The viaLibri website requires cookies to work properly. You can find more information in our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy.

Displayed below are some selected recent viaLibri matches for books published in 1843

        Friedrich Wilhelm I V, King Of Prussia Letter Signed 1 Piece Berlin: June, 1843

      Friedrich Wilhelm III. Very Good with no dust jacket. 1843. Paper. (Estate of John F. Lewis). Friedrich Wilhelm IV, King of Prussia. Letter Signed. 1 piece. Berlin: June, 1843. The document above is one among many important manuscripts which John Frederick Lewis, a highly regarded philanthropist, lawyer, and early 20th-century collector, used as primary source material for a comprehensive genealogy of his forbears. His chronological narrative was meant to chart the various world-historical developments and circumstances which ultimately led to the confluence of Mr. Lewis' Continental ancestors and those of the Mayflower Colony, and it extended even to his own lifetime. Housed in altogether fifteen portfolio volumes, the project was the culmination of decades of painstaking research and discerning collecting of the highest order. Most of the manuscripts in Mr. Lewis' collection have not appeared at auction for a century, or more. ; Signed by Author; 0 .

      [Bookseller: poor mans books]
 1.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  


        Ornithologie du Dauphiné ouDescription des Oiseau observés dans les départements de l'Isère, de la Drôme, des Hautes-Alpes et les contrées voisines.

      Hip. Bouteille Pharmacien, Grenoble 1843 - 2 tomes reliés en 1 volume grand in-8 ( 265x175 mm ) demi basane verte, titre doré sur dos lisse orné de filets dorés en place des nerfs, large guirlande dorée en queue.Avec la collaboration de M. de LABATIE.Ouvrage contenant 300 sujets dessinés d'après nature par M.V. CASSIEN.72 planches hors-texte lithographiées par Pégeron dont 45 coloriées.1 très grand tableau dépliant in fine ( Tableau synoptique de la Classification des Oiseaux du Dauphiné ).- Tome I. 416 pages.Introduction à l'Ornithologie dauphinoise. Historique de l'Ornithologie. Considérations sur les sens, les moeurs, les habitudes, etc des oiseaux. Classe des Oiseaux. Anatomie et physiologie. Taxidermie. Ornithologie du Dauphiné. Ordre premier : les Rapaces. Deuxième ordre : Les Passereaux. Troisième ordre : Les Grimpeurs. - Tome II. 358 pages.Ordre quatrième : Les Chélidons. Cinquième ordre : Les Gallinacés. Sixième ordre : Les échassiers. Ordre septième : Les Pinnatipèdes. Ordre huitième : Les Palmipèdes. Additions et corrections. Errata. Ornithologie. Dauphiné

      [Bookseller: Librairie FAUGUET]
 2.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  


        Pictorial Shakspere

      London: No Publisher Stated, 1843. Leather_bound. Very good. London: No Publisher Stated, 1843. Leather_bound. Eight volumes. Thick octavo. Pictorial Shakspere, Edited by Charles Knight. Illustrated with hundreds of wood-engravings, includes introductory notices and glossary. Contemporary half green morocco, marbled board, lettered in gilt, raised bands, all edges marbled and endpaper.

      [Bookseller: Imperial Fine Books]
 3.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  


        THE CHRISTMAS BOOKS: A Christmas Carol, The Chimes, The Battle of Life, Cricket on the Hearth, The Haunted Man & The Ghost's Bargain.

      London: Chapman & Hall, 1843 - 1848. - ALL FIRST EDITIONS. 5 vols., 6-5/8" x 4-3/8", "Christmas Carol" 1st ED 1st Issue with Stave "I" as the first chapter heading; "The Chimes", 1st ED with the 2nd state of the engraved title page; "The Cricket on the Hearth" 1st ED with 2nd state of advertising leaf at rear; "The Battle of Life", 1st ED with vignette title page in the 4th state; "The Haunted Man and The Ghost's Bargain", 1st ED, illustrated with 63 engravings, four in color, by Leech, Maclise, Stanfield, Doyle and Landseer. Bound in full red calf, vertical floral gilt spines, covers ruled in gilt, gilt dentelles, all edges gilt, all original cloth covers and spines bound in. Front hinges of "Christmas Carol" expertly repaired, other hinges fine, head and foot of spines fine. a VERY GOOD set. [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: D&D Galleries - ABAA]
 4.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  


        Greens großer Luftballon im Lande der Antipoden. Satyrisches Bild No. 17.

