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Displayed below are some selected recent viaLibri matches for books published in 1460

        TEXT FROM THE SUFFRAGES OF THE SAINTS

      Northern France probably Paris ca Northern France [probably Paris], ca, 1460. 130 x 98 mm (5 1/8 x 3 7/8"). Single column, 14 lines in a fine gothic book hand. Attractively matted. The text similarly decorated as in the previous entry, but with panel borders on both sides inhabited by a stately peacock, one with a bright green tail, the other with a brushed gold tail, the recto also WITH A STRIKING MINIATURE (measuring 35 x 33 mm.) OF SAINT SEBASTIAN'S MARTYRDOM, the half-naked saint tied to a tree, bleeding from numerous arrow wounds, his two tormentors a study in contrasts: one a large, uncouth fellow with a plain bow, the other a dandy in pink tights and a blue and gold doublet shooting a crossbow, the scene set in a meadow with rolling green hills leading to a turreted town in the distance.One tiny hole to the background landscape, with minor flaking of paint from the immediate area, peacock on the recto a little rubbed, otherwise a fine, fresh leaf. Although the martyred Saint Sebastian is invariably pictured as shot full of arrows, he did not die from these punctures, but rather was actually nursed back to health by Saint Irene, then returned to serve the emperor, who had him clubbed to death. As Wieck says in "Time Sanctified," the story of these double miseries of our third century captain in Diocletian's army had already made Sebastian one of the two or three most popular of Christian martyrs. But in addition to the wide regard that had accrued from his martyrdom, "the opportunity that Sebastian provided for portraying a beautiful nude youth ensured his popularity among artists and many of their clients . . . from the late Middle Ages, through the Renaissance, to the 19th century." One of the archers in the Sebastian miniature is usually depicted wearing an elaborately decorated doublet, and in that tradition, the artist here has done an impressive job of showing carefully defined gold embroidery on the garment of the figure in the foreground.

      [Bookseller: Phillip J. Pirages Fine Books and Mediev]
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        TEXT FROM THE SUNDAY HOURS OF THE HOLY TRINITY

      Northern France [probably Paris], ca 1460 - 130 x 98 mm (5 1/8 x 3 7/8"). Single column, 14 lines in a fine gothic book hand. Attractively matted. The text similarly decorated as in the previous entry, but with the panel border on the verso inhabited by a spotted yellow hybrid beast with a long neck and a fox-like head, the recto WITH A MINIATURE OF THE TRINITY (measuring 35 x 33 mm.), the Father and the Son seated, their garments joined as if one, Christ on the left with the Cross on his shoulder, the Father across from him holding an orb, and the two displaying an open book between them, the dove of the Holy Spirit hovering between their heads directly above the book, the background with gold-embellished red and blue wall hangings. In extremely fine condition with only the most trivial of imperfections. The artist has chosen to place the Trinity in a contemporary room here, such as the owner of a 15th century Book of Hours might inhabit, rather than in a more exalted celestial environment. At the very least, we might expect a throne rather than a humble bench, but this ordinary setting would remind the reader that the Trinity is always and everywhere present. The connection between faith and scripture is emphasized by the fact that a book (probably a Bible or Book of Hours) is opened at the very center of the miniature, and both God the Father and God the Son have their hands firmly grasping it.

      [Bookseller: Phillip J. Pirages Rare Books (ABAA)]
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        TEXT FROM THE SUFFRAGES OF THE SAINTS

      Northern France probably Paris ca Northern France [probably Paris], ca, 1460. 130 x 98 mm (5 1/8 x 3 7/8"). Single column, 14 lines in a fine gothic book hand. Attractively matted. The text similarly decorated as in the previous entry, but with the panel border on the verso inhabited by a leaping dog, the same side WITH A GOLD-FRAMED MINIATURE (measuring 35 x 33 mm.) OF SAINT CLAUDE OF BESANÇON attired in his bishop's regalia, standing in a hallway between two arch-topped doors, reading a book.A fine, fresh leaf, with only the vaguest sense of soiling. Born in 603 and living well into his 90s, Saint Claude (or Claudius) became Archbishop of Besançon in 685 and after his death was so popular that his shrine became one of the major destinations for pilgrims in France, the town where he was buried actually changing its name from Condate to Saint Claude. Lore surrounding this saint strains credulity, and the historian Henry Wace has said that "on this saint the inventors of legends have compiled a vast farrago of improbabilities." Perhaps chief among the myths is the belief that his body remained in an incorruptible state (at least until it was destroyed during the French Revolution). However well preserved his corpse remained, his feet were exposed three times each day to be kissed by the many pilgrims who flocked to his shrine. In the Hours of Henry VIII in the Morgan Library, there is a miniature showing Claude resuscitating a dead man.

