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Displayed below are some selected recent viaLibri matches for books published in 1849

        The Whale and His Captors, or, The Whaleman's Adventures, and the whale's biography as gathered on the homeward cruise of the "Commodore Preble." With engravings

      NY: Harper & Brothers 1849 - *The price of this item HAS BEEN reduced until Sunday, Oct. 10 as part of our October Abebooks Sale. Order now for best savings! the true first edition (1849), not noted in Sabin; xii, [1] (list of engravings), [1] (plate), [21]-314, [6] (ads) pp., frontis., plates within the text; original gilt & blind stamped brown cloth, spine & tips chipped, text foxed, fading contemporaneous inked line to front free endpaper, however overall very good. Photos available upon request.

      [Bookseller: Zubal Books]
 1.   Check availability:     IberLibro     Link/Print  


        WANDERING SKETCHES OF PEOPLE AND THINGS IN SOUTH AMERICA, POLYNESIA, CALIFORNIA, AND OTHER PLACES VISITED, DURING A CRUISE ON BOARD OF THE U. S. SHIPS LEVANT, PORTSMOUTH, AND SAVANNAH

      Carey and Hart,, Philadelphia 1849 - CALIFORNIA; South America; Polynesia; We fit archival quality clear acrylic covers for additional protection whenever possible. ; 8vo 8" - 9" tall; [Pacific Exploration]. William Maxwell Wood. Wandering Sketches Of People And Things In South America, Polynesia, California, And other Places Visited, during a Cruise on Board of the U. S. Ships Levant, Portsmouth, and Savannah. Phila: Carey and Hart, 1849. 12mo. X, [13]-386pp. Original gilt & blind-stamped cloth with Carey and Hart initials embossed on front board. 1st edition. Howes W646. Sabin 105083. Scattered very light foxing, light ink name on within Table of Contents page, old library bookplate front pastedown and pocket rear pastedown, faint blind seal on title page. Last copy auctioned according to AE was 1980.; 0 [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: poor man's books (mrbooks)]
 2.   Check availability:     IberLibro     Link/Print  


        Modern mansion, showing the arabesque architecture of Cairo. August 1st, 1849.

      London. 1849 - Size: 50 x 35.5 cm. Very good condition. Unobtrusive blind stamp. Tinted lithograph with additional colour. Roberts was the first independent, professional British artist to travel so extensively in the Near East. His tour in 1838-9 produced 272 sketches, a panorama of Cairo and three full sketchbooks, enough material to "serve me for the rest of my life" (Roberts, eastern journal, 28 Jan 1839). Over the next decade he made "a series of intire new drawings" for the large coloured lithographs executed by Louis Haghe for The Holy Land, Syria, Idumea, Arabia, Egypt & Nubia, which was originally published by subscription, 1842-9. No publication before this had presented so comprehensive a series of views of the monuments, landscape, and people of the Near East. "Robert's Holy Land was one of the most important and elaborate ventures of nineteenth-century publishing, and it was the apotheosis of the tinted lithograph" (Abbey, Travel). These lithographs were originally published in twenty parts, most parts containing six plates, the price for each part with coloured plates (the most expensive state) being 3 guineas. Sketches in Egypt and Nubia, from Drawings made on the Spot. 1846-9. Abbey, Travel, 272; Gay 2216; Ibrahim-Hilmy, II, p.176; Lipperheide 1591; Tooley (1954) 402.

      [Bookseller: Peter Harrington. ABA member]
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        pl. 68 Pyrola Umbellata

      Published in London in 1849 by William S. Orr &Co. This print is from the second edition. - A wonderfully detailed hand-colored lithograph of a wild flower by Jane Webb Loudon (Mrs. Loudon) from her book "British Wildflowers" which was published in London in 1849 by William S. Orr &Co. This print is from the second edition and its overall dimensions are 8.5"x10.75". Jane Webb Loudon (1807-1857) was born in Birmingham, England into a well to do family, but was impoverished as a young woman after her father's financial decline and subsequent death. Loudon developed a simple formula for her botanical works, combining a brief text with charming illustrations, an arrangement that appealed to her audience. For each plant a brief botanical description was provided, including its common name in English, its order and genus. Some historical notes, and instructions regarding its cultivation' (An Oak Spring Flora p.326). Jane Loudon first began her series of popular botanical works in 1838 with the intention of alleviating the debt incurred by her husband, the renowned botanist, gardener, and horticultural writer John Loudon, whom she met after the publication of her best-selling novel The Mummy, Tales for the Twenty Second Century. Having had no prior training in botany, she first learned about horticulture after her marriage, when she assisted her husband with his Encyclopedia of Gardening (1834). Taking a less traditional and more generally accessible approach to the subject, Loudon published her first gardening book, Instructions in Gardening for Ladies, in 1838. She followed this up with a series of five linked titles that could also be viewed as separate works. The first work in the series was published in 1840 and was an immediate success, others followed in 1841, the present work in 1844 (second edition 1849) and the series was completed by two further works in 1846 and 1848. Overall this print is in very good condition with some foxing/staining and evidence of previous binding in left margin.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
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        Die Gallerinn auf der Rieggersburg. Historischer Roman mit Urkunden. 3 Tle. Zweite Auflage.

