culture, and a typographical masterpiece from the press of Nicolas Jenson. This copy survives in a contemporary fifteenth-century Venetian binding with Islamic motifs incorporated into the tooled decoration. Augustine's De Civitate Dei appeared in print for the first time in 1467 at Subiaco, printed by Conradus Sweynheym and Arnoldus Pannartz. The first Venetian edition of the City of God was printed by Johannes and Vindelinus de Spira in 1470. This second Venetian edition is the only edition of Augustine issued by French printer Nicolas Jenson (1420-1480), the second printer in Venice, whose publications numbered over 100 works and equaled the best, and often surpassed, all Venetian fifteenth-century printed books in beauty and importance. Jenson's types, the often-magnificent impressions, and the mise-en-page of his books, are considered milestones in the history of printing; his very name is synonymous with excellence. Along with his Pliny of 1472 and his Plutarch's Lives of 1478, the City of God is one of Jenson's most beautiful works. The present text is buttressed by wide margins, and entirely rubricated by hand in red and blue. A seminal Christian text, Augustine's City of God had considerable influence not only on Medieval but also Renaissance thought. Augustine has been called "the first medieval man and the last classical man" (Thomas Cahill, How The Irish saved Civilization, chapter 2). Martin Luther, John Calvin, Thomas Aquinas, Emperor Charlemagne, Voltaire, Schopenhauer, Nietzsche, Heidegger, and many other theologians and philosophers were inspired by this work. Like the Bible, the City of God has been a major topic of debate for theologians, historians, politicians, and philosophers throughout the ages. The binding is a refined and elegant example of Italian craftsmanship ca. 1450-1480, incorporating Islamic elements derived from textiles, leathers, and possibly Islamic bindings by way of trade routes between Venice and the near East in the mid-fifteenth century. Scholar Anthony Hobson suggests that Jenson was the first to introduce the Islamic style of binding in Venice (Humanists and Bookbinders, p. 51). A beautiful example of a Jenson incunable in a contemporary Islamic-style Italian binding, this is an exceptional copy of an essential Christian text. Three text leaves trimmed short and with red edges, probably supplied from another copy; internal blank (f. 16) with very light offsetting, indicating it may have also been supplied. Leaves of one quire (i) bound out of order, and some staining, still a bibliophile's treasure. PROVENANCE: Giovanni Battista Contarini, with his donation inscription to a Venetian seminary dated 1 January 1583 on second leaf; Shakespeare collector Doctor John Gott, Bishop of Truro (1830-1906), with his ownership inscription dated 1865 at Rome on front pastedown; Henry H. Runnell, his ownership signature on last leaf; Abel E. Berland, his sale Christie's New York, October 2001. Early ink marginalia throughout, and eighteenth-century equations on rear pastedown. BMC V, 175 (imperfect). Goff A-1235. GW 2879. HC* 2051. IGI 972. ISTC ia01235000. Polain 360. Pellechet 1550 ([310] ff.). Proctor 4096.

      [Bookseller: Ursus Rare Books]
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        de fide de legibus

      [Augsburg], [Günther Zainer] 1475 - FIRST EDITION fol. 139 ex 140 ll. lacking initial blank, unpaginated and unsigned [a9 b-o10], 43 lines plus headline to page, text in an elegant and unusual Gothicised Roman (type 95 reprod. BMC C15th vol II fasc. p.1), guide spaces, undecorated. Single, apparently dismissive, contemporary marginalium to prologue and marginal markings to table. Early ink smudge to one leaf. A fine, well-margined copy on thick paper, in good C19 polished calf by Mackenzie, spine and covers gilt ruled, a.e.r. First and only early edition of one of the most important works of William of Auvergne, part of his monumental Magisterium divinale, an explanation of the whole natural world, composed about 1231-36. Divided into ten parts, and subdivided into chapters, this attractively produced volume covers i.a. reason, faith and love, the nature of error, belief and its meaning, the power of faith and miracles, the dangers of credulity, heresy, and demonology, the power of the intellect and natural virtue, the errors of the Jews, the dangers of transvestism, superstition, and magic, cults and demons, the errors of Islam (especially in relation to astrology and sex) the cause of 'idolatories' such as witchcraft, conjuring, divination, necromancy, elementalism, and other idols and rites and sacrifices. Thorndike (cit. inf.) devotes an entire chapter to William "whose works present an unexpectedly detailed picture of the magic and superstition of the time. He is well acquainted with the occult literature and the natural philosophy of the day and has much to say of magic, demons, occult virtue, divination and astrology. Finally he also gives considerable information concerning what we may call the school of natural magic and experiment". Although not free from all the superstitions of his time William here makes clear the distinction between natural and black magic and refutes the power of demons over nature or of the stars over human will. William was in fact very well read in Arabic science and Pseudo-Solomonic esoterica, and acquainted with Hermetic philosophy. He has been called "the first great scholastic, setting the stage for Alexander of Hales, Albertus Magnus, and their disciples. Albertus and Alexander were at Paris with him, as was Roger Bacon", DSB cit inf. BMC II 323. GW 11863. Goff G711. Hain 8317. Thorndike vol II pp 219-20, 279-81 and chapter lii. Not in Caillet or Cantamessa. cf. DSB XIV pp 388-89. [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Sokol Books Ltd. ABA ILAB]
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        Anatomia.

      - [22] leaves, Gothic type, 43 lines. Folio (301 x 213 mm.), disbound (some worming towards end). [Padua (not Pavia): Pierre Maufer, about 1475]. First edition, a remarkable discovery of the third known copy of the true first edition of the first modern book devoted solely to anatomy. The other two surviving copies are in the Biblioteca Corsiniana (Rome) and the Biblioteca Comunale (Viterbo). The rarity of this book is well-known: it is revealing that Castiglioni, Choulant, and Garrison all cite the 1478 edition as the first printing. Its influence was great: "The first outstanding anatomist worthy of the name the Anathomia of Mondino was the most used anatomical text up to the end of the sixteenth century, probably because it contained the most important technical indications in brief and concise form."–Castiglioni, A History of Medicine, pp. 341-43. Mondino (ca. 1275-1326), a native of Bologna, was the son of an apothecary and the nephew of a professor of medicine. He attended the University of Bologna where he studied under Alderotti (Thaddeus of Florence), an early dissector, and took his medical degree in 1300. Mondino soon became a professor of medicine at the university. "Mondino’s chief work is his compendium of anatomy, Anatomia Mundini, completed in 1316, which made him, in Castiglione’s [sic] words, ‘the first outstanding anatomist worthy of the name.’ Mondino’s book dominated anatomy for over two hundred years. The major reason for Mondino’s great popularity was the simplicity, conciseness, and systematic arrangement of his book, which is divided into six parts: (1) an introduction to the whole body and a discussion of authorities; (2) the natural members including the liver, spleen, and other organs in the abdominal cavity; (3) the generative members; (4) the spiritual members, the heart, lungs, trachea, esophagus, and other organs of the thoracic cavity up to the mouth; (5) the animal members of the skull, brain, eyes, ears; and (6) the peripheral parts, bones, spinal column, extremities. This organization was not the result of any philosophical approach to the subject but rather derived from the necessity of dissecting the most perishable organs first "Mondino should be regarded as the restorer of anatomy if only because his popular textbook and his experimental teaching were instrumental in preparing the revival of the subject. His text was the first book written on anatomy during the Middle Ages that was based on the dissection of the human cadaver; his efforts consolidated anatomy as a part of the medical program at Bologna and encouraged further study. His book also dominated the teaching of anatomy, and no real improvements were made upon it until 1521, when Berengario da Carpi wrote his famous commentary on Mondino."–D.S.B., IX, pp. 468-69. "Mondino’s book soon became a classic text; he was venerated soon after his death as a divine master and anyone who was found differing from his book was regarded as monstrous. For three centuries the lecturers on anatomy were required to use his book in their teaching, as may be seen in the statutes of many medical schools."–Castiglioni, op. cit., pp. 344-45–(& see the detailed account of the contents of this book and methods of dissection which it reveals on pp. 341-45). A very fine copy with all edges uncut and preserved in a slipcase. Two contemporary annotators have made a number of neat comments in the wide margins. This copy was clearly removed from a sammelband. The final four leaves have some worming, becoming increasingly more pronounced (but not at all offensive) touching the text of the final three leaves. ? Choulant-Frank, pp. 88-96. Garrison-Morton 361–(describing the 2nd edition of 1478)–"The first modern book devoted solely to anatomy, written for his students in 1316. Mundinus re-introduced human dissection, which had been neglected for 1500 years before him; he was the most noted dissector of his period." Garrison, History of Medicine, pp. 160-61. GKW M [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Jonathan A. Hill, Bookseller Inc.]
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        Collectanea Rerum Memorabilium

