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Displayed below are some selected recent viaLibri matches for books published in 1901

        The Harriman Alaska Expedition. Three volume set of the first editions; two in jackets

      New York: Doubleday, Page & Company. Very Good in Very Good dust jacket. 1901, v.3 1904. First Edition. Hardcover. T.e.gilt., deckled edges. Vol. I sports a stain to p. 108 into about six words & slight moisture marking to lower fore edge intermittently pp. 39-110; 130-155(not affecting images or text); otherwise fine. Volumes one and two in scarce canvas jackets. Volume two & three include photogravures by Edward S. Curtis. ; Quarto; Additional images and further information provided upon request. Please note this set will require additional postage. .

      [Bookseller: Virginia Book Shop, Inc., ABAA, ILAB, FA]
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        Collection of 29 offprints, mostly on liquid crystals. ex-libris Becquerel and von Karman

      1901 - Lehmann, Otto (1855-1922). Group of 29 offprints, pamphlets, etc., as listed below. Various sizes. V.p., 1901-13. Original wrappers or without wrappers as issued; see below for detailed condition statements. 21 of the items are from the library of Henri Becquerel (1852-1908) and his family; these bear the characteristic gummed label on the front or back wrapper. The remainder are from the library of Theodore von Karman (1881-1963), with his characteristic cataloguing stamp and docketing. First / First Separate Editions. Lehmann discovered liquid crystals, defined as "collections of long molecules tending statistically to lie along a specific direction" (Twentieth Cent. Phys., III, p. 1540); these have found numerous industrial and technological uses in the 20th century. Lehmann made his discovery in 1888-89, after the Austrian botanist Friedrich Reinitzer had sent him some cholesteric esters which showed two distinct melting points about 30 degrees apart. Lehmann determined "that the cloudy intermediate phase [between the two melting points] contained areas that possessed a molecular structure similar to that of solid crystals, and he called this phase 'liquid crystal'. . . . Lehmann's work stimulated much research in this area as well as studies to find technical applications of the phenomenon, and these efforts are still continuing" (DSB). Lehmann published two important books on liquid crystals (1904 & 1911), as well as about 120 papers in scientific journals; the present collection represents about one-fifth of his output of articles. Twenty-one of the items in this collection are from the library of Nobel laureate Henri Becquerel and his family. Becquerel and his son Jean both performed important research on crystals, with the latter's scientific career being primarily devoted to examination of the effect of a magnetic field on a crystal's optical properties. The remainder of this collection's offprints are from the library of Hungarian physicist Theodore von Karman, who in 1912 co-authored with Max Born the theory of crystal lattices. 1. Ueber Elektrisirung der Luft durch Glimmentladung. Offprint from Ann. Phys., 4th series, 6 (1901). 661-680pp. Fold. plate. Orig. ptd. wrappers, gummed label on front wrapper. 2. Der dunkel Kathodenraum. Offprint from Verh. Naturwiss. Vereins 15 (1902). 55pp. Text diagrams. Orig. ptd. wrappers, gummed label on front wrapper. 2 leaves loose. 3. Gasentladungen in weiten Gefassen. Offprint from Ann. Phys., 4th series, 7 (1902). 28pp. 2 fold. col. plates. Orig. ptd. wrappers, gummed label on front wrapper. 4. Die Gleichgewichtsform fester und flussiger Kristalle. Offprint from Ann. Phys., 4th series, 17 (1905). 728-734pp. Text diagrams. Orig. ptd. wrappers, gummed label on front wrapper. 5. Naherungsweise Bestimmung der Doppelbrechung fester und flussiger Kristalle. Offprint from Ann. Phys., 4th series, 18 (1905). 796-807pp. Orig. ptd. wrappers, gummed label on front wrapper. 6. Drehung der Polarisationsebene und der Absorptions-richtung bei flussigen Kristallen. Offprint from Ann. Phys., 4th series, 18 (1905). 808-810pp. Orig. ptd. wrappers, gummed label on front wrapper. 7. Homotropie und Zwillingsbildung bei fliessend-weichen Kristallen. Offprint from Ann. Phys., 4th series, 19 (1906). 9pp. Text illustration. Orig. ptd. wrappers, gummed label on front wrapper. 8. Fliessend-kristallinische Trichiten, deren Kraftwirkungen und Bewegungserscheinungen. Offprint from Ann. Phys., 4th series, 19 (1906). 22-35pp. Text illustration. Orig. ptd. wrappers, gummed label on front wrapper. Light spotting. 9. Dampf- und Losungstension an krummen Flachen. Offprint from Phys. Zeit. 7 (1906). 3pp. Orig. ptd. wrappers, creased horizontally, gummed label on front wrapper. 10. Die Farbenerscheinungen bei fliessenden Kristallen. Offprint from Phys. Zeit. 7 (1906). 7pp. Text diagrams. Orig. ptd. wrappers, creased horizontally, gummed label on back wrapper. 11. Die Gestaltungskraft fliessender Kristalle. Offprint f [Attributes: Soft Cover]

      [Bookseller: Jeremy Norman's historyofscience]
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        Sammlung der Drucksachen des Preussisches Hauses der Abgeordnenten, 19. Legislaturperiode, III. Session, 1901, in zwei voluminösen Bänden cpl.

      Moeser, Berlin 1901 - Enthält die Drucksachen des Jahres 1901 in diesen 2 Bänden cpl. Mit den Drucksachen Nr. 1 - 156. Mit zahlreichen Tabellen sowie einigen farbigen, teils mehrfach ausfaltbaren, großen Karten. ( Drucksache 23: " Entwurf eines Gesetzes, betreffend die Herstellung und den Ausbau von Kanälen und Flußläufen im Interesse des Schiffsverkehrs und der Landeskultur, und die über die Kanalisierung der Weser von Hameln bis Bremen am 15.März 1899 zwischen Preussen und Bremen sowie zwischen Preussen, Braunschweig und Bremen und am 1. April 1899 zwischen Preussen und Lippe abgeschlossenen Staatsverträge mit den zugehörigen Schlußprotokollen ". Mit einer Übersichtskarte der Wasserstraßen Preussens und der angrenzenden Länder ( zweifach )/ Karte des Verkehrs auf Deutschen Wasserstraßen im Jahre 1895 / Rhein-Elbe-Kanal: Übersichtsplan und Längenschnitt / Dortmund-Rhein-Kanal ( Laar-Herne) Emscherthallinie: Übersichtsplan / Übersichtskarte der Märkischen Wasserstraßen ( mehrfach ) / Wasserstraße Berlin-Hohensaathen (West-u.Ostlinie Übersichtsplan ) / Wasserstraße Berlin-Hohensaathen ( Westlinie: Längenschnitt ) / Karte des Verkehrs auf den Märkischen Wasserstraßen im Jahre 1898 / Verkehr auf der Wasserstraße Berlin-Hohensaathen im Jahre 1898 / Wasserstraße Oder-Weichsel: Übersichtsplan und Längenschnitt sowie Bromberger Kanal und Brahe /( Verbesserung der Vorflut der unteren Oder ( Übersichtsplan und Längenschnitt ) / Verbesserung der Vorfluts-u.Schiffahrsverhältnisse in der unteren Havel / Regulierung der Spree ( Übersichtsplan ). Mit der Drucksache Nr. 6: " Drucksachen des Eisenbahnraths "( 327 Seiten mit einigen Anlagen ) sowie Drucksache Nr. 7 " Bericht über die Ergebnisse des Betriebes der vereinigten preussischen und hessischen Staatseisenbahnen im Rechnungsjahr 1899 " mit 248 Seiten incl. einiger Anlagen. Vor den einzelnen Drucksachen meist ein Inhaltsverzeichnis. Goldgeprägte Ohln, 4°. Einbände etwas berieben, Kanten bestoßen. Innen Exlibris, Bibliotheksvermerke, Buchschnitt stärker angestaubt. 1 Lage verkehrt herum eingebunden. ( Pic erhältlich / webimage available ) [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Friederichsen]
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        The Master Key. An Electrical Fairy Tale Founded Upon the Mysteries of Electricity and the Optimism of Its Devotees. It Was Written for Boys, But Others May Read It

      Indianapolis: The Bowen-Merrill Company Publishers, [1901]. First Edition, First State. IN VERY GOOD ANTIQUARIAN CONDITION. 8vo. [18], 1-245 pp. Complete with 12 color plates plus b/w illustrations in the text by Fanny Y. Corey. Bound in original publisher's green, gilt, front panel with illustrated paper overlay (very minor wear). Protected by mylar sleeve THE MYSTERIES OF ELECTRICITY, here told by the creator of Dorothy and the Wizard of Oz, and presented in the form of science-fiction for boys and girls. Indeed, The Master Key is "a strange story of the electrical Demon, treating of powers that dominate all nature" (The New York Times, November 9, 1901). -- Baum's novel was inspired by his own son's obsession for all things electrical. The protagonist of the story, Rob Joslyn, is in most respects an ordinary American teenager; his one distinguishing peculiarity is his passion for the new science and craft of electricity. He has his own laboratory in the attic of the family home, and has rigged the house with his electrical gadgets. One day, amid the bewildering cluster of circuits and wires in his workshop, Rob causes a blinding flash of light, from which emerges the DEMON OF ELECTRICITY. -- Our copy belongs to the First edition, First State according to Schiller (no. 77) with "The Bowen-Merrill Company" on copyright measuring 1 21/32 inches in length. Baughman, no. 77: "This 'fairy tale founded upon the wonders of electricity' might be considered a venture into the realm of science fiction. It is the story of a boy who, in the course of his experimentations with the electrical equipment that fills his room, accidentally touches the Master Key and summons up the Demon of Electricity." -- Baum begins his story with a short note to the reader titled "Who Knows?" ("The impossibilities of yesterday become the accepted facts of today") and a quote on wonder from Samuel Taylor Coleridge. -- REFERENCES: Carrie L. Hedges. "The Master Key: Its Electrical Origins." The Baum Bugle, Vol. 45 No. 3 (Winter 2001), pp. 6-12. Bleiler, Science-Fiction: The Early Years, no. 136. Anatomy of Wonder (1987), no. 5-9. Clareson, Science Fiction in America, 1870-1930, no. 49. Locke, A Spectrum of Fantasy, p. 29.