      [Bookseller: Phillip J. Pirages Fine Books and Mediev]
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        TEXT FROM THE SUFFRAGES

      Bruges, ca 1460 - 181 x 127 mm (7 1/8 x 5"). Single column, 19 lines in a careful, pleasing gothic book hand. In a very attractive new gilt wooden frame. Rubrics in pink (or faded red), one two-line initial in blue, magenta, and burnished gold, two lines with undulating line fillers in blue and gold, both sides of the leaf with a three-quarter panel border incorporating foliage, blossoms, and ivy leaves on hairline stems, the vertical part of this frame with a bar border composed of colors and burnished gold terminating at top and bottom in colorful acanthus leaves, and WITH TWO SMALL BUT VERY PLEASING MINIATURE PAINTINGS, SAINT ELIZABETH ON THE RECTO AND SAINT GERTRUDE ON THE VERSO. Tiny worm(?)hole in fore edge (where it has done negligible damage), small portions of the blue paint in the Elizabeth miniature eroded (gray paint slightly smeared as well, but apparently at the time of painting), otherwise in fine, clean, fresh condition. This leaf is characteristic work from the circle of Willem Vrelant, the leading purveyor of books of private devotion in Bruges during the third quarter of the 15th century. His leading position among Flemish illuminators of the time is indicated by the considerable number of manuscripts illustrated in his manner by other miniaturists both in Bruges and in nearby cities in Flanders. The illuminator of our Book of Hours shows a number of distinctive stylistic traits. Among these are a preference for boldly patterned cloth backdrops, tessellated flooring, landscapes filled with stylized bushes and trees, and persisting prominent architectural constructions that frame the subject, frequently in a corner (in these leaves, it is a waist-high outdoor wall or an indoor feature resembling wainscoting). The inclination for strong geometrical patterning is manifested in the artist's angular treatment of human figures and their garments. Dressed in pink and blue, Elizabeth is depicted with a sweet, round face. She is saluted here as the woman worthy to be the mother of John the Baptist, the forerunner of the Redeemer. Gertrude is dressed in monastic black, although a pink undergarment is visible, and her inky habit is trimmed in gold. This shimmering feature is a reminder that Gertrude (626-59) was the daughter of Pepin I of Landen, Mayor of the Palace for the Frankish realm of Austrasia and the forebear of Charlemagne. Gertrude is a natural choice for illustration by an artist of Bruges, since she was the patron of nearby Nivelles. The saint was routinely invoked for aid in coping with mice, and is here shown surrounded by four animated rodents as black as her habit. No legend survives to explain why she had such power over the creatures, who seem here to be more her pets (one climbs her staff of office) than her victims. [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Phillip J. Pirages Rare Books (ABAA)]
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        TEXT FROM THE SUFFRAGES OF THE SAINTS

      Northern France [probably Paris], ca 1460 - 130 x 98 mm (5 1/8 x 3 7/8"). Single column, 14 lines in a fine gothic book hand. Attractively matted. The text similarly decorated as in the previous entry, but with the panel border on the verso inhabited by a long-tailed pheasant, the same side WITH A DRAMATIC MINIATURE (measuring 35 x 33 mm.) OF SAINT GREGORY CELEBRATING MASS, the saint holding aloft the Communion wafer while the figure of Christ rises from the altar, blood from the wound to his hand cascading into the chalice on the altar surface, the wall behind displaying the "Arma Christi," Gregory's doubting deacon kneeling behind him, and beside the deacon, a noblewoman representing the owner of the Book of Hours (see items #131 and #135, above). A little faint soiling near edges, otherwise in fresh, bright, and altogether pleasing condition. Representing the most heightened of religious moments in general as well as a key point in the life of Saint Gregory specifically, this leaf features compelling actions being witnessed by the woman for whom this Book of Hours was made. According to the doctrine of Transubstantiation, the Communion wafer becomes the body of Christ once the priest blesses it with the words "this is my body," and this dramatic transformation is revealed publicly at the moment when the wafer is raised; similarly, when the wine is blessed by the priest, it becomes the Christ's blood, a transmutation that is obviously being symbolized by the spouting blood in the present scene. For Gregory (ca. 540-604), this miniature represents the occasion for gratitude toward God. Faced with doubts expressed by his deacon about the validity of Transubstantiation, Gregory had prayed for a sign that the doctrine was true, whereupon the bread was transformed in the deacon's presence into Christ in the visible guise of the Man of Sorrows rising from the altar, clad only in a loincloth and displaying the wounds left by the Crucifixion (here, the wound on just the right hand suffices). The miniature is full of absorbing details, including the "Arms of Christ" (symbols from the Passion) displayed on the wall, the gold hatching and black embroidery on the altar cloth, the line of text and closure tabs on the Missal lying on the altar, and the architectural elements of the chapel (including a rooster standing on a pedestal, one more item in the "Arma Christi").