      In Latin. Illuminated manuscript on vellum. Italy, Naples, ca.1475. 243 x 165mm., 188 leaves, vellum, complete, catchwords and illuminator's instructions survive, ruled page: 145 x 75mm. 51 white vine initials, 180 small decorated initials, two foliate borders, one full-page interlaced with peacocks and rabbits with putti holding the coat-of-arms of Ferdinand I of Aragon, King of Naples (some trivial oxidization to putti in full-page border, otherwise in pristine condition). Binding of 19th-century red velvet over boards by Charles Lewis (spine lightly rubbed). Red slipcase. PROVENANCE:1. Illuminated by Cola Rapicano and likely written by Giovanni Marco Cinico for Ferdinand I of Aragon, King of Naples (1423-94); his coat of arms and emblems in the margins. Two copies of this Solinus text are listed in De Marinis: one, "Solinus de mirabilibus mundi, cubierto de pergamino" is no. 510 in a list of codices left in 1550 to the convent of San Miguel de los Reyes in Valencia by Ferdinand of Aragon, Prince of Taranto, eldest son of the last Aragonese king of Naples Ferdinand III; in all likelihood this is Valencia, Biblioteca Històrica BH Ms. 614 (T. De Marinis, La Biblioteca Napoletana dei rRe d'Aragona, Milan, 1952, II, p.207). The second and most probable match with the present manuscript -- "Solinus de mirabilibus mundi" -- is no. 198 in an inventory from ca.1508-13 by Fabio Vigile of Spoleto found in codex Vaticanus lat. 7134, ff.255-259v, itself a copy of the lost original inventory of Aragonese codices sent to Lorenzo de' Medici from Naples (T. De Marinis, II, p.197).2. Henry Gee Barnard (1789-1858) of South Cave, with his bookplate. 3. Allan Haywood Bright, letter addressed to him. It may be that Bright was given the present manuscript by Henry Yates Thompson (1838-1928); a Book of Hours now at the British Library and illuminated by Cola Rapicano (Yates Thompson 6) also belonged to Henry Gee Barnard before passing to Yates Thompson. The previous documented owner of Yates Thompson 6 was Gioacchino Guasconi (1438-1521), a Florentine representative of Lorenzo de' Medici in the Kingdom of Naples. It seems possible, therefore, that the present manuscript may also have followed the same line of provenance from the Aragonese court to Florence and perhaps Guasconi and Lorenzo de' Medici, and then, several centuries later, to Henry Gee Barnard and Yates Thompson.TEXT:Solinus, Collectanea rerum memorabilium: dedication to Aventinus and list of chapters ff. 1-6v, Chapters I-L, ff. 7-188. The text of the manuscript is the Collectanea rerum memorabilium (also known as the De mirabilibus mundi or Polyhistor) of Caius Iulius Solinus. It is a geographical catalogue of curiosities in the form of a history of the ancient world, borrowing from Pliny's Naturalis Historia and Pomponius Mela's De Situ Orbis, the work proved extremely popular throughout the Middle Ages and the Renaissance.ILLUMINATION: The illumination of this striking manuscript of the 3rd-century Latin grammarian and compiler Solinus's Collectanea rerum memorabilium is attributable to Cola Rapicano, the official illuminator to the Aragon court in Naples from 1451 to 1488. His earliest securely identified and documented work is the copy of Andrea Contario's Obiurgatio in Platonis calumniatorum of 1471 (Paris, BnF, Ms lat.12947), written by Giovanni Marco Cinico, with whom he collaborated on more than one occasion. Each chapter of the present manuscript is preceded by intricate white-vine initials of Florentine inspiration but Neapolitan execution so characteristic of Cola's style, and the hooded-eyed, angular-buttocked little putti in the borders of the opening leaf of the text are clearly related to the lively protagonists in the BnF manuscript (or indeed to those in a Breviary in Valencia, Biblioteca Universitaria Ms. 890-726). From the mid-15th century, Cola led a thriving workshop that produced numerous manuscripts for the Aragonese court, and his engaging and modernizing blend of Catalan, Franco-Flemish and Florentine styles was cemented by his sons and followers: he laid the foundations of a distinctive and coherent Neapolitan style that dominated book illustration in the city for the remainder of the century (see G. Toscano, La Biblioteca Reale di Napoli al tempo della dinastia Aragonese, Naples, 1998, pp. 385-416).LITERATURE:Christie's London, 16 July 2014, lot 20. .

      [Bookseller: Jonathan A. Hill, Bookseller, Inc.]
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        Anatomia

      [22] leaves, Gothic type, 43 lines. Folio (301 x 213 mm.), disbound (some worming towards end). [Padua (not Pavia): Pierre Maufer, about 1475]. First edition, a remarkable discovery of the third known copy of the true first edition of the first modern book devoted solely to anatomy. The other two surviving copies are in the Biblioteca Corsiniana (Rome) and the Biblioteca Comunale (Viterbo). The rarity of this book is well-known: it is revealing that Castiglioni, Choulant, and Garrison all cite the 1478 edition as the first printing. Its influence was great: "The first outstanding anatomist worthy of the name...the Anathomia of Mondino was the most used anatomical text up to the end of the sixteenth century, probably because it contained the most important technical indications in brief and concise form."-Castiglioni, A History of Medicine, pp. 341-43. Mondino (ca. 1275-1326), a native of Bologna, was the son of an apothecary and the nephew of a professor of medicine. He attended the University of Bologna where he studied under Alderotti (Thaddeus of Florence), an early dissector, and took his medical degree in 1300. Mondino soon became a professor of medicine at the university. "Mondino's chief work is his compendium of anatomy, Anatomia Mundini, completed in 1316, which made him, in Castiglione's [sic] words, 'the first outstanding anatomist worthy of the name.' Mondino's book dominated anatomy for over two hundred years. The major reason for Mondino's great popularity was the simplicity, conciseness, and systematic arrangement of his book, which is divided into six parts: (1) an introduction to the whole body and a discussion of authorities; (2) the natural members including the liver, spleen, and other organs in the abdominal cavity; (3) the generative members; (4) the spiritual members, the heart, lungs, trachea, esophagus, and other organs of the thoracic cavity up to the mouth; (5) the animal members of the skull, brain, eyes, ears; and (6) the peripheral parts, bones, spinal column, extremities. This organization was not the result of any philosophical approach to the subject but rather derived from the necessity of dissecting the most perishable organs first... "Mondino should be regarded as the restorer of anatomy if only because his popular textbook and his experimental teaching were instrumental in preparing the revival of the subject. His text was the first book written on anatomy during the Middle Ages that was based on the dissection of the human cadaver; his efforts consolidated anatomy as a part of the medical program at Bologna and encouraged further study. His book also dominated the teaching of anatomy, and no real improvements were made upon it until 1521, when Berengario da Carpi wrote his famous commentary on Mondino."-D.S.B., IX, pp. 468-69. "Mondino's book soon became a classic text; he was venerated soon after his death as a divine master and anyone who was found differing from his book was regarded as monstrous. For three centuries the lecturers on anatomy were required to use his book in their teaching, as may be seen in the statutes of many medical schools."-Castiglioni, op. cit., pp. 344-45-(& see the detailed account of the contents of this book and methods of dissection which it reveals on pp. 341-45). A very fine copy with all edges uncut and preserved in a slipcase. Two contemporary annotators have made a number of neat comments in the wide margins. This copy was clearly removed from a sammelband. The final four leaves have some worming, becoming increasingly more pronounced (but not at all offensive) touching the text of the final three leaves. ❧ Choulant-Frank, pp. 88-96. Garrison-Morton 361-(describing the 2nd edition of 1478)-"The first modern book devoted solely to anatomy, written for his students in 1316. Mundinus re-introduced human dissection, which had been neglected for 1500 years before him; he was the most noted dissector of his period." Garrison, History of Medicine, pp. 160-61. GKW M25666-(citing Pavia in error). ISTC im00871200. Klebs 688.1. .

      [Bookseller: Jonathan A. Hill, Bookseller, Inc.]
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        In Lucanum commentum

      Filippo di Pietro, 1475, Hardcover, Book Condition: Very Good Condition, First EditionSize: 21cm x 31cm, 21 July 1475. 372 unnumbered leaves, roman type, 34 lines, 10 large red ink initials, some greek letters, waterstain on the upper margin of 1 leaf, contemporary wooden boards binding, blind tool decorations, ink titles on the edge, restored. Acid-Free clamshell box. A clean copy in contemporary binding; FIRST EDITION of Leonicenus' commentary to Lucanus. This edition, first attributed to Vindelinus from Spira, seems to be the second to be printed by Philippus de Petri, the first typographer to use greek types. Brunet III, 985; Goff L172; IGI 6999; BMC V 219. PHOTOS AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST, Livre

      [Bookseller: Louis Caron]
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        Sacra historia de gentis hebraicae ortu, progressu; bene & male gestis, variaque fortuna, . libri V. Augsburg und Dillingen, J.C.Bencard 1700. Fol. 34 Bll., 784 (recte 786) S., mit gest. Titelvignette, blindgepr. Schweinsledrbd. d. Zt. über Holzdeckeln.