      [Bookseller: Michael Laird Rare Books LLC]
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        AliceÕs Adventures in Wonderland

      London: Harper & Brothers, 1901. 8vo, xvii, 193 pp. with frontispiece portrait of Carroll, forty black and white plates by Newell, and decorative page borders in green by Robert Murray Wright. Original white paper boards and green dustjacket, both with titles and embossed image of Alice in gilt. Boards slightly spotted, jacket fading to brown and cracking at folds, complete but for a chip in the crown of the spine and very rarely seen better. First edition illustrated by Peter Newell. Newell was the first major illustrator to tackle CarrollÕs work after Tenniel (RackhamÕs Alice was not published until 1907) and the first to depart significantly from TennielÕs vision, opening the door to the many varied interpretations of the twentieth century. His soft pencil drawings emphasize the comedy in the book and often depict moments that Tenniel and the intervening illustrators ignored, such as the three sisters who lived at the bottom of the well and the moment the hedgehog croquet balls commence to fight. An important milestone in the history of AliceÕs Adventures in Wonderland.

      [Bookseller: John Windle Antiquarian Bookseller]
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        The Book of Sport

      New York: J.F. Taylor, 1901. Autograph edition, no. 24 of 50 copies. Hand-colored frontispiece in vol. I (The Girl Who Rides, painting by Henry Hutt), inserted hand-colored frontispiece in vol. II (Off Sandy Hook, painting by J. Verrier) not called for in contents. Profusely illustrated throughout with photographs and drawings; in this edition, the frontispieces and many of the small illustrations have been hand colored. xvi, [1]-280; [iv], [281]-554, [2] pp. 2 vols. Folio. Full green morocco, gilt sporting device centered on upper cover with thistles as cornerpieces, panelled spine also gilt with thistles, t.e.g., others uncut, by H. Blackwell. Fine. One of 50 copies, Superbly Bound An imposing compilation of sporting personalities and statistics, illustrated with drawings and numerous photographic portraits taken especially for this book. THE TWO CHAPTER, 80-PAGE SECTION ON AMERICAN GOLF IS PARTICULARLY INTERESTING, being divided into "Golf-The Women" and "Golf-The Men" written by the sport's recent champions, Ruth Underhill and Beatrix Hoyt, and H.M. Harriman and Findley S. Douglas, and featuring the leading competitors in the field, as well as tournament statistics for 1895-1900. There is a large, six chapter, 53-page section on COURT-TENNIS AND RACQUETS, along with three chapters (48 pages) on LAWN TENNIS; four chapters (43 pages) on POLO (the chapter "Polo in England" being written by Foxhall Keene); chapters on FOX HUNTING, COACHING (by Oliver H.P. Belmont), MOTORING, and a final four chapters (80 pages) on sail and steam YACHTING by H.B. Duryea and W.P. Stephens. A MONUMENTAL AND BEAUTIFUL RECORD OF TURN-OF-THE-CENTURY SPORT.

      [Bookseller: James Cummins Bookseller]
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        Only Perfect Flour Makes Perfect Bread. N.T. Swezey's Son & Co. Flour. 224 Produce Exchange. New York. Est. 1835

      New York: J. Ottman Lith Co. N.Y. 1901. (Poster) Very good. Artist Unknown. Original Calendar 16.5" X 23.5" in heavy wooden frame 22" X 28". In very good condition. Some small light stains and minor wrinkling. Small date block printed onto calendar below image (not tear off style). A beautiful vintage image. N. T. (Noah Terry) Swezey was a flour merchant in New York City. He ran a successful business for over forty years at 176 South St., and was one of the founders of the New York Produce Exchange. The calendar shows an image of two angelic children, one caucasian and one african american playing with a barrel and sack of flour..

      [Bookseller: Aquila Books]
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        "The Day of the Rabblement" [published in Two Essays. "A Forgotten Aspect of the University Question" by F.J.C. Skeffington and "The Day of the Rabblement" by James A. Joyce]

      Dublin: Gerrard Bros, 1901. First edition of Joyce's second published work, one of 85 published. 8 pp. 1 vols. 8vo. Original pink printed wrappers, stapled. Faint crease marks from prior folding, small stain to top margin. In red cloth drop box. Joyce's Second Published Work The first edition of Joyce's second published work, and his first appearance in a book, one of only 85 copies printed (his first appearance was a review of Ibsen's When We Dead Awaken published in the Fortnightly Review the previous year). Joyce's essay, written when he was a nineteen-year-old student at University College, Dublin, is an attack on the Irish Literary Theater and its founders - Yeats, Moore and Martyn. He accuses them of abandoning the high ideals of the Theater's founding and catering to popular tastes, becoming "the property of the rabblement of the most belated race in Europe." The essay appears here in print with school friend F.J.C. Skeffington's essay advocating equal university rights for women. Both essays were first rejected ("refused insertion by the Censor") by St. Stephen's, the newspaper of the University College, Dublin, at which point Joyce and Skeffington gathered the 2 pounds 5 shillings necessary to have the essays printed at a local stationery shop.

      [Bookseller: James Cummins Bookseller ]
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        The Poems of Percy Bysshe Shelley

      [London: Sold by Hacon & Ricketts, The Vale Press, 17 Craven Street, Strand & John Lane, New York, 1901. One of 300 copies. Decorated by Charles Ricketts. (12), ccxpp.; (12), clxxxviii pp.; (12), clxxxviii pp. 3 vols. 8vo. Cream cloth, spines faded. With the bookplate of Cortlandt F. Bishop. Cortlandt Bishop Copy

      [Bookseller: James Cummins Bookseller]
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        Sonnets

      London: Johnson, 1901. Limited. hardcover. fine. Frontispiece reproduction by G.F. Watts. 32mo, full green leather with gilt floral design & leather inlays, gilt spine, all edges gilt, by Riviere. London: Brimley Johnson & Guildford: A.C. Curtis, 1901. Limited Edition. Fine Number 49 of only 60 copies on Japanese vellum. A little gem.

      [Bookseller: Argosy Book Store]
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        CASHEL BYRON'S PROFESSION. A Novel

      Grant Richards. London. 1901. First separate issue, larger untrimmed variant, inscribed by the author. Originally printed in the April 1885-March 1886 issues of "To-Day", this first edition was printed from the corrected and revised stereos of the original setting for the journal. This is the larger, variant issue, with the preliminary blank leaf bound at the beginning. Shaw explains the variant this way: "The size of the bigger copies is due to the fact that they reproduced not only the type but the format of To-day. But the booksellers objected that in this form it occupied too much room to be displayed on their stalls and counters. It was probably cut down as far as the margins would allow to meet this objection" (Laurence). Inscribed by Shaw, "This is the first Issue, which was so tall that the booksellers refused to exhibit it on their counters, as it took too much room. So it had to be cut down. G. Bernard Shaw 26/7/30." . ---- Housed in a green cloth covered chemise and quarter green morocco slip case with raised bands and gilt rules and lettering to the spine. The slip case is a little rubbed and faded to the spine but generally very good. Laurence A3.

      [Bookseller: Paul Foster Books]
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        Collection of 29 offprints, mostly on liquid crystals. ex-libris Becquerel and von Karman

