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Displayed below are some selected recent viaLibri matches for books published in 1844

        London

      Published under the Superintendence of the Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge. 1844 . Map dimensions 35 x 64.5 cm, overall dimensions 40 x 65 cm. Folding map of Central London showing the extents from Holloway down to Battersea New Town and Bow Creek across to Earls Court. Vignette views of the Tower from London Bridge and London from Holloway to the upper left corner adjacent to title. Original colour to the parks and bodies of water, the boundary of the City of London marked out in red. Along the lower edge a comparative chart of the heights of the principal buildings. The whole dissected into 10 sections and mounted on linen, folds into original black cloth slipcase with gilt lettered dark red morocco label to upper board. Trivial wear to extremities of the case, the map paper ever so slightly toned, a particularly nice example. No printed date on the map itself, the date above taken from the gilt lettered label on the case.

      [Bookseller: Bow Windows Bookshop]
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        Commemorative Medallion for Admiral Dumont-D'Urville

      France,: Oudine, 1844.. Bronze medal, 69 mm., extremely fine. A particularly attractive copy of this medal struck to commemorate the tragic death of Dumont D'Urville. As the lengthy caption on the medal explains, having survived two circumnavigations of the globe, the great explorer was killed in a railway accident between Bellevue and Meudon on 8 May 1842.The imposing memorial represented on this medal is in the Montparnasse Cemetery in Paris.Marquess of Milford Haven, British and Foreign Naval Medals, London 1919-1928.

      [Bookseller: Hordern House Rare Books]
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        POEMS

      Cambridge, Mass: John Owen, 1844. First Edition. A couple minor rubs, one to a tip, and the other to top of spine, otherwise a very nice, display-worthy copy.. First Edition. Inscribed "From/J.R. Lowell - Elmwood/ 1844" on the half-title page. True first edition of this 1844 book, basically his first general collection (preceded by some shorter or occasional publications). This is evidently the "small paper" issue noted in BAL 13045 (7 1/16"x4 3/4") but this copy has been trimmed just a bit smaller (to 6 1/2"x 4 3/8") to accomodate a lovely full-leather binding featuring raised bands, gilt spine lettering and decorative devices, gilt rules to front and back covers, plus ruled gilt leather overlap inside front and rear covers (on all three sides, 7/8" in all around). There are a few pages with minor vertical creasing, and some minor foxing here and there, but overall this is a beautiful little copy of what is arguably his earliest comprehensive collection over a long career, with a contemporary dated (generic) presentation. (The binding duly notes "Presentation copy").

      [Bookseller: Bert Babcock - Bookseller, LLC]
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        ENGLISH SONGS AND OTHER SMALL POEMS

      London: Edward Moxon, 1844.. 12mo. Contemporary three-quarter morocco and marbled boards. Binding rather rubbed and edgeworn, otherwise a good copy, with Charles Dickens' lion bookplate and the Gadshill label at the front, and with the bookplate of John Gribbel at the back. Old bookseller's description tipped in front. The second edition, in which Procter took the opportunity "to strike out about forty of the poems (of inferior quality) contained in the old volume, and to introduce, in their stead, nearly seventy Poems, in rhyme, besides a considerable quantity of Dramatic verse" - "Preface to the Present Edition," dated "April 13th 1844." A presentation copy, inscribed on the title-page: "Charles Dickens / with the best Regards of / The Author." In THE DICKENS CIRCLE (New York, 1919, p. 169), J.W.T. Ley states: "We may take it as quite certain that Dickens came to know Procter through Forster. And from the first the novelist and the poet were on the best of terms. It was natural. Procter was a peculiarly lovable man, with a peculiar gentleness, 'childlike, without being childish, and an unfailing buoyancy of spirit.' Such a man could not but have a strong attraction for Dickens. From the beginning he loved the company of his friend, who, in the 'forties, was one of the innermost circle with Forster and Maclise and Ainsworth. Procter was one of the little company at the Greenwich dinner in 1842, and until he grew too old (he was twenty-five years older than Dickens) they had frequent social meetings. For HOUSEHOLD WORDS and ALL THE YEAR ROUND he wrote a great deal, and Dickens valued his contributions very highly indeed . . . As Procter grew old Dickens saw less and less of him, but the friendship remained as deep as ever, and in 1854 it was peculiarly sweetened by the discovery that the 'Miss Mary Berwick' who had contributed verses to HOUSEHOLD WORDS which had won Dickens's unstinted praise was really his old friend's daughter, Adelaide, whom he had known from her childhood."

      [Bookseller: William Reese Company - Literature ABAA-]
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        A New Dictionary of the English Language Combining Explanation with Etymology and Illustrated by Quotations from the Best AuthoritiesIn Two Volumes

      London - WilliamPickering, 1844 Book. Very Good. Hardcover. A set of English dictionaries, considered to be the most substantial lexicographical undertaking in England between that of Samuel Johnson and the O. E. D. In 1818 the opening portions of an English lexicon, by Richardson, appeared in the Encyclopdia Metropolitana In 1834 he issued the prospectus of a New English Dictionary, and the work itself was published by Pickering in parts between January 1835 and the spring of 1837. The dictionary is a republication of the lexicon, with improvements and additions. Richardson's principle was to rely on etymology. The Words - with those of the same family, in German, Dutch and Swedish, or in Italian, French and Spanish - are traced to their origin. The Explanations are deduced from the primitive meaning through the various usages. The Quotations are arranged chronologically from the earliest period to the beginning of the present century. Complete in two volumes, although lacking the original supplementary volume. Condition: In original calf bindings with gilt detailing to the spines. Externally, both volumes are sound, although with some rubbing to the spines and extremities. Very slight evidence of past worming to the spine of volume two. Internally, both volumes are firmly bound and bright, although with scattered instances of foxing. Overall: GOOD.

      [Bookseller: Rooke Books]
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        Oeuvres

      Paris: Chez Lefèvre,, 1844-5. 6 volumes, small octavo (155 × 95 mm). Finely bound in contemporary green morocco by J. Clarke, titles and decoration to spines, raised bands, triple line gilt fillets to boards with cornerpieces, roll to turn-ins, marbled endpapers, gilt edges. Bookplates to front pastedowns, some occasional light foxing, an excellent set. A handsomely bound collection in the original French from the Classiques Français series; Moliere is the fourth edition bound in four volumes, Corneille and Boileau bound in 1 volume. The binder John Clarke was "one of the best and most prolific London binders of the period" (Ramsden), who was binding from about 1820 to 1859. He joined in partnership with Francis Bedford in 1841 and they worked together until 1859, after which Bedford worked on his own. Nothing is recorded of Clarke after this date.

      [Bookseller: Peter Harrington]
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        A CHRISTMAS CAROL

      1844. With Illustrations by John Leech. Ninth Edition. London: Chapman & Hall, 1844. 2 pp undated ads. Recently bound in full red morocco, all edges gilt. "Ninth Edition," issued the year after (and with the same four hand-colored plates as) the first edition. A CHRISTMAS CAROL was initially published in December 1843, and was a huge and immediate success. The first three editions were dated 1843 (though a few copies of the first edition were dated 1844), the fourth through tenth editions were dated 1844, the eleventh and twelfth were dated 1845, and finally the thirteenth and fourteenth were dated 1855 and 1860 respectively. Technically these were all "impressions," not "editions," as they were all printed from the same original setting of type with the text comparatively unchanged; and since no copy of an "Eighth Edition" has ever turned up (it is assumed the publisher lost track and skipped a number), this "Ninth Edition" is actually the eighth impression of the first edition.~This copy is recently bound in full red morocco with the same front cover gilt vignette as appeared on the original cloth; the half-title and ad leaf were retained, and the original gilt page edges remain. (An example of the original front cover cloth is bound in at the end -- but it is red, not brown, so it could not have come from this specific copy, as the "Ninth Edition" was the last to be bound in brown.) Condition is just about fine. Now that fine copies of the first edition are priced from $40,000 to $50,000, many collectors instead seek attractive copies of these later editions. Gimbel A79 ("33rd copy"); Smith II No. 4, note 6.

      [Bookseller: Sumner & Stillman]
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        A Christmas Carol. In Prose. Being A Ghost Story of Christmas

      London, Chapman and Hall,, 1844. Small octavo. Recent red morocco, titles and decoration to spine, raised bands, single rule to boards, marbled endpapers, gilt edges. With colour illustrations by John Leech. Small ownership signature to top of title page, frontispiece and title page lightly marked otherwise a nice clean copy. Seventh Edition. A handsomely bound copy.