      Wien im Bureau der Theaterzeitung, Rauhensteingasse No. 926., [1843]. - Orig. handkol. Kupferstich 22,5 x 29 cm (Blatt) bzw. 18 x 25,5 cm (Stich) von J.W. Zinke nach Cajetan. - Die Karikatur zeigt den engl. Aeronautiker Charles Green (1785 - 1870) u. andere Europäer "im Lande der Antipoden" (Australien / Neuseeland), die den Ureinwohnern nach ihrer Ankunft im Ballon eine illlustrierte Zeitung und Schriftstücke überreichen. Eine Flagge weist auf die "Erste Europäische Luftschiffahrt" hin. Am rechten Bildrand wird einer aufwändig europäisch gekleideten Ureinwohnerin stilvoll englischer Tee serviert. Die Reise war geplant, wurde aber nie durchgeführt. - Blatt etw. gebräunt u. angestaubt, am linken Rand ein Stockfleck. Mittelknick. Insgesamt etw. knickfaltig. Mehrere (fachmännisch hinterlegte) Randeinrisse. Am unteren Rand m. Bleistift die Jahreszahl 1843. Recht gut erhaltenes, seltenes Blatt. - Ballooning; Antipodes; please ask for English description. H/S1 - Please ask for detailed information in English / Demandez des détails en francais s.v.p. - Bitte beachten: die Bearbeitung von Bestellungen ist erst ab dem 24.07. 2017 wieder möglich! Sprache: Deutsch Gewicht in Gramm: 50

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat libretto Verena Wiesehöfer]
 5.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  


        Hunting Reminiscences

      London: Rudolph Ackermann, 1843. First edition. Full Morocco. Custom cloth box.. Fine. 4to. 25.5 by 16.5 cm. ix, [1], 332 pp. 13 plates, which includes maps of hunt countryside, and a four of these plates, plus vignettes on the map plates and the title page, are beautifully hand-colored. Full red morocco binding by Bayntun, with gilt stamped dog, fox, horse head and horseshoe devices decorating the boards and spine between raised bands.

      [Bookseller: White Fox Rare Books and Antiques]
 6.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  


        The History of the Rebellion and Civil Wars in England, ... Also his life written by himself, in which is included a continuation of his History of the Grand Rebellion. A new edition, from the original manuscript, with copious indexes.

      Oxford: University Press, 1843. Oxford:: University Press, 1843.. Thick sm. 4to. [iv], 1364 pp. Original full brown diced calf, gilt rules and corner pieces, gilt extra spine, all edges gilt, two modern maroon and green leather gilt-stamped labels added; joints just starting to show a crack at ends. Bookplate of Jac. Edv. C. Welldon, A.M. [1900]. Very good +. WITH A SPLIT-DOUBLE FORE-EDGE PAINTING, WITH TWO SCENES: (A) ON THE LEFT A PORTRAIT OF CHARLES I; (B) A PORTRAIT OF OLIVER CROMWELL. Painted ca. 1990s.

      [Bookseller: Jeff Weber Rare Books ]
 7.   Check availability:     ABAA     Link/Print  


        Guida di Lucca e dei luoghi più importanti del ducato

      Tip. di Giuseppe Giusti,, Lucca, 1843 - Cm. 20,5, pp. 198 (2). Con 23 belle tavole fuori testo tra cui la pianta della città e la veduta generale a doppia pagina. Legatura originale in cart. rigido decorato con dorso in percallina verde (quest'ultimo rifatto?). Esemplare fresco e genuino, marginoso ed in ottimo stato di conservazione. [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Studio Bibliografico Benacense]
 8.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  


        Notice sur les caractères zoologiques et anatomiques des sauroides vivans et fossiles.

