The viaLibri website requires cookies to work properly. You can find more information in our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy.

Displayed below are some selected recent viaLibri matches for books published in 1852

        Experimental researches in electricity - twenty-eight series. On the Lines of Magnetic Force; their definitive character; and their distribution within a Magnet and through Space. [With:] Ibid. - twenty-ninth series. On the employment of the Induced Magneto-electric Current as a test and measure of Magnetic Forces

      London: Taylor and Francis, 1852. FIRST EDITION IN ORIGINAL WRAPPERS of two papers containing Faraday's detailed investigations of the nature of the 'lines of force'; an extension of work he had begun in his first paper (1821) on electromagnetism. These investigations laid the foundations of field theory. "Faraday's work on electromagnetic rotations led him to take a view of electromagnetism different from that of most of his contemporaries. Where they focused on the electrical fluids and the peculiar forces engendered by their motion (Ampère's position), he was forced to consider the line of force. He did not know what it was in 1821, but he suspected that it was a state of strain in the molecules of the current carrying wire and the surrounding medium produced by the passage of an electrical 'current' (whatever that was) through the wire ... It was the line of force which tied all his researches on electricity and magnetism together" (DSB)."It was not until July of 1851 that Faraday was able to turn his attention fully to the investigation of the intimate nature of lines of force... His purpose was nothing less than to supply a general view of the modes of action of force. Central to this view was the physical reality of the lines of force."The basic question to which Faraday turned in the summer of 1851 concerned the interpretation of the pattern made by iron filings sprinkled on a card over a magnet. The filings arranged themselves in lines; were these lines 'real' or were they merely the result of the interaction of the magnet and the iron filings? Faraday had long viewed them as strains of some sort but it was now time to discover their true nature. If strains, to what were they connected so that the strain could be imposed along the line of force? The electrostatic line of force was firmly anchored in electrically excited matter and the strain, transmitted along the curves of the intervening polarized particles, ended in positively and negatively charged surfaces. An electrostatic line of force could start in a charged sphere and leap across a room to the wall. If the sphere were positively charged, the part of the wall where the line of force ended would be negative. The line, and the particles in between were all polar having 'positive' and 'negative' ends. Magnetic lines were peculiar in that they always returned to the body from which they emanated. It was impossible to hold up a sphere 'charged' with north magnetism and trace a line of magnetic force across a room to a south pole on the wall. Wherever a north pole existed, a south was also to be found, nearby, in the same body. The ends of the line of force, then, had to be the poles of the magnet. This was where the strain originated; here must be where the original tension was applied."When examined critically this explanation made little sense. An iron magnet was, after all, relatively homogeneous. Why, then, should two particular spots, indistinguishable from other places, become poles? Why, to put it another way, should the lines of force terminate at all? From 1845 to 1850 Faraday had gradually convinced himself that the actual particles of magnetic or diamagnetic substances counted for very little in magnetic phenomena. Why, then, call in particles merely to have an anchor for the lines of force? Could not poles be dispensed with altogether?"The first thing that had to be done was to make certain that the lines of force really existed independently of the iron filings that illustrated their forms so beautifully. Since iron itself was magnetic, it was possible that the magnetic curves might be the result of placing iron filings over a magnet and that when the filings were not present, the curves vanished. The use of a compass needle was open to the same objections. If the lines of force were created by the interaction of the needle and the magnet, the needle would still trace them out as if the lines existed independently of the needle. One method alone appeared free from fault. A conducting wire in the presence of a magnet showed no effect; when the wire was moved across the lines of force, a current was generated. The moving wire involved no attraction, repulsion, or other polar effects. The lines of force detected by this method would, therefore, not appear to be created by the presence of the wire. 'So,' Faraday concluded, 'a moving wire may be accepted as a correct philosophical indication of the presence of magnetic force' (3083)."The existence of the lines of force gave no hints about their essential properties. Were they continuous curves, or were they actually attached to points in the magnet called poles? If they were continuous curves, then the lines of force ought to pass through the magnet as well as around it in the external medium. Could these lines be detected inside the magnet? Faraday devised a very simple apparatus for this purpose. Two bar magnets were placed side by side with similar poles next to one another. The two magnets were separated by a thin piece of wood, reaching from the middle of the magnets to one end. The two magnets were then placed in a wooden axle so that they could be rotated about their mutual axis. A copper collar was then placed around the magnets at their middle. A loop of wire could now be arranged so as to make contact with the collar at one end and with a galvanometer at the other. Another wire ran from the galvanometer, down the groove left between the two magnets, and then up to the collar. Each element in the apparatus could be rotated separately; the two magnets around their mutual axis, the wire running down the centre on its axis, and the loop of copper wire around an axis more or less coincident with the extension of the magnetic axis. With this apparatus, Faraday could hope to detect lines of force if they ran through the magnet as well as through the medium in which the magnet was immersed. He first repeated the experiments he had done in 1832 with the rotating magnet to be certain that the lines of force did not rotate with the magnet. 'No mere rotation of a bar magnet on its axis, produces any induction effect on circuits exterior to it', he reported. 'The system of power about the magnet must not be considered as necessarily revolving with the magnet, any more than the rays of light which emanate from the sun are supposed to revolve with the sun' (3090). The conclusion that the lines of force did not move with the magnet reinforced the idea that they were, in a sense, independent of the magnet. This independence must also exist within the magnet. Such independence now could easily be shown. The power of a magnet could be measured precisely in terms of the current generated in a wire cutting the lines of force. Faraday clearly showed that the current (or, better, in modern terms, the electromotive force) directly proportional to the number of lines cut. When all the lines of force were cut, no matter whether the cut was perpendicular or oblique to the lines, the current in the detecting wire was the same (3109-3114). 'The quantity of electricity thrown into a current is directly as the amount of curves intersected' (3113). Knowing this, the existence of the lines of force within the magnet could be determined with great precision. 'there exists lines of force within the magnet, of the same nature as those without. What is more, they are exactly equal in amount to those without. They have a relation in direction to those without; and in fact are continuations of them, absolutely unchanged in their nature, so far as the experimental test can be applied to them. Every line of force therefore, at whatever distance it may be taken from the magnet, must be considered as a closed circuit, passing in some part of its course through the magnet, and having an equal amount of force in every part of its course' (3116-7)."The implications ... were literally revolutionary. If Faraday were correct and the lines of force did actually exist with the properties he attributed to them, then the whole structure of orthodox electric and magnetic science must come tumbling down. The orthodox theories were founded upon central forces acting inversely as the square of the distance; Faraday's new theory rejected central forces. The polarity that was the necessary complement of central forces had been banished. There was no polarity exclusive of the line of force and even this polarity was an odd one ... polarity was the direction of the line of force, and as such, it was a polarity without poles. Since attraction and repulsion must be attraction to or a repulsion from some point (which then could be considered a pole) Faraday explicitly rejected attraction and repulsion as real magnetic phenomena. Not only did his work on magnetic conduction contradict the older forms of attraction and repulsion, but these older ideas were now capable of preventing further progress by blinding men to new approaches. 'To assume that pointing is always the direct effect of attractive and repulsive forces acting in couples (as in the cases in question, or as in bismuth crystals), is to shut out ideas, in relation to magnetism, which are already applied in the theories of the nature of light and electricity; and the shutting out of such ideas may be an obstruction to the advancement of truth and a defence of wrong assumptions and error' (3156)."There is no doubt that Faraday knew exactly how unorthodox he was and that his ideas were bound to meet with opposition. He knew, too, from which quarter the opposition would come. Hence his insistence upon the experimental aspect of his theory. 'I keep working away at Magnetism,' he wrote to Schoenbein, 'whether well or not I will not say. It is at all events to my own satisfaction. Experiments are beautiful things and I quite revel in the making of them. Besides they give one such confidence and, as I suspect that a good many think me somewhat heretical in magnetics or perhaps rather fantastical, I am very glad to have them to fall back upon.' The mathematical physicist was unlikely to reject the simplicity of the inverse square law for anything so distinctly unmathematical as the lines of force. It was to this point that Faraday addressed himself in what may well be called the credo of the experimentalist. 'As an experimentalist', he wrote, 'I feel bound to let experiment guide me into any train of thought which it may justify; being satisfied that experiment, like analysis, must lead to strict truth if rightly interpreted; and believing also, that it is in its nature far more suggestive of new trains of thought and new conditions of natural power (3159). Experiment and his own theories had led him to the physical reality of the lines of force. It was with considerable hesitancy, however, that he presented his new conclusions on the nature of the lines of force at the end of the Twenty-eighth Series:Whilst writing this paper I perceive, that, in the late Series of these Researches, Nos. XXV, XXVI, XXVII, I have sometimes used the term lines of force so vaguely, as to leave the reader doubtful whether I intended it as a merely representative idea of the forces, or as the description of the path along which the power was continuously exerted. What I have said in the beginning of this paper ... will render that matter clear. I have as yet found no reason to wish any part of those papers altered, except these doubtful expressions; but that will be rectified if it be understood, that, wherever the expression line of force is taken simply to represent the disposition of the forces, it shall have the fullness of that meaning; but that wherever it may seem to represent the idea of the physical mode of transmission of the force, it expresses in that respect the opinion to which I incline at present. The opinion may be erroneous, and yet all that relates or refers to the disposition of the force will remain the same (3175)."It was not until 1852 that Faraday insisted upon the reality of the lines of force. In his paper 'On the Physical Character of the Lines of Force', he informed the reader that 'I am now about to leave the strict line of reasoning for a time, and enter upon a few speculations respecting the physical character of the lines of force, and the manner in which they may be supposed to be continued through space' (3243). There can be no doubt that Faraday was firmly convinced that the lines of force were real. The fact that the magnetic force was transmitted along curves, and that these curves were continuous was evidence enough for him. 'I cannot conceive curved lines of force without the conditions of a physical existence in that immediate space' (3258). The reality of the physical lines of force was thus established. But this reality immediately raised a new question. How was the magnetic force transmitted through the lines of force? The search for an answer to this question led Faraday to the foundations of field theory" (Pierce Williams, Michael Faraday, pp. 444-450).This volume contains the 28th and 29th series of Faraday's remarkable Experimental Researches in Electricity, comprising sections 3070-3176 and 3177-3242, respectively.In: Philosophical Transactions, Vol. 142, Part I. London: Taylor and Francis, 1852. Quarto (301 x 231 mm), original wrappers; custom cloth box. A little wear to spine and 7cm closed tear to lower part of front hinge. Rare in original wrappers. Very Good.