      [Bookseller: Peter Harrington]
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        Simcoe's Military Journal. A History of the Operations of a Partisan Corps, Called The Queen's Rangers...During the War of the American Revolution

      New York: Bartlett & Welford , 1844. 1st. Hard Cover. Good. Missing front end papers, INTERNAL, TIGHT BINDING, MINOR FOXING OTHERWISE OVERALL very good.& ILLUSTRATED BY TEN ENGRAVED PLANS OF ACTIONS &C NOW FIRST PUBLISHED WITH A MEMOIR OF THE AUTHOR AND OTHER ADDITIONS.& MAPS INCLUDE:& 1) AFFAIR AT QUINTIN'S BRIDGE& 2) SURPRISE OF REBELS AT HANCOCK'S HOUSE& 3) AMBUSCADE OF THE INDIANS AT KINGSBRIDGE& 4) MARCH OF THE QUEENS RANGERS& 5)PLAN OF OYSTER BAY AS FORTIFIED BY THE QUEENS RANGERS& 6) SKIRMISH AT RICHMOND& 7) THE LANDING AT BURRELLS& 8) SKETCH OF THE SKIRMISTH AT PETERSBURG& 9) SKETCH OF THE ACTION AT OSBURNS& 10) ACTION AT SPENCERS ORDINARY, The book was originally printed at Exeter in 1787 by Simcoe for private distribution and copies are very rare. Simcoe came to America with the 35th Regiment in 1775, at the outbreak of the American Revolutionary War. From 1777 to 1781, he commanded the loyalist regiment known as the Queen"s Rangers, which had been organized in 1776 by Col. Robert Rogers. Simcoe proved to be a very successful commander, and under his leadership, the Queen"s Rangers developed a high degree of efficiency and a reputation for distinguished and honourable conduct. This is his history of the regiment and its operations in New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, North and South Carolina, and Virginia. ".Simcoe brought [the regiment] up to strength, mainly by recruiting loyalist refugees and American deserters. Organized in 11 companies of 30 men each - one hussars, one grenadiers, and the rest light infantry - they served continuously for the duration of the war as reconnaissance and outpost troops: in the Pennsylvania campaign of 1778 and the subsequent retreat to New York, in Benedict Arnold"s raid on Richmond, Va., and in the Yorktown campaign. Their training gave little attention to formal drill, but insisted on physical fitness, rapid movement, bayonet fighting, and, most particularly, discipline in the field.[Simcoe] was invalided home just before the surrender of Yorktown in 1781. The war had been for him a great personal success: he had risen in army rank from lieutenant to lieutenant-colonel; in action he had been one of the two or three most consistently successful of British regimental commanders; and he had acquired a reputation as a tactical theorist, which was soon enhanced by the publication at Exeter in 1787 of his Journal of the operations of the Queen"s Rangers." (S.R.Mealing, DCB) Upon his appointment as the first lieutenant-governor of the newly created province of Upper Canada in 1791, Simcoe resurrected the Queen"s Rangers as an infantry corps, including many officers and men from the former unit, to accompany him and serve as a pioneering force.

      [Bookseller: Lord Durham Rare Books Inc. (IOBA)]
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        Canada Porcupine [Pl. 36]

      New York: J.J. Audubon, 1844. Lithograph, coloured by hand, by J. T. Bowen of Philadelphia. 28 x 21 15/16 inches. "As long as our civilization lasts, America will be in debt to this genius." (Roger Tory Peterson). A fine image of a Canada Porcupine, from the greatest illustrated natural history work to be produced in America during the nineteenth century. The Canada Porcupine's range extends from eastern North America to Hudson's Bay to the Arctic Circle and Alaska. "We kept a living animal of the kind... in Charleston for six months. It was occasionally let out to enjoy the benefit of a promenade in the garden and became very gentle. When we called to it, it would turn its head slowly towards us and give us a mild and wistful look, then with stately steps advance and take the fruit from our hand. If it found the door to our study open it would march in and gently approach us, rubbing its sides against our legs, and look up as if supplicating for additional delicacie." (Quadrupeds, I, p.280) This very fine plate is from the folio edition of John James Audubon's The Viviparous Quadrupeds of North America, produced entirely in the United States. The work was to be John James Audubon's last, and by 1846 he had to hand over the drawing of the final 50 or so plates to his sons. The final parts of this work of national importance were published after his death in 1851, but the images remain as a final fitting memorial to the greatest American wildlife artist who ever lived. The production of the Quadrupeds was begun by John James Audubon and his sons at about the same as the commercially-successful octavo edition of The Birds of America. Unlike the double-elephant folio, the Quadrupeds was produced entirely in the United States. William Reese notes that "By 1843 the Audubon family business was a well-oiled machine, involving John James, his two sons, Victor and John Woodhouse, and various in-laws and friends. The octavo Birds was still in production when J.T. Bowen began to produce the plates for the elephant folio edition of the Quadrupeds, the largest successful color plate book project of 19th-century America. It took the family five years to publish 150 plates in thirty parts. The massive project was a commercial success, thanks to the close management of Victor. There were about three hundred subscribers." (Stamped with a National Character pp.58-59) Cf. Bennett, p. 5; cf. Reese Stamped With A National Character 36; cf. Sabin 2367; cf. Wood, p. 209

      [Bookseller: Donald Heald Rare Books]
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        Simcoe's Military Journal. A History of the Operations of a Partisan Corps, Called The Queen's Rangers...During the War of the American Revolution

      New York: Bartlett & Welford, 1844. 1st. Hard Cover. Very Good. 8vo. 22.5cm. Rebound in quarter speckled dark blue calf, raised black ruled bands, gilt decorations in the panels, crimson crushed morocco label, blue marbled boards.& Contemporary internal library stamps (no bleed through) otherwise a fine copy., illustrated with 10 folding maps.  A very nice copy of the first American edition. The first published edition of one of the legendary Revolutionary War books. In 1775, Simcoe arrived in America as a young British Army officer. In the fall of 1777 he was promoted to the rank of major and given command of the Queen's Rangers, an American Tory cavalry regiment. This book describes the actions in which the regiment was involved, first around Philadelphia in 1777 and 1778, until the withdrawal of Howe to New York; then around New York in Long Island, Westchester County and New Jersey until the end of 1780. On Dec. 11, 1780, the regiment embarked for Virginia as part of Benedict Arnold's campaign there, serving in all of the dramatic actions in Virginia throughout 1781, and finally ending up trapped at Yorktown with Cornwallis. Simcoe then returned to England where he wrote this book, privately printing it in an elaborate fashion, with ten folding maps illustrating different actions. That edition remains among the rarest examples of Revolutionary Americana (the last two copies sold brought more than $20,000). This scarce first published edition includes a memoir of Simcoe. Simcoe later went on to a distinguished parliamentary and military career, and is best known as the first governor of Upper Canada & Lande 749. TPL 562

      [Bookseller: Lord Durham Rare Books Inc. (IOBA)]
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        MORMONISM: EMBRACING THE ORIGIN, RISE AND PROGRESS OF THE SECT, WITH AN EXAMINATION OF THE BOOK OF MORMON; ALSO, THEIR TROUBLES IN MISSOURI, AND FINAL EXPULSION FROM THE STATE...WITH AN APPENDIX, GIVING AN ACCOUNT OF THE LATE DISTURBANCES IN ILLINOIS, WHICH RESULTED IN THE DEATH OF JOSEPH AND HYRUM SMITH. BY G.W. WESTBROOK

      St. Louis: Printed by Ustick & Davies, 1844.. v,[1],[5]-304,36pp. plus errata. Original black ribbed cloth, expertly rebacked with original backstrip laid down. Titlepage reinserted, lower blank margin a bit trimmed. Overall just about very good. In a half morocco box. Second edition, but the first edition to contain Westbrook's important appendix, which makes a large contribution to the history of the events which led to the Smiths' assassinations. Hunt felt the Mormons had slandered the citizens of Missouri by making charges against them in Mormon accounts of their difficulties in the state. Hunt casts a cold eye on the origins of THE BOOK OF MORMON, the Mormon Church, and the activities of the sect from its inception to their present state. The errata leaf cited by Howes and present in the Graff copy is also present in this copy, though lacking from others we have seen. HOWES H805, "b." MISSOURI IMPRINTS 408. GRAFF 2013. FLAKE 4142. WOODWARD 101.