      [Bookseller: Phillip J. Pirages Rare Books (ABAA)]
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        TEXT FROM THE SATURDAY HOURS OF THE CONCEPTION OF THE VIRGIN

      Northern France [probably Paris], ca, 1460. 130 x 98 mm (5 1/8 x 3 7/8"). Single column, 14 lines in a fine gothic book hand. Attractively matted. The text similarly decorated as in the previous entry, but with the panel border on the verso inhabited by a delightful grotesque in purple and gold with a curving trumpet-shaped snout, the recto WITH A CHARMING MINIATURE (measuring 35 x 33 mm.) OF SAINT ANNE HOLDING THE INFANT VIRGIN, the two attended by seven young virgins, the group standing in a room with a tessellated stone floor, a gothic window, and a red and gold wall hanging. One faint brown spot to margin, but a very fine, extremely fresh and clean leaf. This very pretty leaf opens the infrequently seen Hours of the Conception of the Virgin, and it represents the second appearance of Saint Anne in the manuscript from which the present group of leaves comes. While we do not have historical evidence to support such a hypothesis, there is no harm in speculating that this unusual conjunction at least suggests the possibility that the original owner of the Book of Hours in question may herself have been named Anne. Like the others in this group, this miniature is carefully painted and realizes considerable detail in the scene's architecture and clothing.

      [Bookseller: Phillip J. Pirages Fine Books and Mediev]
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        TEXT FROM THE SUFFRAGES OF THE SAINTS

      Northern France [probably Paris], ca 1460 - 130 x 98 mm (5 1/8 x 3 7/8"). Single column, 14 lines in a fine gothic book hand. Attractively matted. The text similarly decorated as in the previous entry, but with the panel border on the verso inhabited by a leaping dog, the same side WITH A GOLD-FRAMED MINIATURE (measuring 35 x 33 mm.) OF SAINT CLAUDE OF BESANÇON attired in his bishop's regalia, standing in a hallway between two arch-topped doors, reading a book. A fine, fresh leaf, with only the vaguest sense of soiling. Born in 603 and living well into his 90s, Saint Claude (or Claudius) became Archbishop of Besançon in 685 and after his death was so popular that his shrine became one of the major destinations for pilgrims in France, the town where he was buried actually changing its name from Condate to Saint Claude. Lore surrounding this saint strains credulity, and the historian Henry Wace has said that "on this saint the inventors of legends have compiled a vast farrago of improbabilities." Perhaps chief among the myths is the belief that his body remained in an incorruptible state (at least until it was destroyed during the French Revolution). However well preserved his corpse remained, his feet were exposed three times each day to be kissed by the many pilgrims who flocked to his shrine. In the Hours of Henry VIII in the Morgan Library, there is a miniature showing Claude resuscitating a dead man.

      [Bookseller: Phillip J. Pirages Rare Books (ABAA)]
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        USE OF ROUEN

      Rouen, ca 1460 - A Distinguished Manuscript with 15 Fine Miniatures,Probably Painted by Rouen's Master Illuminator. 133 x 95 mm (5 1/4 x 3 3/4"). [261] leaves (lacking one leaf after f. 120); first two leaves (unrelated to the original manuscript) inserted later (see below); single column, 16 lines in a small, very pleasing formal bâtarde book hand. CONTENTS: Calendar (in French) ff. 1-12v; Office of the Virgin, Use of Rouen ff. 13-53v; Hours of Saint Catherine ff. 54-67; Hours of John the Baptist ff. 67v-80v; Seven Penitential Psalms ff. 81-92; Litany, Petitions, and Collects ff. 92-97; Hours of the Cross ff. 97v-100; Hours of the Holy Spirit ff. 100v-103; Hours for the Days of the Week: of the Trinity ff. 103-106, of the Dead ff. 106v-110, of All Saints ff. 110-113, of the Holy Spirit f. 113, of the Sacrament ff. 113v-116v, of the Cross f. 117, of the Virgin ff. 117-120v; [1 leaf lacking, with text missing from end of previous and beginning of:] Hours of the Compassion of the Virgin ff. 121-141; Litany of the Virgin ff. 141-144v; prayers to the Virgin ff. 144v-145v; a devotion consisting of the incipits of the Seven Penitential Psalms, each accompanied by a prayer ff. 145v-150v; Psalm 113, the Athanasian Creed, and a collect ff.150v-157; Office of the Dead, use of Rouen-Sarum ff.160-188; Gospel extracts ff. 192-197v; prayers Obsecro te and O intemerata ff. 197v-204v; the Passion of Christ according to Matthew chapters 26-27 ff. 205-220; Long Hours of the Passion ff. 220v-243; prayers to Saint Michael and the Virgin ff. 243-255v; Psalter of Saint Jerome ff.256-274; prayer to All Saints ff. 274v-276v. Excellent brown straight-grain morocco by Charles Hering (his ticket on verso of front free endpaper), covers blind tooled with palmette frame enclosing a stylized fanfare design, raised bands, three spine panels blind tooled in a scrolling pattern, two panels with gilt titling, turn-ins densely gilt with a frame of interlocking circles, fleuron cornerpieces, all edges gilt. In a crushed morocco pull-off box with gilt titling, "Livre d'Heures / MS Picard /1460-65" (see below). Rubrics in red, one-line initials throughout in burnished gold with black penwork or blue with red penwork, a few blue and gold line fillers, calendar leaves with two-line "KL" ("Kalends") in blue and pink on a burnished gold ground and with quarter panels on the recto featuring blue and gold acanthus leaves and flowering vines in red, blue, pink, green, and gold as well as accented with burnished gold besants, important feasts and Golden Numbers in burnished gold, other saints' days in blue or red; numerous two-line initials in blue with white tracery and scrolling floral infill on a burnished gold ground, about half the pages with a very fine floral panel border in colors and gold, three of these pages with panel borders on both sides of the text, and one with a full border; FIFTEEN VERY FINE ARCH-TOPPED MINIATURES WITH FULL BORDERS featuring much foliage, fruit, and flowers rendered in a semi-naturalistic style, the first border with a brushed gold ground, the scenes depicting the Annunciation, the Visitation, the Nativity, the Adoration of the Magi, the Presentation in the Temple, the Flight into Egypt, Christ among the Doctors, the Death of the Virgin, Saint Catherine, Salome Presenting the Head of John the Baptist, King David, the Crucifixion, Pentecost, a Burial, and the Betrayal and Arrest of Christ, the text on these pages beginning with a three- or four-line initial with floral or peacock infill on a ground of burnished gold. Two inserted vellum leaves at front with 15th, 16th, and 17th century family arms. Front flyleaf with faint pencilled inscription: "Missal of considerable delicacy & beauty / cost Mrs. Bliss [£25?]," as described in: Saunders & Hodgson, "Bibliotheca splendidissima: A catalogue of a select portion of the library of Mrs. Bliss, deceased, removed from her residence at Kensington" (1826), lot #461. A touch of rubbing to binding extremities, lower [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Phillip J. Pirages Rare Books (ABAA)]
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        TEXT FROM THE OPENING OF TERCE