      - Erste Ausgabe.- Fürst II, 372 - Wetzer-W. VIII, 1475.- Der Eichstätter Paul Metzger (1637 - 1702) gilt als der Hauptvertreter der theologisch-philosophischen Wissenschaft an der Benediktiner-Universität Salzburg.- Ebd. etw. fleckig, 1 Schließe fehlt, leicht gebräunt, sonst dekoratives Exemplar. [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Müller]
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        Dialogus qui vocatur Scrutinium Scripturarum...(Accedit:)

      impressit rerum scrutinia Schallus Johannes doctor artis Apollinee anno domini 1475 Dialogus qui vocatur Scrutinium Scripturarum...(Accedit:) Samuel Rabbi. Epistola ad Rabbi Isaac. (Colophon:). Paolus de Sancta Maria. Hoc opus impressit rerum scrutinia Schallus Johannes doctor artis Apollinee anno domini 1475. (Mantua, Johannes Schall germanus). In - folio, pergamena moderna uso antico. (250 ff.) n.n. Car. gotico, tipo 539 (Burger), 38 - 39 linee. Esemplare ben conservato, a parte insignificanti forellini di tarlo negli ultimi ff. Uno dei primi libri stampati a mantova e la prima edizione dello Schall, secondo tipografo di questa città. Uno dei pochi esemplari contenenti l' aggiunto dell' Epistola ad Rabbi Isaac. Rarissimo. H. - C., 10765. Proctor, 6898. B.M.C., VII, 933. Polain, 3011. I.G.I., 7328. Oates, 2586.

      [Bookseller: Brighenti libri esauriti e rari]
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        Sacra historia de gentis hebraicae ortu, progressu; bene & male gestis, variaque fortuna, ... libri V. Augsburg und Dillingen, J.C.Bencard 1700. Fol. 34 Bll., 784 (recte 786) S., mit gest. Titelvignette, blindgepr. Schweinsledrbd. d. Zt. über Holzdeckeln.

      . . Erste Ausgabe.- Fürst II, 372 - Wetzer-W. VIII, 1475.- Der Eichstätter Paul Metzger (1637 - 1702) gilt als der Hauptvertreter der theologisch-philosophischen Wissenschaft an der Benediktiner-Universität Salzburg.- Ebd. etw. fleckig, 1 Schließe fehlt, leicht gebräunt, sonst dekoratives Exemplar.

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Johannes Müller]
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        Job on his dungheap

      Paris: c. 1475. 159 x 108mm. Single column, four lines of text (r), 15 lines (v). Three-line initial ÔDÕ, richly illuminated border of floral design heightened in gold. The miniature painted within an arch-top border. Trimmed right to the border, small split in the vellum margin, otherwise in fine and fresh condition. Framed. Not examined out of the frame. Origin and provenance unknown, description pasted on back possibly from Pirages; from a private California collection.

      [Bookseller: John Windle Antiquarian Bookseller]
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        Secuntur quinq[ue] libri de consideratione domini Bernhardi Abbatis Clareuallensis ad Eugenium papam... (3 parts).

      (Augsburg, Anton Sorg, ca. 1475-77). Folio. (29X20,5 cm.). Recent hvellum. With 44 (of 45) leaves. F. 42 missing. Rubricated throughout. With 3 large initials in colour, 12 small initials in red and blue. 3 leaves with a large ornamental tendril in red covering the whole lenght of the page. 4 leaves with a small narrow wormtract in outer margin. A small stamp on foot of F1. Otherwise a nearly mint copy, printed on heavy clean paper.. Scarce second (?) printing of Bernard's instructions to pope Eugene III., On Consideration. - Always a vigorous champion of papal reforms, Bernard of Clairvaux toward the end of his life saw one of his own monks raised to the papal throne as Eugene III. While acting as the new Pope's political and spiritual counsellor, the Great Cistercian abbot was tireless in advancing Eugene's policies and in defending his authority and prestige. Bernard sent him, at the pope's own request, various instructions which comprise the Book of Considerations, the predominating idea of which is that the reformation of the Church ought to commence with the sanctity of the pope. Temporal matters are merely accessories; the principles according to Bernard's work were that piety and meditation were to precede action.Hain, 2887. - Goff B-368

      [Bookseller: Lynge & Søn A/S]
 18.   Check availability:     Antikvariat     Link/Print  


        Duplex grammatice artis Isagoge ab eodem multis nuper locupletata schematibus. (Colophon: Paris, Nicolai Savetier for) Ambrosius Girault, (colophon: July 1525). 4to. With large woodcut printer's device of the Paris printer Pierre Viart on title-page, richly coloured by hand and highlighted with gold, four lines of text on title-page highlighted with gold, 38 larger and smaller historiated and floriated woodcut initials in text, all richly coloured by hand and highlighted with gold, decorations filling out the last line of several paragraphs, nearly every page with words highlighted with gold and nearly all paragraph marks highlighted with gold. Black goatskin morocco (ca. 1900).

      Bibl. Belg. IV, p. 714 (1 copy, in Toulouse City Library); not in Adams; USTC; cf. WorldCat (1 copy of similar Paris ed. pub. by Parvus & Aubry). Richly and beautifully hand-decorated copy of a rare Latin school grammar by Petrus Pontanus, or Petrus de Ponte from Bruges (1475-1539). His Latin grammar distinguished itself by its serious qualities of science and of method. It taught the children by questions and answers, in prose, with examples taken from classical authors. The first part treats Latin grammar proper and the second part Latin syntax.Some restorations to the worn title-page (with an early owner's name, Thomas S[?]... erased), but otherwise in good condition. Hinges cracked.

      [Bookseller: ASHER Rare Books (Since 1830)]
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        Illuminated leaf from a Book of Hours

      France: Paris or Rouen, circa 1475-, 1500. Illuminated leaf, 215 x 139 mm., with an illuminated panel border on each side of the leaf, one 2-line initial, ten 1-line initial and eight line-fillers, 18 lines of gothic bookhand; in excellent condition. A beautifully illuminated leaf from a luxurious fifteenth-century French Book of Hours. On the recto the decorative panel border features a hybrid figure riding a grotesque animal with a human head and the body of a lion. The panel border on the verso is composed of blue and gold acanthus and coloured flowers and leaves in fields of liquid gold. The delicate initials suggest that it was executed in either Paris or Rouen. The extensive use of liquid gold in the margins forming unusual geometric forms is typical for manuscripts made in the second half of the fifteenth century.

      [Bookseller: Hordern House Rare Books]
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        King David in Prayer

      Southern France: circa, 1475. Arched miniature depicting King David kneeling in prayer, 91 x 65mm., set in elaborate illuminated border on three sides; 4-line illuminated initial D (of "Domine" - O Lord), eight lines of gothic text on recto; minor sealed marginal tear upper right, otherwise fine, framed. Superb illuminated manuscript of king david. A superb late fifteenth-century miniature of King David from a French Book of Hours. The miniature of David, with his harp, kneeling in prayer, introduces the opening of the Seven Penitential Psalms. This group of seven psalms (6, 32, 38, 51, 102, 130, and 143) is particularly expressive of sorrow and repentance for sin, and was first given the name by Saint Augustine of Hippo: the title was originally only associated with the fifty-first psalm, 'Miserere', the psalm which was conventionally used to close daily morning service. King David is represented here because he was traditionally identified as the author of the psalms, and also as a model of penitence. After his commission of the dual crimes of adultery, with Bathsheba, and the murder of her husband Uriah, by sending him to be killed in battle, David was rebuked by the prophet Nathan and reprimanded by God. He repented and withdrew to live in exile, devoting himself to prayer. The quality of this miniature is very fine; the king's face, drapery and the naturalistic landscape in which he kneels are all delicately rendered. The intense colours, differentiated landscape, and the elaborate border decoration of acanthus and gold leaves and flowers on swirling hairline stems all point to an artist in southern France. The miniature dates from the end of the fifteenth century, and is a reminder that even after the invention of moveable print and the Gutenberg revolution, the older tradition of manuscript transmission was still the dominant medium of the period, and that the traditions of artistry associated with the illumination of manuscripts were still of the highest quality.

      [Bookseller: Hordern House Rare Books]
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        Illuminated Manuscript Leaf with Miniature: The Flight into Egypt

      France: np. France: np. 1st Edition. No Binding. Very Good. Exquisite vellum leaf from a 15th century French Book of Hours with elaborate borders and miniature of the Virgin, baby Jesus, and Joseph on their escape to Egypt. 17 lines of text on each side; text written in gothic script in Latin with brown ink on vellum. One triple-line initial in burnished gold, with red and blue. Three double-line initials in burnished gold, with red and blue. Two single-line initials in burnished gold, with red and blue. Contains the text of Ecclesiasticus 24, psalms 147 and 127. Verso with stunning three-sided foliate border with red, blue, and pink flowers, green leaves, and blue and gold acanthus leaves. France: c. 1475. Size: Leaf: 175 x 121 mm (6.9 x 4.8 inches). Miniature: 40 x 37 mm (1.6 x 1.5 inches). The text in Latin: Per te dei genitrix est nobis vita perdita data que de coelo suscepisti prolem et mundo genuisti saluatorem. Deo gratias. Elegit eam Deus, et praeelegit eam. 
Et habitare eam facit in tabernaculo suo. Et praeelegit eam Gloria patri [et Filio: et Spiritui sancto. Sicut erat in principio, et nunc, et semper: et in saecula saeculorum, Amen.] Elegit eam. Speciosa facta es et suavis in deliciis tuis sancta Dei genitrix. Domine exaudi [orationem meam] et clamor [meus ad te veniat] orationem. Famulorum tuorum, quaesumus, Domine, delictis ignosce: ut qui tibi placere de actibus nostris non valemus genitricis filii tui Domini nostri intercessione salvemur. Per eundem Dominum nostrum Iesum Christum filium tuum: qui tecum vivit et regnat in unitate spiritus sancti Deus, per omnia saecula saeculorum. Benedicamus Domio. Deo gratias. Deus in adiutorium meum intende. Domine ad adiuvandum me festina. Gloria patri [et Filio: et Spiritui sancto. Sicut erat in principio, et nunc, et semper: et in saecula saeculorum, Amen.] Laetatus sum in his quae dicta sunt… English Translation: Through thee, O Mother of God, has the life we had lost been given back to us: for, from heaven receiving Him who became Thy Son, thou on the world hast bestowed its Savior. Thanks be to God. God elected her, and pre elected her.
 He made her to dwell in His tabernacle. Thou art made fair and sweet in thy delicateness, o holy mother of God. O mother of God make intercession for us. Lord have mercy upon us. Christ have mercy upon us. Lord have mercy upon us. O Lord graciously hear my prayer. And let my cry come unto thee. O Lord, we beseech thee, to forgive the offences of thy servants: that we which are not able to please thee by our own acts: may be saved by the intercession of the mother of thy son, our Lord. Through the same our Lord Jesus Christ thy son: Who liveth and reigneth, God, with thee in the unity of the holy Ghost, world without end. Let us bless the Lord. Thanks be to God. Incline unto my aid O God. O Lord make haste to help me. Glory be to the Father and to the Son: and to the Holy Ghost. Even as it was in the beginning, and now, and ever: and world without end. Amen. I rejoiced at the things that were said….