      [Bookseller: William Reese Company - Americana]
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        Ireland, Scotland, and England

      London: Chapman and Hall, 1844. Early Edition. Hardcover. Very good. 8vo. iv,248,(ii),100,(ii),202pp. 32pp. publisher catalogue. Three works bound in one, the last titled at its beginning, England and Wales". Original greenish-brown T-grain cloth blocked in blind on the boards and with gilt spine titles. coated endpapers. Hinges neatly and nearly invisibly mended, head and tail of the spine worn, light wear to the edges and corners, else a very good copy.

      [Bookseller: Thorn Books]
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        Account of the Northumberland Equatoreal and Dome, Attached to the Cambridge University

      Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1844.. First Edition. Black cloth cover. G : in Good condition. Spine faded. Some browning to page edges and light foxing. Contents tight. Signature of previous owner Professor Hermann Alexander Bruck, Astronomer Royal of Scotland on both fep and title page. Book label 'Presented by The Duke of Northumberland'. 290mm x 240mm (11" x 9"). 39pp + plates. 19 engraved or lithographed plates. George Biddell Airy, the author was born in Alnwick in 1800 and became the Astronomer Royal.

      [Bookseller: Barter Books]
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        Moeurs, Usages et Costumes de tous les peuples du monde

      Brussels,: Librairie Historique,, 1844.. Four volumes, large octavo, with a total of 204 finely handcoloured costume plates; contemporary half crimson roan, flat spines ornately gilt. Scarce and beautiful work on the costumes of the world, finely illustrated with a wonderful series of highly coloured full-page plates. The fourth volume covers Oceania and includes the Aborigines of Jervis Bay and Kangaroo Island, and the exotic peoples of Pitcairn Island, New Guinea, Timor, Java, New Zealand and Hawaii. There are also images familiar to us from published voyage accounts such as the Tahitian dancer after John Webber from the account of Cook's third voyage, and portrait profiles of Maoris based on Sydney Parkinson's images published in the official account of the first voyage.As usual, the plates in the publication do not exactly correspond with the lists published within the work. The table of contents describes 185 plates (actually 188, but an erratum shows that only 185 were issued) and subscribers could also order a series of twelve special supplementary plates - as here - making a total of 197 plates. This copy however has 204 plates. A full collation is available on request.

      [Bookseller: Hordern House Rare Books]
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        The Brook!

      London 1844 - This colored engraving depicts a hunting party, including one member who has fallen into a brook. Measuring 24 3/4" x 30 1/2", the print shows mild staining around the margins and a small red stain in the bottom left hand margin.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries San Francisco]
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        The Lady's Own Cookery Book, and new Dinner-Table Directory; in which will be found a large collection of original Receipts, including not only the result of the Authoress's many years observation, experience, and research, but also the Contributions of an extensive circle of acquaintance: adapted to the use of Persons Living In the Highest Style, as well as those of moderate fortune

      LONDON: HENRY COLBURN, 1844 A very rare original copy of the 3rd edition of Lady Charlotte Bury's famous cookery book for Ladies. This edition has been much reprinted in recent years and is frequently quoted from by cookery writers but is very scarce. Lady Charlotte Bury - also known as Lady Charlotte Campbell Bury - lived from 1775-1861 - and was well known as a society hostess and authoress. She was Lady in Waiting to the Princess of Wales - later Queen - and published a diary based on her experience as well as works of fiction. The book is in its original binding with gilt decoration of hanging game on the spine. It has had a cloth case repair to relay the spine but the original endpapers have been retained. With ink signature of Ella M Smith on the front endpaper. The binding is sound and tight - there has been some damage to the back board possibly where string or tape was used to hold the book together before the binding was repaired. The contents are in very good condition for a cookery book. There is some browning and brown spotting generally to margins rather than text. The odd page has been badly opened. Both endpapers have some damp staining. Publisher's catalogue bound at the rear.

      [Bookseller: E C Books]
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        Moeurs, Usages et Costumes de tous les Peuples du Monde, d'Apresdes Documents Authentiqueset les Voyages les Plus Recents (Three Volumes--Europe, Afrique--Amerique, and Asie; missing Oceanie volume)

      Bruxelles (Brussels): Librairie Historique-Artistique. 1844 and 1845. Hardcover. Very Good. Three volumes of a four volume set, 1844 and 1845, hardcovers (quarter leather with mottled orange boards), small quartos, Europe volume has 361pp., Asia volume has 588pp., and Africa/America volume has 365pp., illustrated in color by gum arabic ink. All books are VG with some light rubbing, general soil, and edge wear to boards and spine ends, rubbing to outer hinges of spine, Asia volume has a hole to front flyleaf near binding and some light pencil notes and a taped in note card to pages behind it and bump to top of spine, all bindings are tight, all texts clean bright and unmarked, though with some foxing throughout. No DJs, but each volume housed in protective plastic. Handsome, though sadly incomplete set! Pictures available upon request. Text in French.

      [Bookseller: Caliban Books ABAA-ILAB]
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        Wien und die Wiener, in Bildern aus dem Leben. Mit Beitr. v. A. Stifter, C. E. Langer, Nordmann, F. Stelzhammer u.a

      Pesth, Heckenast 1844.. gr.-8°. Vortit., Gest. Frontisp., XXI, 454 S., 3 Bll. u. 30 (statt 29) Taf. in Mischtechnik (dav. 26 v. C. MAHLKNECHT nach W. BÖHM). Ln. d. Zt. Stellenw. braun- bzw. stockfl. Ganz vereinz. Textunterstreich. Slg. Eckl IV, 663; Slg. Mayer 2474; Hayn-Got. VIII,525; Eisenmeier 16; Heck S.4, B1 - Seltenes Expl. mit dem hier als Frontisp. eingebund. Orig.-Umschl. sowie einem gelbfarbenen Lieferungsumschlag (das Werk erschien zunächst in Lieferungen, vgl. Rabenlechner S. 69ff.), ein Feuerwerk darstellend, mit verkleinerter Abb. von 12 der 30 Tafeln. Entgegen der kolor. Ausgabe, die nur 26 Taf. hatte, hier mit 30 Tafeln. Heck: "Die Ausgabe mit den handkolorierten Bildern hat immer nur 26 Tafeln, da 4, die Stifter wahrscheinlich fälschlich zugeschrieben werden, sich nicht zum Kolorieren eigneten, diese sind Bettler, Schusterjunge, Stubenmädchen, Werkelmann." In unserem Expl. ist die Taf.: "Der Holzhacker" doppelt vorhanden. Von Stifter stammen - außer der Herausgabe und d. Vorwort - auch 12 Aufsätze, u. a. Aussicht und Betrachtungen von der Spitze des St. Stephansturmes. Der Prater. Der Tandelmarkt. Die Streichmacher. Die Wiener Stadtpost. Stifter wollte dann die 12 Aufsätze zu einem selbständigen Band vereinigt herausgeben, aber es kam nicht mehr dazu. Sie wurden dann in "Vermischte Schriften" und "Erzählungen" aufgenommen. Das Werk gehört zu den besten und historisch wertvollsten Darstellungen des Wiener Volkslebens.

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Burgverlag]
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        Map of the State of Maine with the Province of New Brunswick

      [Portland]: 1844. Engraved wall map on four sheets by J. H. Young and F. Dankworth, hand-coloured. Relined. (A bit toned as usual, expert restoration at edges). 53 1/2 x 43 inches. The best wall map of Maine at the time of its publication. Greenleaf's initial goal was to promote settlement in the interior of Maine. Finding that the available maps were woeful, he set about compiling information for a detailed map of the entire region. The culmination of those efforts was this magnificent map. In the interior, settlements, towns, rivers and lakes are all carefully located. The map shows the entirety of the state, with the counties shaded in various colours. The extensive coastline is very nicely drawn, with many islands, points, and bays identified. Virtually all of New Brunswick is also included on the map, with the far eastern tip and Nova Scotia depicted in an inset. The northern part of the map shows the course of the St. Lawrence River. The scale is about eleven miles to the inch. Moses Greenleaf has been given a great amount of credit for promoting Maine as an entity separate from Massachusetts, a task he began with his "Map of the District of Maine" in 1815, followed the next year by his first book. After Maine attained statehood in 1820, Greenleaf published a revised map and then began compiling the most up-to-date information for this great wall map, which was first published in 1829. The map was published by Shirley & Hyde of Portland, Maine (who also published Greenleaf's Survey of the State of Maine, with Accompanying Atlas, the same year) but the map was engraved in Philadelphia by Young and Dankworth. This third edition, with improvements, is dated January 1844. Phillips Maps, pp.384; Ristow, pp.94-96 (for Greenleaf's cartography of Maine).