      1901. Lehmann, Otto (1855-1922). Group of 29 offprints, pamphlets, etc., as listed below. Various sizes. V.p., 1901-13. Original wrappers or without wrappers as issued; see below for detailed condition statements. 21 of the items are from the library of Henri Becquerel (1852-1908) and his family; these bear the characteristic gummed label on the front or back wrapper. The remainder are from the library of Theodore von Karman (1881-1963), with his characteristic cataloguing stamp and docketing. First / First Separate Editions. Lehmann discovered liquid crystals, defined as "collections of long molecules tending statistically to lie along a specific direction" (Twentieth Cent. Phys., III, p. 1540); these have found numerous industrial and technological uses in the 20th century. Lehmann made his discovery in 1888-89, after the Austrian botanist Friedrich Reinitzer had sent him some cholesteric esters which showed two distinct melting points about 30 degrees apart. Lehmann determined "that the cloudy intermediate phase [between the two melting points] contained areas that possessed a molecular structure similar to that of solid crystals, and he called this phase 'liquid crystal'. . . . Lehmann's work stimulated much research in this area as well as studies to find technical applications of the phenomenon, and these efforts are still continuing" (DSB). Lehmann published two important books on liquid crystals (1904 & 1911), as well as about 120 papers in scientific journals; the present collection represents about one-fifth of his output of articles. Twenty-one of the items in this collection are from the library of Nobel laureate Henri Becquerel and his family. Becquerel and his son Jean both performed important research on crystals, with the latter's scientific career being primarily devoted to examination of the effect of a magnetic field on a crystal's optical properties. The remainder of this collection's offprints are from the library of Hungarian physicist Theodore von Karman, who in 1912 co-authored with Max Born the theory of crystal lattices. 1. Ueber Elektrisirung der Luft durch Glimmentladung. Offprint from Ann. Phys., 4th series, 6 (1901). 661-680pp. Fold. plate. Orig. ptd. wrappers, gummed label on front wrapper. 2. Der dunkel Kathodenraum. Offprint from Verh. Naturwiss. Vereins 15 (1902). 55pp. Text diagrams. Orig. ptd. wrappers, gummed label on front wrapper. 2 leaves loose. 3. Gasentladungen in weiten Gefassen. Offprint from Ann. Phys., 4th series, 7 (1902). 28pp. 2 fold. col. plates. Orig. ptd. wrappers, gummed label on front wrapper. 4. Die Gleichgewichtsform fester und flussiger Kristalle. Offprint from Ann. Phys., 4th series, 17 (1905). 728-734pp. Text diagrams. Orig. ptd. wrappers, gummed label on front wrapper. 5. Naherungsweise Bestimmung der Doppelbrechung fester und flussiger Kristalle. Offprint from Ann. Phys., 4th series, 18 (1905). 796-807pp. Orig. ptd. wrappers, gummed label on front wrapper. 6. Drehung der Polarisationsebene und der Absorptions-richtung bei flussigen Kristallen. Offprint from Ann. Phys., 4th series, 18 (1905). 808-810pp. Orig. ptd. wrappers, gummed label on front wrapper. 7. Homotropie und Zwillingsbildung bei fliessend-weichen Kristallen. Offprint from Ann. Phys., 4th series, 19 (1906). 9pp. Text illustration. Orig. ptd. wrappers, gummed label on front wrapper. 8. Fliessend-kristallinische Trichiten, deren Kraftwirkungen und Bewegungserscheinungen. Offprint from Ann. Phys., 4th series, 19 (1906). 22-35pp. Text illustration. Orig. ptd. wrappers, gummed label on front wrapper. Light spotting. 9. Dampf- und Losungstension an krummen Flachen. Offprint from Phys. Zeit. 7 (1906). 3pp. Orig. ptd. wrappers, creased horizontally, gummed label on front wrapper. 10. Die Farbenerscheinungen bei fliessenden Kristallen. Offprint from Phys. Zeit. 7 (1906). 7pp. Text diagrams. Orig. ptd. wrappers, creased horizontally, gummed label on back wrapper. 11. Die Gestaltungskraft fliessender Kristalle. Offprint from Phys. Zeit. 7 (1906). 11pp. Orig. ptd. wrappers, creased horizontally, gummed label on back wrapper. 12. Uber flussige Kristalle. Offprint from Phys. Zeit. 8 (1906). 9pp. Orig. ptd. wrappers, creased horizontally, gummed label on back wrapper. 13. Flussige Kristalle und mechanische Technologie. Offprint from Phys. Zeit. 8 (1906). 5pp. Text illus. Orig. ptd. wrappers, creased horizontally, gummed label on front wrapper. 14. Fliessende Kristalle und Organismen. Offprint from Arch. Entwicklungsmechanik der Organismen 21 (1906). 14pp. Double-page plate, text illus. Orig. ptd. wrappers, gummed label on front wrapper. 15. Die Struktur der scheinbar lebenden Kristalle. Offprint from Ann. Phys., 4th series, 20 (1906). 63-76pp. Text diagrams. Orig. ptd. wrappers, gummed label on front wrapper. 16. Dir Kontinuitat der Aggregatzustande und die flussigen Kristalle. Offprint from Ann. Phys., 4th series, 20 (1906). 77-86pp. Orig. ptd. wrappers, gummed label on front wrapper. 17. Die Gestaltungskraft fliessender Kristalle. Offprint from Verh. Deutsch. Phys. Gesell. 8 (1906). 143-146pp. Orig. ptd. wrappers, gummed label on front wrapper. Light spotting. 18. Scheinbar lebende fliessende Kristalle. Offprint from Umschau 17 (1906). 7pp. Text illustrations. Without wrappers as issued, creased horizontally, small marginal tears. 19. Die wichtigsten Begriffe und Gesetze der Physik. . . . Berlin: Springer, 1907. 58 [2]pp. Orig. wrappers, gummed label on front wrapper. 20. [Prospectus for] Flussige Kristalle und die Theorien des Lebens. Leipzig: Barth, 1907. [4]pp. Without wrappers as issued, gummed label on first leaf. 21. Uber die van der Waalssche Formel und die Kontinuitat der Aggregatzustande, Erwiderung an K. Fuchs. Offprint from Ann. Phys., 4th series, 22 (1907). 469-480pp. Orig. ptd. wrappers, gummed label on front wrapper. 22. Einfluss von Wirbelbewegung auf die Struktur flussiger Kristalle. Offprint from Ann. Phys., 4th series, 39 (1912). 80-110pp. Text illus. Orig. ptd. wrappers. Karman's cataloguing stamp & docketing. 23. Energiequanten und Magnetonen. Offprint from Verh. Naturwiss. Vereins 24 (1912). 23pp. Orig. ptd. wrappers. Karman's cataloguing stamp & docketing. 24. Magnetische Analyse flussiger Kristalle. Offprint from Phys. Zeit. 13 (1912). 10pp. 2 plates. Orig. ptd. wrappers, creased horizontally. Karman's cataloguing stamp & docketing. 25. Wahl und Benennung der Krafteinheit. Offprint from Zeit. f. Instrumentenkunde (1913). 279-280pp. Single sheet, unbound, creased horizontally. Karman's cataloguing stamp & docketing. 26. Die Beweise fur die Existenz von Molekelen und die Sichtbarmachung der Molekularstruktur von Kristallen durch Rontgenstrahlen. Offprint from Verh. Naturwiss. Vereins 25 (1913). 58pp. Text illus. Orig. ptd. wrappers, front wrapper loose. Karman's cataloguing stamp & docketing. 27. Flussige Kristalle, Molekularstruktur und Molekularkrafte. Offprint from Verh. Naturwiss. Vereins 25 (1913). 29pp. Orig. ptd. wrappers. Karman's cataloguing stamp & docketing. 28. Die Quellung flussiger Kristalle. Offprint from Phys. Zeit. 14 (1913). 5pp. Without wrappers as issued, Karman's cataloguing stamp & docketing. 29. Flussige Kristalle, Molekule und Lebewesen. Offprint from Prometheus 25 (1913). 9pp. Plate. Without wrappers as issued, Karman's cataloguing stamp & docketing.

      [Bookseller: Jeremy Norman's Historyofscience.com]
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        Alice?s Adventures in Wonderland

      London: Harper & Brothers, 1901. 8vo, xvii, 193 pp. with frontispiece portrait of Carroll, forty black and white plates by Newell, and decorative page borders in green by Robert Murray Wright. Original white paper boards and green dustjacket, both with titles and embossed image of Alice in gilt. Boards slightly spotted, jacket fading to brown and cracking at folds, complete but for a chip in the crown of the spine and very rarely seen better. First edition illustrated by Peter Newell. Newell was the first major illustrator to tackle CarrollÕs work after Tenniel (RackhamÕs Alice was not published until 1907) and the first to depart significantly from TennielÕs vision, opening the door to the many varied interpretations of the twentieth century. His soft pencil drawings emphasize the comedy in the book and often depict moments that Tenniel and the intervening illustrators ignored, such as the three sisters who lived at the bottom of the well and the moment the hedgehog croquet balls commence to fight. An important milestone in the history of AliceÕs Adventures in Wonderland.

      [Bookseller: John Windle Antiquarian Bookseller ]
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        The Salmon Fly. [With:] Tips

      London: The Author, 1901. First Editions. With 8 plates of hand-colored flies in the first title. 2 vols. 4to. Original purple cloth over bevelled boards. Some spotting to upper covers of first volume, else fine; second volume fine. Black quarter morocco drop box.

      [Bookseller: James Cummins Bookseller]
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        Harriman Alaska Expedition, Alaska Volume I: Narrative, Glaciers, Natives; Volume II: History, Geography, Resources

      New York: Doubleday, Page & Company, 1901. First Edition. Cloth. Very Good/No Dust Jacket. New York: Doubleday, Page & Company, 1901. First Edition. Cloth. Doubleday, Page & Company. Two volumes, quartos, gilt stamped green cloth, 383 pages + maps + 85 photogravure plates (some by Edward Curtis) + 39 chromolithograph plates. Many in-text engravings. Top edge gilt. First Edition of the initial publication of the Harriman Alaska Expedition which explored and documented the Alaska coast. Bookplates to front paste downs. Text and plates very good. (DH-harriman).

      [Bookseller: Anderson Butler Rare Books]
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        [Grammar of Color in Ancient Japanese Armor]. / Shoko gaishoku ichiran [i.e. Catalogue of Colour Combinations and Designs on Old Armour]

      Tokyo: Yoshikawa Hanshichi, 1901 [Meiji 34]. Original wrappers. Very good. Two volumes, small quarto publisher's decorated wrappers with printed labels; 22 + 19 folded leaves, profusely illustrated throughout with color woodblock designs. Preserved in a folding protective case. Fascinating analysis of colors and color combinations of "odoshi," the art of lacing ancient Japanese armor. This panoply of color patterns is tantamount to a grammar of color, the likes of which we have not encountered hitherto. Styles of lacing often involved diversified and imaginative patterns, as is seen herein. The dazzling array of color illustrations was executed by Kawasaki (Senko) Chitora (1835-1902), a.k.a. 'Kojitsuka', who was an authority on early Japanese armor, samurai dress and customs. Through the selection of colors, or by the patterns of lacing employed, the warrior could identify members of various clans by the particular colors used in the lacing and decoration of their armor. Indeed, the system of lacing became an art in its own right, called "odoshi-gei." Here Kojitsuka presents color lacing patterns a "sode" (specifically an o-sode) as was traditional. Popular silk braid colors include: aka (red), hi (deep orange, but wrongly translated as "scarlet"), moegi (green), yomogi (pale green), murasaki (purple), shiro (white), and kuro (black), and shiro (white), the color of mourning in Japan. The wearer of a suit of armor laced with shiro cords indicated that he did not expect to emerge from the battle alive. This two volume work, complete in itself, formed part of the remarkable Kojitsu Sosho series ("Library of Ancient Customs"), a massive effort which took seven years to create and ultimately comprised 54 volumes. Originally published in 1833, this is the second edition and is not to be confused with the 1930 reprint. Ours appears to be the only complete copy on the market.

      [Bookseller: Michael Laird Rare Books LLC]
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        Indian album. Souvenir of Junagadha. Presented to H. E. Lord Northcote, governor of Bombay, by H. H. Rasulkhanji.

      Nawab of Junagadth 1901. 60 original photographs, (silver prints ca 365 x 285 mm slightly varying in size) mountred on 30 grey cardboard leaves with mounted and printed captions. Cont. brown morocco, richly gilt all over, all edges gilt. Oblong folio (465 x 380 mm). Minor rubbing to gilding else fine.. The album was given to Lord Northcote by the ruler Mohammad Rasul Khanji (1892 - 1911). A marvellous album with views of buildings, streets, campsites, landscape, portraits etc. from the city and district of Junagadh, nowadays part ot the state of Gujarat. The photographs are unfortunately not signed. - All in very good tonal ranges.

