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2020-09-16 16:03:04
John Tyler
President John Tyler, Wanting to Protect the Slave Trade, Writes Former Secretary of State Daniel Webster for Reassurance That the New Webster-Ashburton Treaty Gave British Vessels No Right to Board and Inspect Suspected Slave Ships Flying the American Flag "I have read and now return the private dispatches with which you favored me from Mr. [Edward] Everett and your letter in reply. Lord Ashburton must certainly be under great mistake in relation to what passed between you on the right of visit and of search. Most certainly but one language has been held in all our Cabinet consultations, which was uniformly in negative of any such right." "I have read and now return the private dispatches with which you favored me from Mr. [Edward] Everett and your letter in reply. Lord Ashburton must certainly be under great mistake in relation to what passed between you on the right of visit and of sea
22/05/1843. Our first presidential letter about the Webster-Ashburton Treaty, which settled the border between the United States and CanadaDuring Daniel Webster’s first term as Secretary of State (1841–1843), the primary foreign policy issues involved Great Britain. These included the northeast borders of the United States, the involvement of American citizens in the Canadian rebellion of 1837, and the suppression of the international slave trade. The Webster-Ashburton Treaty, signed August 9, 1842, resolved these frictions in Anglo-American relations.On April 4, 1842, British diplomat Lord Ashburton arrived in Washington at the head of a special mission to the United States. The first order of business was settling the border between the United States and Canada. Several disputes had arisen from differing interpretations of the 1783 Treaty of Paris that ended the Revolutionary War. When these differences led Canadian officials to arrest some Americans in disputed areas, Maine called out the militia and seized the territory in question, in the so-called Aroostock War. The incident dramatized the need for a border settlement. Webster and Ashburton agreed on a division of disputed territory, giving 7,015 square miles to the United States and 5,012 to Great Britain; they also agreed on the international boundary line through the Great Lakes to the Lake of the Woods; reaffirmed the location of the border in the westward frontier up to the Rocky Mountains; and agreed that the two parties would share use of the Great Lakes. The treaty also defined seven crimes subject to ext … [Click Below for Full Description]
Bookseller: The Raab Collection [United States]
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