      [Bookseller: Donald Heald Rare Books]
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        A Christmas Carol. In Prose. Being a Ghost Story of Christmas

      Paris: Baudry's European Library, 1844. Second European Edition, after the Tauchnitz one of 1843. 2 volumes bound in one vols., 12mo. [4], 140 pp. Complete with half-title. Contemporary half calf, gilt spine. Inner hinge cracked. Podeschi A83 (copy lacking half-title) . Very rare -- online searches locate only the Gimbel copy at Yale, which seems to lack the half-title [Bound with:] Talfourd, Thomas Noon. Ion. A Tragedy in Four Acts. Engraved frontispiece of Ellen Tree as 'Ion'. 72pp. Phila. & New York: Turner & Fisher, n.d. [ca. 1844]

      [Bookseller: James Cummins Bookseller]
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        Complete Angler, The

      1844. first edition. An Unique CopyWith Four Original Signed Watercolor Designs by John AbsolonUsed for the Engravings Within the BookWALTON, Sir Isaac. The Complete Angler. Or, The Contemplative Man's Recreation, of Izaak Walton and Charles Cotton. Edited by John Major.London: D. Bogue, 1844. Sixth (titled fourth) John Major edition, a unique copy, with four signed watercolors by John Absolon, original designs used by engraver J.T. Willmore for the corresponding engravings in the text. Quarto (11 x 8 1/4 in; 279 x 210 mm), each octavo leaf mounted onto large, window-paned sheets to match the size of the original art. Twelve steel engravings, nine of which are after designs by John Absolon and new to this edition. Seventy-four woodcuts by John and Mason Jackson. Early twentieth century binding by Riviere & Son (stamp-signed) in full forest green Levant morocco. Triple gilt-ruled borders. Gilt-ruled raised bands, elaborately gilt decorated compartments, gilt-rolled edges, wide gilt dentelles. All edges gilt. From the renowned collection of John T. Spaulding, with his small, distinctive bookplate. A fine copy. John Absolon (1815 - 1895) was a painter of landscape, seascape and genre in both oil and watercolor, and a book illustrator. He began his career as a painter of theatrical scenery at Covent Garden. His first exhibition was at the Royal Society of British Artists in 1832 at the age of 17. He went to Paris in 1835, and on his return in 1838 became a member of the National Watercolour Society, of which he later became Treasurer. He exhibited mainly at the NWS, but also at the Royal Academy, and British Institution and Royal Society of British Artists. Hardie praised his watercolors for their "fresh and breezy manner."John T. Spaulding was Boston's principal collector of nineteenth century paintings during the first third of the twentieth century, parts of his huge collection exhibited at Boston's Museum of Fine Arts in 1932; later bequested to that institution.“Indeed, my good scholar, we may say of angling, as Dr. Boteler said of strawberries, ‘Doubtless God could have made a better berry, but doubtless God never did’; and so, if I might be judge, God never did make a more calm, quiet, innocent recreation than angling” (The Compleat Angler).Izaak Walton (1593-1683), “English biographer, who is best known for The Compleat Angler (1653), a classic guide to the joys of fishing with over 300 new printings. It combines practical information about angling with folklore. The story of three friends, traveling through the English countryside, is enlivened by occasional songs, ballads, quotations from several writers, and glimpses of an idyllic and now lost rural life…The Compleat Angler was a combination of manual and meditation...Walton drew his work on Nicholas Breton's (c. 1545-1626) fishing idyll Wits Trenchmour (1597). The second edition was largely rewritten and in the fifth edition Walton wrote about fly-fishing on the river Dove, a subject the author himself knew little about. The last [i.e., fifth] edition was published in 1676 and included additional material by Charles Cotton (Instructions how to Angle for a Trout or Grayling in a Clear Stream) and Colonel Robert Venables's The Experienced Angler, or Angling Improved. Walton called this work The Universal Angler. He had taught Cotton but never met Venables” (“Izaak Walton (1593-1683)” at Pegasos—A Literature Related Resource Site).Coigney 56.

      [Bookseller: David Brass Rare Books, Inc.]
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        The Smuggler King: or, The Foundling of the Wreck. A Nautico-Domestic Romance

      London - E. Lloyd, 1844 Book. Very Good. Hardcover. First edition. The scarce first edition of Prest's gothic tale of the notorious Smuggler King. A very collectible penny deadful. Unusually well preseved. Bound in cloth with gilt lettering. With a Brackenburn bookplate to the front pastedown. With numerous in-textillustrations. Thomas Peckett Prest, d. 1859, was awriter and playwright. Prest wrote vigorous, stylized prose that popularized penny fiction at the moment when an increasingly literate working-class public were tiring of political and educational reading and looking for entertainment. With his knowledge of popular taste and in particular melodrama he adapted middle-class writing for a popular audience, facilitating a significant stage in the development of literature for the masses -ODNB. Condition: The binding is tight and firm. There is only slight wear to the extremities, with just slight bumping. Internally the pages have browning with intermittent spots and marks. With the very occasional ink mark. There are two burn holes to pages 113/4 and 115/6 that very slightly affect the text to the lower left-hand corner. Overall the condition is very good..

      [Bookseller: Rooke Books]
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        Catlin's North American Indian Portfolio. Hunting Scenes and Amusements of the Rocky Mountains and Prairies of America

      London: C. & J. Adlard for George Catlin, Egyptian Hall, 1844. Folio. (22 5/8 x 16 3/4 inches). [Pp.1-2] letterpress title (verso blank); [pp.3-4] To the Reader; pp.[5-]20 text. 25 hand-coloured lithographic plates, on thick paper, after Catlin, drawn on stone by Catlin (2) or McGahey (23), printed by Day & Haghe. (Endpapers and tissue guards renewed, scattered minor soiling). Publisher's brown moire cloth boards, upper covere lettered in gilt, rebacked and retipped with dark brown calf. First edition, hand-colored issue, of Catlin's Portfolio, a key work for any serious collection of western Americana. Catlin published the first two issues of the North American Indian Portfolio simultaneously in late November 1844. The first issue was hand-coloured, and the second had tinted plates. Catlin originally envisaged publishing a series of linked but separate portfolios, each with its own theme: religious rites, dances, costumes, etc. Unfortunately, the first series was the only one that was ever published, and its production proved to be so taxing (both financially and physically) that Catlin sold both the publication and distribution rights to Henry Bohn. Catlin's North American Indian Portfolio contains the results of his years of painting, living with and travelling amongst the Great Plains Indians. Catlin summarized the Native American as "an honest, hospitable, faithful, brave, warlike, cruel, revengeful, relentless, -- yet honourable, contemplative and religious being." In a famous passage from the preface of his North American Indian Portfolio, Catlin describes how the sight of several tribal chiefs in Philadelphia led to his resolution to record their way of life: "the history and customs of such a people, preserved by pictorial illustrations, are themes worthy of the lifetime of one man, and nothing short of the loss of my life shall prevent me from visiting their country and becoming their historian". He saw no future for either their way of life or their very existence, and with these thoughts always at the back of his mind he worked, against time, setting himself a truly punishing schedule, to record what he saw. From 1832 to 1837 he spent the summer months sketching the tribes and then finished his pictures in oils during the winter. The record he left is unique, both in its breadth and also in the sympathetic understanding that his images constantly demonstrate. A selection of the greatest of images from this record were published in the North American Indian Portfolio in an effort to reach as wide an audience as possible. In addition to publishing the present work, Catlin also spent from 1837 to 1852 touring the United States, England, France and Holland with his collection of paintings, examples of Indian crafts and accompanied by representative members of the Indian tribes. A financial reverse in 1852 meant that he lost the collection, but he spent his later years making several trips to South and Central America, sketching the natives there. A highly important record of a "truly lofty and noble race ... A numerous nation of human beings...three-fourths of whose country has fallen into the possession of civilized man ... twelve million of whose bodies have fattened the soil in the mean time; who have fallen victims to whiskey, the small-pox, and the bayonet" (Catlin). Abbey Travel 653; Field 258; Howes C-243; McCracken 10; Sabin 11532; Wagner-Camp 105a:1; William S. Reese, The Production of Catlin's North American Indian Portfolio, 1844-1876, issue 2

      [Bookseller: Donald Heald Rare Books]
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        JOC-O-SOT, THE WALKING BEAR, A SAUK CHIEF FROM THE UPPER MISSOURI

      London. 1844.. Large folio lithograph, colored in aquatint. Slight discoloration, otherwise a very nice copy. This portrait is one of the extra, unnumbered, plates from CATLIN'S NORTH AMERICAN INDIAN PORTFOLIO.... A nice, striking portrait of a standing chief holding a spear. WAGNER-CAMP 105a.