      Northern France [probably Paris], ca, 1460. 130 x 98 mm (5 1/8 x 3 7/8"). Single column, 14 lines in a very fine gothic book hand. Rubrics in red, verso with three one-line initials and one two-line initial in blue with white tracery and scrolling pink and blue floral infill on a ground of burnished gold, two line fillers in similar style, a panel border with acanthus leaves and much other vegetation as well as a charming yellow bird with outstretched wings, recto with two one-line initials and a line filler like those on the verso, a similar but more detailed three-line "D" on a burnished gold ground, and A SPLENDID BRUSHED GOLD FULL BORDER teeming with vegetation, flowers, and fruit in rich shades of several colors, the border inhabited by two realistically painted birds, an insect with delicate aqua wings, and a perky, long-eared squirrel munching on a berry, this golden frame ENCLOSING A VERY PLEASING ARCH-TOPPED MINIATURE OF THE ANNUNCIATION TO THE SHEPHERDS (measuring approximately 58 x 45 mm.), at the top a bright red angel peeking through a semi-circle of burnished gold and holding a scarlet banderolle, in the foreground two shepherds on a hillside, attired in brown sugarloaf hats and warm tunics and leggings, one on the ground gazing up at the angel in awe, the other standing with folded arms, leaning on his staff, apparent skepticism on his face, a golden sheepdog curled up asleep a short distance away, further back a huddled herd of sheep grazing on a verdant hillside punctuated with trees, and in the distance a white, turreted castle. Significant flaking to the shepherds' garments and to one of their faces, otherwise in fine condition, the rich gold frame lustrous, the margins extremely ample, and other defects all trivial. As often happens with the Annunciation to the Shepherds image, this miniature presents us with a dramatic contrast between celestial splendor and the lowly life of humans. Above, the fiery angel parts the sky to let a small piece of heaven shine through, while on the rough ground below, two peasants in tattered clothes struggle to grasp the situation. Our shepherds are well individuated, one falling to the ground in surprise, the second more hesitant, but thrusting his face forward as if listening intently. The dog provides a spot of tranquillity at the center of the scene, blissfully sleeping through all the excitement. The artist is obviously sophisticated. We can feel the night cold because of the heavy garments of the sheepherders, the tightly curled sleeping dog, and the flock of sheep conspicuously pressed together as they graze. And the miniature is well designed: the repeated round shapes of the huddle of sheep, the hill they stand on, and the treetops give the scene a pleasing design harmony, and the artist has admirably suggested depth of space by using a high horizon for the vivid green hill, placing the tower centrally in the middle distance, and adding a misty blue slope on the right in the far distance. The border (no doubt done by a different painter) is arresting in its lavish decoration, with botanical elements being unusually dense, and their swirling shapes giving a sense of movement and animation. The birds' markings are carefully rendered, and the insect's imaginatively blue-green wings are delicately stippled and flecked with larger pimple-like spots. The overall level of aesthetic achievement is high, suggesting that the leaf came from a manuscript of notable quality.