      Wien, C. Gerold & Sohn 1849.. 8°. XVIII(2) S. (Tit., Vorrede), 222(2), 531(1) S.; Tit., 278(2), 319(1) S.; Tit., 243(1), 292 S. Mit 2 lithogr. Portr. und 1 lithogr. Ansicht als Frontispiz sowie 12 lithogr. Tafeln und 2 wiederh. Textholzst. Halbleinenbde. d. Zt. m. goldgepr. Rü.titel und Deckelbezug aus Achat-Marmorpapier. Einbde. berieben u. an den Deckelkanten z.Tl. abgewetzt, Exlibris auf vord. Spiegel, im Text sauber aber tlw. stark braunfl., mehrere Ss. m. Knickspuren.. Goed.VII, 768; Wurzbach VII, 278. Titelauflage zur 1845 bei Leske in Darmstadt anonym erschienenen EA (vgl. dazu Goedeke). Umfaßt: Tl.1: Die Burgfrau und das Erbfräulein. / Tl.2: Die Huldigung und die Verschwörung. / Tl.3: Der Hexenprozeß. - Roman über die österreichische adlige Burgherrin und frühe Frauenrechtlerin Elisabeth Katharina Freifrau von Galler (um 1607-1672) genannt 'die Gallerin' oder 'die schlimme Liesl', die als eine der tatkräftigsten Frauen der steirischen Geschichte gilt. Verfasser ist der bedeutende österr. Orientalist und Diplomat Joseph von Hammer-Purgstall, der 1774 in Graz als Joseph von Hammer geboren wurde. Nachdem er nach dem Tod seines Freundes Graf Wenzel Johann Purgstall und dessen Sohnes von der aus Schottland stammenden Gräfin Jane Anne von Purgstall adoptiert wurde, die ihn als Erben von Schloss Hainfeld in der Steiermark einschließlich der dortigen Fideikommissherrschaft einsetzte, wurde er 1835 unter dem Namen von Hammer-Purgstall in den Freiherrnstand erhoben. Die zahlreichen Dokumente über die Gallerin, die durch diese Erbschaft in seinen Besitz kamen, dienten ihm als Material für den vorliegenden Roman.

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Löcker]
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        The Emigrant Family: or, The Story of an Australian Settler. By the Author of Settlers and Convicts

      London, Smith, Elder and Co. 1849 - First Edition, first issue in the original cloth. A superb set. Ferguson, 5061. Miller/Macartney, p219. Three volumes. Green blind-stamped cloth, gilt lettering to spine, all edges uncut. A significant and scarce colonial novel. This rare novel provides the most realistic and comprehensive account of early colonial life in Australia. A valuable reference source for social historians, who have found in them informed and accurate comments on such features of the colonial scene as the convict system, the Aborigines, land reform, modes of transport, bushrangers, urban and outback life styles. The Emigrant Family, in spite of its length, is one of the major works of fiction of the period. (The Oxford Companion to Australian Literature, p346). Westleys & Co. of London binding ticket on rear pastedown. [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Grisly Wife Bookshop (ANZAAB/ILAB)]
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        Codice Mendieta: Documentos Franciscanos Siglos XVI y XVII

      2 volumes bound in one: xvi+280 pages; 280 pages. Octavo (9" x 5 3/4") bound in full leather with red and black labels on spine in gilt lettering. Nueva Coleccion de Documentos para la Historia de Mexico, volumes IV and V. From the library of George M Foster. Limited to 200 copies. 1st edition.The Codex Mendieta is a collection of documents and letters relating to the writings of Mendieta to his superiors in both the church and state. In volume two there is a discussion of the codex Tlatelolco. This is volumes IV and V of the five volume in the Neuva Coleccion de Documentos para la Historia de Mexico.Joaquín García Icazbalceta defined his primary role as "writing nothing new but gathering materials that others might do so." As a collector, bibliographer, and editor of historical and linguistic documents he received in his life-time and afterwards much well-derserved acclain for meticulously carrying out this important mission. His works have generally withstood the test of time, and are a modern point of departure for serious study of colonial Mexico. About 1849 Garcia Icazbalceta began to form a "Collection of Documents for the History of America," which eventually grew to 87 large volumes, each containing one or more copies of original manuscripts, some of the highest importance. Fortunately, after Garcia Icazbalceta's death his large manuscript collection and important library of 12,000 volumes remained relatively intact. The manuscript collection passed nearly complete by sale to the University of Texas Library in 1937.Condition:Two volumes wonderfully rebound in one volume else a very good to fine set of an extremely rare item.

      [Bookseller: The Book Collector]
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        Reizen en Ontdekkingstogten van Abel Jansz Tasman, van Lutkegast

      Groningen: A.L. Scholtens, 1849. Small slim octavo, three plates, a few spots but mostly excellent; in the original blue printed stiff wrappers a little discoloured, neatly rebacked to match. Tasman for young readers. Uncommon edition of the journals of Abel Tasman, here condensed and edited for use by younger readers. This copy is well preserved in the original printed wrappers and contains three skilfully printed lithographic plates. These depict Amsterdam Island, and also the first contact between Europeans and the Maori at "De Moordenaars-Baii" (Murderer's Bay, now renamed Golden Bay located at the northwest point of the South Island). Of special interest given Tasman's early Australian landfall is the bucolic scene of Tasmanian Aborigines, here depicted in a style reminiscent of the work of nineteenth-century French voyage illustrators such as Charles-Alexandre Lesueur and Louis de Sainson.

      [Bookseller: Hordern House Rare Books]
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        Reizen en Ontdekkingstogten van Abel Jansz Tasman, van Lutkegast?

      A.L. Scholtens, Groningen 1849 - Small slim octavo, three plates, a few spots but mostly excellent; in the original blue printed stiff wrappers a little discoloured, neatly rebacked to match. Tasman for young readers. Uncommon edition of the journals of Abel Tasman, here condensed and edited for use by younger readers. This copy is well preserved in the original printed wrappers and contains three skilfully printed lithographic plates. These depict Amsterdam Island, and also the first contact between Europeans and the Maori at "De Moordenaars-Baii" (Murderer's Bay, now renamed Golden Bay located at the northwest point of the South Island). Of special interest given Tasman's early Australian landfall is the bucolic scene of Tasmanian Aborigines, here depicted in a style reminiscent of the work of nineteenth-century French voyage illustrators such as Charles-Alexandre Lesueur and Louis de Sainson. [Attributes: Soft Cover]

      [Bookseller: Hordern House Rare Books]
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        Schistes Albogularis (White-throated Wedge Bill)