      [Bookseller: William Reese Company - Americana]
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        [Dying Buffalo Bull in a Snow Drift [Pl. 17]

      London: Henry Bohn, 1844 or 1845]. Lithograph, coloured by hand, printed by Day & Haghe, on original card mount within ink-ruled frame. Good condition with the exception of some light overall foxing. 12 x 17 1/2 inches. 15 7/8 x 21 1/4 inches (mount). From Catlin's 'North American Indian Portfolio', one of the most important accounts of native-American life. "In this view the reader is introduced to the optimum of... severity which the hunters of the northern prairies have to contend with in the depths of winter. An intensely cold day, with dry and sand-like snow three or four feet in depth, drifting before the wind, and a herd of buffaloes labouring to plough their way through it, whilst they are urged on by a party of Indians on snow-shoes, deeply clad in furs... The... bull in the foreground of this picture... [was] carefully sketched by my own hand... and I therefore confidently offer them as faithful delineations of their forms and looks, as well as fit and impressive subjects for contemplation for those who may ever have the time, and feel disposed to sympathize with... this useful and noble animal." Catlin summarized the Native American as "an honest, hospitable, faithful, brave, warlike, cruel, revengeful, relentless, -- yet honourable, contemplative and religious being". In a famous passage from the preface of his North American Indian Portfolio, Catlin describes how the sight of several tribal chiefs in Philadelphia led to his resolution to record their way of life: "the history and customs of such a people, preserved by pictorial illustrations, are themes worthy of the lifetime of one man, and nothing short of the loss of my life shall prevent me from visiting their country and becoming their historian". He saw no future for either their way of life or their very existence, and with these thoughts always at the back of his mind he worked, against time, setting himself a truly punishing schedule, to record what he saw. From 1832 to 1837 he spent the summer months sketching the tribes and then finished his pictures in oils during the winter. The record he left is unique, both in its breadth and also in the sympathetic understanding that his images constantly demonstrate. A selection of the greatest of images from this record were published in the North American Indian Portfolio in an effort to reach as wide an audience as possible. The present image is one of the results of this publishing venture and is both a work of art of the highest quality and a fitting memorial to a vanished way of life. Abbey Travel 653; Field Indian Bibliography 258; Howes C-243; McCracken 10; Sabin 11532; Wagner-Camp 105a:1.

      [Bookseller: Donald Heald Rare Books]
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        NARRATIVE OF THE UNITED STATES EXPLORING EXPEDITION. DURING THE YEARS 1838, 1839, 1840, 1841, 1842

      Philadelphia: C. Sherman, 1844-1845.. Six volumes: five quarto text volumes plus atlas. Text: Half titles; small format errata slip in Vol. V. Nine double-page maps, sixty- four steel engraved plates, 293 woodcut and steel engraved illustrations (including forty- seven steel-engraved vignettes). Atlas: Five folding maps, one handcolored. Text: Contemporary half calf over marble paper-covered boards, rebacked to style in roan, spines ruled and lettered in gilt, marbled edges. Some light offsetting from plates. Atlas: Contemporary marbled calf, expertly rebacked to style. Corners slightly rubbed. Browned, some expert repairs to map folds. Else very good. All contained within three modern blue morocco-backed cloth boxes, with onlaid red morocco labels tooled in gilt. First edition, mixed issue, of the text: the volumes limited to between seventy-five and 150 copies. The first three volumes of the text are variants of the first edition, first issue (Haskell 1, limited to 100 copies, of which twenty-five were destroyed by fire): the official issue, with Sherman's name on the front of the titles, but a variant with no mention on the half titles that the work was published "by authority of Congress." The fourth and fifth volumes are from the first edition, second (unofficial) issue (Haskell 2A, limited to 150 copies). The atlas (Haskell 17B), from an edition of 1000 copies, was issued to accompany the imperial octavo issue. This set therefore includes elements from the only two quarto issues of this work, allied with the atlas from the subsequent imperial octavo issue. "Wilkes wrote in Jan. 28, 1845, that since general distribution 'would not be accomplished by the one hundred copies ordered by the government of the 4to edition...I have had printed the remainder of the token, (namely 150 copies) of the 4to edition, for the purpose of presentation to my friends, and for sale to those who should desire a book of that size'" - Haskell (p.37). The United States Exploring Expedition "was the first American scientific expedition of any size, charged to 'extend the bounds of Science and promote the acquisition of knowledge,' and was one of the most ambitious Pacific expeditions ever attempted" (Forbes). The expedition represents "the first governmental sponsorship of scientific endeavor and was instrumental in the nation's westward expansion. Specimens gathered by expedition scientists became the foundation collections of the Smithsonian Institution. Significant American contributions in the fields of geology, botany, conchology, anthropology, and linguistics came from the scientific work of the expedition. Wilkes's evaluations of his landfalls influenced later U.S. positions in those areas" (DAB). "The chief fields of exploration in this expedition were the coast of the Antarctic continent, the islands of the Pacific Ocean, and the American northwest coast. In total some 280 islands in the Pacific and adjacent waters and 800 miles of streams and coasts in the Oregon country were surveyed, and 1,600 miles of the coast of Antarctica were charted. After leaving Hampton Roads in 1838, the expedition visited Madeira, the Cape Verde Islands, Brazil, Patagonia, the South Shetland Islands and Peter I Island, Chile, and Peru, before proceeding to the Tuamotu or the low Archipelago, the Samoa Islands, and New South Wales. From Sydney, Wilkes sailed into the region now known as Wilkesland. He visited Tonga, the Fiji group, and the Hawaiian Islands in 1840, and in 1841 explored the west coast of North America. Much valuable information is given on the Columbia River, the Willamette Valley, Puget Sound, the Strait of Juan de Fuca, and the Sacramento Valley, and the findings on the northwest coast of America proved timely in light of the dispute with Great Britain over the Oregon Territory. The Wilkes expedition also visited San Francisco bay and the Sacramento River. Crossing the Pacific, Wilkes called at the Philippine Islands, the Sulu Archipelago, Borneo, Singapore, and, rounding the Cape of Good Hope, finally reached New York in 1842, having sailed round the world" - Hill. HASKELL 2A; ref 1 (text), 17B (atlas). HOWES W414, "c." HILL 1746, 1866. David B. Tyler, THE WILKES EXPEDITION (Philadelphia, 1968). Herman J. Viola, ed., MAGNIFICENT VOYAGERS, THE U.S. EXPLORING EXPEDITION, 1838-1842 (Washington, 1985). FORBES 1517. SABIN 103994. SPENCE, p.56. FERGUSON 3954. TWENEY 83.

      [Bookseller: William Reese Company - Americana]
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        Narrative of the United States Exploring Expedition. During the years 1838, 1839, 1840, 1841, 1842

