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2020-09-17 05:09:10
Theodore Roosevelt
Perhaps the First Public, Recorded Statement - and Almost Surely the Earliest Autograph on the Market - of Then 27 Year Old Theodore Roosevelt in Favor of Racial Justice and Against Disenfranchisement of Blacks ""I don't care a snap of my finger whether a man fought on one side or the other, so long as he wishes to see justice done to all his fellow citizens now..." "I don't care a snap of my finger whether a man fought on one side or the other, so long as he wishes to see justice done to all his fellow citizens now..."
15/11/1885. He opposes "the present disenfranchisement of a class..."In the wake of the Civil War, Union troops occupied the old Confederacy in a period called Reconstruction. The goal was ostensibly to rebuild the South; but in fact the main policy was to enfranchise southern blacks, and with their votes, many Republicans (black and otherwise) were elected to office. This released a firestorm of discontent in the old Confederacy that grew with every year. Meanwhile, the North became increasingly weary of the burden of maintaining Reconstruction, and voices were raised that it was time to bring the last of the occupying troops home and let the South govern itself. Then in 1877, in order to gain the swing electoral votes to place a Republican - Rutherford B. Hayes - in the White House, a deal was struck to end Reconstruction.The Democratic Party in the South had a systematic plan to win the governorships of the southern states and then attempt to restore some of the way of life before the war, most notably by trying to restrict the right of southern blacks to vote. The end of Reconstruction made that plan a viable one, and in time the South became solidly Democratic and a program of segregation was implemented. By 1896 when the U.S. Supreme Court held that segregation was legal, the plan was complete.In the Virginia gubernatorial race of 1885, the Republican candidate was John Sergeant Wise, who had fought for the Confederacy as a teenager, but by 1885 was a champion for Republican causes. His Democratic opponent was Robert E. Lee's nephew (and Confederate general) Fitzhugh … [Click Below for Full Description]
Bookseller: The Raab Collection [United States]
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