      1849 - John Gould (1804-1881) An illustration from A Monograph of the Trochilidae, or Family of Hummingbirds First edition: London, 1849-61 (supplement printed 1880-87) Hand-colored lithographs with gum arabic metallic detail Framed size: 27 1/2” x 21” (silver leaf frame) John Gould was without question the most prolific ornithological artist of the 19th century, and the only one to rival John James Audubon in ambition and quality. The19th century was a time of intense fascination with discoveries in natural history, especially regarding knowledge of the wildlife of exotic lands. Gould shared the romantic enthusiasm of his time for such subjects, as well as the popular impulse to catalogue exotic wildlife. He combined his passion for natural history with outstanding scientific, artistic, and entrepreneurial talents. Drawing on these abilities, he embarked on a series of projects that would eventually make him the leading publisher of ornithological illustrations in Victorian Britain. Gould’s unparalleled career spanned five decades, and he produced a monumental series of books of birds throughout the world. From the time he took up taxidermy in his early teens, Gould was devoted to recording bird life, either as he observed it personally or as it was reported to him by other ornithologists. He procured the scientific information through extensive correspondence, travel, and field research. The preparatory drawings that he produced were passed on for completion to skilled illustrators, most notably his wife, Elizabeth, and Edward Lear. The plates which resulted from such partnerships were a splendid fusion of art and science, with a scope than remains unsurpassed. Stunning and at the same time highly accurate, Gould’s illustrations linked beauty to science, and science to beauty, in and an unprecedented manner. Of all his works, many of Gould’s best-known images come from this beautiful and comprehensive monograph on hummingbirds. One of his largest productions, the Hummingbirds was also the most painstaking, meticulously detailed project that the ornithologist attempted. In order to create accurate representations of the tiny, delicately beautiful birds, Gould invented a new method of coloring, using metallic pigments to reproduce the iridescence of their plumage. Most images also show at least one subject in flight to further accentuate the coloring of their feathers. The compositions generally show the birds in animated groupings of two or three, surrounded by foliage and landscapes. All of the hummingbirds are drawn to scale and are anatomically correct to the smallest detail, their brilliant coloring highlighted with gold and transparent luster. Most of the subjects in the book were taken from Gould’s personal collection of hummingbird specimens, a number of which he exhibited at the Zoological Gardens, Regent’s Park, during the Great Exhibition of 1851. Joining commerce with science, Gould also utilized the exhibition to display his method of metallic coloring (a shrewd move that worked to publicize his monograph). Gould’s exhibition was a major success, attracting more that 75,000 visitors and, very possibly, not a few of the 273 subscribers to A Monograph of the Trochilidae. These tiny, exuberantly colored birds captured the attention and affection of a vast number of European viewers. Gould’s Hummingbirds represents a splendid triumph of aesthetic sensitivity and scientific rigor.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
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        Plate 17 - Diphlogaena aurora

      London 1849 - John Gould (1804-1881) A selection from A Monograph of the Trochilidae, or Family of Hummingbirds First edition: London, 1849-61 (supplement printed 1880-87) Hand-colored lithographs with gum arabic metallic detail Paper size: 21 1/2” x 14 1/2” Condition: Small areas of foxing along some margins John Gould was without question the most prolific ornithological artist of the 19th century, and the only one to rival John James Audubon in ambition and quality. The19th century was a time of intense fascination with discoveries in natural history, especially regarding knowledge of the wildlife of exotic lands. Gould shared the romantic enthusiasm of his time for such subjects, as well as the popular impulse to catalogue exotic wildlife. He combined his passion for natural history with outstanding scientific, artistic, and entrepreneurial talents. Drawing on these abilities, he embarked on a series of projects that would eventually make him the leading publisher of ornithological illustrations in Victorian Britain. Gould’s unparalleled career spanned five decades, and he produced a monumental series of books of birds throughout the world. From the time he took up taxidermy in his early teens, Gould was devoted to recording bird life, either as he observed it personally or as it was reported to him by other ornithologists. He procured the scientific information through extensive correspondence, travel, and field research. The preparatory drawings that he produced were passed on for completion to skilled illustrators, most notably his wife, Elizabeth, and Edward Lear. The plates which resulted from such partnerships were a splendid fusion of art and science, with a scope than remains unsurpassed. Stunning and at the same time highly accurate, Gould’s illustrations linked beauty to science, and science to beauty, in and an unprecedented manner. Of all his works, many of Gould’s best-known images come from this beautiful and comprehensive monograph on hummingbirds. One of his largest productions, the Hummingbirds was also the most painstaking, meticulously detailed project that the ornithologist attempted. In order to create accurate representations of the tiny, delicately beautiful birds, Gould invented a new method of coloring, using metallic pigments to reproduce the iridescence of their plumage. Most images also show at least one subject in flight to further accentuate the coloring of their feathers. The compositions generally show the birds in animated groupings of two or three, surrounded by foliage and landscapes. All of the hummingbirds are drawn to scale and are anatomically correct to the smallest detail, their brilliant coloring highlighted with gold and transparent luster. Most of the subjects in the book were taken from Gould’s personal collection of hummingbird specimens, a number of which he exhibited at the Zoological Gardens, Regent’s Park, during the Great Exhibition of 1851. Joining commerce with science, Gould also utilized the exhibition to display his method of metallic coloring (a shrewd move that worked to publicize his monograph). Gould’s exhibition was a major success, attracting more that 75,000 visitors and, very possibly, not a few of the 273 subscribers to A Monograph of the Trochilidae. These tiny, exuberantly colored birds captured the attention and affection of a vast number of European viewers. Gould’s Hummingbirds represents a splendid triumph of aesthetic sensitivity and scientific rigor.***If you frame up this item with Arader Galleries you can take a 50% discount off the listed price of this work of art.***

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
 11.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  


        Plate 159, Vol. III - Calliphlox Amethystina (The Amethyst)