      Philadelphia: C. Sherman, 1844-1845. 6 volumes (text: 5 vols., quarto [12 1/2 x 9 1/4 inches]; atlas of maps: 1 vol., (10 1/2 x 6 1/2 inches]). Text: half-titles, vol.V with small format errata slip. 9 double-page maps, 64 steel engraved plates, 293 woodcut and steel engraved illustrations (including 47 steel-engraved vignettes). (Some light offsetting from plates); atlas: 5 folding maps, one hand-coloured. (Browned, some expert repairs to folds). Text: contemporary half-calf over marble paper-covered boards, rebacked to style in roan, spines ruled and lettered in gilt, marbled edges (slight rubbing to corners); atlas: contemporary marbled calf (expertly rebacked to style, corners rubbed), all contained within three modern blue morocco-backed cloth boxes, with onlaid red morocco labels tooled in gilt. First edition, mixed issue, of the text: the volumes limited to between 75 and 150 copies The first three volumes of the text are variants of the first edition, first issue (cf. Haskell 1, limited to 100 copies, of which 25 were destroyed by fire): the official issue, with Sherman's name on the front of the titles, but a variant with no mention on the half-titles that the work was published 'by authority of Congress'. The fourth and fifth volumes are from the first edition, second (unofficial) issue (Haskell 2A, limited to 150 copies). The atlas (Haskell 17B), from an edition of 1000 copies, was issued to accompany the imperial 8vo issue. This set therefore includes elements from the only two quarto issues of this work, allied with the atlas from the subsequent imperial 8vo issue. 'Wilkes wrote in Jan. 28, 1845, that since general distribution "would not be accomplished by the one hundred copies ordered by the government of the 4to edition ... I have had printed the remainder of the token, (namely 150 copies) of the 4to edition, for the purpose of presentation to my friends, and for sale to those who should desire a book of that size" (Haskell p.37). The United States Exploring Expedition 'was the first American scientific expedition of any size, charged to "extend the bounds of Science and promote the acquisition of knowledge," and was one of the most ambitious Pacific expeditions ever attempted' (Forbes). The expedition represents 'the first governmental sponsorship of scientific endeavor and was instrumental in the nation's westward expansion. Specimens gathered by expedition scientists became the foundation collections of the Smithsonian Institution. Significant American contributions in the fields of geology, botany, conchology, anthropology, and linguistics came from the scientific work of the expedition. Wilkes's evaluations of his landfalls influenced later U.S. positions in those areas' (Dictionary of American Biography). 'The chief fields of exploration in this expedition were the coast of the Antarctic continent, the islands of the Pacific Ocean, and the American northwest coast. In total some 280 islands in the Pacific and adjacent waters and 800 miles of streams and coasts in the Oregon country were surveyed, and 1,600 miles of the the coast of Antarctica were charted. After leaving Hampton Roads in 1838, the expedition visited Madeira, the Cape Verde Islands, Brazil, Patagonia, the South Shetland Islands and Peter I Island, Chile, and Peru, before proceeding to the Tuamotu or the low Archipelago, the Samoa Islands, and New South Wales. From Sydney, Wilkes sailed into the region now known as Wilkesland. He visited Tonga, the Fiji group, and the Hawaiian Islands in 1840, and in 1841 explored the west coast of North America. Much valuable information is given on the Columbia River, the Willamette Valley, Puget Sound, the Strait of Juan de Fuca, and the Sacramento Valley, and the findings on the northwest coast of America proved timely in light of the dispute with Great Britain over the Oregon Territory. The Wilkes expedition also visited San Francisco bay and the Sacramento River. Crossing the Pacific, Wilkes called at the Philippine Islands, the Sulu Archipelago, Borneo, Singapore, and, rounding the Cape of Good Hope, finally reached New York in 1842, having sailed round the world' (Hill p.662). Cf. Fergusson 3954; cf. Forbes1517; Haskell 2A and cf.1 (text) and 17B (atlas); cf. Howes W-414; cf Hill (2004) 1746 & 1866; cf. Sabin 103994; cf. Spence p.56.

      [Bookseller: Donald Heald Rare Books]
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        Voyage dans l'Inde, par Victor Jacquemont, pendant les Annees 1828 a 1832. Sous les auspices de M. Guizot. Atlas. Tome second. Planches des descriptions des collections. (botany section only)

      Paris: Firmin Didot freres,, 1844. the botany section from the second volume of the atlas only, only a single plate of a crustacean remains from the zoology and entomology sections that should be found in this volume but all of the 180 botanical plates are present; folio (35.5 cm. tall), the illustrations are after line drawings, volume title present but detached and chipped, library markings including a hand stamp on the verso of every plate, many plates have age spotting or speckling but usually in margins, still sewn together but only the detached front cover of a later binding remains. Photos available upon request.

      [Bookseller: Zubal Books]
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        The Highlands of Aethiopia

      London: Longman, Brown, Green, and Longmans,, 1844.. 3 volumes octavo. Original terracotta finely-diapered cloth, title gilt to spines, blind stamped compartments to the spine and panels to the boards, cream surface-paper endpapers. Lithographic frontispiece to each, those in volumes I and II single-tint studies after Bernatz, that in volume III a hand-coloured portrait of Saheela [Sahla] Selassie from a sketch by Harris, chromolithographic dedication leaf and a large folding map to volume I, title-page vignettes. A little rubbed, corners bumped, spines sunned and with some minor restoration, endpapers slightly discoloured, pale foxing to the plates, light toning, two clean tears to the map professionally repaired, a very good set. First edition. A soldier of the Bombay Army, Harris has first travelled out to Africa in 1836 for his health. Meeting Richard Williamson, a like-minded Bombay civil servant, on the voyage out, Harris immediately set of on a shooting expedition to the interior. They "started by ox-wagon from Algoa Bay, by way of Somerset and the Orange River, and travelled in a north-easterly direction until they reached the regions of the formidable Matabele chief Mzilikaze. He proved friendly, and permitted the travellers to return to the Cape by a new and previously closed route by summer of 1837" (ODNB). He returned to India becoming field engineer for the Sind army in 1838, and in 1840 he was made superintending engineer to the southern provinces. In 1841 he was sent in charge of the mission to open trade relations with the then virtually unknown Christian kingdom of Shoa in the highlands of Ethiopia. He returned to England with a commercial treaty with that state, and was knighted for his services in 1844, publishing his account in the same year. "The journey through the hinterland of the country is described in great detail, as are the cultures of the various cities that were visited. While this is truly an epic of travel and exploration, there are two sporting incidents of note with a huge buffalo bagged near the Casam River and elephant taken in Galla country" (Czech). All front pastedowns with the ownership inscription of the Rev. Thomas Pyne who in 1840 was given responsibility for the guardianship of two princes from the Gold Coast, (John) Ossoo Ansah, son of the reigning king of Ashanti, and his cousin (William) Quanti Massah, the princes had been sent as hostages under a peace treaty of 1831 between the Ashantis and the British government. Pyne's archive at SOAS shows his considerable interest in African affairs. A very nice set in the original cloth with minimal restoration.

      [Bookseller: Peter Harrington]
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        The Highlands of Aethiopia, 3 Volumes

      London: Longman, Brown, Green and Longmans, 1844. A fine set, bound in dark green 3/4 calf , gilt decoration on and flanking each raised band on the spine, with red calf spine labels having bright gilt letters. Slight wear at top of one spine only. No foxing , but clean and tight inside. Collated with Abbey Travel 290, half titles and all other pages and illustrations complete as called for. The author, of the Bombay Engineers, East India Co., was sent to the unknown Kingdom of Shoa to open trade and diplomatic relations. His party of 16 included a naturalist, an artist, and a surveyor. A Treaty was signed with Sahela Selassie, and Harris (1807- 1848) was knighted the year this set was published. It is an epic of travel and exploration, describing the hinterland of Ethiopia and its people in great detail. Fine, and scarce especially in this condition. . First Edition. Illus. by Folding Map, Tinted Frontispiece in Each Volume, and Color Dedication Page in Style of Illuminated Leaf. 8vo - over 7¾" - 9¾" tall.

      [Bookseller: Craftsbury Antiquarian Books]
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        VIEWS OF ANCIENT MONUMENTS IN CENTRAL AMERICA, CHIAPAS AND YUCATAN

      London: F. Catherwood, 1844.. [2],24pp., plus chromolithographed title by Owen Jones printed in red, blue, and gold; lithographic map printed in red and black; twenty-five tinted lithographic plates after Catherwood. Folio. Original half straight- grain green morocco and green moiré cloth-covered boards, titled in gilt "Catherwood's Views / in Central America / Chiapas and Yucatan" at center of upper cover, titled in gilt on spine. Small neat expert repairs to the corners of the covers. In a green morocco-backed cloth box. "In the whole range of literature on the Maya there has never appeared a more magnificent work" - Von Hagen. This beautiful and rare plate book was printed in an edition of 300 copies. It is seldom found in presentable condition, and it is one of the first and primary visual records of the rediscovery of Mayan civilization. Until the publication of the work of Alfred Maudslay at the turn of the century, this was the greatest record of Mayan iconography. Frederick Catherwood was a British architect and artist with a strong interest in archaeology. These combined talents led him to accompany the American traveller and explorer, John Lloyd Stephens, on two trips to the Mayan region of southern Mexico in 1839 and 1841. These explorations resulted in Stephens' two famous works, INCIDENTS OF TRAVEL IN CENTRAL AMERICA, CHIAPAS, AND YUCATAN and INCIDENTS OF TRAVEL IN YUCATAN. These immensely popular works, foundation stones in Mayan studies, were both illustrated by Catherwood and inspired him to undertake the larger portfolio. VIEWS... was produced in London, although issued with both London and New York titlepages. Catherwood recruited some of the most distinguished lithographers in London to translate his originals onto stone: Andrew Picken, Henry Warren, William Parrott, John C. Bourne, Thomas Shotter Boys, and George Belton Moore. The beautiful titlepage was executed by Owen Jones. Three hundred sets were produced, most of them tinted, as in the present copy (there is a colored issue on card stock, which is exceedingly rare). The views depict monuments and buildings at Copan, Palenque, Uxmal, Las Monjas, Chichen Itza, Tulum, and several scattered sights. The work of Stephens and Catherwood received great praise, but neither lived to enjoy it long. Stephens died in 1852 of malaria contracted in Colombia, and Catherwood went down on a steamship in the North Atlantic in 1854. "Catherwood belongs to a species, the artist- archaeologist, which is all but extinct. Piranesi was the most celebrated specimen and Catherwood his not unworthy successor" - Aldous Huxley. Not in Abbey. PALAU 50290. SABIN 11520. TOOLEY 133. Von Hagen, SEARCH FOR THE MAYA, pp.320-24. GROCE & WALLACE, p.115. HILL 263.