      [Bookseller: The Manhattan Rare Book Company]
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        Job on his dungheap.

      - Paris: c. 1475. 159 x 108mm. Single column, four lines of text (r), 15 lines (v). Three-line initial ÔDÕ, richly illuminated border of floral design heightened in gold. The miniature painted within an arch-top border. Trimmed right to the border, small split in the vellum margin, otherwise in fine and fresh condition. Framed. Not examined out of the frame. Origin and provenance unknown, description pasted on back possibly from Pirages; from a private California collection.

      [Bookseller: John Windle Antiquarian Bookseller, ABAA]
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        Illuminated Manuscript Leaf: Saint John the Baptist and Saint Anthony

      France: np. France: np. 1st Edition. No Binding. Very Good. Illuminated Manuscript Leaf on vellum from a French Book of Hours (c.1475) with miniatures of John the Baptist and Saint Anthony. The recto features an historiated initial ("D") with a miniature of John the Baptist in a landscape wearing a brown robe (approx. 40mm x 40 mm; 1.5x1.5 in) pointing with his right hand at his left hand which is holding a lamb resting on a book. The miniature is surrounded by a floral border of blues and golds. The recto has a right floral border of deep blacks, blues, gold, and green and one two-line initial in red and gold. The verso displays a finely painted image of Saint Anthony with crisp lines and strong color (approx. 35 x 35mm) and a sharp blue and gold border. The floral leaf border is the same as the verso. With 18 lines of text on each side in a gothic liturgical hand in dark brown ink and with headings in blue. The text contains prayers to John the Baptist and Saint Anthony. France: c.1475. Vellum. Leaf size: 155mm x 108mm. A little flaking to John image, some toning to borders. A beautiful, richly-colored leaf.

      [Bookseller: The Manhattan Rare Book Company]
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        Der Heiligen Leben. Sommerteil. (GWM11352, H 9970, Schramm III, 422).

      Augsburg, Johann Bämler, 19. August 1475. Type 1a, 2.. Einspaltiges, 28-zeiliges O-Inkunabelblatt mit einem farbig koloriertem Holzschnitt (7,9 x 6,7 cm) des Heiligen Sankt Agapito (Agapitus). Blatt etw. fleckig und knapp beschnitten. Blattgröße: 15,5 x 22,7 cm. Incunabula text woodcut leaf.. Seltenes Exemplar!. Der italienische Prediger und Schriftsteller Jacobus de Voragine (Viraggio) aus dem heutigen Varazze bei Genua lebte von 1230 - 1298. Der Dominikaner Jacobus de Voragine fügte aus der Bibel, den Apokryphen, verschiedenen Akten sowie überlieferten Geschichten, die Lebensgeschichten der Heiligen zur Legenda Aurea. Das Werk in volkstümlicher lateinischer Sprache geschrieben, wurde zum populärsten religiösen Volksbuch des Mittelalter. Die deutschen Übersetzungen der Legenda Aurea wurden das Leben der Heiligen oder Der Heiligen Leben genannt. Zahlreiche Anzeichen deuten heute darauf hin, dass zwischen 1384 und 1421 im Umkreis des Dominikanerordens in Nürnberg eine neue Kompilationen der Heiligenlegenden entstand, die unter Einbeziehung der Legenda aurea, stärker auf den deutschsprachigen Glaubensraum bezogen waren. So wurden in diesem Legendar Bonifazius, Gallus, Kilian oder Magnus von Füssen aufgenommen. Dieser deutsche Legendar übertraf in seiner Verbreitung die Leganda Aurea. (Becker; Overgaauw: Aderlass + Seelentrost 2003, 219) Das Blatt ist online einsehbar unter dem link: http://daten.digitale-sammlungen.de/~db/0003/bsb00034578/images/index.html?id=00034578&fip=93.220.237.38&no=1&seite=631

      [Bookseller: Versandantiquariat Christine Laist]
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        Der Heiligen Leben. Sommerteil (GWM11352, H 9970, Schramm III, 387). Sant Gervasius (Gervais, Gervase ) und Prothasius (Protasius, Protais).

      Augsburg, Johann Bämler, 19. August 1475. Type 1a, 2.. Einspaltiges, 28-zeiliges O-Inkunabelblatt mit einem farbig koloriertem Holzschnitt (7,9 x 6,7 cm) des Heiligen Sankt Geruasius und St. Prothasius. Blatt breitrandig auf festem Papier. Untere Ecke etwas fingerfleckig. Nummernstempel am unteren Rand und kl. handschriftlicher Seitenzahl von alter Hand (112) Wasserzeichen: Wohl Fisch mit großer Rückenflosse (20 x 38 mm). Blattgröße: 29,7 x 20,7 cm. Incunabula text woodcut leaf.. Seltenes Inkunabelblatt! Der italienische Prediger und Schriftsteller Jacobus de Voragine (Viraggio) aus dem heutigen Varazze bei Genua lebte von 1230 - 1298. Der Dominikaner Jacobus de Voragine fügte aus der Bibel, den Apokryphen, verschiedenen Akten sowie überlieferten Geschichten, die Lebensgeschichten der Heiligen zur Legenda Aurea. Das Werk in volkstümlicher lateinischer Sprache geschrieben, wurde zum populärsten religiösen Volksbuch des Mittelalter. Die deutschen Übersetzungen der Legenda Aurea wurden das Leben der Heiligen oder Der Heiligen Leben genannt. Zahlreiche Anzeichen deuten heute darauf hin, dass zwischen 1384 und 1421 im Umkreis des Dominikanerordens in Nürnberg eine neue Kompilationen der Heiligenlegenden entstand, die unter Einbeziehung der Legenda aurea, stärker auf den deutschsprachigen Glaubensraum bezogen waren. So wurden in diesem Legendar Bonifazius, Gallus, Kilian oder Magnus von Füssen aufgenommen. Dieser deutsche Legendar übertraf in seiner Verbreitung die Leganda Aurea. (Becker; Overgaauw: Aderlass + Seelentrost 2003, 219). Das hier beschriebene Blatt können Sie unter folgendem Link einsehen: http://daten.digitale-sammlungen.de/~db/0003/bsb00034578/images/index.html?id=00034578&fip=93.220.237.38&no=8&seite=235 Gervasius (Übers. Speerknecht, Gervais, Gervase ) Protasius (Protais) Märtyrer von Mailand. Gervasius starb vermutlich zusammen mit Protasius um 300 unter Kaiser Diokletian in Mailand den Märtyrertod. Beide Heiligen sind die Stadtpatrone von Mailand, Breisach und Bormio. Nach einer Legende waren Gervasius und Protasius Zwillinge zur Zeit Neros. Sie wurden in Rom als Christen gefangen, nach Mailand gebracht, wo Gervasius mit Geißeln zu Tode gepeitscht und Protasius enthauptet wurde. 1162 soll Rainald von Dassel Reliquien des Heiligen Gervasius und Heiligen Protasius nach Breisach gebracht haben, wo diese sich heute im Münster in einem Reliquienschrein befinden.

      [Bookseller: Versandantiquariat Christine Laist]
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        Stundenbuch von Rouen N.S. Maitre de l'Echevinage "La Livre d'Heures de Notre Seigneur".