      London 1849 - John Gould (1804-1881) A selection from A Monograph of the Trochilidae, or Family of Hummingbirds First edition: London, 1849-61 (supplement printed 1880-87) Hand-colored lithographs with gum arabic metallic detail Paper size: 21 1/2” x 14 1/2” Condition: very small areas of foxing throughout John Gould was without question the most prolific ornithological artist of the 19th century, and the only one to rival John James Audubon in ambition and quality. The19th century was a time of intense fascination with discoveries in natural history, especially regarding knowledge of the wildlife of exotic lands. Gould shared the romantic enthusiasm of his time for such subjects, as well as the popular impulse to catalogue exotic wildlife. He combined his passion for natural history with outstanding scientific, artistic, and entrepreneurial talents. Drawing on these abilities, he embarked on a series of projects that would eventually make him the leading publisher of ornithological illustrations in Victorian Britain. Gould’s unparalleled career spanned five decades, and he produced a monumental series of books of birds throughout the world. From the time he took up taxidermy in his early teens, Gould was devoted to recording bird life, either as he observed it personally or as it was reported to him by other ornithologists. He procured the scientific information through extensive correspondence, travel, and field research. The preparatory drawings that he produced were passed on for completion to skilled illustrators, most notably his wife, Elizabeth, and Edward Lear. The plates which resulted from such partnerships were a splendid fusion of art and science, with a scope than remains unsurpassed. Stunning and at the same time highly accurate, Gould’s illustrations linked beauty to science, and science to beauty, in and an unprecedented manner. Of all his works, many of Gould’s best-known images come from this beautiful and comprehensive monograph on hummingbirds. One of his largest productions, the Hummingbirds was also the most painstaking, meticulously detailed project that the ornithologist attempted. In order to create accurate representations of the tiny, delicately beautiful birds, Gould invented a new method of coloring, using metallic pigments to reproduce the iridescence of their plumage. Most images also show at least one subject in flight to further accentuate the coloring of their feathers. The compositions generally show the birds in animated groupings of two or three, surrounded by foliage and landscapes. All of the hummingbirds are drawn to scale and are anatomically correct to the smallest detail, their brilliant coloring highlighted with gold and transparent luster. Most of the subjects in the book were taken from Gould’s personal collection of hummingbird specimens, a number of which he exhibited at the Zoological Gardens, Regent’s Park, during the Great Exhibition of 1851. Joining commerce with science, Gould also utilized the exhibition to display his method of metallic coloring (a shrewd move that worked to publicize his monograph). Gould’s exhibition was a major success, attracting more that 75,000 visitors and, very possibly, not a few of the 273 subscribers to A Monograph of the Trochilidae. These tiny, exuberantly colored birds captured the attention and affection of a vast number of European viewers. Gould’s Hummingbirds represents a splendid triumph of aesthetic sensitivity and scientific rigor.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
 12.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  


        Plate 207 - Orthorhynchus exilis

      London 1849 - London, 1849. No Binding. Book Condition: Very Good. John Gould (1804-1881) A selection from A Monograph of the Trochilidae, or Family of Hummingbirds First edition: London, 1849-61 (supplement printed 1880-87) Hand-colored lithographs with gum arabic metallic detail Paper size: 21 ½’ x 14 ½’ Condition: Minute areas of foxing along some margins John Gould was without question the most prolific ornithological artist of the 19th century, and the only one to rival John James Audubon in ambition and quality. The19th century was a time of intense fascination with discoveries in natural history, especially regarding knowledge of the wildlife of exotic lands. Gould shared the romantic enthusiasm of his time for such subjects, as well as the popular impulse to catalogue exotic wildlife. He combined his passion for natural history with outstanding scientific, artistic, and entrepreneurial talents. Drawing on these abilities, he embarked on a series of projects that would eventually make him the leading publisher of ornithological illustrations in Victorian Britain. Gould’s unparalleled career spanned five decades, and he produced a monumental series of books of birds throughout the world. From the time he took up taxidermy in his early teens, Gould was devoted to recording bird life, either as he observed it personally or as it was reported to him by other ornithologists. He procured the scientific information through extensive correspondence, travel, and field research. The preparatory drawings that he produced were passed on for completion to skilled illustrators, most notably his wife, Elizabeth, and Edward Lear. The plates which resulted from such partnerships were a splendid fusion of art and science, with a scope than remains unsurpassed. Stunning and at the same time highly accurate, Gould’s illustrations linked beauty to science, and science to beauty, in and an unprecedented manner. Of all his works, many of Gould’s best-known images come from this beautiful and comprehensive monograph on hummingbirds. One of his largest productions, the Hummingbirds was also the most painstaking, meticulously detailed project that the ornithologist attempted. In order to create accurate representations of the tiny, delicately beautiful birds, Gould invented a new method of coloring, using metallic pigments to reproduce the iridescence of their plumage. Most images also show at least one subject in flight to further accentuate the coloring of their feathers. The compositions generally show the birds in animated groupings of two or three, surrounded by foliage and landscapes. All of the hummingbirds are drawn to scale and are anatomically correct to the smallest detail, their brilliant coloring highlighted with gold and transparent luster. Most of the subjects in the book were taken from Gould’s personal collection of hummingbird specimens, a number of which he exhibited at the Zoological Gardens, Regent’s Park, during the Great Exhibition of 1851. Joining commerce with science, Gould also utilized the exhibition to display his method of metallic coloring (a shrewd move that worked to publicize his monograph). Gould’s exhibition was a major success, attracting more that 75,000 visitors and, very possibly, not a few of the 273 subscribers to A Monograph of the Trochilidae. These tiny, exuberantly colored birds captured the attention and affection of a vast number of European viewers. Gould’s Hummingbirds represents a splendid triumph of aesthetic sensitivity and scientific rigor.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
 13.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  