      Neuchatel, Petitpierre, 1843. Folio (33.5 x 24.8 cm). 73 pp., four large, folded, lithographed plates. Contemporary quarter calf over marbled boards. Spine with gilt lines and title. Marbled endpapers.= This finely illustrated work forms a part of Agassiz's grand work on fossil fishes, as the subtitle reads: "Extrait de la 15e livraison des Recherches sur les Poissons fossiles", but published separately as it deals with recent herpetology. This copy is dedicated to the French zoologist (ichthyologist, herpetologist and malacologist) Achille Valenciennes (1794-1865;dedication in Agassiz's handwriting on the title page). A second inscription on the title page, being the autograph of the French ichthyologist, herpetologist and taxidermist at the Paris natural history museum, Alexandre Thominot (1821-1896), dated 5 julliet 1866 (i.e. after Valenciennes's death). Some light shelf wear, scattered foxing in the text page margins, the plates with light foxing. Rare. Dean I, p. 7; Nissen ZBI, 39.

      [Bookseller: Antiquariaat Schierenberg]
 9.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  


        The vicar of Wakefield.

      A presentation copy signed by the publisher, "Dr. W. Cooke Taylor / from John Van Voorst," on the half-title. This is likely addressed to William Cooke Taylor, the Irish journalist and historian who wrote extensively for the Anti-Corn Law League. There are => 32 illustrations provided by William Mulready, "the most distinguished talent of British Art applicable to this purpose . . ." (p. v). Binding: Bound by Hayday in green pebbled morocco, spine with raised bands; two compartments with title and author and four with rich and elaborate gilt decoration; wide gilt composite borders to boards, board edges with gilt hatching, gilt zig-zag design on turn-ins. All edges gilt.

      [Bookseller: PRB&M/SessaBks (Philadelphia Rare Books ]
 10.   Check availability:     Direct From Seller     Link/Print  


        INCIDENTS OF TRAVEL IN YUCATAN [TWO VOLUMES SET]

      New-york: Harper & Brothers. Very Good. 1843. First Edition. Hardcover. Boards with light rubbing to extremities, especially spine ends and corners. Light foxing to pages. Moderate foxing and a bit of browning to first and last few pages, not affecting readability. Tissue paper (illustrations) are browned ; Dark buckram boards. Front board and spine with gilt decoration. 120 tissue guarded steel engravings. Volume 1 contains an unusually large panorama steel engraving from "Casa Del Gobernador, Uxmal" while Volume 2 contains a smaller illustration of Labna; 8vo; 459, 478 pages .

      [Bookseller: Complete Traveller Antiquarian Bookstore]
 11.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  


        The vicar of Wakefield

      London: John Van Voorst, 1843. 8vo (8.25"; 21 cm). xv, 306 pp. A presentation copy signed by the publisher, "Dr. W. Cooke Taylor / from John Van Voorst," on the half-title. This is likely addressed to William Cooke Taylor, the Irish journalist and historian who wrote extensively for the Anti-Corn Law League.    There are => 32 illustrations provided by William Mulready, "the most distinguished talent of British Art applicable to this purpose . . ." (p. v).    Binding: Bound by Hayday in green pebbled morocco, spine with raised bands; two compartments with title and author and four with rich and elaborate gilt decoration; wide gilt composite borders to boards, board edges with gilt hatching, gilt zig-zag design on turn-ins. All edges gilt. Bound as above; light rubbing particularly to spine-head, one slim scrape to front board and several to rear one. Endpapers lightly foxed, silk placemarker present with end a little frayed, old pencilling to verso of front free endpaper. Interior and illustrations clean and unmarked. => A very good presentation copy of this classic.

      [Bookseller: Philadelphia Rare Books & Manuscripts Co]
 12.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  


        Costume Drawings

      1843. [WAHLEN, Auguste—pseudonym for LOUMYER, Jean Françios Nicolas]. Costume Drawings. No place: no publisher, circa late 19th-century. Slim quarto, modern red paper boards, green morocco cover label. $1600.Collection of eight lovely original watercolor paintings of Indian costume, seven likely copied from Whalen's mid-19th-century encyclopedia of costume from around the world, Moeurs, Usages, et Costumes.Whalen completed his comprehensive survey of world culture and costume with the collaboration of J. J. Van Beveren; seven of these eight paintings (Plates 2-8) are found in Whalen's published survey, and are most likely copied faithfully after Whalen's published designs. Fine condition, watercolors vivid.

      [Bookseller: Bauman Rare Books]
 13.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  


        Opisanie Bukharskogo Khanstva [Description of the Khanate of Bukhara].