      [Bookseller: Phillip J. Pirages Fine Books and Mediev]
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        TEXT FROM GOSPEL LESSONS

      Northern France [probably Paris], ca, 1460. 130 x 98 mm (5 1/8 x 3 7/8"). Single column, 14 lines in a fine gothic book hand. Attractively matted. The text similarly decorated as in the previous entry, but with panel borders on both sides inhabited by a bird flapping its wings, the recto also WITH A PLEASING MINIATURE (measuring 35 x 33 mm.) OF SAINT MARK WITH HIS LION, the saint sitting on a bench writing in a stone room with mullioned windows and a red wall hanging decorated with gold, the lion watching alertly from the right. A hint of thumbing, otherwise in very fine condition--fresh, clean, and especially bright. This leaf comes from the section of Gospel readings near the beginning of the prayer book. Although Mark is pictured here, the text is from the first chapter of Luke, relating the Annunciation.

      [Bookseller: Phillip J. Pirages Fine Books and Mediev]
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        USE OF ROUEN

      Rouen, ca, 1460. Hardcover. A Distinguished Manuscript with 15 Fine Miniatures,Probably Painted by Rouen's Master Illuminator. 133 x 95 mm (5 1/4 x 3 3/4"). [261] leaves (lacking one leaf after f. 120); first two leaves (unrelated to the original manuscript) inserted later (see below); single column, 16 lines in a small, very pleasing formal bâtarde book hand. CONTENTS: Calendar (in French) ff. 1-12v; Office of the Virgin, Use of Rouen ff. 13-53v; Hours of Saint Catherine ff. 54-67; Hours of John the Baptist ff. 67v-80v; Seven Penitential Psalms ff. 81-92; Litany, Petitions, and Collects ff. 92-97; Hours of the Cross ff. 97v-100; Hours of the Holy Spirit ff. 100v-103; Hours for the Days of the Week: of the Trinity ff. 103-106, of the Dead ff. 106v-110, of All Saints ff. 110-113, of the Holy Spirit f. 113, of the Sacrament ff. 113v-116v, of the Cross f. 117, of the Virgin ff. 117-120v; [1 leaf lacking, with text missing from end of previous and beginning of:] Hours of the Compassion of the Virgin ff. 121-141; Litany of the Virgin ff. 141-144v; prayers to the Virgin ff. 144v-145v; a devotion consisting of the incipits of the Seven Penitential Psalms, each accompanied by a prayer ff. 145v-150v; Psalm 113, the Athanasian Creed, and a collect ff.150v-157; Office of the Dead, use of Rouen-Sarum ff.160-188; Gospel extracts ff. 192-197v; prayers Obsecro te and O intemerata ff. 197v-204v; the Passion of Christ according to Matthew chapters 26-27 ff. 205-220; Long Hours of the Passion ff. 220v-243; prayers to Saint Michael and the Virgin ff. 243-255v; Psalter of Saint Jerome ff.256-274; prayer to All Saints ff. 274v-276v. Excellent brown straight-grain morocco by Charles Hering (his ticket on verso of front free endpaper), covers blind tooled with palmette frame enclosing a stylized fanfare design, raised bands, three spine panels blind tooled in a scrolling pattern, two panels with gilt titling, turn-ins densely gilt with a frame of interlocking circles, fleuron cornerpieces, all edges gilt. In a crushed morocco pull-off box with gilt titling, "Livre d'Heures / MS Picard /1460-65" (see below). Rubrics in red, one-line initials throughout in burnished gold with black penwork or blue with red penwork, a few blue and gold line fillers, calendar leaves with two-line "KL" ("Kalends") in blue and pink on a burnished gold ground and with quarter panels on the recto featuring blue and gold acanthus leaves and flowering vines in red, blue, pink, green, and gold as well as accented with burnished gold besants, important feasts and Golden Numbers in burnished gold, other saints' days in blue or red; numerous two-line initials in blue with white tracery and scrolling floral infill on a burnished gold ground, about half the pages with a very fine floral panel border in colors and gold, three of these pages with panel borders on both sides of the text, and one with a full border; FIFTEEN VERY FINE ARCH-TOPPED MINIATURES WITH FULL BORDERS featuring much foliage, fruit, and flowers rendered in a semi-naturalistic style, the first border with a brushed gold ground, the scenes depicting the Annunciation, the Visitation, the Nativity, the Adoration of the Magi, the Presentation in the Temple, the Flight into Egypt, Christ among the Doctors, the Death of the Virgin, Saint Catherine, Salome Presenting the Head of John the Baptist, King David, the Crucifixion, Pentecost, a Burial, and the Betrayal and Arrest of Christ, the text on these pages beginning with a three- or four-line initial with floral or peacock infill on a ground of burnished gold. Two inserted vellum leaves at front with 15th, 16th, and 17th century family arms. Front flyleaf with faint pencilled inscription: "Missal of considerable delicacy & beauty / cost Mrs. Bliss [£25?]," as described in: Saunders & Hodgson, "Bibliotheca splendidissima: A catalogue of a select portion of the library of Mrs. Bliss, deceased, removed from her residence at Kensington" (1826), lot #461. A touch of rubbing to binding extremities, lower blank corner of June calendar leaf and lower fore edge of folio 234 neatly replaced, probably ca. 1800 when the book was rebound (text not affected), burial miniature creased at top (and possibly repaired, though, if so, with considerable skill), Crucifixion and Nativity miniatures with marginal smudge and/or imperfection at the top (not affecting miniature), one border and one initial slightly blurred by a minor splash, other trivial imperfections, but IN REMARKABLY FINE CONDITION, the binding and text showing very few