      [Bookseller: William Reese Company - Americana]
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        Views of Ancient Monuments in Central America Chiapis and Yucatan

      London: F. Catherwood, 1844. Folio. (21¼ x 14¼ inches). Chromolithographed title by Owen Jones printed in red, blue, and gold, 1 lithographic map printed in red and black, 25 tinted lithographic plates after Catherwood. Original green moiré cloth-covered boards, titled in gilt "Catherwood's Views / in Central America / Chiapas and Yucatan" at center of upper cover, expertly rebacked to style in green morocco, the flat spine titled in gilt, small neat expert repairs to the corners of the covers, modern green morocco-backed cloth box. "In the whole range of literature on the Maya there has never appeared a more magnificent work" (Von Hagen). This beautiful and rare plate book was printed in an edition of 300 copies. It is seldom found in presentable condition, and is one of the first and primary visual records of the rediscovery of Mayan civilization. Until the publication of the work of Alfred Maudslay at the turn of the century, this was the greatest record of Mayan iconography. Frederick Catherwood was a British architect and artist with a strong interest in archaeology. These combined talents led him to accompany the American traveller and explorer, John Lloyd Stephens, on two trips to the Mayan region of southern Mexico in 1839 and 1841. These explorations resulted in Stephens' two famous works, Incidents of Travel in Central America, Chiapas, and Yucatan and Incidents of Travel in Yucatan. These immensely popular works, foundation stones in Mayan studies, were both illustrated by Catherwood and inspired him to undertake the larger portfolio. The Views was produced in London, although issued with both London and New York titlepages. Catherwood recruited some of the most distinguished lithographers in London to translate his originals onto stone: Andrew Picken, Henry Warren, William Parrott, John C. Bourne, Thomas Shotter Boys, and George Belton Moore. The beautiful titlepage was executed by Owen Jones. Three hundred sets were produced, most of them tinted, as in the present copy (there is a coloured issue on card stock, which is exceedingly rare). The views depict monuments and buildings at Copan, Palenque, Uxmal, Las Monjas, Chichen Itza, Tulum, and several scattered sights. The work of Stephens and Catherwood received great praise, but neither lived to enjoy it long. Stephens died in 1852 of malaria contracted in Colombia, and Catherwood went down on a steamship in the North Atlantic in 1854. "Catherwood belongs to a species, the artist- archaeologist, which is all but extinct. Piranesi was the most celebrated specimen and Catherwood his not unworthy successor" (Aldous Huxley). Sabin 11520; Tooley (1954) 133 (gives a list of the plates); Von Hagen, Search for the Maya, pp. 320-24; Palau 50290; Groce & Wallace, p.115; cf. Hill [2004], 263. Not in Abbey.

      [Bookseller: Donald Heald Rare Books]
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        Des Deutschen Mannes Geschaftshelfer; Enthaltend die Nusslichsten

      1844. Diefenbach, Daniel. Des Deutschen Mannes Geschaftshelfer: Enthaltend die Nusslichsten und Gebrauchlichsten Vorschriften, Um Mehrere Arten von Geschaftsschriften, Ohne Hulfe eines Anwalts oder Notarius Gesetzmassig in Deutscher Sprache, Selbst zu Schreiben. Baltimore: Gedruckt in der Buch-Handlung der Evang. Luth. Kirche, 1844. 123, [1] pp. 12mo. (5-3/4" x 4-1/2"). Contemporary three quarter sheep over plain paper boards. Moderate rubbing to boards and extremities with some wear to spine ends and corners, rear joint starting. Occasional foxing, faint annotations to a few leaves. Early annotations in pencil to endleaves, interior otherwise clean. * Only edition. Diefenbach, a Pennsylvania German, seems to have based this formbook on Thomas Crowell's The Counsellor, or Every Man His Own Lawyer (1844). It contains a variety of forms relating to personal and business transactions. OCLC locates 7 copies, 6 in North America, none in a law library. Not in Cohen.

      [Bookseller: The Lawbook Exchange, Ltd.]
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        The Zoology of the Voyage of H.M.S. Erebus and Terror, under the Command of Capt. J. C. Ross during 1839-1843: Mammalia

      London: E.W. Jansen, 1844-1875. First edition. The wrappers are a bit age-toned, the text and plates are generally clean and free from foxing, custom-made clam-shell box is new; a clean copy in near fine condition.. Pp. xii, 53, 62 plates (1 plate not numbered, 30 of the whale plates are fine facsimile reproductions, 17 of the original hand-colored plates are present, other plain plates present). Unbound in the original wrappers (from the "Fishes" part), as published, in new custom-made clam-shell box of half brown morocco over cream-colored textured cloth, boldly lettered in gilt on the spine, sm folio. This work presents the complete Mammalia section from The Zoology of the Voyage of H.M.S. Erebus and Terror (Richardson, J. and Gray, J.E., editors). Details of contents follow: pp. i-iv: hand-colored chart of the south circumpolar regions, showing the discovery tracks of Cook, Weddell and Ross, and title page (both blank on verso); pp. v-xii introductory text "summary of the voyage" by Joseph Dalton Hooker. The 53 text-pages are divided in chapters: Chapter I - The Seals of the Southern Hemisphere (pp. 1-12), Chapter II - Miscellanea (pp. 12a -12d), and Chapter III - On the cetaceous animals (pp.13-53). The 62 plates are collated as follows: I-X, XIV-XVII, XXII are plates to accompany the Seals section; XXIII, 19-22, 25-29 are plates to accompany the Miscellanea section (depicting mostly small rodents and bats) and the plates to accompany the cetaceous animals section are as follows: 1 plate is not numbered, 1-32, 32bis, 33-37, Plates 1 to 30 of this series are in recent facsimile, made on good heavy paper at the same size as the other plates. 17 of the illustrations to accompany the Seals and Miscellanea sections are the original hand-colored plates. The unbound sheets in original printed wrappers (as issued) are now preserved in a new custom-made clam-shell box of brown gilt-decorated half morocco over cloth-covered boards, sm folio. The unbound pages of this work are presented the in original "Zoology of voyage of Erebus and Terror" oversized wrappers (of the "Fishes" section instead of the "Mammalia" section). The separately issued title page to the Mammalia section is included.