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Mertens & Pomplun GbR (Versa]
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        La belle France

      Stock 1901 - - Stock, Paris 1901, 12x19cm, broché. - Edition originale sur papier courant, il n'a été tiré que 5 Hollande en grands papiers. Rare envoi autographe signé de l'auteur à Emile Faguet. Dos insolé, fendillé et restauré, manques angulaires comblés sur les plats. - [Automatic english translation: ] Edition on current paper, it has been printed in Holland paper as 5 leading copies. Rare autograph dedication signed by the author Emile Faguet. Insolated back, cracked and restored, angular gaps filled on the boards. --- Please note that the translation in english is done automatically, we apologize if the formulas are inaccurate. Contact us for any information! [Attributes: First Edition; Signed Copy; Soft Cover]

      [Bookseller: Librairie Le Feu Follet]
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        "The Day of the Rabblement" [published in Two Essays. "A Forgotten Aspect of the University Question" by F.J.C. Skeffington and "The Day of the Rabblement" by James A. Joyce]

      Dublin: Gerrard Bros, 1901. First edition of Joyce's second published work, one of 85 published. 8 pp. 1 vols. 8vo. Original pink printed wrappers, stapled. Faint crease marks from prior folding, small stain to top margin. In red cloth drop box. Joyce's Second Published Work The first edition of Joyce's second published work, and his first appearance in a book, one of only 85 copies printed (his first appearance was a review of Ibsen's When We Dead Awaken published in the Fortnightly Review the previous year). Joyce's essay, written when he was a nineteen-year-old student at University College, Dublin, is an attack on the Irish Literary Theater and its founders - Yeats, Moore and Martyn. He accuses them of abandoning the high ideals of the Theater's founding and catering to popular tastes, becoming "the property of the rabblement of the most belated race in Europe." The essay appears here in print with school friend F.J.C. Skeffington's essay advocating equal university rights for women. Both essays were first rejected ("refused insertion by the Censor") by St. Stephen's, the newspaper of the University College, Dublin, at which point Joyce and Skeffington gathered the 2 pounds 5 shillings necessary to have the essays printed at a local stationery shop.

      [Bookseller: James Cummins Bookseller]
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        Signed First Day Cover (FDC) from President Roosevelt's well known stamp collection commemorating the 25th anniversary of airmail, Dayton, May 15, 1943, noting Dayton, Ohio as the "Birthplace of Aviation."

      The FDC is addressed to "The Honorable Franklin D. Roosevelt, The White House, Washington, D. C. " To the left is a printed commemorative 24 cent stamp, "sponsored by the Dayton Philatelic Society," and to its right, Wright has signed in full, "Orville Wright." The FDC is also signed by aviation pioneer and pilot, Ruth Nichols, (1901-1960) the only woman to hold simultaneous world records for speed, altitude and distance by a female pilot. The FDC is encased in a plastic wrapper and placed atop a printed black and white photograph of the Wright Brothers historic first flight from Kitty Hawk. Below this image is a typed note indicating provenance from Roosevelt's stamp collection. "From the stamp collection of President Franklin D. Roosevelt, authenticated by H. R. Harmer, Inc. New York." The note is separately matted under the photograph. All pieces together In original mat and silver and brown wooden frame measuring 19" x 19" square. Roosevelt began collecting stamps when he was eight years old, introduced to the hobby by his mother, herself a stamp collector. Her philatelic collection was passed down to FDR who claimed that stamp collecting saved his life. When he died and his stamp collection went to auction, there were some 1.2 million stamps in the collection. The collection sold at H.R. Harmer, Inc. in two sales on Feb. 4-5 and Apr. 1-2, 1946. Roosevelt had a hand in what stamps were issued during his tenure in office. In a Smithsonianmag.com article on the 2009 exhibition of FDR's stamp collection, Jordan Seffen writes, "During his administration, Roosevelt played a critical role in much of the creation, design and promotion of some 200 stamps released during his time in office (1933-1945). John Finch, in his article "The Great American Stamp Collector: FDR" at stamps.about.com states, "He contributed to the design of U.S. stamps, turned Lindbergh into a philatelic flyer, promoting airmail for the USPOD - Lindy even got his own stamp, in contravention of the post office's rules against honoring the living on a stamp...." Orville Wright, born in Dayton, Ohio, was the first man to fly a motored airplane, on December 17, 1903. Wright was in Cleveland, Ohio on May 13, 1943, so very likely in Dayton on May 15, the date of the FDC. He attended the dedication of the new (at that time) National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics' Aircraft Engine Research Laboratory (later to become the Lewis Research Center in Cleveland, and later still, in 1958, taken over by NASA). In a 1945 directory, Orville Wright was listed as a member of this committee. In addition to being in Ohio, May 13 was also when the first authorized biography of the Wright Brothers ("Wright Brothers" by Fred C. Kelly) as published (Harcourt Brace & Co., New York). And another related event, in May of 1943, the Orville Wright Air Scouts Squadron was organized in Dayton. In October, 1943, FDR invited Wright to attend a dinner and be honored on the occasion of the 40th anniversary of the first flights of the Wright Brothers in 1903. That event was held in December of 1943. Ruth Rowland Nichols (1901-1960) was an aviation pioneer, the only woman to hold simultaneous world records for speed, altitude and distance by a female pilot. She was the first woman to obtain a hydroplane license (1924) and the first woman pilot of a commercial passenger airline (1932). She was born in New York City into a wealthy family. As a high school graduation present, her father gave her a ride on an airplane. She graduated from Wellesley in 1924 and got her pilot's license shortly thereafter. She was a founding member, with Amelia Earhart, of the Nonety-Nines, in 1929, an organization of licensed women pilots that still exists today. During World War II, Nichols organized and headed "Relief Wings," a flying ambulance for mercy missions. She also few in the Civil Air Patrol. Nichols was inducted into the National Aviation Hall of Fame in 1992. Nichols' connection to Orville Wright, other than the two being pioneers of aviation, is that on November 19, 1932, when the 60-foot granite pylon commemorating the Wright Brothers flight of December 17, 1903 was unveiled, it was unveiled by Ruth Nichols. Orville Wright, of course, attended and thanked her on behalf of himself and his already deceased brother.

      [Bookseller: Schulson Autographs ]
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        POEMS

      George Bell & Sons. London. 1901. Reprint of the Second edition, revised and with new illustrations, originally published in 1898. Fully illustrated throughout with dozens of full page and smaller illustrations in line. Attractive early leather binding by Riviere. Full red morocco. Spine with raised bands, each decorated in gilt using heart and cross tools. Compartments with elaborate floral gilt design. Gilt double ruled borders with floral corner pieces and intermittent dots, all in gilt, to the inner boards. Marbled endpapers. All edges gilt. Some minor rubbing to the front hinge but still overall a very good copy in a beautiful early 20th century binding.

      [Bookseller: Paul Foster Books]
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        Harriman Alaska Expedition, Alaska, Volume I: Narrative, Glaciers, Natives; Volume II: History, Geography, Resources

      New York: Doubleday, Page & Company, 1901. First Edition. Hardcover. Fine. Two volumes, continuously numbered, xxvii, 383 pp, indexed. Complete with 39 color plates from paintings of landscapes, birds, mammals, and flowers, 76 photogravure plates and 4 maps (2 on one folding plate). Original green cloth stamped in gilt. A lovely set; both volumes clean and sound, with minimal wear to the boards. No dust jackets. Organized and financed by railroad magnate Edward H. Harriman, the Harriman Alaska Expedition included 25 scientists and naturalists, as well as sizeable team of photographers and artists, among them Edward Curtis, Frank Dellenbaugh, and Louis Agassiz Fuertes. During the summer of 1899, the party cruised the waters off southeastern and southern Alaska and the eastern Aleutians, making numerous stops for scientific investigation and collecting. The Narrative, which recounts the party's transcontinental train journey and voyage from Seattle via the Inside Passage (with descriptions of the scenery, glaciers, villages, native people, and fauna and flora), was written by Burroughs. Muir authored the section on glaciers, Grinnell wrote about the natives of the Alaska coast region, and Dall provided a history of exploration in Alaska. Arctic Bib. 2544; 6676; Wickersham 4013; Kimes 229.

      [Bookseller: Walkabout Books, ABAA]
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        An important series of 47 letters from Benjamin to his second wife, the author Fannie Nichols Weed Benjamin, and to his daughter Edith