      [Bookseller: The Manhattan Rare Book Company]
 1.   Check availability:     Direct From Seller     Link/Print  


        The Life of Franklin Pierce

      FIRST EDITION. AN ASSOCIATION COPY OF THE GREATEST INTEREST, inscribed and signed by the subject of the book, President-elect Franklin Pierce, lifelong friend of the author. Pierce has inscribed the book to the Ohio newspaper publisher Washington McLean: "For Washington McLean from Frank. Pierce Concord N.H. Feby. 5. 1853." Hawthorne and Pierce met at Bowdoin College and developed a close friendship. In 1846 Pierce played an important role in obtaining for Hawthorne the position of Surveyor of the Custom House is Salem with a salary of $1200 per year. Six years later, Hawthorne wrote this Life of Franklin Pierce, the campaign biography which helped win Pierce the 1852 presidential election. After the election, Pierce made Hawthorne American Consul to the Port of Liverpool. This position allowed Hawthorne a substantial income and provided the inspiration for later works such as The Marble Faun, Our Old Home, and the Italian and English Notebooks. In 1863 Hawthorne dedicated his Our Old Home to Pierce. His publisher and others warned Hawthorne against dedicating the work to Pierce, due to the strong public feelings against Pierce's faction of the Democratic Party, which was viewed as pro-slavery. Insisting upon the dedication, Hawthorne wrote: "I find that it would be a piece of poltroonery in me to withdraw either the dedication or the dedicatory letter. My long and intimate personal relations with Pierce render the dedication altogether proper, especially as regards the book ... and if he is so exceedingly unpopular that his name ought to sink the volume, there is so much more the need that an old friend stand by him." The following year Hawthorne took ill, and he prepared for his death taking a final journey to the lakes of New Hampshire with his beloved companion Pierce. On May 18, 1864, Hawthorne died alone with his old friend Franklin Pierce. Association copies of such personal interest linking great American political and literary figures are rarely encountered. Original brown cloth. Front free endpaper excised, else in fine condition. The great Stephen Wakeman, Carroll Wilson, and Parkman Dexter Howe collections all had copies of this title inscribed by Hawthorne, but none included a copy inscribed by Pierce. No other examples appear in the auction records of the past fifty years.

      [Bookseller: 19th Century Rare Book and Photograph Sh]
 2.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  


        Manuscript entitled "Conférences sur le Cannonage faites à bord de l'Uranie," with numerous hand-drawn illustrations of cannons, guns, ammunition, and instruments in the margins as well as many tables in the text

      157 leaves of text paginated 1-124 & 129-[317] (nothing seems lacking). Large 4to (318 x 215 mm), cont. sheep-backed black cloth (extremities slightly worn), title in gilt on spine. S.l.: [c. 1852]. A finely written and illustrated manuscript with highly technical observations on French naval artillery training and testing in the mid-19th century, which are complemented by numerous hand-drawn marginal diagrams and many tables. The present manuscript was composed by Floucaud de Fourcroy (1831-1929), a descendant of the famous chemist Antoine de Fourcroy, as a cadet aboard the Uranie, a former frigate converted into a training ship in 1851. By the end of his career, Floucaud de Fourcroy was a highly decorated admiral and commander in the Legion of Honor. The present manuscript recapitulates the curriculum of naval artillery in the middle of the 19th century. It begins with a survey of weapons classifications (artillery, rifles, swords, pikes, axes, etc.) and the situations in which to use them, different types of ammunition and their purposes, and the history of their development. There are then lengthy explanations of each weapon's size, range, reloading time, effectiveness, etc. Each of these is presented with precise measurements and dimensions. The author recounts the multitude of exercises which a cadet had to undergo and master in order to progress as a naval officer (pp. 265-90). There are also extensive notes on his lessons in ballistics, often accompanied by intricate diagrams and mathematical formulas. Pages 295-96 feature a section entitled (in trans.): "Notes on the Practical Instruction which a Sailor-Gunner must Receive." The drawings in the margins, many very complex, illustrate the composition of ships, weapons, ammunition, and instruments, the trajectory of cannons and firearms, the construction of equipment, the optimal angles of attack, the adjustments necessary to maintain accuracy while the ship is in motion, etc., etc. On page 317, Floucaud de Fourcroy has drawn detailed cross-sections of five types of cannons. The tables concern the range of various cannons, their effectiveness at specific ranges (in terms of speed and their penetration), the supply needs of cannons, the number of cannons that can fit on a ship, etc. A most interesting manuscript in fine condition that captures the state of French naval training and warfare in the middle of the 19th century. Pages 227-28, 258-64, and 315-16 are blank.

      [Bookseller: Jonathan A. Hill, Bookseller, Inc.]
 3.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  


        Teilansicht, Innenstadtansicht, "Vue de la Grande place de Romela au Cairo".

      - kol. Lithographie m. Tonplatte v. G.B. Cecchini n. J. e. G. Fratinelli de Andrea ( 1852 ) b. G. Draghi in Venedig, dat. 1853, 32,5 x 58 Seltene Ansicht. Die Darstellung zeigt einen belebten Platz mit zahlr. Moscheen. - Die Ansicht mit allseitig sehr knappen Rand, daher auf ein Trägerblatt montiert. Der ausgeschnittene Titel ist ebenfalls auf das Trägerblatt montiert.

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Nikolaus Struck]
 4.   Check availability:     ZVAB     Link/Print  


        Four Years in a Government Exploring Expedition; to the Island of Madeira, Cape Verd Islands, Brazil, Coast of Patagonia, Chili, Peru, Paumato Group, Society Islands, Navigator Group, Australia, Antarctic. Sandwich Islands. Oregon, California,.

      Cornish, Lamport & Co., New York 1852 - 371 pages, plus 18 plates of which only four are not included in the pagination. Later (i.e. early twentieth century) binding with black leather over spine and corners and marbled paper over boards. Gilt stamped lettering on spine. Decorative end leaves, followed by two blank leaves before pagination begins with title page. Scattered smudges and light foxing. Volume remains tight and otherwise intact. [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Lloyd Zimmer, Books and Maps]
 5.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  


        Harriet Beecher Stowe Signed Quote.

      Autographed signed quote from Harriet Beecher Stowe. It reads, "Lives of all great men remind us we can make our lives sublime and in dying leave behind us footprints on the sands of time. HB Stowe." The quote is from Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's poem A Psalm of Life. In near fine condition. Double matted and framed with a photograph of Beecher Stowe. The entire piece measures 10 inches by 16 inches. Harriet Beecher Stowe was an American abolitionist and author. She came from the Beecher family, a famous religious family, and is best known for her novel Uncle Tom's Cabin (1852), which depicts the harsh conditions for enslaved African Americans. The book reached millions as a novel and play, and became influential in the United States and Great Britain, energizing anti-slavery forces in the American North, while provoking widespread anger in the South. Stowe wrote 30 books, including novels, three travel memoirs, and collections of articles and letters. She was influential for both her writings and her public stances on social issues of the day.