      St. Petersburg: Imperial Academy of Sciences, 1843 - Octavo (220 × 147 mm). Contemporary yellow marbled paper-covered boards, new leather label to the spine, edges sprinkled blue. A little rubbed and with some judicious restoration to joints and head and tail of the spine, light browning, a couple of short edge-splits to the maps professionally repaired, a very good copy. Lithographic portrait and 2 folding lithographic maps at rear, a regional map and a city plan of Bukhara. First and only edition, uncommon just 9 locations recorded on OCLC. A classic of the literature of the Great Game, probably the first attempt at a scientific description of the Khanate of Bukhara. The author was the noted Russian orientalist, historian and diplomat Nikolay Khanykov (1819-1878) and is based on his experience during Colonel Konstantin Butenev's 1841-2 embassy to Bukhara. The mission was organised as a response to a request of the Bukhara's Khan, Nasrullah, for the dispatch of a geological officer "for the investigation of local ores and location of metals and precious stones". While the embassy was in Bukhara Butenev negotiated for the release of British intelligence officers Arthur Conolly and Charles Stoddart who had been detained there. Despite making contact with Stoddart, and obtaining some detail from him of both his reconnaissance of the region and the conditions of the prisoners' captivity, Butenev failed to obtain the British officers's freedom, and they were murdered soon after the Russian delegation left Bukhara. The book offers a detailed survey of the khanate; the last chapter giving a biographical overview of the life and struggle for power of Nasrullah Khan, the fifth Emir of Bukhara (r. 1827-1860), including his portrait by Lev Alexandrovich Belousov (1806-1864), artist and lithographer, a graduate of the Imperial Academy of Arts who became noted his lithographs to Alexander Viskovatov's "Collection of uniforms of the Russian Army" (1830); "Historical Description of Uniforms and Arms of the Russian Troops" (1841-1862), and others; the volume concludes with a supplementary alphabetical index of place names in Russian and Arabic. The lithographed map shows the borders of the Khanate of Bukhara and its immediate neighbours, and the plan of Bukhara locates over 80 specific buildings and other sights. Widely considered to be "the most valuable achievement in pre-Revolutionary Central Asian studies before the annexation of the region by Russia Khanykov, who stayed in Bukhara for eight months in 1841-2 as a member of a Russian mission, observed the city of Bukhara for the purpose of "systematic description". He left valuable records, which are brief and to the point, of Bukhara's city gates, its area, graveyards, fountains, ark (citadel), jails, mosques, madrasas (including the number of rooms and students and the value of scholarships), caravanserais (including charges), public baths, tim (arcades of shops), the structure of houses, the permanent bazaar, suburban weekly fairs, feasts (festivals), mausolea, population (estimated as 60,000-70,000), trade with neighbouring countries and cities (Russia, Khiva, Mashhad, Kabul, Khokand, Kashgar, Yarkand), prices of goods, the machinery of governments, the ulama, the isan (Sufi spiritual masters), and the academic situation Though the descriptions of Samarkand and Karshi are superficial, Khanykov's record of nineteenth-century Bukhara is meticulous and well deserves the praise accorded it by later scholars such as V.V. Bartol'd and O.A. Sukhareva" (Henda & Miura (eds.), Islamic Urban Studies: Historical Review and Perspectives, p. 282). Nikolay Khanykov (1819-78) graduated as an interpreter in oriental languages from the Imperial Lycée at Tsarkoye Selo in 1836, and in this capacity took part in Perovsky's ill-fated military expedition to Khiva of 1839-1840. Following his participation in the present expedition he joined the diplomatic office of the Main Administration of the Transcaucasian Krai and continued his ethnographic researches [Attributes: First Edition]

      [Bookseller: Peter Harrington. ABA member]
 14.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  


        Gespräche mit Dämonen. Des Königsbuchs zweiter Band.