signs of use, the vellum especially clean and fresh, and the text, paint, and glistening gold entirely intact. The finest Book of Hours we have ever offered for sale, this lovely manuscript was created at the leading atelier in Rouen, at a time when that city was producing the most sumptuous manuscripts in Europe, and it is notable for its uncommon contents and the high level of its aesthetic achievement. The illumination here bears the unmistakable marks of the workshop of the eponymous Master of the Geneva Latini, also known as the Master of the Échevinage de Rouen, and the work here is of such high quality that it is likely to have been done by the master himself, generally recognized as the most successful Norman illuminator of the period. Active in Rouen for a quarter century, beginning in the late 1450s, the artist painted a substantial number of chronicles, including perhaps a dozen copies of the Bouquechardière, Jean de Courcy's ancient history of the Rouen region; these were done for municipal patrons, or "échevins," from which our painter takes his name. While he earned great prestige for providing these large manuscripts, his workshop made its way by issuing Books of Hours. His work is characterized by very detailed and richly colored miniatures that have distinct similarities in composition (see, for example, Christopher de Hamel's comparison of several key details of four Geneva Latini Nativity scenes in "History of Illuminated Manuscripts"). Other particular distinguishing characteristics of the master are seen here in the use of grisaille acanthus leaves in the liquid gold border of the first miniature, and the use of an unusually opaque yellow pigment, noticed most prominently in the Betrayal miniature. The grisaille acanthus is useful in dating the manuscript, as it was a feature that made a limited appearance in the master's work in the early 1460s. And this fact is of great interest, as his early work is recognized as much superior to what came later, when demand invited the simplification of style in the name of more rapid production. While the dimensions and the number of miniatures are very different, the style, coloring, composition, delicacy, and finish of the illuminations here display a strong kinship with the Hours of Saint-Lô, the masterpiece of the Master of the Geneva Latini, which sold at the Ortiz-Patiño sale in 1998 for $3,3000,000, the highest price ever paid for a Book of Hours. Each of our 15 miniatures is a remarkable little achievement, with vibrant paint deftly applied in scenes of memorable realization composed in such a way as to bring about the optimal emotional response. All have richly detailed architecture, costumes, and backgrounds, and in the faces, our artist particularly shines, producing a wide range of features and expressions that manifest character as well as emotions. For example, the face of Joseph (often portrayed as buffoonish in Medieval art and drama) shows the confusion and concern of a man who finds himself completely out of his depth. When confronted with the Magi, he gawks comically at the three kings while clutching his head in amazement at the riches before him. As another example in a very different scene, the bloodied Christ looks down from the cross, conflicted with pity, regret, and resignation, as he sees his mother collapsed in the arms of Saint John. In addition to the expected texts, this manuscript contains the rare Hours of the Days of the Week, the Hours of the Compassion of the Virgin, the Long Hours of the Passion, the Psalter of Saint Jerome, the Athanasian Creed, two chapters from the Gospel of Matthew recounting the Passion of Christ, and additional prayers and devotions. Given the particularly full texts and uncommonly-seen miniatures (Christ among the Doctors, Salome with the head of John the Baptist), it seems likely that this manuscript would have been a commission of considerable importance that could only have been answered by the finest work the workshop could produce. The provenance here is intriguing and important. There are no Suffrages to the saints, but the inclusion of the full Hours of Saint Catherine and of Saint John the Baptist suggests that the work was commissioned by or for a couple with those patron saints. It is tempting to speculate that this Catherine and this John are represented by the richly attired young couple holding a candle in the Presentation miniature, standing in the spot normally occupied by Joseph (absent here, but present in other Geneva Latini manuscripts). The arms on the inserted leaves are probably those of early (though not the original) owners, some of them possibly members of noble families from Artois. The "MS Picard" on the morocco box that houses the volume indicates another possible owner: Charles-Adrien Picard (d. 1779), one of the greatest of all 18th century collectors, who owned more than 100 illuminated manuscripts of the very highest class. The present manuscript may have been lot #39 from his sale of 31 January 1780, "Heures, MSS sur vélin, decoré de XVI miniatures, in-8, v. m. dent d';or." The book later passed into the hands of Rebekah Bliss (1749-1819), England's earliest female bibliophile. It was bequeathed to her life-long companion Ann Whitaker (d. 1825), and sold as lot #461 in the Bliss sale at Saunders & Hodgson on 26 April 1826. It is likely that Bliss had the book rebound by the great English binder of the day, Charles Hering (d. 1815), who has been described as the artistic successor to Roger Payne. This manuscript has apparently not appeared in the marketplace since 1902, when it was offered in a Quaritch catalogue.