      [New York and elsewhere], 1901. Approximately 170 pages, pen and ink. 8vo or small quarto. A few letters incomplete, old folds, some darkening which very occasionally leads to a line or two being illegible. Approximately 170 pages, pen and ink. 8vo or small quarto. Samuel Greene Wheeler Benjamin (February 13, 1837 - July 19, 1914) was an American statesman. His parents were American missionaries in Greece. Born in Argos, Greece, but then educated in the United States, he pursued careers as a journalist, author, and diplomat. In 1883, he was appointed as the first American Minister to Persia, a post he occupied for two years. It was he who first drafted the diplomatic code used by the American legation in Persia. The letters from S.G.W. Benjamin to his wife and daughter (and one letter from his daughter to him) are as follows: 1. June 13 1882. 4pp. on headed paper 'The Century, 109 East 15th Street [New York]', autograph letter signed with initials, to an unnamed recipient, but to his soon-to-be-second wife Fanny or Fannie. A love letter ('...I love you and impatiently await the day that unites our lives!...") and mentioning that he has 'an immense pressure of work to get through with before I leave for Charlottetown last of next week.' 2. June 25 1882. 8pp. (of 12pp., pp.1-7 and 12 are present), written on board the 'Sch.[ooner] Alice May /Grande Ligne, Madame Is. [Nova Scotia]', autograph letter signed with initials, to Fannie 'My dear heart', a love letter ('...I treasure these dear letters written during the days before our marriage. I can think of nothing but you...") and mentioning that financial demands will mean that he is tied to New York 'as the Magazine of Art obliges me to be there part of every month, I was able to get away this summer only by providing & paying a substitute. Then the articles about this cruise must be ready by Nov. 1st'. He goes into some detail about his financial prospects, mentions that he would prefer to live somewhere near New York, and perhaps rent a cottage for the summer the following year. He also mentions the potential for a diplomatic post 'As regards the consulate, the question is this way. For me to leave America just now would be prejudicial to my literary and art interests at my age. Later a consulate m[a]y be a good thing, & I look forward to a residence somewhere abroad'. The final page includes more details of the cruise: dining at Arichat, and plans to sail on to Georgetown, Prince Edward Island. The 'Century Magazine' published Benjamin's articles which were collected and then published as a book by Appleton's in 1885: 'The Cruise of the Alice May in the Gulf of St. Lawrence and adjacent waters ...  Reprinted from the "Century magazine."' 3. October 2 1882. 8pp. (incomplete) on headed paper 'The Century, 109 East 15th Street [New York]', autograph letter signed with initials, to 'My dearest Fannie'. A love letter ('...I might have more wealth but, greatly as I need it, I want companionship more, my heart is terribly lonely...") and mentioning plans and possible places to live: Brooklyn or Eaglewood. Benjamin and Fanny Nichols Weed were married on 16 November 1882. 4. December 20 1882, addressed from 'Salem [Mass.]' Edith Benjamin: An autograph letter signed 'Edith' to 'My dear Papa ' recording what appears to have been the first meeting of Benjamin's daughter (from his first marriage) with his second wife Fannie. 'I have seen my mother and I love her very much, I think she is lovely, and I know that we shall be very happy indeed.' 5. February 27 1883. 2pp. on headed paper 'The Century Club / 109 East 15th Street [New York]', autograph letter signed, to Fannie 'My darling', mostly concerning his forthcoming diplomatic appointment 'Perhaps you have heard that by a law passed yesterday my title is raised to that of Minister Resident & Charge d'affaires, the President has therefore sent in my name again for the new place. This will oblige me to have a new plate made for my visiting cards! But if it results in an increase in salary I can afford it.' Benjamin went on to serve between 1883 and 1885 as the first U.S. Minister to Persia (combining this with the position of U.S. Consul General in Teheran). 6. July 24 1885, 2pp. (incomplete) on headed paper 'The Century Club / 109 East 15th Street [New York]', autograph letter, to Fannie 'My dear wife', mentioning their 'pleasant home in Teheran' and that he has 'been twice to Washington & seen the President' 7. October 28 1885, 4pp. on headed paper 'The Century Club / 109 East 15th Street [New York]', autograph letter signed, to Edith 'My darling little daughter' mentioning lack of money plans 'I am doing everything possible to make money ... The plan I wrote of about the encyclopedia is maturing and will be a "big thing" both as an enterprise & for the money it will probably bring', also mentions his wife and daughter's European trip. 8. October 29 1885, 2pp. (incomplete) on headed paper 'The Century Club / 109 East 15th Street [New York]', autograph letter signed, to 'My dear Fannie', mentioning the death of her brother Henry, and Benjamin's attempts to raise money to finance his wife and daughter's trip to Paris. 9. November 15 1885, 4pp. on headed paper 'The Century Club / 109 East 15th Street [New York]', autograph letter signed, to Fannie 'My dear little wife', letting her know how much she is missed and that money is on its way. He also mentions that his 'things have at last arrived. I find to my intense disgust that every case was opened in transit in London, I suppose owing to the dynamite scare [the final incidents in a Fenian bombing campaign had happened in London in January 1885] , so far I have found no important losses...' He has heard 'from Harper & Brothers that they are highly pleased with the advance chapter of my book ... & predict a success for it here and in London.' 10. December 31 1885, 4pp. (incomplete) on headed paper 'The Century Club / 109 East 15th Street [New York]', autograph letter signed, to Edith 'My darling daughter' wishing that they were together, and mentioning that 'Last evening I gave a talk or unwritten lecture before the Century Club combined with an exhibition of Persian photographs & pictures. The lecture ... was received with much interest ... Of course the audience included many of the leading artists, authors and professional men of the country...' 11. January 11 1886, 4pp. written from New York, autograph letter signed, to Fannie 'My dear little wife', letting her know that he is sending money to pay for the trip to Paris and mentioning that the artist Edwin Lord Weeks (1949-1903) will call on her: an 'American painter of oriental scenes ... He is [in Paris]... with his wife and a first rate fellow as well as talented'. 12. March 1 1886, 4pp. written from New York, autograph letter signed, to 'My darling little Edith' mentioning how much he misses them, and mentioning that he is to 'lecture at Brooklyn this evening before the Rembrandt club. Next Tuesday I lecture again in Brooklyn before the Long Id Hist. Soc. ... and the following evening I lecture in Salem before the Lyceum. That closes my lecturing for the season probably... I hate lecturing with a stereopticon which seems to reduce the lecturer to the level of a showman...', he ends by hoping the trip will be useful 'You will speak French like a Frenchwoman, I daresay, on your return..' 13. July 20 1886, 4pp. written from 'Pigeon Cove' [Cape Anne, Mass.], autograph letter signed, to Fannie 'My dear wife', during a cruise, noting that he expects to arrive in Salem the following day, describing Pigeon Cove in glowing terms 'a charming little place', suggesting that they visit it as a family at a later date, complaining about his fellow travelers 'I shall take to no more landsmen on cruises with me', mentioning 'Mr. Handford' in particular, and noting the his 'book has been delayed by the slowness of the printers and I must push them or it will be late for the holiday trade'. 14. 16 August 1886, 4pp. written from 'Salem' [, Mass.], autograph letter signed, to Fannie 'My dear wife' noting that he has arrived with Edith and the house is being got in order, that his 'book is finished & in the publishers hands. I worked very hard to finish it, never so hard before. I think it one of the best things I have done...', and commenting that he hopes that she will 'come prepared to enjoy our home and make the best of it while it lasts, we must try & be forbearing and not direct each other too much'. 15. 24 August 1886, 1p., autograph letter signed, to Fannie 'My dear wife', asking her to let him know which train she is going to take. 16. 4 September 1886, 3pp. on headed paper 'The Century Club / 109 East 15th Street [New York]', autograph letter signed, to 'My dear Fannie', sending keys, regretting that he had to leave and commenting that 'I think with a little forbearance & mutual self control we can learn to be happy together, for we have more in common in our natures than usually occurs in married life.' 17. 12 October 1886, 4pp. written from 'N.Y.', autograph letter signed to Fannie and Edith 'My dear ones at home', talking about work and money difficulties 'I am pulling some wires, but no definite result as yet ... I am busy finishing a few drawings for Putnam' , wishing he was home, enclosing $5, but noting that his 'creditors are after me on all hands, four since I came here, & it will be a desperate struggle to keep up until help comes from some quarter. Literary life is an attractive one for some but for me it is a prolonged purgatory. I have as much right to pursue my avocation unmolested by steady trouble as Tennyson or Longfellow & I should work just as hard if permitted to be from such persecution...' 18. 30 December 1886, 2pp. on headed paper 'The Century Club / 109 East 15th Street [New York]', autograph letter signed, to Fannie 'My darling wife', commenting on the weather, wishing he were at home, noting that he 'was in Princeton yesterday, & am now busy on my 2nd paper for the Hist. Mag. To be done on the 5th. The first .. is attracting much favorable attention. The Nation, a severe... critic, gives me a long & cordial review of my book', wishing wife and daughter a happy new year. 19. 28 March 1887, 3pp. written from 'N.Y.', autograph letter signed to Fannie 'My darling wife', complaining that he is 'as usual, driven to death trying to raise money', wishing he was at home 20. 2 April 1887, 4pp. on headed paper 'The Century Club / 109 East 15th Street [New York]', autograph letter signed, to Fannie 'My dearest wife', apparently written in response to a rebuke from Fannie 'I have no desire to keep things from you but sometimes there is not time to consult ... It is wrong for you to bring up the house in Salem, I have explained to you repeatedly the circumstances ... Nothing can be gained by calling up bygones ... you are apt to do this my love', wishing he were at home, mentioning he has received 'a paper and a word from a friend in India, I presume Weeks; the paper has three columns of quotations from my book ... My friend writes in the margin that I am talked of all over India! I have had no end of praise for my last painting...' 21. 8 April 1887, 2pp. on headed paper 'The Century Club / 109 East 15th Street [New York]', autograph letter signed, to Edith 'My darling little daughter', wishing he was with his family, noting that he is about to set sail, noting that he has not yet had time to send Fannie's story to any periodical as he has been too busy. 22. 15 April 1887, 3pp. on headed paper 'Fort George Hotel, Fort George Isl'd, [Jacksonville,] Florida', autograph letter signed, to Fannie 'My darling wife', noting that he will leave for home by train the next day, and describing the hotel in Florida 'The climate here is simply delicious ... they pick peas and strawberries as early as Jan. 10th! There are fifty different kinds of trees growing here ... There is no place on our continent where such variety and luxuriance of vegetation are to be found. ... The views are most enchanting. There is no question that this place is destined to come up and become sought after.', he goes on to note that Mrs. Kimball, Judge Pierrepoint and his wife, and Mrs. Viall all endorse the hotel and location. He then goes writes that he has 'selected a good [building] lot on the best road not far from the hotel & with good neighbors & a fine view ... No cellar is needed but only low brick posts on which the house is built... I think of my dear ones ... & picture to myself our little future home here...' 23. 23 September 1887, 3pp. autograph letter signed to Fannie 'My darling wife', concerning a legal case between Benjamin and their landlord and railing against the 'injustice of the Almighty in placing us here.' He goes on to note that had 'received the proof of my Fort George Id. Paper last evening', and finishes by asking Fannie to write to Edith. 24. 24 September 1887, 4pp. autograph letter signed to Fannie 'My dear little wife', noting that it has got much colder, and that he has 'finished my Franklin article today & got it off; although it required no severe thoughts it was of a nature requiring great care in copying & editing & became wearisome at the last, because it had to be done under such pressure. I hate to be driven in my work by lack of time or money; half the pleasure is lost for me... I'd rather rust and die with a feeble brain, than having a brain never to be allowed to use it in a way that brings pleasure ... If this life is a specimen of what is to be the continued law of our existence then give me annihilation at once, for it is only a damned drudgery & slavery at the behest of a pitiless & bloodless tyrant. My article on Daniel Webster is out today in Mag. Of Amer. History ... Few will read it, & I get neither money nor ... reputation ... verily my life is a pounding of air in a mortar, leading to nothing but vexation, labor without compensation! ... Job's wife was right ... My old friend in my left big toe is bothering me today & makes me wince sometimes ... I need a rest but don't expect any either here or in the next life ... Edith is doing very nicely...' 25. 10 December 1887, 4pp. written from 'Baltimore', autograph letter signed to Fannie 'My darling wife', making plans about Fannie's visit and noting that he has 'been treated in the most handsome manner by the gentlemen here. I was invited to a little dinner given in the Athenaeum Club by Mr. Pitt on Thursday eve before the lecture. Yesterday Prof. Remsen of Johns Hopkins University invited me to lunch ... While I am finding in this a rest from work I am not well yet ... By the aid of morphine & quinine & the sail to Norfolk I hope to feel stronger before I reach home. I take the boat tonight...' 26. 