      [Bookseller: Raptis Rare Books ]
 6.   Check availability:     ABAA     Link/Print  


        Opere… ordinate ed illustrate coll'analisi storica della mente di Vico in relazione alla scienza della civiltà da Giuseppe Ferrari

      dalla Società Tipog. de' Classici Italiani, 1852. Sei volumi cm. 20,5, pp. 3.000 ca. complessive. Con 5 tavole f.t. (3 delle quali finemente incise in rame): ritratto di Vico, fac-simile, grande tavola cronologica ripieg., una tavola della mensa ed una tavola allegorica. Graziosa legatura coeva in mezza pelle con dorso a 4 nervi, titoli e filetti ornati in oro e fregi impressi a secco; carta marmorizzata ai piatti. Ben conservato. Così Gamba (2494) a proposito di quest'edizione completa delle opere di Vico, assai stimata anche da Benedetto Croce: "Sono in quest'edizione tutte le opere del Vico ordinate ed illustrate, coll'analisi storica della mente di Vico in relazione alla scienza della civiltà, di Giuseppe Ferrari. Ha il primo vol. la Mente di Vico, di Giuseppe Ferrari, ed il Primo scritto storico di Vico; il vol. secondo ed il terzo, le Opere latine; il vol. quarto i Principi di Scienza nuova, secondo l'edizione del 1725, e la Vita dell'Autore: il vol. quinto i Principi di Scienza nuova secondo la terza impressione del 1744, con le varianti di quella del 1730; ed il vol. sesto Opuscoli e scritti inediti". Cfr. anche Graesse, VII, 298 ; Brunet, V, 1175..

      [Bookseller: Studio Bibliografico Apuleio]
 7.   Check availability:     maremagnum.com     Link/Print  


        Handgeschreven brief van Koning Willem III der Nederlanden (1817-1890) aan zijn hofarchitect Henri Camp.

      25,4 x 19,3 cm. Gevouwen blad met blindstempel 'London Superfine' (dun schrijfpapier van hoge kwaliteit). Alle vier pagina's beschreven. Gericht aan 'Mon cher architecte et exélève!', gesigneerd 'Votre affectionné Guillaume.' en gedateerd 'La Haye 28 Mars 1852'. 76 regels tekst. Tweemaal gevouwen.l Franstalige brief over landbouw en waterhuishouding aan koning Willems hofarchitect, de in het Belgische Mons geboren Henri François Guillaume Nicolas Camp (dank aan Dik van der Meulen voor deze informatie!). Willem was sterk geïnteresseerd in praktische wetenschappen, verbetering van landbouwtechnieken en dergelijke. In deze uitvoerige brief noemt hij twee vooruitstrevende landeigenaren, Frederik baron van Brakell van den Eng (1788-1865) en de idealistische Iman G.J. van den Bosch (1799-1880) uit Wilhelminadorp. Hij stelt Camp voor om samen met Van Brakell en Van den Bosch op paleis het Loo te komen logeren en de mogelijkheden te bespreken om er een landbouwbedrijf te stichten (Willem III was natuurlijk zelf ook een grootgrondbezitter). Camp ontwierp verschillende belangrijke gebouwen voor de koning, onder andere Bronbeek en het Aardhuis. Een zeer uitvoerige, vriendschappelijke brief, in curieus en niet gemakkelijk leesbaar handschrift geschreven.

      [Bookseller: Antiquariaat Fokas HOLTHUIS]
 8.   Check availability:     NVvA     Link/Print  


        Essai historique, philosophique et pittoresque sur les Danses des Morts.

      Rouen, Lebrument, 1852. - Deux volumes in-8 avec 54 planches et de nombreuses vignettes gravées et dessinées par E.-H. Langlois, Mlle Langlois, MM. Brévière et Tudot. Exemplaire bien frais pour le texte, quelques rousseurs sur les planches qui sont au complet. Ex-donno manuscrit d'Alfred Baudry à Monsieur D. Brière. Alfred Baudry, ami de Gustave Flaubert, fut avec André Pottier le publicateur de l'ouvrage de Langlois après son décès en 1837 et propriétaire du Journal de Rouen avec Thomas Desisles-Brière. Demi-veau rouge d'époque, dos rond orné de filets dorés. Reliure en très bon état. Cet ouvrage, d'une exécution remarquable est l'un des plus complets en la matière. Il renferme dans le tome I, trois chapitres qui se rattachent à l'histoire de Rouen, et dans le tome II, "le sacristain de Bonport, légende fantastique". Un catalogue des éditions de la Danse des Morts par Holbein, et une bibliographie des différentes publications sur les danses macabres complètent cet ouvrage. Frère. [Attributes: Soft Cover]

      [Bookseller: Librairie BERTRAN]
 9.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  


        The Cape and the Kafirs

      or, Notes of Five Years' Residence in South Africa.First edition. Tinted lithograph frontispiece. 8vo. Original red cloth, blindstamped, spine sunned, owner's signature on front free endpaper. xv, 319pp. London, Richard Bentley,

      [Bookseller: Maggs Bros. Ltd.]
 10.   Check availability:     Direct From Seller     Link/Print  


        Konvolut bestehend aus 9 Manuskripten, 7 Briefen und 8 Postkarten.