      Deutscher Kommentarband: claus Weinert.,. Rouen, 1475. Erstausgabe Madrid 1997. Vollständiges Testimonio-Faksimile der Pergament-Handschrift in der Biblioteca National^de Lisboa mit der Signatur IL 42 (olim Z-3-7 Melo de Manuel). Ganzleder-Einband mit Blindprägung. Kommentar: Martim de Albuquerque, Lissabon. 142 S. Im originalen Oktav-Format (20,5 x 14,5 cm) mit 29 ganzseitigen Miniaturen und dem Stundenbuchtext nach dem Gebrauch von Rom. Zustand (I) Bei Kaufinteresse unverbindliche Ansicht möglich., Numerierte und auf 980 Exemplare limitierte Auflage.. Aus der Schule von Rouen sind hervorragende Livre d'Heures erhalten, unter denen der Codex de Lisboa wegen seiner Zuschreibung an den Maitre de l'Echevinage (den "Magistratsmeister") einen besonderen Rang einnimmt. Zudem stammt die marianische Handschrift aus der reichen Sammlung Don Franciscos de Melo Manuel, aus der auch zwei andere Stundenbücher mit goldverzierten Miniaturen des James Marrow (Princeton) als typische Rouennais-Werke bewertet werden. Der Maitre de l'Echevinage de Rouen war ein äußerst kreativer Buchmaler, der zwischen 1450 und 1480 in Hauptstadt des Seine-Maritime nachweisbar ist. Er ist auch berühmt unter dem Namen Maitre de Geneve Latini nach Bruno Latinis Le tresor in Genf. Für seine Chroniken und insbesondere für seine Stundenbücher unterhielt der Meister eine enorm produktive Werkstatt. Bl

      [Bookseller: Versandantiquariat Karl Heinz Schmitz]
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        Illuminated Manuscript Leaf: The Coronation of the Virgin

      France: np. France: np. 1st Edition. No Binding. Very Good. Illuminated manuscript leaf (c1475) from a French Book of Hours with a colorful, vivid miniature of Mary and God on vellum. The miniature, colored with bright blues, gold, brown, and gray, depicts Mary with crown kneeling before God the Father. God is wearing the characteristic beehive-shaped crown as he holds the sovereign's orb in his left hand; with his right hand, God is in the act of blessing Mary and anointing her Queen of Heaven. Surrounding the miniature is a wide acanthus-leaf border with greens, blues, reds, and gold. Beneath the miniature is five lines of text ("Converte nos, Deus salutaris noster, et averte iram tuam a nobis... / Convert us, O God our saviour: and turn off thy anger from us. ..) with a large floral initial and two gold single-line initials. The verso, which contains most of Psalm 12, is highlighted by six red, blue, and gold initials. Size: 163 x 112 mm (approx. 6.5 x 4.5 inches) Miniature: 85 x 60 mm (approx. 3.25 x 2.25 inches) France: c.1475. A few smudges at the bottom of Mary's robe extending into text, a few small creases to vellum. Generally, a clean and bright leaf representing the Coronation of the Virgin, one of the more popular and enduring subjects of medieval art. Note: A frame is available for this item for an additional $150.

      [Bookseller: The Manhattan Rare Book Company]
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        Aggregator sive De Medicinis simplicibus

      286 leaves (complete) with a duplicate of quire [g]6 giving a total of 292 leaves. Royal folio (403 x 282mm.), 55 lines, Gothic type, 2- to 7-line initials supplied in red (some with marginal extensions), red initial-strokes, paraphs & underlinings, cont. German blind-stamped pigskin over thick wooden boards (binding slightly rubbed, a couple of leaves a little foxed or stained), small stamps of eagles, flowers and dragons (with less stamping on lower cover), two catches & remains of clasps, paper label on upper cover "Aggrega. Paduano." [Strasbourg: The R-Printer (Adolf Rusch), ca. 1475-80]. First edition of this important herbal and pharmacological work, one of the earliest printed books with an exclusively medical content; the recipes are largely based on Greek and Arabic sources. This is a magnificent copy -- crisp, large, and rubricated -- in its first binding from the Episcopal Court Library at Eichstätt. Dondis (1295-1359), a native of Padua, was the municipal physician of Chioggia, a coastal town near Venice and later became professor of medicine at Padua. Dondis was also a mechanician who designed a complicated automatic clock for his native town; it was certainly one of the earliest tower clocks. Astronomy was another area in which Dondis worked; he wrote a work entitled Planetarium, a set of astronomical tables based on the Alphonsine ones but simpler and computed for the meridian of Padua. Dondis' "most extensive work was the Aggregatio medicamentorum, or Promptuarium medicinae, a work which contains a large collection of medical recipes based largely on Greek and Arabic sources. It is divided into four main sections: (1) impostumes (37 chapters), (2) contusions and fractures (8 chapters), (3) wounds (12 chapters), (4) ulcers and abscesses (20 chapters). The work was completed after 1358."-Sarton, III, p. 1670. This was a most successful work with a number of later editions. The Italian translation appeared under the title Herbolario volgare (eds. of 1536 and 1540). Binding & Provenance: This combination of binding stamps is also recorded on a Venice imprint of 1477 now in Augsburg (Ink 226). Seventeenth-century inscription at head of first leaf: "Ad Bibl. Aul. Eystettensem" (the Episcopal Court Library of Eichstätt). A really fine copy and rare; the only other copy to have come to auction in recent years is the Norman copy in 1998. ❧ Garrison-Morton 6789-"an encyclopaedic dictionary of medicine, containing a large number of medical recipes based upon Greek and Arabic sources." Goff D-358-(dating the book "1470"). Stillwell The Awakening Interest in Science during the First Century of Printing, 355. .

      [Bookseller: Jonathan A. Hill, Bookseller, Inc.]
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        Opus Restitutionum, Usurarum, Excommunicationum

      Woodcut printer's device on recto of final printed leaf. 216 unnumbered leaves (two leaves are blank). 38 lines, Gothic type, initial spaces of various sizes. Chancery folio (252 x 183 mm.), cont. Polish blind-tooled calf over bevelled wooden boards (carefully rebacked with a few discrete repairs, light dampstain to inner margins and occasionally to upper & lower margins, careful and discrete repairs to inner margins of first 30 leaves & outer margins of first two leaves), the covers divided by triple fillets forming rectangular panels, creating a Latin cross on upper cover, the compartment edges with a semi-circular arcade tool & filled with impressions of an open leafy stamp & an arrangement of leafy foliage in a lozenge, one chaste brass clasp with strap of white tawed leather. [Cracow: Printer of Turrecremata, Expositio (Kaspar Staubel)], 1475. [bound with]:GERSON, Johannes. De Examinatione Doctrinarum [and other texts, see below]. Lombard initials supplied in blue flourished with red or red flourished with green, red & blue paragraph signs. 22 unnumbered leaves. 35 lines, Gothic type, initial spaces of various sizes. Chancery folio (252 x 183 mm.) (occasional minor dampstain to margins, one or two leaves with initial flourishing with minor cropping). [Nuremberg: Johann Sensenschmidt and Andreas Frisner, between 1474 and 1476]. A fine sammelband in a contemporary Polish blind-stamped calf binding over bevelled wooden boards, containing what is very probably the first substantial book printed in Poland. I. One of only four works printed at the first press in Poland and the only dated book of the press. The other works from this press include a broadside almanac for 1474, which is considered to have been printed in late 1473 or early 1474. The other two books from the press, St. Augustine's Opuscula and the Expositio Psalmorum of Johannes de Turrecremata are dated ca. 1475 or ca. 1475-1476 based on the printed date of the present edition and a rubrication date of 1476 in one copy of the Turrecremata. Books from this Cracow printing house are of the greatest rarity on the market. Cracow, a cosmopolitan city with a university founded in 1364, was the only Polish town to have printing in the 15th century. While many Polish printers were at work in Italy, Spain, and elsewhere, the first printers in Poland were all foreigners. Discoveries of archival references from 1477 to the presence in Cracow of Kaspar Straube, from Dresden or Leipzig, also called in the documents "Casper Drucker," have led to the currently accepted designation of Straube as Poland's first printer. Apart from the works of this press, no other Latin printing survives from 15th-century Cracow. This work on restitution, usury, and excommunication is one of the earliest texts printed to be concerned with economic problems. The author, Franciscus de Platea (d. 1460), was an Italian Franciscan. The text was quite popular in the 15th century with nine editions. There are apparently three variants of the final printed leaf; our copy corresponds to variant B with the printer's mark and the date printed below it. This book is of considerable rarity: ISTC locates only four copies outside of Poland, two in German libraries (Berlin and Munich) and two in the U.S. (Morgan and Huntington). II. First and only 15th-century edition of this collection of texts by Johannes Gerson (1363-1429), chancellor of the University of Paris, produced by Nuremberg's first printer, Johann Sensenschmidt in partnership with Andreas Frisner. The other texts include: De duplici statu in Dei ecclesia; Admonitio brevis quo modo caute legendi sunt quorundam libri; De appellatione peccatoris a divina justitia ad divinam misericordiam; De unione ecclesiae; and Dubium de delectatione in servitio Dei. Provenance: From the library of Helmut N. Friedlaender with booklabel (sale 23 April 2001, lot 98). Very good copies. ❧ I. Goff P-756. II. Goff G-229. .