20 January 1888, 3pp. autograph letter signed to Fannie 'My dear heart', talking about improvements in his house, talking about his health, noting that he has 'taken morphine & quieted the pain & feel much better this evening', he finishes 'I have been invited to exhibit at the Society of American Artists for the first time; it is very exclusive. I get my share of notice but no money!' 27. 30 January 1888, 3pp. on headed paper 'The Century Club / 109 East 15th Street [New York]', autograph letter signed, to Fannie 'My dear wife', noting that he is tired but busy, he ends by noting that he is also 'on a committee of three to pass a bill through congress for $10,000; we are in correspondence with members of the House, where such bill originate...' 28. 4 October 1888, 3pp. autograph letter signed to Fannie 'My darling wife', 'I laugh to myself sometimes when I think of the quaint little touch of Bohemianism which we enjoyed together at my studio. It looks still better since my Turkey rug arrived... I have painted the sea in my picture of the Eagle's Eyrie [sic.], & I think it begins to look well. I had great difficulty in getting the nondescript package here but everything is safe even the mask of Cromwell..', noting that his work has been interrupted by receiving and making calls, and that 'The piano has gone to Steinways & they are to tell me what will be the cost of repairs & I will write you about it ... I am proud of having the two nicest little women in America in my possession & keeping. I enclose the milk bill...' 29. 5 October 1888, 3pp. autograph letter signed to Fannie 'My dear wife' describing a typical day 'To show you how busy I have been & am every day I'll give you a list of my tasks today. I was up at six; dressed , shaved, folded up the bedclothes. Wrote a letter & went to Sinclair house for breakfast. Then to post office for stamps, then to the club for letters & read the papers. Then back to my room & painted a while, wrote another letter and took a package to the express office; thence to the tailor's; then to Pach's photo gallery for photo's for my article. Walked thence a mile to Anthony's for photo's. Thence rode down Broadway & went to Will Wheeler's office, and to six different stores for photo's. Then took a light lunch and went to two real estate brokers, and thence to office of a broker having money to loan. Thence I went to Remnick's office to obtain architectural designs for my article; too train there for Chambers St. & called on President of Park Board. Then took train for my studio 14th St where I wrote another letter & painted an hour. Went out to dinner, then to club for letters, then to my room where I have made some financial calculations, then written two more letters on real estate matters, have done some work on my encyclopedia, have received a call & am now writing to you at 9 1?2 p.m. This is only an average example of my daily duties. I have walked during the day nearly seven miles... Fortunately the day has been charming...', he ends with a not 'The artists think the waves in my painting are excellent'. 30. 14 October 1888, 3pp. on headed paper 'The Century Club / 109 East 15th Street [New York]', autograph letter signed, to Fannie 'My dear little wife', explaining how work will keep him in NYC until the middle of the next week. 31. 28 October 1888, 8pp., from 'N.Y.', autograph letter signed to Fannie 'My dear wifey' talking about his painting 'I have begun a canvas to fit the large frame ... a wild storm scene in mid ocean ... a large ship forms the chief object, while the atmosphere is that of a lurid sunset... It is important that if Miss Parker is thinking of buying one of my paintings that she should come to New York ... I can always exhibit any of my paintings at the Century, if desirable...', he goes on say that he is not sure when he will be able to come home as he has so much to do 'Money I must have and to have it must be earned. It is better not to repeat to people just how rapidly I paint or they must assume that a quick picture should have less money. Of course that is not the way of the world for the quickest work is sometimes the best and the best paid; for to work that way generally implies a long previous training ... You might if occasion offers, incidentally allude to biog.[raphical] notices in Scribners' Great American Encyclopedia of painters ... I also appear in several other works of the sort which indicates an established position as an artist', he continues with reasons why she cannot accompany him on his forthcoming trip, and then turns to why his chances of getting another diplomatic post are slim "I have not seen Sen Torrance. He is in the city but has not replied to my letter nor called. He is doubtless very busy, l[a]ying pipes for himself I understand in business & very possibly also for the next vacancy at Teheran. He is welcome to the post, so far as I am concerned, as I am laying no plans for diplomatic positions & have no desire to return to Persia, much as I liked it when there. I think it unwise to retrace our steps in this life & if I have to protect missionaries, which I do not seek, for obvious reasons, prefer doing so at Constantinople than Teheran. It is a point against any aspirations I might have that by moving when we did I lost my vote... . he goes on to point out that lack of money meant that he could not put the required amount of time into political work that would have got him noticed again (as opposed to ex-foreign service colleagues 'Fish, & Chance, & [Ernest Clifford] Peixotto & others' who have been 'working like beavers for the party'). 32. 30 October 1888, 3pp. autograph letter signed to Fannie 'My dearie wife' mentioning an 8-verse 'very vigorous [presidential] campaign poem' which he had written on the 29th October and which is 'to appear in the "Evening Mail & Express" It is so "rough on Grover [Cleveland]," that I issue it anonymously. I think it may be of use", he goes on to mention that the number of callers is interrupting his work, including an article on "American Diplomacy" for the 'North American Review'. 33. 6 November 1888 'Election day', 2pp. autograph letter signed to Fannie 'My darling wife', he is feeling unwell and depressed, telling her not to come to the city, turning to political matters " I wrote a paper for the Tribune Sunday afternoon & it appeared yesterday. There was no elevator running & the climb Sunday evening to the editor's office in the tenth story is worth a first class mission from the next President if he proves to be Republican! The weather is good today & hence favorable to us. But it is not safe to predict it; I think it looks well for [Benjamin] Harrison, however'. 34. 9 November 1888, 4pp. (incomplete) autograph letter signed to Fannie 'My dear wifey' concerning the election result 'The battle is over, and we have won. The victory is greater than the most sanguine Republican dared to hope for. I predicted 10,000 in this state for Gen. Harrison & he has 13,000. The solid south is broken; we have West Virginia & Delaware, & both houses of Congress are ours. It is a great victory ... I see Cleveland so badly defeated and Bayard losing his own state ... As for myself I expect nothing [as he had not had the time to participate fully, and had only been able to prepare] two or three articles... ', he then returns to his financial woes 'This has been a very hard week for me ... Life is hard, but I will not complain...' 35. 30 January 1889, 2pp. on headed paper 'The Century Club / 109 East 15th Street [New York]', autograph letter signed, to Fannie 'My dear wife', sending money and mentioning two notices for his "Story of Persia" 'in the Athenaeum and the Academy, they are in the main favorable & quite as good as American has to expect in an English periodical for a work ... of only medium merit & popular in style' 36. 8 December 1889, 3pp., on 'Athenaeum Club / Franklin & Charles Sts. [Baltimore]' headed paper, autograph letter signed to Fannie 'My darling wife' singing the praises of Baltimore, mentioning that he attended a private concert of the Baltimore Glee Club, but was leaving for Washington in the morning, then to Norfolk by boat, then Philadelphia. He ends by noting that he had met Col. Donn Piatt: 'I met Don [sic.] Piatt here last evening; he is in a very bad state physically & will probably not live long. He seems brilliant but inclined to cynicism'. 37. 13 October 1890, 2pp, on 'Prebble House / Portland, Me.' headed paper, autograph letter signed to Fannie and Edith 'My dear little wife and daughter' describing a wonderful cruise from New York, including rough seas, a clear night and the Northern lights, 'I was so fascinated with it all I could hardly go to bed, sitting up ... while the other passengers were sleeping or throwing up with all their might', he goes on to mention his immediate travel plans and gives some instructions about a coal delivery before returning to the cruise which 'has revived all my intense love for the sea.' 38. 22 August 1893, 2pp. autograph letter signed to Fannie 'My dear wifey', written in financial extremis, both personally and in the midst of the international 'panic of 1893', he asks that his family give him time: 'I am trying to do the best I can, my dear, but I have a very hard road to plough & you must not bear hardly on me nor must my child unless you would hasten the end. It is only by keeping calm and free from worry that I can work ... I am much nearer the grave than I was & if I do not do it soon I may leave some to throw dirt on my grave. With love and kisses...', he ends with a brief description of the so-called "Midnight Storm" or New York Hurricane of August 1893 'Sunday we had a terrible storm lightened [sic.] & thundered from 8 o'clock Saturday night until one o'clock & kept it up nearly all of Sunday. Electric belles [sic.], telephones &c ruined over half the city'. 39. 27 July 1894, 2pp. (incomplete), from 'N.Y.', autograph letter to Fannie 'My dear wifey' in which he rails against his misfortune, including the dashed hopes of an editorship ('an exploded dream') which he takes as further proof that God does not exist 'I do not, I cannot believe in the existence of a loving heavenly father! And what is more, I will not believe such a lie...' 40. 3 August 1894, 4pp., on 'Parker House, Boston' headed paper, autograph letter signed to Fannie 'My dear little wife' 'I have been quite ill since I last wrote you' which he attributes to various causes including 'some lobster I eat [sic.]', the symptoms included 'neuralgia in my chest & the worst attack of diarrharea [sic.] I ever experienced ... I took dose after dose of cholera mixture, brandy, morphine &c without any effect ...', mentioning the possibility of taking a voyage to Nova Scotia, and the asking her to 'Excuse any incoherence in my expressions, for I am half dazed by the laudanum [sic.], morphine, quinine, peppermint &c I have had to take as well as weakness from loss of food. I need a long & quiet rest & change but do not now expect to get them before they lay me in the grave.', to further darken the mood he then relates how he was almost run over by a run-away horse which passed so close that it 'knocked off my hat with the bit'. 41. 6 August 1894, 3pp. autograph letter signed to Edith 'My dear little daughter' letting her know that he will not be able to join them, and will be very busy, he also asks her to reassure Fannie that he is feeling much better. 42. 6 August 1894, 4pp. autograph letter signed to Fannie 'My dear little wife' regretting that he will not be able to join them - the need to earn money triumphs. Thoughts of the moon lead to 'the biggest humbug of all' - the 'alleged benevolence of the Heavenly Father'. 'There's nothing sure but suffering...' 43. 19 August 1894, 10pp. (incomplete) autograph letter to Fannie 'My dear wifey' thanking her for her letters, and continuing 'I am glad to learn that Mrs. Nichols [a famer's wife] is better': this prompts him to write at length about the 'depressing' nature of life on a New England farm, the narrow-minded dour character of farmers, etc. The sound of a Salvation Army band outside deflects him onto an anti-religion theme, this is followed by the news that a Century club friend of his (W. Betts Lawrence) has attempted to kill himself by shooting himself in the head, but failed, which leads on to Benjamin admitting that he 'knows what the temptation to suicide is. It would be easy to kill oneself without pain. I have not yet done so, not because I think it a wrong to myself, but because it would be an injury to my reputation, and a pain to my family. In itself I do not consider suicide wicked ... I think the law which punishes suicides wicked and ridiculous...', he then continues with comments about 'the Chino-Japanese conflict' and notes that he preparing 'to write something in reply to these foolish women who are trying to stir up conflict between the sexes by pitching into men...' 43. 22 August 1894, 2pp., from 'N.Y.', autograph letter signed to Fannie 'My dear wife', 'I am distressed to learn that Edith is not well again' offering advice about doctors and dentists, and ending with the comment that she had 'singularly misunderstood part of my [last] letter.' 44. 26 August 1894, 8pp. autograph letter signed to Fannie 'My dear little wife' explaining what he had meant in a previous letter and laying out his wishes as to how, where and when he will work, refusing to be 'interferred with or dictated to'; noting that 'an active independent worker & thinker must be left alone in his working hours... I have been working for nearly 30 years. I have formed my methods & habits of thought & work, & it is too late now to change them ... I do not propose to meet anyone unlawfully nor do anything to be ashamed of, but I simply propose, to do my work in my own way & I wish to be free to do so without wrangles & unpleasant scenes at home ... How, when, & where I choose to work concerns no one outside of my family ... Now, dear, don't take what I say unkindly. I simply wish a distinct understanding before my little family return to New York...' 45. 28 October 1895, 4pp. (damaged), from 'Etan Hall, Charlotte', autograph letter signed to Fannie 'My dear little wife', describing how upset the dog was when Fannie and Edith left, with other news of contract having been signed and delivered. 46. 31 October 1895, 3pp autograph letter signed to Fannie 'My dear little wifey', with more news of the dog, and speculation about the fate of a telegram which had not arrived 47. 15 October 1901, 2pp (incomplete), from 'Washington', autograph letter signed to Fannie 'My dear wifey' with general domestic news. Also included are a number of letters to Fannie from various friends and relatives, dating from the 1860s to about 1910. In addition there is an extraordinary undated letter, from Edith to her father, telling him that his extra-marital affair is discovered, her disgust with his behavior, that he must end the liaison, how much he owes his wife, etc. This affair is not referred to directly anywhere else in the correspondence.