      Gr.-8. 1 Bl.,. VIII, 371 (+ 1 S. Impressum). Brauner Pappband mit Rückenschild aus rotem Leder mit goldgeprägtem Titel u. 6 Doppellinien in Gold, sauber a. Halbleinenrücken aufgezogen (Bibliothek Viktor Achter). Erstausgabe (WG 10 Goed. VI, 85, 10). - Fortsetzung des sozialkritischen Werks "Dies Buch gehört dem König" (1843). Bettina setzt sich für die politische Gleichstellung von Frauen und Juden und die Abschaffung der Todesstrafe ein, hält aber fest an der Idee eines Volkskönigs. Das Buch wurde bereits vor seinem Erscheinen von der preußischen Zensur verboten. - Exlibris u. Stempel "VA" (Viktor Achter, Jurist u. Büchersammler, 1905-1981) u. Bleistift-Notizen von Auktionsergebnissen (von der Hand Sibylle von Steinsdorff) a. Innendeckel. Rücken unten mit kleiner Fehlstelle, sonst alles sehr schön. Der Buchblock ist noch unbeschnitten, mit nahezu fleckenlosem, sehr gutem Papier. - Selten!

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Richard Husslein]
 15.   Check availability:     booklooker.de     Link/Print  


        Opisanie Bukharskogo Khanstva [Description of the Khanate of Bukhara].

      St. Petersburg: Imperial Academy of Sciences,, 1843. Octavo (220 × 147 mm). Contemporary yellow marbled paper-covered boards, new leather label to the spine, edges sprinkled blue. Lithographic portrait and 2 folding lithographic maps at rear, a regional map and a city plan of Bukhara. A little rubbed and with some judicious restoration to joints and head and tail of the spine, light browning, a couple of short edge-splits to the maps professionally repaired, a very good copy. First and only edition, uncommon just 9 locations recorded on OCLC. A classic of the literature of the Great Game, probably the first attempt at a scientific description of the Khanate of Bukhara. The author was the noted Russian orientalist, historian and diplomat Nikolay Khanykov (1819-1878) and is based on his experience during Colonel Konstantin Butenev's 1841-2 embassy to Bukhara. The mission was organised as a response to a request of the Bukhara's Khan, Nasrullah, for the dispatch of a geological officer "for the investigation of local ores and location of metals and precious stones". While the embassy was in Bukhara Butenev negotiated for the release of British intelligence officers Arthur Conolly and Charles Stoddart who had been detained there. Despite making contact with Stoddart, and obtaining some detail from him of both his reconnaissance of the region and the conditions of the prisoners' captivity, Butenev failed to obtain the British officers's freedom, and they were murdered soon after the Russian delegation left Bukhara. The book offers a detailed survey of the khanate; the last chapter giving a biographical overview of the life and struggle for power of Nasrullah Khan, the fifth Emir of Bukhara (r. 1827-1860), including his portrait by Lev Alexandrovich Belousov (1806-1864), artist and lithographer, a graduate of the Imperial Academy of Arts who became noted his lithographs to Alexander Viskovatov's "Collection of uniforms of the Russian Army" (1830); "Historical Description of Uniforms and Arms of the Russian Troops" (1841-1862), and others; the volume concludes with a supplementary alphabetical index of place names in Russian and Arabic. The lithographed map shows the borders of the Khanate of Bukhara and its immediate neighbours, and the plan of Bukhara locates over 80 specific buildings and other sights. Widely considered to be "the most valuable achievement in pre-Revolutionary Central Asian studies before the annexation of the region by Russia … Khanykov, who stayed in Bukhara for eight months in 1841-2 as a member of a Russian mission, observed the city of Bukhara for the purpose of "systematic description". He left valuable records, which are brief and to the point, of Bukhara's city gates, its area, graveyards, fountains, ark (citadel), jails, mosques, madrasas (including the number of rooms and students and the value of scholarships), caravanserais (including charges), public baths, tim (arcades of shops), the structure of houses, the permanent bazaar, suburban weekly fairs, feasts (festivals), mausolea, population (estimated as 60,000-70,000), trade with neighbouring countries and cities (Russia, Khiva, Mashhad, Kabul, Khokand, Kashgar, Yarkand), prices of goods, the machinery of governments, the ulama, the isan (Sufi spiritual masters), and the academic situation … Though the descriptions of Samarkand and Karshi are superficial, Khanykov's record of nineteenth-century Bukhara is meticulous and well deserves the praise accorded it by later scholars such as V.V. Bartol'd and O.A. Sukhareva" (Henda & Miura (eds.), Islamic Urban Studies: Historical Review and Perspectives, p. 282). Nikolay Khanykov (1819-78) graduated as an interpreter in oriental languages from the Imperial Lycée at Tsarkoye Selo in 1836, and in this capacity took part in Perovsky's ill-fated military expedition to Khiva of 1839-1840. Following his participation in the present expedition he joined the diplomatic office of the Main Administration of the Transcaucasian Krai and continued his ethnographic researches; his writings included On Muridism and the Murids, A Translation of Muslim Decrees on War, and On the Alternating Changes in the Level of the Caspian Sea. Between 1850 and 1855, Khanykov served as one of the directors of the newly organised Caucasus section of the Russian Geographic Society; from 1854 to 1857 he was consul general in Tabriz; and in 1858–9 he led a scientific expedition to Khorasan. From 1860, Khanykov lived mainly in Paris where he was close to Ivan Turgenev, moving in the circles of Russian revolutionary émigrés surrounding Alexander Herzen, whose papers and letters he helped preserve. Khanykov wrote two books about his exploration of Khorasan; one of these, Mémoire sur la partie méridionale de l'Asie centrale (first published in French in 1861, and not in Russian until 1973), was awarded the Grande Médaille d'Or of the Société de géographie. The present work was Khanykov's first published book, it was subsequently translated in English - as Bokhara: its Amir and its People, 1845 - French and German.