      Kralik, Richard, Schriftsteller (1852-1934). 8 eigenh. Postkarten, 7 davon mit U., 7 eigenh. Briefe mit U., 8 Manuskripte, 3 Kuverts. Eine Postkarte undatiert, sonst Briefe und Postkarten von 9. X. 1913 bis 16. XI. 1919. Manuskripte undatiert. Verschiedene Formate. Zus. ca. 101 Seiten. - Adressiert an (und aus dem Nachlass von) Joseph Eberle, Redakteur bei der Reichspost und Herausgeber der katholischen Zeitschrift "Schönere Zukunft" 1884-1947). Manuskripte zur Veröffentlichung in der Reichspost, bei welcher Eberle den Bereich "Allgemeine Kultur und religiöse Fragen" leitete. (7. IX. 1919:) "Es gibt keinen Autor, der nicht von einem mißwollenden Leser hingerichtet werden könnte dagegen hilft keine Vorsicht. Als ich vor Jahren meine apologtischen Gespräche über Religion in Jos. Mosers "Schul- u. Elternztg." veröffentlichte, erhielt Moser auch von einem Ordenspriester, der mich aber wiederholt in gedrückten Kritiken überschwenglich gelobt hat, bedenkliche Briefe, so daß mir nachträglich die Herausgabe in Buchform verleidet war. Und nun sagte mir vor kurzem Seminardirektor Gustav Müller, ihm habe ein Priester gesagt, daß er noch jetzt diese alten Kapitel bei Predigten u. sonst sehr gut gebrauchen könne. Ich habe dann bei Moser auch eine Psychologie ("Welt und Seele") kapitelweise erscheinen lassen da würden mir aber die Bedenken über diese Arbeit zu arg und ich brach die Veröffentlichung plötzlich ab, um nicht Ärgernis zu erregen" Weiter Bezug zur Flucht von Joseph Görres, Publizist (1776-1848). - Sonstige Briefe zu bestimmten Zeitungsartikeln oder der Position Kraliks gegenüber der Reichspost, etc. - Postkarten: (Undatierte Postkarte:) Verschiebung einer Gralsitzung (Anm.: Kralik gründete die katholisch-nationalistische Gesellschaft "Gralbund" mit der Zeitung "Der Gral") - (undatierte Postkarte:) Einladung zu einer Gralsitzung am 6. XII. 1916. - (Postkarte 16. XI. 1918:) "L[ieber] fr[eund] Ich rate dir, in der Anzeige des neuen Titels zu sagen, daß nicht eine Wandlung in den Anschauungen über die Staatsform, sondern der Umstand ausschlaggebend war, daß derzeit eine "öst.-ung. Monarchie" als Reichsgebiet nicht existiert, sondern nur verschiedene Teilstaaten, von denen wir allerdings hoffen, daß sie auf föderativem Wege wieder zu einem Bunde einigen werden, dessen Benennung wir aber nicht vorgreifen wollen. - Ich habe heute wieder ein paar Artikelchen geschrieben [...]" - (1. IX. 1919:) "Ich beug mich geknirscht vor dem Wauwau Von der Hohen Schule von Stockerau und flehe, man spreche mich endlich frei Von meiner verbrecherischen Bahrbahrei". - Manuskripte: Alle Manuskripte sind auf der Rückseite eines alten Manuskriptes verfasst worden, welches unvollständig und unzusammenhängend ist (hauptsächlich Geschichtliches). Die Seitenangabe bezieht sich auf die relevanten Seiten, d. h. 10 S. = 10 Bl.) - 1. "Tage und Werke. Lebenserinnerungen von Richard Kralik. Werke zur Literaturgeschichte. "[...] Wenn Gott, der Vater, Christi, die Welt geschaffen hat, so ist auch die ganze Welt ihrem Wesen nach christlich, d. h. katholisch. Darum steht Christus auch in der Mitte der Weltliteratur [...] Alles dient nur dazu, die christliche Kultur zu schmücken und auszugestalten. [...]"(10 S.) - 2. "Tage und Werke. Lebenserinnerungen von Richard Kralik. Literarische Vereinigungen. Kommentare zu Idunna, Leogesellschaft, Wiener Literarischer Verein, viel über den Gralbund. "[...]Ich sah nicht etwa die Katholische Literatur als "auch" zulässig an, sondern als den Gipfel, die Krone, die Vollendung aller Literatur sie sollte nicht bloß geduldet, sondern in ihrer alles überragenden Bedeutung sowohl von Katholiken wie Nichtkatholiken anerkannt werden. [...]" (10 S.) - Beiliegend Buchseiten über die Geschichte Wallensteins. (24 S.) - 3. "Zur Revision der deutschen Geschichte und Kultur vom süddeutsch-österreichischen Standpunkt. Neue Beiträge von Dr. Richard Kralik. " II. - Geschichtliche Abhandlung, die mit einem Aufruf gegen die Entente endet, die das katholische Österreich "an Haupt und Gliedern" zerstören will. (10 S.) - 4. "Tage und Werke. Lebenserinnerungen von Richard Kralik. Meine wissenschaftlichen Werke. Geschichte." In erster Linie Abhandlung über seine eigenen Geschichtsbücher. (12 S.) - 5. Die erste Seite fehlt, daher titellos. Kommentar zum ersten Weltkrieg und zu Kaiser Karl I. (4 S.) - 5. "Kulturelle Gedanken zu den Wahlen" Eine Ermahnung, die Wahlen ernstzunehmen. (6 S.) - 6. "Zum Jubiläum des hl. Hieronymus" Abhandlung über den Hl. Hieronymus mit Kommentar auf die Gegenwart (5 S.) - 7. "Allgemeine Geschichte der Neuesten Zeit. Eine Selbstanzeige von Dr. Richard Kralik" Abhandlung über die Entwicklungen der letzten Jahrzehnte, darunter v. a. Bismarck, welchen er stark verurteilt: "[...]Nicht die Begeisterung für deutsche oder preußische Größe hat seine Handlungen beseelt, sondern der Haß gegen das katholische, das habsburgische Österreich.[...]" (11 S.) - 8. "Legitimität. Von Dr. Richard Kralik" Beitrag hauptsächlich zum bereits geschehen ersten Weltkrieg: "[...] Aber - aber - die nichtlegitimen Einflüße und Störungen waren es, die verfassungsmäßige Fortentwicklung gestört haben. Also nicht Schwäche und Irrtum in der legitimen Handhabung der Gesetze, sondern Bosheit, Verbrechen und Verrat haben die organische Entwicklung der österreichisch-ungarischen Verfassung aufgehalten. unmöglich gemacht und zum Scheitern gebracht. Bis zum letzten Augenblick haben sich die Nationalitäten Österreichs als loyal bekannt und ihre Mitarbeit am Verfassungswerk zugesagt. Der Verrat kam von außen, von den Ententemächten und ihrer lebhaften Propaganda [...]" Weiter Kommentar zum Kommunismus und seinem Widerspruch zur Natur. (13 S.) - 9. "Das Unfehlbarkeitsdogma. Von Richard Kralik" Abhandlung über die päpstliche Unfehlbarkeit und dem Ersten Vatikanischen Konzil von 1870. Dabei Verurteilen der Bischöfe, die dem gegenüber skeptisch waren (und Verurteilung Bismarcks). Der katholische Theologe Ignaz von Döllinger (1799-1890) wird ebenfalls stark kritisiert. (20 S.) - Richard Ritter Kralik von Meyrswalden war katholisch-konservativer Kultur- und Literaturhistoriker, Dramatiker und Lyriker (vgl. ÖAW). Nanuskripte auf den Rückseiten stets mit einem blauen Buntstift durchgestrichen. Auf den Vorderseiten öfters Korrekturen durch eine fremde Hand (vermutlich von Eberle). Öfters sind Textpassagen korrigierend mit anderen Textpassagen überklebt, dadurch Klebspuren. Die äußeren Seiten jeweils immer leicht angestaubt. Sonst gut erhalten.

      [Bookseller: erlesenes Antiquariat und Buchhandlung]
 11.   Check availability:     booklooker.de     Link/Print  


        Souvenirblatt, Gesamtans., umgeben von 8 Teilansichten.

      - Lithographie m. Tonplatte, 1852, 27 x 37 Seltene Ansicht mit russ. Beschriftung. Mittig eine Gesamtansicht von Schlagenbad, die Randansichten zeigen Bad Schwalbach, Neudorf usw. ru,ru

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Clemens Paulusch GmbH]
 12.   Check availability:     ZVAB     Link/Print  


        Jerusalem. - Gesamtansicht. - Theodor Verhas. - "Jerusalem".

      - Historische Ortsansicht. Zeichnung / Bleistift- & Pinselzeichnung, braun laviert, auf Zeichenkarton, 1852. Von Theodor Verhas. 15,1 x 22,0 cm (Darstellung / mit Schmuckrahmen) / 15,9 x 22,9 cm (Blatt). Rechts unten in Bleistift signiert und datiert: "Th. Verhas 1852". Oberhalb betitelt: "Jerusalem". In der rechten oberen Ecke und im unteren Rand jeweils Sammlerstempel mit Zirkel, Winkelmaß und den Initialen IB (nicht bei Lugt). - In der Darstellung etwas fleckig, v.a. im linken Bilddrittel. Insgesamt mäßig gut erhalten. Theodor Verhas (1811 Schwetzingen - 1872 Heidelberg), Deutscher Landschaftsmaler und Zeichner. Schüler der Münchener Akademie und bei Ernst Fries in Karlsruhe. Werke von ihm sind in diversen Museen vertreten. Sprache: Deutsch [Attributes: Signed Copy]

      [Bookseller: GALERIE HIMMEL]
 13.   Check availability:     ZVAB     Link/Print  


        Waverley Novels. In 25 volumes

      Edinburgh: Adam and Charles Black 1852 / 1857. 8vo. In 25 volumes complete. Published 1852 - 1857. Uniformly bound in full tan calf. Raised bands to spines with gilt panels and maroon & brown leather title labels. All edges marbled and marbled endpapers. Minor wear to some spine ends and spotting to some boards. Bookplate to front pastedowns. Extra-engraved title page to each volume. Frontis engraving and four to eight full-page engravings to each volume. Offsetting to engravings. A few sprung sections. Gilt spines bright. A handsome set in VG condition. . Very Good. Full Calf. 1852.

      [Bookseller: Fosters' Bookshop]
 14.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  


        SUPPLIMENTO A' VOCABOLARJ ITALIANI.:

      Bernardoni, 1852-1857, Milano - (Codice AN/2997) Opera completa in 6 volumi in 8° (27 cm), 4470 pp. complessive. Autorevole opera, prima edizione. Testo su 2 colonne. Ottime legature dell'epoca in mezza pelle rossa, fregi e titolo oro ai dorsi. Splendido esemplare esente da ingialliture. Euro 430.00 All books are in stock in fine conditions or described meticulously. Very safe packaging

      [Bookseller: Bergoglio Libri d'Epoca]
 15.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  


        Blanquart Evrard, Etudes Photographiques

      1852 - Photographie,vintage salt print // Circa 1852 // Papier salé // Format (cm): 17x22

      [Bookseller: photovintagefrance]
 16.   Check availability:     ZVAB     Link/Print  


        Experimental researches in electricity - twenty-eight series. On the Lines of Magnetic Force; their definitive character; and their distribution within a Magnet and through Space. [With:] Ibid. - twenty-ninth series. On the employment of the Induced Magneto-electric Current as a test and measure of Magnetic Forces.