      [Bookseller: James Cummins Bookseller]
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        Matayori Gajo. Two volumes

      1901. MATSUI T?" SHÛ. Matayori Gajo. Two volumes. Illustrated with two folding coloured woodcuts and 50 full-page coloured plates. 8vo., 250 x 177 mm, bound in original stitched Japanese wrappers, with paper title lables on covers. Preserved in half blue morocco box. Kyoto: Honda Unkindô, [1901]. A collection of Japanese design plates, issued by the publishing firm of Unkindô, that was begun by Yamada Unsôdô's older brother, known for his elegant and deluxe printings of books and his unique and striking decorative vision. His excesses lead to eventual bankruptcy, after which he merged his company into his more practical brother's printing firm.

      [Bookseller: Ursus Rare Books]
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        Peru History of Coca

      J.H. Vail & Company, New York 1901 - Hardcover. Maroon cloth with gilt lettering and design. Slight lean to spine, head and tail creased and frayed. Extremities and corners bumped and rubbed. Endpapers and pages lightly soiled. [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Booked Up, Inc.]
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        The Story of the Stock Exchange: Its History and Position (First Edition)

      London: Grant Richards, 1901. First Edition. First Edition. About Near Fine lacking dust jacket. Mild shelf wear to the boards, spine ends and corners minutely rubbed, with light offsetting to endpapers. An attractive, fresh copy of this title, with gilt especially bright. Seventeen black and white illustrations.

      [Bookseller: Royal Books, Inc.]
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        CASHEL BYRON'S PROFESSION. A Novel.

      Grant Richards. London. 1901 - First separate issue, larger untrimmed variant, inscribed by the author. Originally printed in the April 1885-March 1886 issues of To-Day, this first edition was printed from the corrected and revised stereos of the original setting for the journal. This is the larger, variant issue, with the preliminary blank leaf bound at the beginning. Shaw explains the variant this way: "The size of the bigger copies is due to the fact that they reproduced not only the type but the format of To-day. But the booksellers objected that in this form it occupied too much room to be displayed on their stalls and counters. It was probably cut down as far as the margins would allow to meet this objection", (Laurence). Inscribed by Shaw, "This is the first Issue, which was so tall that the booksellers refused to exhibit it on their counters, as it took too much room. So it had to be cut down. G. Bernard Shaw 26/7/30." . ---- Housed in a green cloth covered chemise and quarter green morocco slip case with raised bands and gilt rules and lettering to the spine. The slip case is a little rubbed and faded to the spine but generally very good. Laurence A3. [Attributes: First Edition; Signed Copy; Soft Cover]

      [Bookseller: Paul Foster. - ABA & PBFA Member.]
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        THE WRITINGS OF "COLONEL WILLIAM BYRD of Westover in Virginia Esqr"

      Doubleday, Page & Co. // The DeVinne Press, New York 1901 - Quarto. Bound in parchment over boards; loss to the head of the spine has been archivally mended affecting just a bit of the title label; the covers are a bit toned/foxed; there is some particular staining along the bottom of the front board; this copy belonged to Robert Bryan of Richmond and bears his name and address on the front free endpaper; copies of any edition are uncommon, but this is an extremely limited edition, finely printed on vellum; digital images can be made available upon request. Very Good binding. Limited Edition, numbered 4/15 copies on Imperial Japanese vellum paper [Attributes: First Edition]

      [Bookseller: BLACK SWAN BOOKS, INC., ABAA, ILAB]
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        System der Volkswirtschaft. Ein Hand- und Lesebuch für Geschäftsmänner und Studierende.

      J. G. Cotta'sche Buchhandlung,, Stuttgart und Berlin, 1901 - 5 Bde. (in 7). Stuttgart und Berlin, J. G. Cotta'sche Buchhandlung, 1901-22. Gr.-8vo. Zusammen ca. 4600 S. Einheitlich in neue Halbleinen eingebunden. Letzte Ausgabe von Roschers Hauptwerk. - Roscher (1817-94) war Mitbegründer der älteren historischen Schule. "Jedoch hat er mehr als die unter Führung Schmollers stehende 'jüngere' historische Schule den Zusammenhang mit der klassischen Theorie der Volkswirtschaft aufrechterhalten" (Brockhaus, 15.Aufl., XVI, 94). Er habilitierte sich 1840 in Göttingen, war dort 1843-48 Professor, 1848-94 dann an der Universität Leipzig. I. Grundlagen der Nationalökonomie. 26. Aufl. (Omnitypie-Druck), ergänzt durch Robert Pöhlmann. 1922. XV, 895 S. Originaler Halbleinen. II. Nationalökonomik des Ackerbaues und der verwandten Urproduktionen. Ein Hand- und Lesebuch für Staats- und Landwirte. 14., vermehrte Aufl., bearb. von Heinrich Dade. 1912. XVI, 904 S. Neuerer Halblederband. III. Nationalökonomik des Gewerbefleißes und Handels. 8., vermehrte Aufl., bearb. von Wilhelm Stieda. 2 Halbbde. (1. Nationalökonomik des Gewerbfleißes; 2. Nationalökonomik des Handels). 1913-17. XVIII, 618; XIII, 795 S. Originale Halbleinenbände. IV. System der Finanzwissenschaft. 5., vermehrte Aufl., bearb. durch Otto Gerlach. 2 Halbbde. 1901. XII, 511; VI, 523 S. Neue Ganzleinenbände. V. System der Armenpflege und Armenpolitik. 3. Aufl., ergänzt von Christian J. Klumker. 1906. X, 406 S. Einheitlich in neue Halbleinen eingebunden. [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat + Verlag Klaus Breinlich]
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        Eigenh. Schriftstück mit U.

      München, 3. IX. 1901. - 2 SS. Folio. Antwort auf die Besprechung seiner "biografisch-kritischen Würdigung Gustav Mahlers" durch Richard Batka (1868-1922) in der Zeitschrift "Der Kunstwart": "1. Herr Dr. Batka schreibt: 'Die musikhistorischen Kenntnisse Schiedermayers scheinen ziemlich dürftige zu sein, S. 9 und 14 enthalten dafür besorgniserregende Belege'. Ich wäre neugierig, dieselben kennen zu lernen, um so mehr als auf S. 14 eines musikhistorischen Faktums mit keiner Silbe Erwähnung gethan wird [.] 3. Auf die Zensur des Herrn Dr. Batka über meinen 'gewisse schriftstellerische Begabung, die noch einmal Besseres erwarten lässt', kann ich verzichten, da ich lediglich nur als fortschrittlicher Musiker, der wenn nötig zur Feder greift, eingeschätzt werden will [.]". - Nach dem Studium der Geschichte, Germanistik und Musikwissenschaften war Schiedermair kurzzeitig als Lehrer tätig und setzte dann das musikwissenschaftliche Studium in Leipzig und Berlin fort. 1906 habilitierte er sich in Marburg und wurde 1915 a. o.Prof. an der Univ. Bonn. Seit 1920 Ordinarius, gründete er 1927 das Bonner Beethoven-Archiv, dem er bis 1945 als Direktor vorstand. Schiedermair wurde 1937 Präsident der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Musikwissenschaften, 1940 Vorsitzender der Musikabteilung der Deutschen Akademie. Die deutsche Gesellschaft für Musikforschung ernannte ihn 1952 zu ihrem Ehrenmitglied. S. widmete sich vor allem der Beethoven- und Mozartforschung.

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat INLIBRIS Gilhofer Nfg. GmbH]
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        Die Mission der Brüdergemeinde in Missionsstunden. Viertes Heft: Südafrika.

      Leipzig, Verlag von Friedrich Jansa, 1901.. Original-Broschur, 8°, 111 Seiten. Mit Stempel auf dem Umschlag "s.1905 Verlag der Missionsbuchhandlung Herrnhut". Unbeschnittenes, gutes und sauberes Exemplar..