      [Bookseller: Peter Harrington]
 16.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  


        Singing for the Million

      Printed by S. Leith, Edin. - Lithograph. Uncoloured. Size: 58 x 41 cm. (23 x 16 inches) Good condition. This cartoon dating from around 1843, is considered to be by the Edinburgh artist and caricaturist, Benjamin Crombie. It is one of a series of cartoons on the disputes between the Church of Scotland and the government. The title refers to Joseph Mainzers(1801-1851) famous singing manual of 1841 and he is depicted in the image attempting to get the members of Assembly to sing in harmony. A number of pencil identifiactions, including Mainzer, are written in a contemporary hand along the lower margin beneath caption text.

      [Bookseller: Peter Harrington. ABA member]
 17.   Check availability:     ZVAB     Link/Print  


        Die wahrhaftige Geschichte vom deutschen Michel und seinen Schwestern. Nach bisher unbekannten Quellen bearbeitet.

      Zürich und Winterthur, Verlag des literarischen Comptoirs, 1843. 22 x 14,5 cm. 23, 8 S. Mit 6 getönten Lithographien von Martin Disteli. HLwd. d. Zt. Rümann 339. - Erste Ausgabe dieser Satire, die in allegorischer Form die Zersplitterung Deutschlands und den Untertanengeist in den deutschen Kleinstaaten beklagt. Trotz sofortigem Verbot in Deutschland erlebte die Schrift in schneller Folge vier Auflagen. - II. (Köppen, Karl Friedrich). \"Der deutsche Michel. Erläutert von Einem seiner Freunde und Leidensgenossen\". Lpz., Renger, 1843. 23 S. Ohne die meist fehlende Lithographie. - III. Kries, C.G. \"Weshalb wollen wir zwei Kammern und wie sind dieselben zu bilden?\". Breslau, Max und Komp., 1848. 36 S. - IV. (Nádasdy, Thomas) \"Die Unruhen der letztvergangenen Jahre mit vergleichender Hinweisung auf einen Theil der Geschichte Frankreichs und Ungarns nebst Vorschlägen, den nachtheiligen Folgen derselben in finanzieller und politischer Hinsicht für die Zukunft zu begegnen, dabei den Wünschen der Völker zu entsprechen, und die Vereinigung aller Kronländer Oesterreichs herzustellen\". Wien, Keck & Sohn, 1850. V., 146 S., 1 Bl. - Einband verblichen. Mehrfach gestempelt, teils gering fleckig, wenige Seiten angestaubt. - Die in diesem Sammelband vereinigten Schriften, alle in Erstausgabe, sind fast durchgehend selten und gesucht. Versand D: 6,00 EUR Gesch./Politik, Revolution 1848

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Bierl]
 18.   Check availability:     buchfreund.de     Link/Print  


        A Christmas Carol

      London: Chapman & Hall, 1843. First Edition. Hardcover. Very Good. 166 + [2] publisher's ads. First edition. Finely bound in full green leather, raised bands, gilt stamping to spine, all edges gilt. Title page printed in red and blue, dated 1843 in Roman numerals; half title and verso of title page printed in blue; "Stave I" on page [1]; end papers appear contemporary to rebinding. Previous owner gift inscription at top of title page. In custom slipcase.