      [Bookseller: Phillip J. Pirages Fine Books and Mediev]
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        TEXT FROM THE SUFFRAGES

      Bruges, ca, 1460. 181 x 127 mm (7 1/8 x 5"). Single column, 16 lines of text (17 on verso) in an attractive gothic book hand. Rubrics in pink, two two-line initials in blue, magenta, and burnished gold, undulating line fillers in blue and gold, BOTH SIDES OF THE LEAF WITH THREE-QUARTER PANEL BORDERS incorporating foliage, blossoms, and ivy leaves on hairline stems, the vertical part of this frame with a bar border of colors and burnished gold terminating at top and bottom in colorful acanthus leaves, and WITH TWO SMALL BUT CHARMING MINIATURE PAINTINGS, SAINT STEPHEN ON THE RECTO AND SAINT LAWRENCE ON THE VERSO. IN ESPECIALLY FINE CONDITION, the paint without any perceptible erosion and the leaf generally fresh and clean. Saint Lawrence and Saint Stephen are paired together here, just as they are in the famous paintings of Fra Angelico in the Vatican chapel of Pope Nicholas V. Both were martyrs and both were deacons, Stephen serving the first community of Christians in Jerusalem, Lawrence ministering to the first Christians of Rome. They are here dressed in similar deacon outfits, royal blue tunics trimmed with gold over long white gowns which crumple about their feet. The artist has varied his treatment, centralizing the backdrop for Lawrence, who holds in his hand the gridiron on which he was grilled, and placing off center the angle of the room in which Stephen stands.

      [Bookseller: Phillip J. Pirages Fine Books and Mediev]
 12.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  


        LIBER SUPER ETHICORUM ARISTOTELIS (Commentary on the Ethics of Aristotle); Illuminated manuscript on vellum

      BOOK DESCRIPTION: ELEGANT RENAISSANCE ILLUMINATED MANUSCRIPT IN NEAR PRISTINE CONDITION IN LATIN ON VELLUM, Northeastern Italy (Ferrara?), c. 1460-1480, 340 x 235 mm.,160 folios, complete (collation, i-xii10, xii8, xiii-xvi10, xvii2), written in rounded southern gothic bookhands by three scribes in two columns of forty to thirty-eight lines (justification, 213-205 x 150-148 mm.), the first scribe copied ff. 1-67rb, and ff. 81va, line 27- 82ra, line 19, the second scribe, ff. 67va-81va, line 26, and the third scribe, ff. 82ra, line 19 to the end, red rubrics f. 1 only, red underlining through f. 4v, red and blue paragraph marks and running titles, three-line alternately red and blue initials with very fine violet or red pen decoration, diagram, f. 75v, NINE LARGE ILLUMINATED INITIALS with floral borders, f. 1, HISTORIATED INITIAL WITH THREE-QUARTER BORDER. BINDING: Bound in luxurious nineteenth-century red crushed morocco in the Jansenist style by R. Petit, spine with intricate monogram ("E M B"), elaborately gold-tooled turn-ins and green watered silk doublures, edges gauffered and gilt, front joint a little worn, minor rubbing and scuffs on the front and back covers, but in very good condition. TEXT: Thomas Aquinas (c.1224/1225-1274), the “Angelic Doctor,” has been called the greatest philosopher between Aristotle and Descartes. He wrote this commentary on Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics (ed. Opera Omnia vol. 47, 1969) later in his life, c. 1271-2, while writing his great Summa theologica (1265-1273). It follows Aristotle's text closely, providing a detailed explanation, often line by line, discussing the aim of moral philosophy, the definition of what is "good" for man, the virtues, both moral and intellectual, friendship, and the rewards (and limits) of pleasure and happiness. ILLUMINATION: This is an elegant example of a Renaissance manuscript decorated in the Ferrarese style. The border decoration (especially the flowers with long stamens), the animal roundel, and even the two-toned pink initials, exhibit many similarities to manuscripts illuminated by Guglielmo Giraldi (active 1445-1490), one of the favorite illuminators of the Este of Ferrara. The elegant illuminated frontispiece includes an historiated initial of St. Thomas, accompanied by a three-quarter floral border set in black ink trellises, with two painted roundels: the monogram, "YHS," and a white swan. PROVENANCE: The distinctive style of the illumination, script and pen work all support an origin in Northeastern Italy, very likely in Ferrara, c. 1460-1480, as suggested by the script, pen decoration and illumination; may have once have belonged to the Dominican Convent of SS. Giovanni e Paolo in Venice. Probably belonged to E. M. Bancel, the nineteenth-century collector (monogram on the spine is probably his). Belonged to the Haverhill Public Library, Massachusetts (De Ricci, Census, p. 1062, no. 1). CONDITION, f. 2 is creased with slight loss of legibility in one column (crease also visible on f. 1, text remains legible), f. 1, slightly soiled and with some pigment flaking in the border and initial, small ink smudges, ff. 75, 113, slight stain f. 81, ink on occasional pages abraded (no loss of text), overall in excellent, almost pristine, condition. Full description and photographs available (TM 629).