      London: Richard Taylor and William Francis, 1852. First edition, journal issue, of these two papers containing Faraday's detailed investigations of the nature of the 'lines of force' he had proposed in his first paper on electromagnetism, 'On some new electro-magnetical motions, and on the theory of magnetism', originally published in the 21 October 1821 issue of the Quarterly Journal of Science. These investigations laid the foundations of field theory. "Faraday's work on electromagnetic rotations led him to take a view of electromagnetism different from that of most of his contemporaries. Where they focused on the electrical fluids and the peculiar forces engendered by their motion (Ampère's position), he was forced to consider the line of force. He did not know what it was in 1821, but he suspected that it was a state of strain in the molecules of the current carrying wire and the surrounding medium produced by the passage of an electrical "current" (whatever that was) through the wire ... It was the line of force which tied all his researches on electricity and magnetism together" (DSB). This volume contains the 28th and 29th series of the 30 series of Faraday's Experimental Researches in Electricity, comprising sections 3070-3176 and 3177-3242, respectively. "It was not until July of 1851 that Faraday was able to turn his attention fully to the investigation of the intimate nature of lines of force. In part this was due simply to the press of business and the fact that as he grew older he could no longer work as he had done in the 1850s. His mind, although still able to rise to great peaks of originality was, nevertheless, failing. His memory was increasingly bad and he found it ever more difficult to keep the object of his researches before him ... The character of his thought also changed at about this time. Before 1850 he had rather carefully hidden his theoretical ideas from the scientific world, using them to guide him from discovery to discovery. By 1850 the long string of discoveries that were to guarantee him immortality in the history of science had come to an end. Never again was he to startle the learned world with some new effect which few, if any, of his colleagues had suspected but which he had deduced from his own hypotheses. The decade of the 1850s, rather, was to be spent in the exposition and defence of his theories. He was not, of course, prepared to abandon experiment but his experiments were now overtly the ammunition with which he supported theoretical positions taken up publicly and in print. His purpose was nothing less than to supply a general view of the modes of action of force. Central to this view was the physical reality of the lines of force. "The basic question to which Faraday turned in the summer of 1851 concerned the interpretation of the pattern made by iron filings sprinkled on a card over a magnet. The filings arranged themselves in lines; were these lines 'real' or were they merely the result of the interaction of the magnet and the iron filings? Faraday had long viewed them as strains of some sort but it was now time to discover their true nature. If strains, to what were they connected so that the strain could be imposed along the line of force? The electrostatic line of force was firmly anchored in electrically excited matter and the strain, transmitted along the curves of the intervening polarized particles, ended in positively and negatively charged surfaces. An electrostatic line of force could start in a charged sphere and leap across a room to the wall. If the sphere were positively charged, the part of the wall where the line of force ended would be negative. The line, and the particles in between were all polar having 'positive' and 'negative' ends. Magnetic lines were peculiar in that they always returned to the body from which they emanated. It was impossible to hold up a sphere 'charged' with north magnetism and trace a line of magnetic force across a room to a south pole on the wall. Wherever a north pole existed, a south was also to be found, nearby, in the same body. The ends of the line of force, then, had to be the poles of the magnet. This was where the strain originated; here must be where the original tension was applied. "When examined critically this explanation made little sense. An iron magnet was, after all, relatively homogeneous. Why, then, should two particular spots, indistinguishable from other places, become poles? Why, to put it another way, should the lines of force terminate at all? From 1845 to 1850 Faraday had gradually convinced himself that the actual particles of magnetic or diamagnetic substances counted for very little in magnetic phenomena. Why, then, call in particles merely to have an anchor for the lines of force? Could not poles be dispensed with altogether? "The first thing that had to be done was to make certain that the lines of force really existed independently of the iron filings that illustrated their forms so beautifully. Since iron itself was magnetic, it was possible that the magnetic curves might be the result of placing iron filings over a magnet and that when the filings were not present, the curves vanished. The use of a compass needle was open to the same objections. If the lines of force were created by the interaction of the needle and the magnet, the needle would still trace them out as if the lines existed independently of the needle. One method alone appeared free from fault. A conducting wire in the presence of a magnet showed no effect; when the wire was moved across the lines of force, a current was generated. The moving wire involved no attraction, repulsion, or other polar effects. The lines of force detected by this method would, therefore, not appear to be created by the presence of the wire. 'So,' Faraday concluded, 'a moving wire may be accepted as a correct philosophical indication of the presence of magnetic force' (3083). "The existence of the lines of force gave no hints about their essential properties. Were they continuous curves, or were they actually attached to points in the magnet called poles? If they were continuous curves, then the lines of force ought to pass through the magnet as well as around it in the external medium. Could these lines be detected inside the magnet? Faraday devised a very simple apparatus for this purpose. Two bar magnets were placed side by side with similar poles next to one another. The two magnets were separated by a thin piece of wood, reaching from the middle of the magnets to one end. The two magnets were then placed in a wooden axle so that they could be rotated about their mutual axis. A copper collar was then placed around the magnets at their middle. A loop of wire could now be arranged so as to make contact with the collar at one end and with a galvanometer at the other. Another wire ran from the galvanometer, down the groove left between the two magnets, and then up to the collar. Each element in the apparatus could be rotated separately; the two magnets around their mutual axis, the wire running down the centre on its axis, and the loop of copper wire around an axis more or less coincident with the extension of the magnetic axis. With this apparatus, Faraday could hope to detect lines of force if they ran through the magnet as well as through the medium in which the magnet was immersed. He first repeated the experiments he had done in 1832 with the rotating magnet to be certain that the lines of force did not rotate with the magnet. 'No mere rotation of a bar magnet on its axis, produces any induction effect on circuits exterior to it', he reported. 'The system of power about the magnet must not be considered as necessarily revolving with the magnet, any more than the rays of light which emanate from the sun are supposed to revolve with the sun' (3090). The conclusion that the lines of force did not move with the magnet reinforced the idea that they were, in a sense, independent of the magnet. This independence must also exist within the magnet. Such independence now could easily be shown. The power of a magnet could be measured precisely in terms of the current generated in a wire cutting the lines of force. Faraday clearly showed that the current (or, better, in modern terms, the electromotive force) directly proportional to the number of lines cut. When all the lines of force were cut, no matter whether the cut was perpendicular or oblique to the lines, the current in the detecting wire was the same (3109-3114). 'The quantity of electricity thrown into a current is directly as the amount of curves intersected' (3113). Knowing this, the existence of the lines of force within the magnet could be determined with great precision. 'there exists lines of force within the magnet, of the same nature as those without. What is more, they are exactly equal in amount to those without. They have a relation in direction to those without; and in fact are continuations of them, absolutely unchanged in their nature, so far as the experimental test can be applied to them. Every line of force therefore, at whatever distance it may be taken from the magnet, must be considered as a closed circuit, passing in some part of its course through the magnet, and having an equal amount of force in every part of its course' (3116-7). The implications ... were literally revolutionary. If Faraday were correct and the lines of force did actually exist with the properties he attributed to them, then the whole structure of orthodox electric and magnetic science must come tumbling down. The orthodox theories were founded upon central forces acting inversely as the square of the distance; Faraday's new theory rejected central forces. The polarity that was the necessary complement of central forces had been banished. There was no polarity exclusive of the line of force and even this polarity was an odd one ... polarity was the direction of the line of force, and as such, it was a polarity without poles. Since attraction and repulsion must be attraction to or a repulsion from some point (which then could be considered a pole) Faraday explicitly rejected attraction and repulsion as real magnetic phenomena. Not only did his work on magnetic conduction contradict the older forms of attraction and repulsion, but these older ideas were now capable of preventing further progress by blinding men to new approaches. 'To assume that pointing is always the direct effect of attractive and repulsive forces acting in couples (as in the cases in question, or as in bismuth crystals), is to shut out ideas, in relation to magnetism, which are already applied in the theories of the nature of light and electricity; and the shutting out of such ideas may be an obstruction to the advancement of truth and a defence of wrong assumptions and error' (3156). "There is no doubt that Faraday knew exactly how unorthodox he was and that his ideas were bound to meet with opposition. He knew, too, from which quarter the opposition would come. Hence his insistence upon the experimental aspect of his theory. 'I keep working away at Magnetism,' he wrote to Schoenbein, 'whether well or not I will not say. It is at all events to my own satisfaction. Experiments are beautiful things and I quite revel in the making of them. Besides they give one such confidence and, as I suspect that a good many think me somewhat heretical in magnetics or perhaps rather fantastical, I am very glad to have them to fall back upon.' The mathematical physicist was unlikely to reject the simplicity of the inverse square law for anything so distinctly unmathematical as the lines of force. It was to this point that Faraday addressed himself in what may well be called the credo of the experimentalist. 'As an experimentalist', he wrote, 'I feel bound to let experiment guide me into any train of thought which it may justify; being satisfied that experiment, like analysis, must lead to strict truth if rightly interpreted; and believing also, that it is in its nature far more suggestive of new trains of thought and new conditions of natural power (3159). Experiment and his own theories had led him to the physical reality of the lines of force. It was with considerable hesitancy, however, that he presented his new conclusions on the nature of the lines of force at the end of the Twenty-eighth Series. 'Whilst writing this paper I perceive, that, in the late Series of these Researches, Nos. XXV, XXVI, XXVII, I have sometimes used the term lines of force so vaguely, as to leave the reader doubtful whether I intended it as a merely representative idea of the forces, or as the description of the path along which the power was continuously exerted. What I have said in the beginning of this paper ... will render that matter clear. I have as yet found no reason to wish any part of those papers altered, except these doubtful expressions; but that will be rectified if it be understood, that, wherever the expression line of force is taken simply to represent the disposition of the forces, it shall have the fullness of that meaning; but that wherever it may seem to represent the idea of the physical mode of transmission of the force, it expresses in that respect the opinion to which I incline at present. The opinion may be erroneous, and yet all that relates or refers to the disposition of the force will remain the same' (3175). "It was not until 1852 that Faraday insisted upon the reality of the lines of force. In his paper 'On the Physical Character of the Lines of Force', he informed the reader that 'I am now about to leave the strict line of reasoning for a time, and enter upon a few speculations respecting the physical character of the lines of force, and the manner in which they may be supposed to be continued through space' (3243). There can be no doubt that Faraday was firmly convinced that the lines of force were real. The fact that the magnetic force was transmitted along curves, and that these curves were continuous was evidence enough for him. 'I cannot conceive curved lines of force without the conditions of a physical existence in that immediate space' (3258). The reality of the physical lines of force was thus established. But this reality immediately raised a new question. How was the magnetic force transmitted through the lines of force? The search for an answer to this question led Faraday to the foundations of field theory" (Pierce Williams, Michael Faraday, pp. 444-450). In: Philosophical Transactions, Vol. 142, Part I. 4to (301 x 231 mm) spine strip with a little wear, 7cm closed tear to lower part of front hinge. Custom cloth box.