        Plate 120, Vol. III - Lophornis Regulus

      London 1849 - John Gould (1804-1881) A selection from A Monograph of the Trochilidae, or Family of Hummingbirds First edition: London, 1849-61 (supplement printed 1880-87) Hand-colored lithographs with gum arabic metallic detail Paper size: 21 1/2” x 14 1/2” Condition: very small areas of foxing throughout John Gould was without question the most prolific ornithological artist of the 19th century, and the only one to rival John James Audubon in ambition and quality. The19th century was a time of intense fascination with discoveries in natural history, especially regarding knowledge of the wildlife of exotic lands. Gould shared the romantic enthusiasm of his time for such subjects, as well as the popular impulse to catalogue exotic wildlife. He combined his passion for natural history with outstanding scientific, artistic, and entrepreneurial talents. Drawing on these abilities, he embarked on a series of projects that would eventually make him the leading publisher of ornithological illustrations in Victorian Britain. Gould’s unparalleled career spanned five decades, and he produced a monumental series of books of birds throughout the world. From the time he took up taxidermy in his early teens, Gould was devoted to recording bird life, either as he observed it personally or as it was reported to him by other ornithologists. He procured the scientific information through extensive correspondence, travel, and field research. The preparatory drawings that he produced were passed on for completion to skilled illustrators, most notably his wife, Elizabeth, and Edward Lear. The plates which resulted from such partnerships were a splendid fusion of art and science, with a scope than remains unsurpassed. Stunning and at the same time highly accurate, Gould’s illustrations linked beauty to science, and science to beauty, in and an unprecedented manner. Of all his works, many of Gould’s best-known images come from this beautiful and comprehensive monograph on hummingbirds. One of his largest productions, the Hummingbirds was also the most painstaking, meticulously detailed project that the ornithologist attempted. In order to create accurate representations of the tiny, delicately beautiful birds, Gould invented a new method of coloring, using metallic pigments to reproduce the iridescence of their plumage. Most images also show at least one subject in flight to further accentuate the coloring of their feathers. The compositions generally show the birds in animated groupings of two or three, surrounded by foliage and landscapes. All of the hummingbirds are drawn to scale and are anatomically correct to the smallest detail, their brilliant coloring highlighted with gold and transparent luster. Most of the subjects in the book were taken from Gould’s personal collection of hummingbird specimens, a number of which he exhibited at the Zoological Gardens, Regent’s Park, during the Great Exhibition of 1851. Joining commerce with science, Gould also utilized the exhibition to display his method of metallic coloring (a shrewd move that worked to publicize his monograph). Gould’s exhibition was a major success, attracting more that 75,000 visitors and, very possibly, not a few of the 273 subscribers to A Monograph of the Trochilidae. These tiny, exuberantly colored birds captured the attention and affection of a vast number of European viewers. Gould’s Hummingbirds represents a splendid triumph of aesthetic sensitivity and scientific rigor.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
 14.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  


        Plate 2 - Grypus spixi

      London 1849 - John Gould (1804-1881). A selection from A Monograph of the Trochilidae, or Family of Hummingbirds First edition: London, 1849-61 (supplement printed 1880-87) Hand-colored lithographs with gum arabic metallic detail Paper size: 21 ½’ x 14 ½’ Condition: Some minute areas of foxing along some margins. John Gould was without question the most prolific ornithological artist of the 19th century, and the only one to rival John James Audubon in ambition and quality. The19th century was a time of intense fascination with discoveries in natural history, especially regarding knowledge of the wildlife of exotic lands. Gould shared the romantic enthusiasm of his time for such subjects, as well as the popular impulse to catalogue exotic wildlife. He combined his passion for natural history with outstanding scientific, artistic, and entrepreneurial talents. Drawing on these abilities, he embarked on a series of projects that would eventually make him the leading publisher of ornithological illustrations in Victorian Britain. Gould’s unparalleled career spanned five decades, and he produced a monumental series of books of birds throughout the world. From the time he took up taxidermy in his early teens, Gould was devoted to recording bird life, either as he observed it personally or as it was reported to him by other ornithologists. He procured the scientific information through extensive correspondence, travel, and field research. The preparatory drawings that he produced were passed on for completion to skilled illustrators, most notably his wife, Elizabeth, and Edward Lear. The plates which resulted from such partnerships were a splendid fusion of art and science, with a scope than remains unsurpassed. Stunning and at the same time highly accurate, Gould’s illustrations linked beauty to science, and science to beauty, in an unprecedented manner. Of all his works, many of Gould’s best-known images come from this beautiful and comprehensive monograph on hummingbirds. One of his largest productions, the Hummingbirds was also the most painstaking, meticulously detailed project that the ornithologist attempted. In order to create accurate representations of the tiny, delicately beautiful birds, Gould invented a new method of coloring, using metallic pigments to reproduce the iridescence of their plumage. Most images also show at least one subject in flight to further accentuate the coloring of their feathers. The compositions generally show the birds in animated groupings of two or three, surrounded by foliage and landscapes. All of the hummingbirds are drawn to scale and are anatomically correct to the smallest detail, their brilliant coloring highlighted with gold and transparent luster. Most of the subjects in the book were taken from Gould’s personal collection of hummingbird specimens, a number of which he exhibited at the Zoological Gardens, Regent’s Park, during the Great Exhibition of 1851. Joining commerce with science, Gould also utilized the exhibition to display his method of metallic coloring (a shrewd move that worked to publicize his monograph). Gould’s exhibition was a major success, attracting more that 75,000 visitors and, very possibly, not a few of the 273 subscribers to A Monograph of the Trochilidae. These tiny, exuberantly colored birds captured the attention and affection of a vast number of European viewers. Gould’s Hummingbirds represents a splendid triumph of aesthetic sensitivity and scientific rigor.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
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        Supplemental Plate 53 - Elvira Cupreiceps