      [Bookseller: Natural History Books]
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        Versuch einer Monographie des grossen Veitstanzes und der unwillkürlichen Muskelbewegung, nebst Bewegungen über den Taranteltanz und die Beriberi

      Leipzig, Brockhaus 1844. 23 cm. 30, (2), 486, (2) Seiten Festeinband, Halbledereinband der Zeit mit Rückenvergoldung - Waller 10284 - Geschichte, Krankheitsverlauf und Therapie, unter anderem: Feier des Johannisfestes, Johannistanz, verschiedene Bezeichnungen des Veitstanzes, Veitstanz in anderen Ländern, Unterschiede zwischen Veitstanz und unwillkürlichen Muskelbewegungen. Der Anhang über den in Süditalien heimischen Taranteltanz (Tarantella) und die Vitaminmangelkrankheit Beriberi, deren tatsächliche Ursache der Verfasser nicht erkennt, sondern als Ursache eine rheumatische Affektion des Gangliennervensystems vermutet. Rücken Schabspuren, stellenweise gebräunt bzw. stockfleckig, erste 30 Blatt in der oberen Ecke Feuchtigkeitsrand, auf Vorsatz Besitzeintrag des schwedischen Arztes Johan Anton Waldenström (1838-1879) -

      [Bookseller: Wenner Antiquariat]
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        Reliques of Ancient English Poetry:

      sp;- London - Edward Moxon, 1844 Book. Very Good. Hardcover. A handsome collectionof Percy's masterpiece, with an advertisement, preface and 'foregoing essay' to first volume. In three volumes complete. Thomas Percy(1729 - 1811) was Bishop of Dromore. Before being made bishop, he was chaplain to George III. Percy's greatest contribution is considered to be his Reliques of Ancient English Poetry (1765), the first of the great ballad collections, which was the one work most responsible for the ballad revival in English poetry that was a significant part of the Romanticmovement. The Reliques of Ancient English Poetry set the stage not only for Robert Burns, but also for Wordsworth and Coleridge's Lyrical Ballads. The book is based on an old manuscript collection of poetry, which Percy claimed to have rescued in Humphrey Pitt's house at Shifnal, Shropshire, from the hands of the housemaid who was about to light the fire with it. The manuscript was edited in its complete form by J. W. Hales and F. J. Furnivall in 1867 - 1868. This manuscript provides the core of the work but many other ballads were found and included, some by Percy's friends Johnson, William Shenstone, Thomas Warton, and some from a similar collection made by Samuel Pepys. Previous owner's bookplates to front pastedowns. Condition: Handsomely rebound in calf. Externally, in excellent condition with only minor shelfwear and the odd mark to boards. Internally, firmly bound. Generally bright and clean throughout but with the odd handling mark and slight scattered foxing to endpapers only. Overall: NEAR FINE.

      [Bookseller: Rooke Books]
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        Plate XII Swift Fox. The Viviparous Quadrupeds of North America

      Philadelphia: Audubon, J.J., 1844. Imperial Folio Edition Fine with bright original hand-coloring. A Fine original hand-colored lithographed plate, archivally matted and accompanied by original text. First Royal Octavo Edition. (10.5 x 7 inches). Drawn from nature by John Woodhouse Audubon, drawn on stone by William E. Hitchcock and lithographed, printed and colored by JT Bowen, Philadelphia. The Quadrupeds of North America, which encompassed a total of 155 native American four-legged (thus quadruped) mammals individually documented and portrayed in their landscape and natural settings, was a collaborative effort between premier Nineteenth Century American naturalist painters: John James, his sons John Woodhouse and Victor Gifford Audubon and the naturalist Reverend John Bachman. To document and portray what Audubon considered a dwindling resource; the native mammals set among the splendor and majesty of the uninhabited America landscape, the team traveled westward from Audubon's home in Mill Grove, Pennsylvania up the Missouri River and through territory just previously explored by Lewis and Clark, from the Canadian border of the Northern Russian Territories, now Alaska, southward to Mexico. Arduous and monumental, the journey influenced the pathos of the compositions, however, the true legacy of the work rests on John James Audubon's prolific vision and mastery of his subject and medium. Heretofore unseen, The Quadrupeds of North American is a wildlife classic: an essential and timeless contribution to both American Culture and the Art of American Wildlife Painting. The American Review, a Whig journal, heralded the national origin of the Quadrupeds: "We have at last have a Great National Work, originated and completed among us- authors, artists and artisans of which are our own citizens.. the Bible of Nature!" (John James Audubon in the West. New York: Henry H. Abrams, 2000) &

      [Bookseller: Lowry-James Rare Prints & Books, ABAA]
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        [MANUSCRIPT LOG OF THE U.S.S. DELAWARE, KEPT BY ROBERT STORER, DURING HER FINAL CRUISE HOME FROM THE MEDITERRANEAN]

      [Various places]. Jan. 1 - March 22, 1844.. 62pp. Quarto. Original brown cloth. Cloth moderately soiled and stained. Light dampstaining to some of the text. About very good. Manuscript log book of the U.S.S. Delaware, kept by seaman Robert B. Storer during the ship's final voyage. The U.S.S. Delaware was launched in October 1820. She spent most of her active duty cruising in the Mediterranean, where she served in the interests of American commerce and diplomacy in that area, though she also spent several years stationed in Brazil, patrolling the coasts of Brazil, Uruguay, and Argentina to represent American interests during political unrest in those countries. She began her final voyage to the Mediterranean in February 1843, setting out from Rio de Janeiro. This log covers the last three months of the Delaware's active service, documenting her return voyage from the Mediterranean to Norfolk. She arrived home in March 1844, and was still at the naval yard in 1861, when she was set afire with other U.S. ships in order to keep them from falling into Confederate hands. The log begins with the ship at anchor in Mahon harbor, off Minorca in the Mediterranean. Storer keeps details of provisioning the ship and readying to sail for first twelve days of January. As is standard with ship's logs, he records speeds, winds, and weather conditions, as well as the positioning of the sails. Everyday events such as inspecting the crew or holding "divine service" on Sundays are noted, as are sightings of other ships' sails and exchanging colors with passing vessels. The Delaware sights the coast of Spain and moves into the Atlantic around the third week in January; on February 2, crew member Jacob Lawrence, a marine, dies (though Storer does not say from what), and his funeral service is held the next day, and Lawrence's body is committed to the deep. Also of note, the Delaware investigates a wreck on Feb. 15: "At 7.45 hauled up the courses, hauled down the jib and laid the main and mizen topsails to the mast, and sent a boat to board the wreck. At 8.15 the boat returned from the wreck; discovered her to be the English Hermaphrodite Brig 'Halifax' of 'Halifax,' loaded with lumber, water logged and foremast sawed off, nothing living on board." The rest of the voyage is uneventful and relatively smooth, and the Delaware sights the Cape Henry lighthouse on March 4th. The last few days are recorded as the ship is anchored at Hampton Roads, including a salute to the passing of former Secretary of the Navy Thomas Gilmer, who died on February 28th.

      [Bookseller: William Reese Company - Americana]
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        Autograph letter signed by Hudson Bay Company factor Donald Ross to the Chief Factor of the Company John Stuart, describing the season's trade and commenting on the Oregon boundary dispute

      "Norway House" [Nelson River, Manitoba, Canada]: 12 August 1844. 3pp, plus integral address leaf. Folded sheet. (Short separations at folds, hole from opening costing a few words). Strong content letter between Hudson Bay Company factors on the fur trade and the Oregon Question. Ross writes: "...Our furs, I am happy to see, sold well last winter, with the exception of Beaver, and the quantity sent home was by no means small, yet somehow or other, we cannot manage to make profit nowadays, tho' the trade was never carried on in this country with so little expense; there must be a peg loose somewhere, that is a clear case, but I shall not pretend to say where the leakage is. The trade of this Department for the last outfit is certainly very good ... and as we are now again to hunt beaver without restraint, I expect the current year will produce something even better than the last ... The Columbia too has given large return for the last outfit but its expenses, I fear, will swallow all up, and probably more; our affairs in that quarter, I expect are in a very critical state. The Americans are pouring across the mountains by thousands, and if the Oregon question be not speedily settled, some serious mischief will assuredly arise before long. These grasping Republicans it appears insist on the line of 49 to the sea; if they get that, it will be better to give them the whole, the rest will be of little value to England and will rather be a source of trouble and annoyance than of real benefit to the nation; they have no just claim whatever to any portion of the territory, but John Bull, good honest soul as he is, terrible when his anger is up, allows himself to be cheated and gulled by every body who can manage to blurry and tickle him into good humour. For my own part, I sincerely wish we were well rid of the whole concern, for I strongly fear we shall then suffer the heaviest blow that ever fell on the fur trade..." For much of the first half of the 19th century, Great Britain and the United States had jointly occupied the fur rich Oregon country (known as the Columbia District to the HBC), the northwest coast region west of the continental divide, north of the Columbia River to the 54th parallel. By 1844, however, with America's vision of manifest destiny in full swing, the U.S. laid claim to the region, launching the Fifty-four Forty or Fight campaign. Particularly debated was the area north of the Columbia but south of the 49th parallel (i.e. much of present day Washington State). Ross here argues that if that area were ceded, then the entire region to the 54th parallel might as well be foresaken. Two years later, the Oregon Treaty was signed, setting the boundary between the U.S. and Canada as the 49th parallel.

      [Bookseller: Donald Heald Rare Books]
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