      [Bookseller: Les Enluminures ]
 13.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  


        APOCALYPSIS JOHANNIS (THE BOOK OF THE END OF THE WORLD) Fine Facsimile Edition of Hand Coloured Incunabulum

      Il Bulino. New. Hardcover. <p>The book of the End of the WorldThe codex is known as the Estense Apocalypse. It is a xylographic book, printed in brown ink, circa 1460, from the Dutch or Rhine region. The images are all hand coloured and therefore the codex is considered to be unique. It consists of 48 sheets, of which 44 are divided into two scenes while 4 show single scenes. Each plate is edged by a line that serves as both a frame and a border separating the scenes. The images are printed and coloured on the recto of the sheet while the verso is blank. In the 19th century the plates were detached, trimmed and glued to 22 × 29 cm sheets. The order of the plates, for the first time in this kind of codex, respects the biblical text and so increases the originality of the work. The block-cut Latin writing, in medium-large letters, is arranged in scrolls or freely outlines the figures, blending together with them perfectly, almost anticipating modern comics. </p><p>The apocalyptic imageryThe suggestive imagery of the Apocalypse was always an inviting source of inspiration for predication, astrology and for artists such as Memling, Albrecht Dürer and the medieval illuminators of the Beatus of Liébana. Our Apocalypse appears similar in style to the Bibliae Pauperum realized in the German area in the same period, and not too distant from the teachings of the Flemish school of the early 1400s; at the same time it seems to project itself towards models and moments of religious life still in gestation. In many scenes the engraver-painter shows neither respect nor pity for the faults of the clergy, a kind of prelude to the reformed rebellions that were to shake the Germanic world and the whole of Europe.   </p><p>Facsimile editionThe unabridged edition of the Estense Apocalypse, presented by Arturo Carlo Quintavalle at the Esten­se Library, has been realized according to Il Bu­lino&#146;s qualitative principles with the aim of producing a perfect facsimile of the original. The worn out 1900s binding in half leather and cardboard has now been substituted by a calfskin binding, especially made for the restoration of the original and this edition. The 96 page Italian commentary by Ernesto Milano is half leather bound. This world exclusive edition is limited to 999 certified copies numbered from 1 to 980 and I to XIX. Codex, commentary and certificate of authenticity are boxed together. </p> .

      [Bookseller: New Boston Fine and Rare Books]
 14.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  


        TEXT FROM THE SUFFRAGES

      1460. 181 x 127 mm (7 1/8 x 5"). Single column, 16 lines of text (17 on verso) in an attractive gothic book hand. Rubrics in pink, two two-line initials in blue, magenta, and burnished gold, undulating line fillers in blue and gold, BOTH SIDES OF THE LEAF WITH THREE-QUARTER PANEL BORDERS incorporating foliage, blossoms, and ivy leaves on hairline stems, the vertical part of this frame with a bar border of colors and burnished gold terminating at top and bottom in colorful acanthus leaves, and WITH TWO SMALL BUT CHARMING MINIATURE PAINTINGS, SAINT STEPHEN ON THE RECTO AND SAINT LAWRENCE ON THE VERSO.IN ESPECIALLY FINE CONDITION, the paint without any perceptible erosion and the leaf generally fresh and clean. Saint Lawrence and Saint Stephen are paired together here, just as they are in the famous paintings of Fra Angelico in the Vatican chapel of Pope Nicholas V. Both were martyrs and both were deacons, Stephen serving the first community of Christians in Jerusalem, Lawrence ministering to the first Christians of Rome. They are here dressed in similar deacon outfits, royal blue tunics trimmed with gold over long white gowns which crumple about their feet. The artist has varied his treatment, centralizing the backdrop for Lawrence, who holds in his hand the gridiron on which he was grilled, and placing off center the angle of the room in which Stephen stands.

      [Bookseller: Phillip J. Pirages Fine Books and Mediev]
 15.   Check availability:     ABAA     Link/Print  

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