      London 1849 - John Gould (1804-1881) A selection from A Monograph of the Trochilidae, or Family of Hummingbirds First edition: London, 1849-61 (supplement printed 1880-87) Hand-colored lithographs with gum arabic metallic detail Paper size: 21 1/2” x 14 1/2” Condition: very small areas of foxing throughout John Gould was without question the most prolific ornithological artist of the 19th century, and the only one to rival John James Audubon in ambition and quality. The19th century was a time of intense fascination with discoveries in natural history, especially regarding knowledge of the wildlife of exotic lands. Gould shared the romantic enthusiasm of his time for such subjects, as well as the popular impulse to catalogue exotic wildlife. He combined his passion for natural history with outstanding scientific, artistic, and entrepreneurial talents. Drawing on these abilities, he embarked on a series of projects that would eventually make him the leading publisher of ornithological illustrations in Victorian Britain. Gould’s unparalleled career spanned five decades, and he produced a monumental series of books of birds throughout the world. From the time he took up taxidermy in his early teens, Gould was devoted to recording bird life, either as he observed it personally or as it was reported to him by other ornithologists. He procured the scientific information through extensive correspondence, travel, and field research. The preparatory drawings that he produced were passed on for completion to skilled illustrators, most notably his wife, Elizabeth, and Edward Lear. The plates which resulted from such partnerships were a splendid fusion of art and science, with a scope than remains unsurpassed. Stunning and at the same time highly accurate, Gould’s illustrations linked beauty to science, and science to beauty, in and an unprecedented manner. Of all his works, many of Gould’s best-known images come from this beautiful and comprehensive monograph on hummingbirds. One of his largest productions, the Hummingbirds was also the most painstaking, meticulously detailed project that the ornithologist attempted. In order to create accurate representations of the tiny, delicately beautiful birds, Gould invented a new method of coloring, using metallic pigments to reproduce the iridescence of their plumage. Most images also show at least one subject in flight to further accentuate the coloring of their feathers. The compositions generally show the birds in animated groupings of two or three, surrounded by foliage and landscapes. All of the hummingbirds are drawn to scale and are anatomically correct to the smallest detail, their brilliant coloring highlighted with gold and transparent luster. Most of the subjects in the book were taken from Gould’s personal collection of hummingbird specimens, a number of which he exhibited at the Zoological Gardens, Regent’s Park, during the Great Exhibition of 1851. Joining commerce with science, Gould also utilized the exhibition to display his method of metallic coloring (a shrewd move that worked to publicize his monograph). Gould’s exhibition was a major success, attracting more that 75,000 visitors and, very possibly, not a few of the 273 subscribers to A Monograph of the Trochilidae. These tiny, exuberantly colored birds captured the attention and affection of a vast number of European viewers. Gould’s Hummingbirds represents a splendid triumph of aesthetic sensitivity and scientific rigor.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
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        Plate 19 - Phaethornis cephalus

      London 1849 - London, 1849. No Binding. Book Condition: Very Good. John Gould (1804-1881) A selection from A Monograph of the Trochilidae, or Family of Hummingbirds First edition: London, 1849-61 (supplement printed 1880-87) Hand-colored lithographs with gum arabic metallic detail Paper size: 21 ½’ x 14 ½’ Condition: Minute areas of foxing along some margins John Gould was without question the most prolific ornithological artist of the 19th century, and the only one to rival John James Audubon in ambition and quality. The19th century was a time of intense fascination with discoveries in natural history, especially regarding knowledge of the wildlife of exotic lands. Gould shared the romantic enthusiasm of his time for such subjects, as well as the popular impulse to catalogue exotic wildlife. He combined his passion for natural history with outstanding scientific, artistic, and entrepreneurial talents. Drawing on these abilities, he embarked on a series of projects that would eventually make him the leading publisher of ornithological illustrations in Victorian Britain. Gould’s unparalleled career spanned five decades, and he produced a monumental series of books of birds throughout the world. From the time he took up taxidermy in his early teens, Gould was devoted to recording bird life, either as he observed it personally or as it was reported to him by other ornithologists. He procured the scientific information through extensive correspondence, travel, and field research. The preparatory drawings that he produced were passed on for completion to skilled illustrators, most notably his wife, Elizabeth, and Edward Lear. The plates which resulted from such partnerships were a splendid fusion of art and science, with a scope than remains unsurpassed. Stunning and at the same time highly accurate, Gould’s illustrations linked beauty to science, and science to beauty, in and an unprecedented manner. Of all his works, many of Gould’s best-known images come from this beautiful and comprehensive monograph on hummingbirds. One of his largest productions, the Hummingbirds was also the most painstaking, meticulously detailed project that the ornithologist attempted. In order to create accurate representations of the tiny, delicately beautiful birds, Gould invented a new method of coloring, using metallic pigments to reproduce the iridescence of their plumage. Most images also show at least one subject in flight to further accentuate the coloring of their feathers. The compositions generally show the birds in animated groupings of two or three, surrounded by foliage and landscapes. All of the hummingbirds are drawn to scale and are anatomically correct to the smallest detail, their brilliant coloring highlighted with gold and transparent luster. Most of the subjects in the book were taken from Gould’s personal collection of hummingbird specimens, a number of which he exhibited at the Zoological Gardens, Regent’s Park, during the Great Exhibition of 1851. Joining commerce with science, Gould also utilized the exhibition to display his method of metallic coloring (a shrewd move that worked to publicize his monograph). Gould’s exhibition was a major success, attracting more that 75,000 visitors and, very possibly, not a few of the 273 subscribers to A Monograph of the Trochilidae. These tiny, exuberantly colored birds captured the attention and affection of a vast number of European viewers. Gould’s Hummingbirds represents a splendid triumph of aesthetic sensitivity and scientific rigor.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
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        Supplemental Plate 44 - Rhamphomicron Olivaceum, Lawr.