      [Bookseller: Jonathan A. Hill, Bookseller, Inc.]
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        TEXT FROM THE SUFFRAGES TO THE SAINTS

      France, last quarter of the, 1475. Hardcover. 152 x 114 mm (6 x 4 1/2"). Single column, 15 lines of text on the recto and 11 on the verso, in a very careful and pleasing bâtarde hand. Rubrics in red, recto with two-line initial in brushed gold on a red ground, verso with five one-line initials in brushed gold on a red or blue ground, two line fillers in colors and gold, and WITH A FULL BORDER OF GEOMETRIC DESIGN creating a patchwork of red, blue, and brushed gold squares and triangles, the red and blue compartments decorated in white to create bas-relief-style flowers and acanthus leaves, brushed gold compartments with sprays of flowers or strawberries in colors, THE BORDER ENCLOSING AN ARCH-TOPPED MINIATURE OF SAINT BARBARA in an architectural frame (measuring approximately 60 x 65 mm.), the saint, in blue and ermine robes and a brushed gold cloak, shown standing on the prone body of her father beside the tower in which he imprisoned her, a book in one of her hands and a palm frond in the other, behind her the wall of a loggia with two red pillars creating windows through which the countryside beyond is visible. Fore edge neatly extended by a half-inch-wide strip of vellum (to compensate for close cropping, with very tiny loss near the bottom), otherwise in especially fine condition, with everything clean, bright, and fresh. This colorful leaf celebrating the popular Saint Barbara is of considerable interest in both its decoration and visual content. The columns framing the miniature as well as those in the background are brushed gold with red detailing, and the saint herself is golden from head to foot--nimbus, hair, palm branch, and sumptuous cloak. Even her wicked father has golden hair and beard. In addition to her martyr's palm, the saint holds an open book, which suggests the power she has gained through learning. The text below the miniature is the opening of the suffrage to Saint Barbara, while that on the recto is the suffrage to Saint Roch, who, like Barbara, was one of the Fourteen Holy Helpers invoked for protection from plague and sudden death. Partly because the borders are fully covered with paint (as opposed to the usual swirling vegetation placed amid considerable unpainted space) and partly because there are so many rich colors used, the leaf as a whole is unusually vibrant.

      [Bookseller: Phillip J. Pirages Fine Books and Mediev]
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        TEXT FROM MATINS FOR CHRISTMAS DAY

      Tuscany, perhaps Florence, last quarter of the, 1475. 572 x 410 mm (22 1/2 x 16 1/8"). Single column, five lines of text beneath five four-line staves of music, in a very pleasing regular gothic book hand. Attractively matted. Rubrics in red, one large maiblumen initial in blue and red, and the recto WITH A MAJESTIC INITIAL "H" (measuring approximately 146 x 140 mm.) in pink with white tracery and with several sprouting leafy vegetal elements in blue, green, and pink (these extending into the margin, along with many gold bezants), the initial ON A BURNISHED GOLD GROUND AND ENCLOSING A PROMINENT GRACEFUL FLOWER in the same colors and burnished gold in the center against a field of deep blue with many swirling white tendrils and stylized floral buds. Faint thumbing in bottom margin, a bit of fading to notes on the verso, the gilt partially eroded from portions of the initial and some of the bezants, but still a most impressive leaf, the rich paint on the initial completely intact, and the entire leaf generally fresh and clean. The text of this leaf contains the end of the antiphon ("Diffusa est gratia"), the heading for Psalm 44, and the first response ("Hodie nobis c[a]elorum rex") beginning with our huge and lovely "H.".

      [Bookseller: Phillip J. Pirages Fine Books and Mediev]
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        TEXT FOR THE MONTH OF JUNE, IN FRENCH

      France, late, 1475. 162 x 114 mm (6 3/8 x 4 1/2"). Single column, recto with 16 lines of text, verso with 15, in a fine gothic book hand. Text of saints' days in alternating red or blue (special saints in gold), headings and numerals in burnished gold, four one-line initials in burnished gold on a red and blue ground, "K L" at top left of recto in the form of gray and white acanthus leaves on a background of brushed gold, verso with quarter panel border featuring blue and gold acanthus leaves and sprays of blue or red flowers on leafy stems, RECTO WITH THREE-QUARTER BORDER of blue and lavender acanthus leaves and flowers on a brushed gold ground, THE LOWER BORDER WITH A MINIATURE OF A LARGE RED CRUSTACEAN representing Cancer, the Zodiac sign of the month, AND THE OUTER BORDER WITH A MINIATURE SHOWING THE LABOR OF THE MONTH (mowing hay). A touch of browning to fore edge, minor wrinkling to inner margin, otherwise A VERY FINE, BRIGHT LEAF, the colors rich and the gold sparkling. From the same manuscript as the previous leaf and similarly decorated, this delightful specimen displays an equivalent level of sophistication, charm, and curious detail. Like the ram that seems rather equine on our March leaf, the Cancer crustacean here seems to be a cross between a crab and a lobster, but notwithstanding this uncertain lineage, it seems merry and certainly bright--very pleasantly red and with much gold highlighting (almost as if having been boiled). The pale greens and blues of the pastoral background provide a soothing contrast to inflamed Cancer. The besmocked haymaker, wearing a broad-brimmed hat to protect against the sun, has evidently been wielding his scythe for some time, as we see a very large haystack in the background, at its foot a white sack, perhaps containing the laborer's midday meal. The painter has given him the convincing look of someone who understands his work and is willing to do it.

      [Bookseller: Phillip J. Pirages Fine Books and Mediev]
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        Illuminated Manuscript: Miniature of The Holy Trinity, "The Mercy Seat

      France: np. 1st Edition. No Binding. Fine. Exquisite depiction of the Holy Trinity from a late 15th Century Book of Hours (c.1475). The Trinity is presented in the pose of "The Mercy Seat" with God the Father on the throne holding the crucified Christ as Man of Sorrows and the Holy Spirit represented as a dove between them. A stunningly beautiful leaf with the miniature on recto painted in rich blue, red, and gold and surrounded by an L-shaped decorative bar and a detailed floral border containing a swan-catcher and swan. With four lines of text including a three-line initial in gold and blue beneath the miniature. Verso with 15 lines of text and half floral border. With two single and two two-line initials in gold and other colors. France: c1475. Size: Leaf 12.6 x 8.5 cm; Miniature: 7.0 x 4.5 cm. Closely cropped at top and right margin. In fine condition with colors remarkable sharp and bright.

      [Bookseller: The Manhattan Rare Book Company]
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        TEXT FOR THE MONTH OF OCTOBER, IN FRENCH

      France, late, 1475. 162 x 114 mm (6 3/8 x 4 1/2"). Single column, 16 lines of text in a fine gothic book hand. Text of saints' days in alternating red or blue (special saints in gold), headings and numerals in burnished gold, five one-line initials in burnished gold on a red and blue ground, the usual "K L" at top left of recto in the form of gray and white acanthus leaves on a background of brushed gold, verso with quarter panel border featuring blue and gold acanthus leaves and sprays of blue or pink flowers on leafy stems, RECTO WITH THREE-QUARTER BORDER of red and blue acanthus and various flowers on a brushed gold ground, THE LOWER BORDER WITH A MINIATURE OF A SCORPION (representing Scorpio, the Zodiac sign of the month), AND THE FORE BORDER WITH A MINIATURE SHOWING THE LABOR OF THE MONTH (a man sowing). A bit of browning right at fore edge on both sides, minor wrinkling to inner margin, otherwise IN FINE, BRIGHT CONDITION, with only the most trivial loss of pigment. Perhaps even more than in the previous three leaves, the artist here has made excellent use of gold in the labor of the month miniature, where it appears as the bright rain of seeds being scattered into freshly ploughed furrows as well as the leaves taking on their autumnal coloring on the trees in the background. We notice this in particular because the gold on this leaf is even a bit more glittering than on the others. The worker here is warmly dressed for the cool fall weather, and the contrast of the brown plowed earth to the green field behind it is appealing.

      [Bookseller: Phillip J. Pirages Fine Books and Mediev]
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        Illuminated leaf from a Book of Hours

      Northern France (probably Paris),: circa 1475-, 1500.. Illuminated leaf, 215 x 139 mm., with an illuminated panel border on each side of the leaf, one 2-line initial, eleven 1-line initial and nine line-fillers, 18 lines of neat gothic bookhand; in excellent condition. A beautifully illuminated leaf from a French Book of Hours with all the hallmarks of Paris- or Rouen work at the end of the 1400s. On the verso, the decorative panel border features a spikey-haired grotesque with a ruddy snout, happily playing a flute and a drum. The panel border on the recto is composed of blue and gold acanthus and coloured flowers and leaves in roundels of liquid gold.

      [Bookseller: Hordern House Rare Books]
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        PERGAMENOVÁ LISTINA POLEPŠENÍ ZNAKU STARÉHO MESTA PRAŽSKÉHO CÍSAREM FRIDRICHEM III. (PARCHMENT DOCUMENT CHASTENED CHARACTER OF THE OLD TOWN EMPEROR FREDERICK III) Fine Facsimile Edition