      [Bookseller: Afrika- und Kolonialantiquariat Welwitsc]
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        The History of Helyas, Knight of the Swan.,

      NY, 1901. - 6 3/4 x 9. xviii, (150) pages. Full pigskin stamped in brown with facsimile of the devices of Caxton and De Worde; brass clasps. In the fleece-lined half pigskin chemise and full pigskin slipcase stamped to match the binding. Chemise is worn and split on leather side, but held together by lining; slipcase is rubbed along edges, spine darkened. The book's turn-ins have offset onto the marbled endpapers, as usual, otherwise the book is fine. One of 300 copies printed by Theodore L. De Vinne on Whatman handmade paper, in the same size as the original. The type for this printing was specially cast, using de Worde's fonts as a model. Reproduced from Robert Hoe's unique copy of the 1512 edition, with an historical essay by Hoe, this a beautifully made book. [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Veatchs Arts of the Book, ABAA]
 32.   Check availability:     IberLibro     Link/Print  


        1. A History and Genealogy of the Habersham and Other Southern Families; 2. A History and Genealogy of the families of Bulloch and Stobo, and of Irvine of Cults; 3.The Cuthberts, Barons of Castle Hill and Their Descendants in South Carolina and Georgia; 4. A Biographical Sketch of Hon. Archibald Bulloch, President of Georgia, 1776-77. (Four Volume Set)

      Washington, DC; Columbia, SC: (J.G.B. Bulloch). (1901-1911). First. Four separately published works in printed wrappers, all first editions, housed together in a custom made slip case. The third volume is Inscribed by the author on the first blank leaf. Volume one: vi, 222 pp. (Columbia, SC: R.L. Bryan, 1901). Volume two: 95, vi pp. (Washington, DC: Press of Byron S. Adams, 1911). Volume three:100 pp. (Washington, DC: April, 1908). Volume four: 17 pp. (no imprint or date), the last leaf (p.17) laid-in as issued. Housed in a contemporary brown cloth slipcase with an inner wrap-around cloth chemise and red leather spine label. 25.5 cm. Near fine with a few small chips and rubbing to the slip case. .

      [Bookseller: Between the Covers- Rare Books, Inc. ABA]
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        Ägyptische Inschriften aus den staatlichen Museen zu Berlin - 2 vol, complete. Band I: Hefte 1,2,3,4. Band II: Hefte 1,2,3,4.

      JC Hinrich, Leipzig 1901 - Extremely rare. Complete set of 2 volumes. J.C. Hinrichs'sche Buchhandlung, 1901-24. First edition. 4o. Red half-leather. Perfect condition. [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Meretseger Books]
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        Hong Kong and Canton

      1901. UNDERWOOD and UNDERWOOD. Hong Kong and Canton. 15 stereoptic cards, loose as issued in the publisher's cloth slipcase, accompanied by an original Underwood stereo viewer. New York: Underwood and Underwood, 1901. |~||~||~||~| A fine set of this very rare series of views of Hong Kong and Canton. The views are: 1. Britain's rich Mart of the Orient - Hong Kong, from the Harbor. 2. Looking across the Bay to Kowloon... 3. Looking down the Chukiang River...Canton. 4. A Street of Flower Boats...Canton. 5. Canton, the vast Metropolis of China... 6. Panorama northwest from the City's northern Wall, Canton. 7. Looking into Shappat-Po Street...Canton. 8. Splendor of Chun-Ka-Chie...Canton. 9.In the Temple of 500 Genii...Canton. 10. Examination Hall...Canton. 11. West End of Shameen Island...Canton. 12. Mission Children...Canton. 13. Watching the "Foreign Devils". 14. Dying in the :Dying Field"...Canton. 15. A Chinese Bible-Woman, Canton.

      [Bookseller: Ursus Rare Books]
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        Statuten für den erhabenen Österreichisch-Kaiserlichen Leopolds-Orden 1808.

      Wien, 1901 - Wien, (1901). 44x31 cm. 20 S., (6) S. Nachträge (bis 1901). Mit 9 gestoch. Tafeln. Roter Ln.-Bd. mit goldgepr. Deckeltitel, blindgepr. mehrfacher Deckelfiletierung mit Eckfleurons und Ganzgoldschnitt. (Kanten leicht berieben. Winziger Fleck auf Vorderdeckel und Titelblatt). - Sonst sauberes Exemplar. Sprache: Deutsch Roter Ln.-Bd. mit goldgepr. Deckeltitel, blindgepr. mehrfacher Deckelfiletierung mit Eckfleurons und Ganzgoldschnitt.

      [Bookseller: Biblion Antiquariat]
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        Only Perfect Flour Makes Perfect Bread. N.T. Swezey's Son & Co. Flour. 224 Produce Exchange. New York. Est. 1835.

      J. Ottman Lith Co. N.Y., New York - 1901. (Poster) Very good. Artist Unknown. Original Calendar 16.5" X 23.5" in heavy wooden frame 22" X 28". In very good condition. Some small light stains and minor wrinkling. Small date block printed onto calendar below image (not tear off style). A beautiful vintage image. N. T. (Noah Terry) Swezey was a flour merchant in New York City. He ran a successful business for over forty years at 176 South St., and was one of the founders of the New York Produce Exchange. The calendar shows an image of two angelic children, one caucasian and one african american playing with a barrel and sack of flour. [Attributes: Soft Cover]

      [Bookseller: Aquila Books(Cameron Treleaven) ABAC]
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        Beautés de la lettre moderne 1868 1900 Souvenir Enseignes Bouvais Fabrique d'enseignes publicitaires en tous genre

      chez l'auteur 1901 - grand in-8, belle reliure demi cuir à coins, 52 pages cartonnées, photos de lettres et enseignes commerciales, bel état Troisième République

      [Bookseller: Librairie Histoire d'en lire]
 38.   Check availability:     IberLibro     Link/Print  


        Oriental Tales : The Book of the Thousand Nights and One Night [in 9 volumes]; Tales from the Arabic [in 3 volumes]; Aladdin and the Enchanted Lamp and Other Stories; Persian Letters; A Thousand and One Quarters of an Hour

      London: printed for subscribers only, 1901. Limited Edition . Hardcover. Fine/No Jacket. 15 volumes in rust buckram with paper labels to spines. Khorassan Edition, Limited to Five Hundred Copies, No. 327. Top edges gilt, sides and bottoms untrimmed. Illustrated with tissue-protected black and white plates. Each volume approx. 300 pages. Wear to paper spine labels, a few small dings here and there. No writing, signatures, bookplates, foxing, swelling, water damage, or tears. Bindings square and strong, pages bright and clean. Not ex-library. Extra shipping charges will apply for this 15 volume set.

      [Bookseller: Lexikon Books & Maps]
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        Topographie des weiblichen Ureters mit besonderer Berücksichtigung der pathologischen Zustände und der gynäkologischen Operationen.

      - Wien und Leipzig, Wilhelm Braumüller, Leipzig 1901, Folio, 78 pp., mit 32 farblith. Tafeln, Halblederband mit orig. geprägten Deckelbezügen; feines Exemplar. Erste Ausgabe - Entklammert und neu aufgebuden; feines Exemplar ! - "1901 erschien bei Wilhelm Braumüller in Wien der Atlas über die "Topographie des weiblichen Ureters mit besonderer Berücksichtigung der pathologischen Zustände und der gynäkologischen Operationen", von Tandler und Josef Halban (1870-1937), der 1903 zum Dozent für Gynäkologie ernannt wurde. Auf 32 lithographischen Tafeln mit kurzem Text werden alle topographischen Beziehungen dargestellt, die für den gynäkologischen Operateur wichtig sind. Verschiedene Operationsmethoden, vor allem die vaginalen sind festgehalten; pathologische Zustände der weiblichen Beckenorgane wurden durch Bilder dem Verständnis näher gebracht. Die Präparate, in natürlicher Größe abgebildet, sind teilweise durch IVoige Chromsäure fixiert worden, in anderen Fällen durch ein Gemisch von Formol, Alkohol und Glycerin. Die Bedeutung des Werkes liegt darin - und hier findet sich eine Ansicht Tandlers nicht nur vorgebildet, sondern schon ausgeprägt -, daß die Anatomie die Gynäkologie befruchten kann." - Der Wunsch nach naturgetreuen Abbildungen entspricht den praktischen Bedürfnissen des gynäkologischen Operateurs, heißt es im Vorwort. Die normale Anatomie wurde nicht mit einbezogen, da Zuckerkandl gerade ein einschlägiges Werk vorbereitete. Nur die pathologischen Zustände und operativen Eingriffe wurden dargestellt. Die Bilder zeigen den Einfluß der pathologischen Zustände auf die Topographie des Ureters. Die Topik des Ureters wird in den einzelnen Phasen der wichtigsten Operationen festgehalten. Die Bilder - der Künstler war B. Keilitz - wurden nach dem frischen Objekt in natürlicher Größe gezeichnet, mit möglichster Beibehaltung der topographischen Verhältnisse. - Die Rezensionen überboten sich: "Nach wissenschaftlichem Inhalte und Ausstattung einfach ein Prachtwerk ersten Ranges", schrieb Gustav Klein (1862-1920, Leiter der Universitätsbibliothek München) in der "Münchner Medizinischen Wochenschrift" (92), der Operateur findet sofort alles in klarster Weise im "Tandler und Halban". Das Buch wurde zum Begriff. Man sollte es "neben dem Operationszimmer" aufbewahren, um es bei schwierigen Fällen stets zur Hand zu haben. Der Rezensent schloß sich den Worten Zuckerkandis an, daß bald ähnliche Werke für andere Organe geschrieben werden mögen. . " Karl Sablik , Julius Tandler: Mediziner und Sozialreformer (2010), p.26 [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Medicusbooks]
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        Haggadah shel Pesach Paskhalnoye agada Hagadah shel Pesah Paskhalnoe skazanie : s russkim perevodom [Passover Hagadah]

      Izdanie I. I. Pirozhnikova, vilna vilnius, Lithuania 1901 - Yudlov 2155. Yaari 1590. The pages are detached and loose in the binding. [68], 38, [7] pages. [8] full page pictures. Hebrew and Russian. With pictures by Gustav Dore and Musical notation for the Chad Gadya by I. I. Pirozhnikov with the words underneath in Russian. This may well be Itzhak I. Priozhnikov. [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Meir Turner]
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        Die Technik der Aquarell-Malerei

      1901. FISCHER, Ludwig Hans. Die Technik der Aquarell-Malerei. 122 pp. Illustrated with 15 tipped-in colour plates, 2 pages of tipped-in colour samples and 1 page with 5 tipped-in paper samples. 8vo., bound in publisher's cloth-backed illustrated boards. Vienna: Gerold, 1901. A scarce manual for water-colour painters which went through numerous editions beginning in 1888. The coloured paint samples are from H. Schminke & Co. of Dusseldorf, J.M. Paillard of Paris, Winsor and Newton of London and Alois Ebesder of Vienna. All are quite scarce. OCLC lists only one copy in the United States in the Brooklyn Museum, and 3 copies in Germany. A fine copy.

      [Bookseller: Ursus Rare Books]
 42.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  

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