      [Bookseller: SOPHIA RARE BOOKS]
 17.   Check availability:     Direct From Seller     Link/Print  


        Denkmäler der Baukunst. Unter Mitwirkung von Franz Kugler und Jacob Burckhardt herausgegeben von Ludwig Lohde, 5 Bände. Erster Band Denkmäler aus alter Zeit, zweiter Band Denkmäler des Mittelalters erste bis fünfte Abtheilung, dritter Band Denkmäler des Mittelalters sechste Abtheilung, vierter Band Denkmäler der neueren Zeit, fünfter Band Inhaltsverzeichnis und Tafel - Erklärung zu Jules Gailhabaud Denkmäler der Baukunst ( Erklärung zu den Tafelbänden ).

      Hamburg, Leipzig Joh, Aug, Meissner, Julius E, Richter, 1852 - 1060 Seiten erster Band mit 100 Stahlsich Tafeln, zweiter Band mit 119 Tafeln, dritter band mit 80 Tafeln, vierter Band mit 71 Tafeln, fünfter Band mit 682 Seiten, einige wenige Tafeln zart fleckig, marmorierter Schnitt, 4 Bünde, Einband Rücken und Kanten etwas begriffen, sonst alle fünf Bände guter Zustand Sprache: Deutsch Gewicht in Gramm: 7500 [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Thomas Schäfer]
 18.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  


        Gesamtans., "Vue de Montjoie, coté de l' Est ( Province Rhenane)".

      - Lithographie n. u. v. Ponsart de Malmedy b. Simonau & Toovey, 1852, 32,7 x 43 Sehr selten!!! Blick von einer Aussichtsterrasse zur Stadt, im Vordergrund ein Maler ( sitzend). Der Künstler ? Sprache: Deutsch

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Clemens Paulusch GmbH]
 19.   Check availability:     ZVAB     Link/Print  


        Conversations in Ebury Street. [With an interesting full-page manuscript letter by George Moore, written in ink into the book verso titlepage].

      Second edition. 14.5 x 21.5cm. 315 pages. Original hardcover with spine label. Deckled edges. With a fantastic, full-page, signed message written inside the book by George Moore. Very good - condition of the binding with signs of external wear (some spotting). Moore responds in his manuscript note on the halftitle possibly to the request of Frieda Lawrence, wife of D.H.Lawrence, who requested a copy of Moore's book "The Pastoral Loves of Daphnis and Chloe". Moore sent her instead this edition. George Moore (1852 - 1933) was an Irish novelist, short-story writer, poet, art critic, memoirist and dramatist. Moore came from a Roman Catholic landed family who lived at Moore Hall in Carra, County Mayo. He originally wanted to be a painter, and studied art in Paris during the 1870s. There, he befriended many of the leading French artists and writers of the day. As a naturalistic writer, he was amongst the first English-language authors to absorb the lessons of the French realists, and was particularly influenced by the works of Émile Zola. His writings influenced James Joyce, according to the literary critic and biographer Richard Ellmann, and, although Moore's work is sometimes seen as outside the mainstream of both Irish and British literature, he is as often regarded as the first great modern Irish novelist. George Moore's family had lived in Moore Hall, near Lough Carra, County Mayo for almost a century. The house was built by his paternal great-grandfather-also called George Moore-who had made his fortune as a wine merchant in Alicante. The novelist's grandfather was a friend of Maria Edgeworth, and author of An Historical Memoir of the French Revolution. Ebury Street in Belgravia was where Moore lived when he was in London. This copy of "Conversations in Ebury Street" contains a full-page, signed message written inside the book by George Moore. Moore responds in his manuscript note to the request of a Mrs. Lawrence (possibly Frieda Lawrence, wife of D.H.Lawrence), who requested a copy of Moore's book The Pastoral Loves of Daphnis and Chloe. Moore sent her instead this edition.

      [Bookseller: The Time Traveller's Bookshop]
 20.   Check availability:     booklooker.de     Link/Print  


        2 eigenh. Briefe mit U.

      Berlin, 1. und 20. IX. 1852. - Zusammen 2 SS. auf Doppelblättern. 8vo. Mit 2 eh. adressierten Kuverts. An den Maler Johann Heinrich Schramm (1810-1865): "Mittwoch Abend 7½ Uhr erwarte ich einige Freunde um bei einer Tasse Thee ein Stündchen zu verplaudern. Dürfte ich Sie um die Ehre bitten den kleinen Kreis durch Ihre freundliche Gegenwart zu erweitern? [.]" (Br. v. 20.IX. 1852). - Nach abgeschlossener Ausbildung durch Carl Friedrich Zelter und während seiner Tätigkeit als Organist an der Nikolaikirche in Berlin trat Grell 1817 in die Berliner Singakademie ein, die er von 1853-76 auch leitete. Als Komponist schuf er in jungen Jahren kammermusikalische, Klavier- und Orchesterwerke, später wandte er sich jedoch beinahe ausschließlich der A-cappella-Vokalmusik im Stil Giovanni Pierluigi Palestrinas zu. Sein Hauptwerk ist die sechzehnstimmige Missa solemnis senisdenis vocibus decantanda, die 1861 in der Berliner Singakademie uraufgeführt wurde. - Johann Heinrich Schramm war bekannt für seine tls. in Bleistift, tls. in Aquarell ausgeführten Portraits von berühmten Zeitgenossen, darunter Alexander von Humboldt, Jakob Grimm, Friedrich Rückert, Heinrich Laube, Ludwig Tieck und Clemens Wenzel Fürst Metternich. [Attributes: Soft Cover]

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat INLIBRIS Gilhofer Nfg. GmbH]
 21.   Check availability:     IberLibro     Link/Print  


        Chinese Court Women Playing Instruments on Pith

      1852. Pith paintings were produced from the early part of the 19th century and onwards, and exclusively for the export market. They were usually created at "factories" in Canton by highly skilled artists, mostly unsigned. Pith is often called rice paper by mistake. It's an unprocessed plant material taken from a shrub native to Taiwan and south China. The highly complex cellular structure makes it highly reactive to moisture and when paint is applied to the pith's surface the cells swell which create a special (deep) effect to the image.. Inscribed Miss Mary H. Paliccor (?) in San Jose CA from Mrs. Sarah M. Baldosa (?) on free endpaper. A collection of twelve (12) water colors on pith depicting ladies playing various musical instruments, held within blue silk frames. Original silk brocade covered boards, ties. Edge wear and chips most pages. The watercolors are without damage or disturbance with one exception; a horizontal break across the entire plate elbow height. One plate lacks the top and bottom of the silk frame. Measures `3" x 9 1/4".

      [Bookseller: Eclectibles]
 22.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  


        Nile Notes of a "Howadji;" or, the American in Egypt.

      London: Henry Vizetelly, 1852. Hardcover in acceptable condition. No jacket. Illustrated with twenty-nine black and white engravings. Half-leather boards are lightly worn. Abrasions on worn leather spine. Title plate is torn and partially detached from spine. Page block andf some pages are marked and slightly tanned. Book plate on front pastedown. Front pastedown hinge is split but binding remains intact. Light creases throughout pages. Contents remain clear throughout. HCW. Hardcover. Acceptable. Used.