      Tempus Libri. New. Hardcover. <p>Emperor Frederick III.  polep&#154;uje Prague&#39;s Old Town character and camp at Neuse am Rhein issued ninth June 1475 confirming the German-language list. </p><p>The Charter describes what is betterment for granted and to what extent:  "We Fridrich, by God&#39;s grace Roman Emperor (...).  We confess and publicly announce to everyone in this letter to all those who see or hear him read, (...) Now that our honorable, wise, us and our empire particularly dear and loyal mayor, councilors and all the townsfolk of Old Town and the ancestors of this described below and sign jewel, namely: red shield over the center of it passing over the castle wall battlements of silver in it standing three silver towers and battlements open the silver gate, adorned with a canopy and a silver portcullis, as an excellent urban character of the Old Town have been using and led, let us stated Mayor, councilors and all the townspeople same City Hall put forward its important message to supplicate and pray that we, as a Roman emperor them and all their descendants and heirs purkmistrum, councilors and all the burghers of the Old Town such their urban character from our special imperial grace and goodness decorated, better off, and resume our imperial favor new talent and have provided graciously organized.  Because we recognize and monitor such loyal, willing and courageous service to us a realm often and generously, especially to us with a considerable expenditure of their lives and property, when we were in our our castle in Vienna shelling and siege joyfully and faithfully serving and continue in future times it might provide wanted and had.  And therefore prudent mind, good advice and a fair knowledge of the same burgrave, councilors and all the burghers of the Old Town and all their descendants and heirs in perpetuity that their urban character and jewel ornaments described below and uplift, namely: red shield over the center of it passing over the castle wall battlements of silver in it standing three gold towers and battlements open the golden gate golden portcullis, also decorated with a canopy to shield helmet, decorated with gold, red and white wherewith to him golden imperial crown between two white lions, two-tailed who holds the imperial crown as this character and gem in the shield and helmet in the midst of our current imperial sheet painted with the appropriate colors and coloring, as the Roman Emperor graciously decorated, newly reformed and a special grace of our imperial graciously bestowed and made ? ? Ornaments , reformation lends them is we therefore also new and completeness power of the Roman emperor and equitable aware of the power of this sheet.  (...) Given in our imperial army against the duke of Burgundy in a field near Neuss on the Rhine on Friday before St. Vitus ctrnáctistém and seventy-five year. "</p><p>Parchment document of size 701 x 425 mm to 110 mm Pliko contains a thumbnail of the character in the middle of dimensions 123 x 133 mm, which shows the new reformed character.  Thumbnail adorned with gold plated and powder.  The charter is confirmed by a large imperial mint (= double) from crude wax seal diameter 136 mm suspended from green-purple silk threads.  Quite at the bottom of the obverse side of the seal imprint Emperor sekretního oval ring size of 11 x 15 mm. </p> .

      [Bookseller: New Boston Fine and Rare Books]
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        LITURGICAL MISCELLANY FROM FLORENCE ,Fifteenth-century manuscript with eighteenth-century illuminated borders

      : ILLUMINATED MANUSCRIPT ON VELLUM IN LATIN AND ITALIAN, Italy (Florence?), c. 1475-1500, with eighteenth-century illuminated borders, 135 x 97 mm., 78 folios, apparently complete apart from the final added prayer (collation, i-vii10 viii8), written in a mannered humanistic bookhand, added prayers in italic (justification, 97 x 64-62 mm.), rubrics in text ink, often capitals highlighted with red diagonal slashes, red initials throughout, some with simple red pen decoration, FIVE ILLUMINATED FULL BORDERS, probably added in the eighteenth-century. BINDING: Bound in eighteenth-century (?) brown leather over pasteboard, with the original Italian, fifteenth-century blind-tooled front and back covers laid down, TEXT: This is an important small-format collection of prayers, together with formal liturgical texts, including the Office of St. Catherine, Mass of the Virgin and biblical readings, in both Latin (approximately sixty-nine texts) and Italian (seventeen prayers). The lengthy vernacular prayers are probably by contemporary fifteenth-century figures (including the Franciscan peacher, Cherubino da Spoleto (1414-1484) on ff. 11-12v, and a certain &#147;Ser Pace patre de sancta felicita,&#148;on ff. 16-19v) and deserve careful study. Dominican connections seem important, including a litany of Mary &#147;composuit frater Margaretus OP,&#148; on ff. 51-53. ILLUMINATION: Six illuminated borders, certainly added, probably in the eighteenth century: f. 1, full border of small red and purple flowers with thin stems and leaves, interspersed with small gold ball; a peacock and coat of arms of the French royal family (azure, three fleur de lis or) in the lower margin; f. 12, similar full border with bird in the lower margin and a grasshopper in the inner margin; f. 51, full border of red, blue, green and gold acanthus; ff. 70v-71, double-page opening, both pages with full borders of red and green acanthus, on f. 70v, with a spray of purple flowers, and on f. 71 an Angel playing an instrument. These carefully-executed, attractive illuminated borders add considerably to the manuscript&#146;s charm. Probably the most well-known examples of medieval manuscripts (as well as fifteenth-century printed books) with decoration added in the eighteenth century, are those by the artist sometimes known as the &#147;Master of the Canonici Fakes,&#148; who decorated manuscripts for Franz-Joseph von Hahn (1699-1748). Although Hahn probably had his books decorated and linked to famous owners to add (fraudulently) to their value, other eighteenth-century collectors had their books and manuscripts decorated by contemporary artists simply for their own pleasure. It seems most likely that this manuscript was owned by a pious owner in the eighteenth century who wanted to embellish a rather austere manuscript by adding decoration. PROVENANCE: The evidence of the script supports an origin in Italy in the later fifteenth century, most likely in Florence. Early ownership inscription, inside front cover: &#147;Questo si e uno librizino in lo quale se contene molte bene et diuote oratione a onore de dio de la gloriosa Vergine maria et de molti sancti del paradiso. Lo quale librizino e de me Nanna donna de Iohane Baptista Corbinello de Firenza.&#148; The Corbinello family was one of the Republic&#146;s wealthiest families, active as wool merchants, landowners and merchant bankers; modern dealers&#39; annotations and inscription in pencil in Norwegian. CONDITION: good condition with occasional minor stains at edges, some soiling, ink rubbed or partially flaked-away on eight pages (text generally still legible apart from occasional letters lost); binding worn along the joints and partially split at the top and bottom joining the upper board, scuffed and worn especially at edges, but in serviceable condition.

      [Bookseller: Les Enluminures ]
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        SERMONES DE TIMORE DIVINORUM JUDICIORUM

      Venice: Johannes de Colonia and Johannis Manthen, 1475. Second Edition. Hardcover. An Excellent Contemporary Copy of a WorkPublished during the 15th Century Author&#39;s Lifetime. 241 x 165 mm (9 1/2 x 6 1/2"). 94 unnumbered leaves (the first and last blank). Double column, 40 lines, gothic letter, capital spaces with guide letters. Second Edition. Contemporary calf over wooden boards, broad triple-ruled blindstamped diaper patterns on covers, small portions of the original spine leather carefully renewed, 17th c.(?) paper label at top of spine, clasp and catch lacking, early (faded) ownership number painted in white over orange at base of spine. Old notes on front blank (including at least one 17th century ownership inscription), a few other neat marginal annotations in the text, modern bookplate of Walter Hirst on last flyleaf. Goff C-184; BMC V, 226. Leather a little spotted, marked, and with minor worming (covers with a total of perhaps 40 small round wormholes), but a very satisfying, entirely solid binding without serious wear. Minor worming at front and back, first couple of quires with a bit of thumbing and soil, but mostly bright, smooth, and fresh internally. This is a very attractive copy in an unrestored period binding of a collection of sermons significant because they comprise the words of a living 15th century author and because they come from one of the earliest presses in Venice. Robertus Caracciolus (1425-95) was the most celebrated preacher in Italy during the last four decades of his life. Called a "second Paul," the "new Paul," and the "prince of preachers," he was able to arouse his listeners to sometimes unseemly levels of emotion, and partly for that reason, he was a controversial figure among the Franciscans of his time. (Catholic Encyclopedia) The sermons here deal largely with the fear of divine justice as the consequence mankind must expect for disobeying God&#39;s laws. Caracciolus&#39; effectiveness and popularity as a preacher can be explained partly by the clarity of his approach: he makes use of lists, naming, for example, three or four topics--sins, penalties, God&#39;s gifts--and then expanding on each one. He also employs the effective rhetorical device of repetition, using such phrases as "Fear God" numerous times in one section. It is easy to imagine other clerics studying his work as much for technique as for content. Our printers have a direct connection with the first press established in Venice. In 1467, the Venetian Senate granted a printing monopoly lasting five years to Johannes Emericus de Spira, who was not able to use this to much advantage, as he died while printing his fourth book. That production was finished by his brother Vindelinus, who continued the business in an active way through 1472, but then his output tailed off abruptly. The three fonts of type the brothers had used--including the earliest gothic face employed in Venice--then came into the possession of our printers, for whom the surviving brother had already printed some books on commission and for whom he probably worked until 1476. The two Johanneses were extremely active printers, producing more than 60 books between 1474 and 1480. This second edition of "Sermones" is both early and scarce. According to Goff, it is the rarest of the 15th century sermon collections of Caracciolus, and only one other book by him was completed before the year of this publication. All copies of the first and second editions are rare in the marketplace: since 1975, ABPC records, besides the present volume, just one copy of the first edition of 1471 and one of our second, both in 19th century bindings.