      London 1849 - John Gould (1804-1881) A selection from A Monograph of the Trochilidae, or Family of Hummingbirds First edition: London, 1849-61 (supplement printed 1880-87) Hand-colored lithographs with gum arabic metallic detail Paper size: 21 1/2” x 14 1/2” Condition: very small areas of foxing throughout John Gould was without question the most prolific ornithological artist of the 19th century, and the only one to rival John James Audubon in ambition and quality. The19th century was a time of intense fascination with discoveries in natural history, especially regarding knowledge of the wildlife of exotic lands. Gould shared the romantic enthusiasm of his time for such subjects, as well as the popular impulse to catalogue exotic wildlife. He combined his passion for natural history with outstanding scientific, artistic, and entrepreneurial talents. Drawing on these abilities, he embarked on a series of projects that would eventually make him the leading publisher of ornithological illustrations in Victorian Britain. Gould’s unparalleled career spanned five decades, and he produced a monumental series of books of birds throughout the world. From the time he took up taxidermy in his early teens, Gould was devoted to recording bird life, either as he observed it personally or as it was reported to him by other ornithologists. He procured the scientific information through extensive correspondence, travel, and field research. The preparatory drawings that he produced were passed on for completion to skilled illustrators, most notably his wife, Elizabeth, and Edward Lear. The plates which resulted from such partnerships were a splendid fusion of art and science, with a scope than remains unsurpassed. Stunning and at the same time highly accurate, Gould’s illustrations linked beauty to science, and science to beauty, in and an unprecedented manner. Of all his works, many of Gould’s best-known images come from this beautiful and comprehensive monograph on hummingbirds. One of his largest productions, the Hummingbirds was also the most painstaking, meticulously detailed project that the ornithologist attempted. In order to create accurate representations of the tiny, delicately beautiful birds, Gould invented a new method of coloring, using metallic pigments to reproduce the iridescence of their plumage. Most images also show at least one subject in flight to further accentuate the coloring of their feathers. The compositions generally show the birds in animated groupings of two or three, surrounded by foliage and landscapes. All of the hummingbirds are drawn to scale and are anatomically correct to the smallest detail, their brilliant coloring highlighted with gold and transparent luster. Most of the subjects in the book were taken from Gould’s personal collection of hummingbird specimens, a number of which he exhibited at the Zoological Gardens, Regent’s Park, during the Great Exhibition of 1851. Joining commerce with science, Gould also utilized the exhibition to display his method of metallic coloring (a shrewd move that worked to publicize his monograph). Gould’s exhibition was a major success, attracting more that 75,000 visitors and, very possibly, not a few of the 273 subscribers to A Monograph of the Trochilidae. These tiny, exuberantly colored birds captured the attention and affection of a vast number of European viewers. Gould’s Hummingbirds represents a splendid triumph of aesthetic sensitivity and scientific rigor. ***If you frame up this item with Arader Galleries you can take a 50% discount off the listed price of this work of art.***

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
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        Plate 280 - Eriocnemus aline

      London 1849 - John Gould (1804-1881). A selection from A Monograph of the Trochilidae, or Family of Hummingbirds First edition: London, 1849-61 (supplement printed 1880-87) Hand-colored lithographs with gum arabic metallic detail Paper size: 21 ½’ x 14 ½’ Condition: Some minute areas of foxing along some margins. John Gould was without question the most prolific ornithological artist of the 19th century, and the only one to rival John James Audubon in ambition and quality. The19th century was a time of intense fascination with discoveries in natural history, especially regarding knowledge of the wildlife of exotic lands. Gould shared the romantic enthusiasm of his time for such subjects, as well as the popular impulse to catalogue exotic wildlife. He combined his passion for natural history with outstanding scientific, artistic, and entrepreneurial talents. Drawing on these abilities, he embarked on a series of projects that would eventually make him the leading publisher of ornithological illustrations in Victorian Britain. Gould’s unparalleled career spanned five decades, and he produced a monumental series of books of birds throughout the world. From the time he took up taxidermy in his early teens, Gould was devoted to recording bird life, either as he observed it personally or as it was reported to him by other ornithologists. He procured the scientific information through extensive correspondence, travel, and field research. The preparatory drawings that he produced were passed on for completion to skilled illustrators, most notably his wife, Elizabeth, and Edward Lear. The plates which resulted from such partnerships were a splendid fusion of art and science, with a scope than remains unsurpassed. Stunning and at the same time highly accurate, Gould’s illustrations linked beauty to science, and science to beauty, in an unprecedented manner. Of all his works, many of Gould’s best-known images come from this beautiful and comprehensive monograph on hummingbirds. One of his largest productions, the Hummingbirds was also the most painstaking, meticulously detailed project that the ornithologist attempted. In order to create accurate representations of the tiny, delicately beautiful birds, Gould invented a new method of coloring, using metallic pigments to reproduce the iridescence of their plumage. Most images also show at least one subject in flight to further accentuate the coloring of their feathers. The compositions generally show the birds in animated groupings of two or three, surrounded by foliage and landscapes. All of the hummingbirds are drawn to scale and are anatomically correct to the smallest detail, their brilliant coloring highlighted with gold and transparent luster. Most of the subjects in the book were taken from Gould’s personal collection of hummingbird specimens, a number of which he exhibited at the Zoological Gardens, Regent’s Park, during the Great Exhibition of 1851. Joining commerce with science, Gould also utilized the exhibition to display his method of metallic coloring (a shrewd move that worked to publicize his monograph). Gould’s exhibition was a major success, attracting more that 75,000 visitors and, very possibly, not a few of the 273 subscribers to A Monograph of the Trochilidae. These tiny, exuberantly colored birds captured the attention and affection of a vast number of European viewers. Gould’s Hummingbirds represents a splendid triumph of aesthetic sensitivity and scientific rigor. ***If you frame up this item with Arader Galleries you can take a 50% discount off the listed price of this work of art.***

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
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        The historie of travaile into Virginia Britannia; expressing the cosmographie and comodities of the country, together with the manners and customes of the people.

      Hakluyt Society London 1849 - First edition. 8vo., viii, xxvi, 203pp., folding map, 5 plates, 1 facsimile, original blue cloth gilt, ex-libris Manchester University with bookplate ("withdrawn" stamp), a very good copy. Hakluyt Society first series, 6. [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Shapero Rare Books]
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        The Historie of Travaile into Virginia Britannia; expressing the Cosmographie and Comodities of the Country, together with the Manners and Customes of the People. Gathered and observed as well by those who went first thither as collected by William Strachey, Gent., the first Secretary of the Colony.