      [Bookseller: PsychoBabel & Skoob Books]
 23.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  


        LETTER FROM ONE QUAKER TO ANOTHER BEMOANING THE EFFECT OF THE CALIFORNIA GOLD RUSH UPON THE MEN OF HIS COMMUNITY; Three-page letter, sent in a stampless temperance envelope, from one Quaker to another bemoaning the fact that some many men are departing for the gold fields of California

      Winslow-North Vassalboro, Maine, 1852. Unbound. Very good. This letter, written by C. G. Pinkham of Winslow, Maine to J. H. Osborne of Weare, Maine, is headed with a Quaker date: "1st 29th 1852" (January 29, 1852). It is enclosed in a "Maine Law" temperance propaganda envelope printed and sold by Thurston & Co. of Portland. The envelope has two circular "Paid 3" handstamps and a very scarce circular North Vassalboro, Maine postmark dated February 6. The envelope and letter are in very nice shape. Pinkham's letter is filled with "thees, thous, and thys" and begins with a short acknowledgment of several deaths. He soon, however, begins to discuss the God Rush fever that had gripped the country: "Mayhew is just upon the eve of starting for Calafornia. He told me that he had been to see Nathan and Phelie, he said they appeared very happy. George Jenkins has just left here for the last time before starting for Providence where he is to meet Mayhew. They are to sail for Calafornia from New York the 7th of next month. There are a number of young men from this region going with them and about the tenth of third month there are about thirty from this vicinity going to that land of adventures. I think it nothing short of a Calamity that so many of our useful and valuable citizens are leaving us prompted I fear by a vain hope of obtaining gold. What say thou about it? Brother Williams is designing to start for the Gold region in about two months this so says he. He is married again to a sister of his former wife.". The qualities one may achieve by abstaining from hard drink are listed in the four corners of the classic Temperance envelope, and the fine print between them discusses the Maine Liquor Law of 1851, the use of moral suasion to reform drunkards and liquor sellers, and statistics describing the negative effects of alcohol on the people of the United States. A superfecta of desirability: a letter written in Quaker vernacular, a discussion of the impact of Gold Rush fever on young men, a hard-to-find Temperance propaganda cover, and a scarce Maine postmark.

      [Bookseller: Read 'Em Again Books, ABAA]
 24.   Check availability:     IOBABooks     Link/Print  


        Monserrate subterranea. Sus cuevas, sus galerías, sus grutas, sus cavernas, sus maravillas.

      - Imp. Vicente Castaños. Barcelona, 1852. 29 cm. 108 p., 2 h. Texto enmarcado en doble filete. Ilustrado con 18 lám. litográficas, una de ellas plegada (la cual falta en muchos ejemplares), fuera del texto. Enc. en pasta española de época. . * Según Palau el autor es Santiago Ángel Saura. [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Antiquària Malda, Llibreria]
 25.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  


        [Manuscript Letters Signed] Josiah Quincy To Samuel Atkins Eliot Concerning Harvard, Boston, and Religious Education

      [Cambridge & Boston, Mass.], 1852. Very good copies, some creasing and light browning, tears to three letters from opening, not affecting text.. 4 bifolium. 1. Manuscript Letter Signed. 26 April 1841. To Samuel A. Eliot. Thanking Eliot for his donation to "the fund recently established for aspiring students in the seminary to which you so largely contributed..." and providing an attested copy of the note from the March 27th meeting of the Fellows. Signed twice and dated by Josiah Quincy as President. 1 page. Bifolium. Address, folds, torn at seal. 2. Manuscript Document Signed. 9 August 1842. Attested copy that Samuel Atkins Eliot was chosen to replace Thomas Wren Ward as Treasurer. Signed James Walker, Sec't to the Corporation (later President of Harvard). 1 page. Bifolium. 3. Author Letter Signed. 10 November 1842. To Samuel A. Eliot from Josiah Quincy. Thanking Eliot for sending one of his books; praising its content. Most likely Eliot's: "Observations on the Bible: for the use of young persons," which had just been published. "I received two days since, your favor of the 14th instant, with its accompanying volume. I would not, however, acknowledge the work, until I had read it, which I have throughout, with satisfaction and advantage. The religious views are well adapted to convince by their strength and the manifest depth of feelings & sincerity, with which they are expressed...." 2 pages. Bifolium. Address, postmark, complete red wax Harvard seal. 4. Author Letter Signed. 8 January 1852. To Samuel A. Eliot, from Josiah Quincy. Requesting information on deliberations about the Overseers of the Poor in 1837 during Eliot's time as major of Boston: "relative to the irresponsibility of the overseer of the poor for the expenditure of public monies, you conclude with a reference to the subject 'the deliberations of the City Council' - will you do me the favor to state whether any such deliberations we've had in consequence of that communication. & if so, what was the result & if none, what in your judgment prevented any deliberation or action on the subject." Most likely concerning Quincy's research for his book, "A Municipal History of Boston." Signed Josiah Quincy. 1 page. Bifolium. Address. Seal. Josiah Quincy III (1772-1864) was President of Harvard University from 1829 to 1845. Prior to that he was a Federalist member of the U.S. House of Representatives, speaker of the Massachusetts Senate, and later Mayor of Boston (1823-1828). James Walker (1794-1874) was Harvard's Alford Professor of Natural Religion, Moral Philosophy, and Civil Polity, Fellow of Harvard College, and President of Harvard (1853-1860). He wrote a memoir of Josiah Quincy. Samuel Atkins Eliot (1798-1862) served in the Massachusetts House of Representatives (1834-)1837 then as mayor of Boston (1837 to 1839), and was was treasurer of Harvard University from 1842 to 1853. His son would become President of Harvard in 1869.

      [Bookseller: Kaaterskill Books, ABAA/ILAB]
 26.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  


        Minnesota year book for 1853

      W.G. Le Duc & Rohrer, St. Paul 1852 - Slim 8vo, pp. [17], 37, [17] ads; folding wood-engraved frontispiece map of Minnesota Territory, fine in original printed salmon wrappers. Editions of Le Duc's Minnesota Year Book were published for 1851, 1852, 1853, and 1855.Martin, Minnesota Imprints, 63. Howes L-179. [Attributes: Soft Cover]

      [Bookseller: Rulon-Miller Books (ABAA / ILAB)]
 27.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  


        Veduta della piazza Vittorio Emanuele/Vue de la Place Victor Emanuel.

      Turin, chez les frères Bacciarini, 1852 - Litografia originale (mm. 320x475) firmata H. Gonin in basso a sinistra. Titolo in italiano e francese al centro del margine inferiore. Seguono le note tipografiche. Al centro del margine superiore la scritta "Torino". Veduta prospettica della Piazza Vittorio Emanuele animata da personaggi, sullo sfondo la chiesa della Gran Madre e la collina. Realizzata su disegno di Nicolas Marie Joseph Chapuy. Tratta dalla raccolta "Turin et ses environs, Vues dessinées d'après nature par Chapuy et litographiées par H. Gonin". Turin, chez les frères Bacciarini, Editeurs et Négociants d'estampes, Sous les Portiques de Po presqu'en face de l'eglise de S. Françoise de Paule, 1852. Bell'esemplare non comune.  Peyrot, Torino nei secoli, Vol II, n. 546/3. [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Libreria Antiquaria Pregliasco]
 28.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  


        History of the American Revolution.

      Bentley, London 1852 - Vols 1-3. Pp. xii,527; xii,524; xxiv, 584. Frontispiece plan in vol. 1. Contemporary half calf & maroon labels A handsome early binding in green half calf. [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Anah Dunsheath RareBooks ABA ANZAAB ILAB]
 29.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  


        Autograph letter signed ("P. J. Proudhon").

      Paris, 25. XI. 1852. - 4to. 1½ pp. on bifolium with integral address panel. To Monsieur Perron at the Ministry of State, inquiring for two friends which were detained at Belle-Île: "[ ] 1. Victor Pilhes, ex-représentant du Peuple, condamné par la Cour de Versailles à la déportation, pour la tentative d'insurrection de juin 1849. M. Pilhes est d'accord avec moi des conditions mises à sa libération, savoir le renoncement à l'action politique, sous quelque forme et pour quelque parti que ce soit. Je produirai, s'il faut, ses lettres confidentielles. [.]. 2. George Duchêne, ancien gérant du Peuple, condamné pour délit de presse à cinq ans d'emprisonnement. Il lui reste à faire 15 ou 16 mois". Duchene ought to appear in the next amnesty, but Proudhon wishes to "prevent an unfortunate oversight": "[ ] et j'ose dire honteux. Duchêne a donné pendant et depuis sa gérance, des preuves d'un talent littéraire tout à fait original [ ]". He is "guarantor and surety" of his friends, "assured as I am by the nature of their ideas and their true feelings" (transl.). - Despite the intervention of Proudhon, Victor Pilhes was not released until August 1854. - Strong damage to edges.

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat INLIBRIS Gilhofer Nfg. GmbH]
 30.   Check availability:     ZVAB     Link/Print  


        Davies's Map of the British Metropolis. The Boundaries of the Boroughs, County Court Districts, Railways and Modern Improvements.

      1852 - London: Edward Stanford, c.1852. Original colour. Dissected and laid on linen with brass hanging rings, total 745 x 995mm. A large and detailed map, covering from Hammersmith clockwise to Willesden, Highgate, Leytonstone, Canning Town, Greenwich, Bromley, Mitcham, Wimbledon and Barnes. A ring marks 4 miles from Charing Cross. The map is undated, but as Brunel's Hungerford Suspension Bridge is still in place and King's Cross Station is marked we estimate it c.1852. HYDE: 27.