      [Bookseller: Phillip J. Pirages Fine Books and Mediev]
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        [Summa de virtutibus] [On the Virtues ; The Summation of Virtues] [Quintæ Partis Principalis, Tractatus de Beatitudinibus]

      [Basle, Switzerland : Michael Wenßler (Wenssler), 1475], 1475. Book. Very Good. Hardcover. Folio - over 12 - 15" tall. 169 Folio leaves ; 31 cm. ; 2° ; bound in quarter suede with three raised bands, hand-written titles on spine ; an incunable from the early and important press of Michael Wenssler of Basel, Switzerland ; this partial copy without title page or colophon ; Hain 12383, Proctor 7464, British Museum 15th century III, 722 (IB.37053), Polain 3034, Goff P-83, Walsh 1114 ; single column 36 line Gothic type, with conventional 15th century printing ligatures, and with rubricized initials throughout; some generally minor edge staining and tears ; a few worm holes in the margins ; a few pages with larger stains ; this copy with no chapter headings or signature marks ; begins at Quintæ Partis Principalis, Tractatus de Beatitudinibus, with the section on Patience and the temptations of demons and ends the Beatitudes with the discourse on Peace; rubics in the same hand that executed those for the 1474 Quennell edition at the University of Darmstadt ; Michael Wenssler, floruit 1472-1497 [name variations: Wensler, Wensel, Vrenssler, Wenkler or Wenßler] was originally from Strasbourg, but became a citizen of Basel in 1473 and was active from 1475 to 1488, when he had to sell his press to pay off his debts. He then leaves Basel for Cluny, while his family remained behind in penury, and he does not return until 1499, when he retires ; this publication, amongst the earliest for Basle, is of the celebrated work of William of Auvergne, ca. 1180-1271 : the Summa de Virtutibus, or The Summation of Virtues, the first of the famous two-part tract (whose second part, published separately, treats of the vices). William was born in the former Province of Auvergne about 1180, and by 1223 he was master of theology at the University of Paris and a canon at Notre Dame. He was consecrated Bishop and given the See of Paris in 1228 by Pope Gregory IX, and he remained there until his death in 1249. The Summa de Virtutibus et Viitis, On the Virtues and Vices, a massive work, is itself part of a much larger work, the Magisterium Divinale et Sapientiale (The Teaching on God in the Mode of Wisdom). The style of the work is somewhat rambling, moving off into many tangents as it explores related concepts and makes the work appear as an extemporaneous discourse, often making a point and then immediately raising objections to that point, which William then proceeds to refute. It was reprinted many times and was a monumental Dominican theological work. [name variants for William of Auvergne: Guilelmus Peraldus, Guillermus Parisiensis, Guilielmus Peraldus, Guilelmus Peraldus, Guillaume Perrault, Guilelmus Peraldus, Willelmi de Peraldo, Wilhelm Peraldus, Guilelmus de Petra Alda, Guillaume de Peyraud (Ardeche), G. Lugdunensis, G. de Peyrauta, G. de Peraudus, G. Parisiensis, Guil. de Lugduno, Guillelmus Peraltus, Fr. Guil. a Peira, Fr. Guillermo Peraldo, Wilhelmus Ep. Lugdun., and Willelmus Arch. Lug.] ; extremely rare edition ; VG.

      [Bookseller: Joseph Valles - Books]
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        Oldenburg. Das Oldenburger Wunderhorn. Kupfer aus der Winkelmann-Chronik 1671

      38.5x31 cm. H. - Gilly, Oldenburg 945. Darstellung des vergoldeten Silbertrinkhornes aus der Zeit um 1475. Kurzer Einriß in alter Faltung restauriert.

      [Bookseller: Wenner Antiquariat]
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        In Lucanum commentum

      Venice: Filippo di Pietro, 1475 21 July 1475. 372 unnumbered leaves, roman type, 34 lines, 10 large red ink initials, some greek letters, waterstain on the upper margin of 1 leaf, contemporary wooden boards binding, blind tool decorations, ink titles on the edge, restored. Acid-Free clamshell box. A clean copy in contemporary binding; FIRST EDITION of Leonicenus&rsquo; commentary to Lucanus. This edition, first attributed to Vindelinus from Spira, seems to be the second to be printed by Philippus de Petri, the first typographer to use greek types. Brunet III, 985; Goff L172; IGI 6999; BMC V 219. PHOTOS AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST.

      [Bookseller: Louis Caron]
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        Historia Ecclesiastica Gentis Anglorum

      97 (of 98, without final blank) leaves. 40 lines, gothic type, paragraph & capital strokes in red, cont. MS. guide-letters. Small folio (275 x 198 mm.), 18th-cent. English calf (very expertly rebacked with orig. spine laid-down), double gilt fillet round sides with Spencer arms in center in gilt. [Strassburg: Heinrich Eggestein, not after 1475]. First edition. The Venerable Bede (673-735), "was the greatest English historian and one of the greatest European historians of the Middle Ages. It is therefore not surprising that his most important work -- and certainly the one with the strongest appeal to laymen -- should have been one of the first historical books to be printed. The &#39;Ecclesiastical History of the English People&#39;, which is in fact a comprehensive history of the Anglo-Saxon tribes, was completed in 731 and its fame soon spread far and wide. The English scholars and missionaries who worked in the Frankish empire in the eighth and ninth centuries -- men such as Boniface and Alcuin -- were well acquainted with Bede&#39;s writings, and manuscripts of the Historia Ecclesiastica were in many monasteries of the Rhine and Moselle regions... "The appearance in Strasbourg of the editio princeps of the Historia Ecclesiastica is less puzzling than might appear at first sight. The publisher, Heinrich Eggesteyn, like all his Strasbourg fellow-printers, specialized in publications for the laity; and the fact that he produced the earliest surviving advertisement sheet (1466) shows that he had a shrewd eye for the market. Moreover, the Rhenish printers -- besides those of Strasbourg, especially those of Cologne -- were obviously interested in the English market...Thus Eggesteyn no doubt reckoned that Bede&#39;s masterpiece would sell among the educated public on the continent as well as in England. He was not mistaken: the Historia Ecclesiastica had to be reprinted in 1500 in Strasbourg, and, by Heinrich Gran of Hagenau in Alsace, in 1506 and 1514."-Printing & the Mind of Man 16. This work has considerable musical interest. Bede&#39;s writings "constitute some of the most important and informative evidence for musical practice in the 6th, 7th and 8th centuries...The richest of Bede&#39;s works, for the light it throws on the importance of music in the development of the English church, is the Ecclesiastical History...Bede clearly testified that the first missionaries to England, sent by Gregory in 597, took with them a Roman manner of singing, and that this manner, often mentioned in conjunction with Gregory, survived and was taught in England well into the 8th century... "Bede&#39;s descriptions of music are therefore most important as records of the central role played by the practical art of singing the daily liturgy in monastic life during the early Middle Ages."-New Grove, Vol. 2, p. 345. Provenance: Mainz, Jesuit College (17th-century inscription at end); George John, second Earl Spencer (1748-1834, binding, accession number &#39;1073&#39; on front pastedown); William Foyle (bookplate, sale Christie&#39;s, 11 July 2000, lot 117). Fine crisp copy. First few quires with a light dampstain. &#10087; Goff B-293. GW 3756. .

      [Bookseller: Jonathan A. Hill, Bookseller, Inc.]
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        TEXT FOR THE MONTH OF MARCH, IN FRENCH

      1475. With an Early Depiction of What Seems To Be Vineyard Grafting 162 x 114 mm (6 3/8 x 4 1/2"). Single column, 16 lines of text in a fine gothic book hand. Text of saints' days in alternating red or blue (special saints in gold), headings and numerals in burnished gold, four one-line initials in burnished gold on a red and blue ground, the usual "K L" (for "Kalends," that is, the first of the month) at top left of recto in the form of gray and white acanthus leaves on a background of brushed gold, verso with quarter panel border featuring blue and gold acanthus leaves and sprays of blue or pink flowers on leafy stems, RECTO WITH THREE-QUARTER BORDER of red, blue, and pink acanthus leaves and flowers on a burnished gold ground, THE LOWER BORDER WITH A ZODIACAL MINIATURE of a white quadruped (surely a sheep, probably a ram) in a pleasant landscape, representing Aries, AND THE OUTER BORDER WITH A MINIATURE SHOWING THE LABOR OF THE MONTH (a man pruning and/or grafting grapevines). A touch of browning to fore edge, a bit of wrinkling to inner margin, minute loss of blue and white paint of acanthus leaves on the recto, one saint's name a bit smudged, two trivial marginal stains, but still in excellent condition, fresh and clean and with the flesh side (containing the painted scenes) quite bright. This very pleasing calendar leaf and those described in the next three entries are extremely animated and altogether charming. The decoration is full of detail and brightness: the name of month, the numbers, and the major saints' days are all in gold, and all occurrences of "A" in the descending sequence of Dominical Letters appear enlarged and gilded. The style of painting is naïve, but the leaf is nevertheless engaging and intriguing. In the zodiac miniature, we see the lamb frolicking in green pastures, with blue hills in the distance. It is a reminder that Easter, the sacrifice of the Lamb of God, is coming, when all shall be renewed. Featuring a bare landscape under a cloudy sky, the vineyard scene depicts a worker in a rough jacket apparently pruning with a bladed implement in his left hand and a length of plant in his right. A curious feature of the scene, and one obviously intended by the artist to be noticed, is the presence of a length of white cloth wrapped around a vine at the worker's foot. Whatever other operations are being undertaken, it seems possible, even likely, that, we are seeing an early--and quite uncommon--representation of grafting, an activity that would have involved a cut (with the man's implement) and then some way to secure the pressing together of the grafted elements (with the tied cloth). A small white mass in the foreground probably represents some form of sustenance or refreshment. A gratifying detail that manifests the artist's desire to be representational rather than suggestive is the presence of a second blade tucked inside the worker's belt. Our vintner is absorbed in his labor, the artist having succeeded in infusing his face with concentrated enterprise.

      [Bookseller: Phillip J. Pirages Fine Books and Mediev]
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