      Printed for the Hakluyt Society, London 1849 - viii, xxxvi, 203 pp. 8vo. Cloth. Illus. with 5 plates,1 facsimile, and 1 folding map. Hakluyt Society, First series: No. 6. From British Library, Sloane MS 1622. "The author, of whom almost nothing is certainly known, was evidently a person of some importance in Virginia during the period of which he writes,--- from 1610 to 1612. Book I., pp. 23 to 133, is almost wholly occupied with a description of the Indians of Virginia, their customs and peculiarities. It was written probably some years before Captain John Smith?s General History of Virginia, and is more especially remarkable as having afforded Mr. Deane and Mr. Niel the data to charge the name of Pocahontas with infamy. The following passage will scarcely be considered sufficient evidence to convict the Indian maiden: ?Their younger women goe not shadowed amongst their owne companie, until they be nigh eleaven, or tuelve returnes of the leafe old, nor are they very much ashamed thereof, and therefore would the before remembered Pochahontas, a well featured, but wanton yong girle, Powhatuns daughter, sometymes resorting to our port, of the age then of eleven or twelve yeares, get the boys forth with her into the markett place, and make them wheele falling on their hands turning up their heeles upwards, whome she would followe and wheele so her self, naked as she was, all the fort over, but being once twelve yeares, they put on a kind of seme-cinctum lethern apron before their bellies, and are very shamefact to be scene bare.? On the modern interpretation of the word wanton, rests almost all the weight of the arguments against Pochahontas? chastity. A word used two centuries ago, like ?wench,? ?quean,? and many other terms, since degraded by use to reproach, is here in the sense of saucy, hoydenish, reckless, and other kindred terms indicating boldness and want of propriety. Like other native girls she was incapable of viewing her nudity with shame, because her youth forbid the association of sexual indulgence, or even desire, with it," (Field, Indian Bibliography, p. 383). Sabin 92664. Field 1514. Pilling 3764. Howes S1053. Spine a bit sunned, wear to head of spine, small institutional bookplate to front pastedown; endpapers at hinges ragged and re-glued, else a very good unopened (uncut) copy. Map about fine. [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Kaaterskill Books, ABAA/ILAB]
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        Anatomie comparee: receuil de planches de myologie dessinees par G. Cuvier ou executees sous les yeux par Laurillard et Mercier.

      . Paris, Dusacq, 1849-1856. In two volumes. Elephant folio (58.0 x 42.0 cm). 336 lithographed plates with descriptive text and three handwritten tables at the end of each volume. Volume I: Title, pp. vi ("Note preliminaire"), 168 (90 individually numbered, and 39 double-sized and double numbered) plates, 23 explanatory text leaves; Volume II: 168 plates (112 individually numbered, and 28 double-sized and double numbered,) 30 explanatory text leaves. Uniform contemporary green half calf over green pebbled boards. Spines with five raised bands, gilt ornaments and title. Marbled endpapers. Top edges gilt.* Monumental and very rare work on the myology, osteology and anatomy of vertebrates, starting with "l'Homme Negre" (12 plates), followed by, for instance, Orang-Outang (5), Magot (13), Papion (17), Coaita (8), Sajou (2), Maki (4), Ours (13), Chien (12), Hyene (14), Lionne (13), Panthere (13), Guepard (1), Kanguroo (21), Marmotte (5), Castor (10), Porc (5), Lapin (5), Agouti (6), Orycterope (3), Ornithorynque (6), Elephant (26), Hippopotame (7), Cochon (9), Tapir (4), Ane (10), etc., etc. Copies of this posthumously published atlas are extremely rare. The Bibliotheque Nationale in Paris only possesses an incomplete copy. Most of the elaborately drawn plates are by Cuvier; the remaining are by Laurillard, his pupil. In the preface we read that it was Cuvier's opinion that myology had been greatly neglected in comparative research. It had been Cuvier's aim to publish a large work on comparative anatomy. Cuvier had great difficulty finding a publisher, as none were willing to produce this costly and sumptuously illustrated atlas. In 1840 however, a special grant was given by the state to make publication possible. It was published in livraisons over a period of 7 years. Because the work is very uncommon it is likely that it was only published in a small edition. DSB: "Seeking to produce one great Anatomie comparee, he spent his life gathering some 13000 items for the museum's public gallery and collecting drawings and documents; 336 plates made according to his drawings and those of Laurillard appeared between 1849 and 1856, with the title Anatomie comparee, Recueil de planches de Myologie". All plates are beautifully executed and the work as offered is in very good condition. Nissen indicates that plates 309, 310, 324 and 325 and the explanatory text to plates 336-340 have never been published; which is consistent with our copy, but also consistent with other copies. Bindings slightly rubbed and somewhat soiled, corners a bit bumped, but despite several signs of use and wear generally still in a good and sound condition. Title page, plates 21, 109, 198, 220, and the explanation sheet to plate 169 with a library stamp in the lower margin. Plate 243 and its explanation leaf with a small (less than one square cm) piece of text (a few letters) and paper loss due to adhesion, last plate strongly age-toned, otherwise only slightly toned in places and occasionally very weakly thumbed, but these are minor flaws and it is definitely, in all, a good, complete copy. There are very few copies available in libraries worldwide and there has been no more than one auction record in the last 50 years. DSB III, p. 524: Nissen ZBI, 1005..

      [Bookseller: Dieter Schierenberg BV]
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        Les Confessions d'un révolutionnaire pour servir à l'histoire de la Révolution de février.

      au bureau du journal La Voix du Peuple 1849 - PROUDHON Pierre-Joseph. Les Confessions d'un révolutionnaire pour servir à l'histoire de la Révolution de février. Paris, au bureau du journal La Voix du Peuple, 1849, in-8 demi-chagrin cerise, dos à nerfs, titre doré, 106 pages, 1ff. de table, texte sur deux colonnes, couv. jaunes conservées et restaurées ; la première est contre-collée sur le faux-titre. E.O. des Confessions écrites à la prison de Sainte-Pélagie. Bel exemplaire. [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: LIBRAIRIE ANCIENNE Séverine HERVELIN]
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