      [Bookseller: Altea Antique Maps]
 31.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  


        Aquatic Notes, or Sketches of the Rise and Progress of Rowing at Cambridge. By a member of the C.U.B.C. With a Letter, Containing Hints on Rowing and Training, By Robert Coombes, Champion Sculler.

      Cambridge & London : J. Deighton & G. Bell , 1852. Book measures 7 x 4 1/2 inches. Collation, xi,107pp, half title present. Bound in original publishers blind and gilt stamped blue cloth, with coloured endpapers. Small repair to head and tail of spine, cloth age darkened, gilt of spine faded. Binding in very good clean firm condition. Internally, previous owners bookplate, pages clean throughout. A very nice copy. . Publishers Cloth. Very Good Plus. 8vo.

      [Bookseller: George Jeffery Books]
 32.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  


        Meyer's Universum or Views of the Remarkable Places and Objects of all Countries...by Eminent Writers in Europe and America, Edited by Charles A. Dana

      New York: Hermann J. Meyer, 164, William Street, 1852. English American edition. Complete as issued of Volume One. 48 plates engraved on steel, with tissue guards. 294, [2]pp. Oblong 4to. Yellow printed and illustrated yellow wrappers. Part I has above title "H. Fleigel in Evansville Agent of...". Some foxing. English American edition. Complete as issued of Volume One. 48 plates engraved on steel, with tissue guards. 294, [2]pp. Oblong 4to. With printed notice tipped onto the front wrapper of Part XII: "This number (12) completes the First volume of the 'Universum'. Subscribers,having paid in advance for this volume, aere entitle to----splendid engravings..." With some loss at right margins.

      [Bookseller: James Cummins Bookseller ]
 33.   Check availability:     ABAA     Link/Print  


        Kritische Schriften. Zum erstenmale gesammelt und mit einer Vorrede herausgegeben. 4 Bände. Hübsche grüne Leinenbde des späten 19. Jhdts mit Rückentitel, etwas Rückenvergoldung sowie Deckelblindprägung.

      Leipzig, F. A. Brockhaus, 1848-1852. - Erste Ausgabe. Die Bände 3 und 4 mit dem zweiten Titel 'Dramaturgische Blätter', die schon 1826 erschienen waren, hier aber erstmals in erweiterter Form vorliegen. Enthält Aufsätze, Vorreden und Rezensionen; sie wurden nicht in die Gesamtausgabe der 'Schriften' aufgenommen, sondern waren als Ergänzung dazu gedacht. "Meine kritischen Versuche, sowol die meiner Jugend als die meines reifern Alters waren bisher noch niemals gesammelt erschienen. Diejenigen aus einer frühen Periode waren nicht unter meinem Namen bekannt und wurden andern Autoren zugeschrieben, . so setze ich voraus, daß es den Freunden meiner Bemühungen interessant sein werde, auch im Fache der Kritik meine frühern Arbeiten kennen zu lernen, um sie vielleicht mit meinen spätern zu vergleichen und sich zu überzeugen, wie ich von Jugend auf einem und demselben Ziel zugestrebt habe ." (Vorrede). – Gelegentlich stockfleckig. – Goed. VI 43, 124 und 126. [Attributes: First Edition]

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Wolfgang Braecklein]
 34.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  


        Antique Print-WORLD MAP-AMERICA-EUROPE-GREENLAND-Depot de la Marine-1852

      1852 - Antique print, titled: 'Mappemonde Hydrographique dressee par Mr. C.L. Gressier [ ].' - A partial world map of the Northern Hemisphere, from Alaska and the Bering Strait in the left edge, to Scandinavia and Spitsbergen in the right edge. The map extends as far as Cuba and North Africa to the south. Published by the Depot de la Marine, 1852. Engraving on laid paper. Made by an anonymous engraver after 'C.L. Gressier'. Depot des Cartes et Plans de la Marine (1720 - present), often called the Depot de Marine, was a French hydrographic mapping organization founded in 1720. Much like the U.S. Coast Survey, the British Admiralty, and the Spanish Deposito Hydrografico, the Depot was initiated as a storehouse and distribution center of existing nautical and marine charts. Eventually the Depot initiated its on mapping activities in an attempt to improve and expand upon existing material. Some of the well known hydrograhers / cartographers in the development of Depot were Jacques Nicholas Bellin and Rigobert Bonne. Good, given age. Original middle fold, as issued. Some paper damage in the lower margin (not affecting image). Soft creases in the margins. Offsetting where the map was folded on itself. General age-related toning and/or occasional minor defects from handling. Please study scan carefully. The overall size is ca. 99.4 x 66.6 cm. The image size is ca. 91.7 x 62.7 cm. The overall size is ca. 39.1 x 26.2 inch. The image size is ca. 36.1 x 24.7 inch. Storage location: Overasselt-359

      [Bookseller: ThePrintsCollector]
 35.   Check availability:     ZVAB     Link/Print  


        Christmas Books

      First Collected Edition Of The Five "Christmas Books"DICKENS, Charles. Christmas Books.... London: Chapman and Hall, 1852.First collected edition of the five "Christmas books" and first appearance of this Preface. Octavo (7 1/2 x 5 inches; 188 x 125 mm). [i-iv], [1-3]4-266, [1, publisher's ads], [1, blank] pp. Inserted frontispiece, "Mr. Fezziwig's Ball," after John Leechís original design for the frontispiece of the first edition of A Christmas Carol.Original publisher's green vertical-ribbed cloth, decoratively paneled in blind, spine decorated and lettered in gilt. Original pale yellow coated endpapers. Spine slightly faded, covers slightly discolored. Spine ends just starting to fray. Text generally clean throughout. Very small bookseller stamp in blind on front free endpaper. Overall very good.Part of "The Cheap Edition of Charles Dickens," this volume comprises A Christmas Carol, The Chimes, The Cricket on the Hearth, The Battle of Life, and The Haunted Man, originally published in separate book editions from 1843 through 1848.Gimbel D5 notes.HBS 67902.$750

      [Bookseller: Heritage Book Shop, LLC ]
 36.   Check availability:     ABAA     Link/Print  


        Vandringar genom verlden och naturen 3 årgång 1852-1854

      1852. Inbunden bok. Fler bilder

      [Bookseller: Antikt & Västerbok Antikvariat]
 37.   Check availability:     Bokbörsen     Link/Print  


        VANDRINGAR GENOM VERLDEN OCH NATUREN 1852 1853 1854

      1852. Inbunden bok. Vidare bilder SE verket igen genom att söka på titeln

      [Bookseller: Antikt & Västerbok Antikvariat]
 38.   Check availability:     Bokbörsen     Link/Print  


        American Notes for General Circulation [Two Volumes]

      Chapman and Hall. Hardcover. London, 1852. 8vo, green cloth, 308 + 306 pp. First edition, first issue, in a possibly later green cloth with morocco spine labels. With the bookseller ticket of Mitchell Booksellers of Old Bond St., suggesting possibly a bookseller binding. With yellow endpapers, as called for. An exceptionally preserved set in fine condition with minimal shelfwear. Edges of pages speckled. Points checked per Walter Smith's Charles Dickens in the Original Cloth. " Hardly less joyous were Dickens's reunions with his friends Forster, Macready, Maclise, Stanfield, and others but he soon had to buckle down to the writing of his promised American travel book. The furore over international copyright continued, fed by a circular letter Dickens wrote on the topic (on 7 July) which got into American newspapers alongside a forged letter in which he was maliciously represented as branding America a country of gross manners and squalid money-making. There was copious and vehement editorializing about this seemingly clear evidence of Dickens's snobbishness and ingratitude. Against this background he wrote his promised travel book for Chapman and Hall, American Notes, for General Circulation (2 vols.), which appeared on 19 October. In it Dickens praised many of America's public institutions but condemned the national worship of 'smartness' (that is, sharp practice), and attacked particularly the hypocrisy and venality of the American press. He also commented unfavourably on many aspects of American social life, notably the widespread habit of spitting in public, and, predictably, denounced slavery at some length. American Notes sold well but attracted little favourable comment in Britain (Macaulay deemed it 'at once frivolous and dull'; Collins, Critical Heritage, 124) and, unsurprisingly, it met with a very hostile reception in the American press." - Oxford DNB. Please contact us for additional pictures or information. . Fine. 1852. First Edition.

      [Bookseller: Auger Down Books ]
 39.   Check availability:     ABAA     Link/Print  

______________________________________________________________________________


      Home     Wants Manager     Library Search     562 Years   Links     Contact      Search Help      Terms of Service      Privacy     


Copyright © 2018 viaLibri™ Limited. All rights reserved.