      [Bookseller: Burnside Rare Books]
 19.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  


        Johann Sporschil's Schweizerkronike fra Rütliforbundets Stiftelse til den evige Fred med Frankrig. Oversat af F. L. Liebenberg.

      Kjobenhavn, Andr. Fred. Hofts Forlag, 1843, - gr. in-8vo, 2 Bl. + 505 S., vereinzelt stockfleckig, ex-dono eines Vorbesitzers auf Vorsatz, rez. Halb-Lederband mit Ecken, Rücken mit Titelschildchen und reicher Rückenvergoldung, sehr schönes Exemplar. Selten. Rare en langue danoise.Please notify before visiting to see a book. Prices are excl. VAT/TVA (only Switzerland) & postage. [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Harteveld Rare Books Ltd.]
 20.   Check availability:     ZVAB     Link/Print  


        MANUAL OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF NEW YORK FOR THE YEARS 1843 & 4

      New York: Wm. C. Bryant, Printer, 1843. Embossed Cloth. Very Good binding. One of the very earliest of the Valentine's manuals for New York (the first was the 1841-2). With the two folding maps of New York, as called for. Also, the folding chart of "Real and Personal Estate in the City and County of New York". The binding has been discreetly repaired (the textblock had broken where the map is stubbed in) and the middle third of the book has a tideline near the bottom of the textblock. In the publisher's brown cloth which is stamped in blind, and with the arms of the city in gold; titling in gold to the spine. There is a previous owner bookplate on the pastedown. The two maps are splendid. Very Good binding.

      [Bookseller: Black Swan Books, Inc.]
 21.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  


        El castillo de Nebelstein (cuento)

      Imprenta y casa de la Unión Comercial 1843 - 96 pp. 8 x 11,5 cm. Obra completa. Sobre Ann Radcliffe: "Ann Radcliffe (9 de julio de 1764 – 7 de febrero de 1823), novelista británica, pionera de la llamada novela gótica de terror." Sobre Teodoro Guerrero: "Teodoro Guerrero Pallarés, (9 de noviembre de 1824 en La Habana; 6 de octubre de 1904 en Madrid), fue un escritor y diputado, miembro del Congreso de los Diputados de España por varios Distritos de la isla de Puerto Rico durante dos legislaturas, desde el 27 de mayo de 1879 hasta el 8 de marzo de 1886.1 Como escritor ha empleado varios seudónimos: Juan Diente, Tomás García Piñeiro, Goliat, Mr. Papillon, Tadmir el Medyched, Fanny Warrior y Juan sin miedo." (Fuente: Wikipedia) [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: La Vieja Factoría de Libros]
 22.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  


        A Christmas Carol. In prose. Being a Ghost story of Christmas. With illustrations by John Leech.

      London: Chapman & Hall, 1843 - Small octavo (155 x 98 mm). Near-contemporary purple calf, titles to red label to spine, spine richly decorated gilt in compartments, covers elaborately blocked in gilt and blind, orange coated endpapers, edges and turn-ins gilt, brown silk page marker. Contemporary gift inscription to front binder's blank. Minor rubbing to extremities, a couple of tiny scratches to covers, an excellent, bright copy. Title page printed in blue and red, frontispiece and 3 plates by John Leech, all handcoloured as issued; 4 woodcut illustrations in the text. First edition, second issue, with red and blue title page dated 1843, "Stave One" on the first page of text, and all the first edition textual points. Eckel pp. 110–15; Smith II, 4. [Attributes: First Edition]

      [Bookseller: Peter Harrington. ABA member]
 23.   Check availability:     ZVAB     Link/Print  


        A Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year to You [caption title].

      London: Published at Summerly's Home Treasury Office, 12 Old Bond Street, [1843]. Hand-colored lithographed card, 8 x 13 cm with the contemporary inscription to "My very dear Father & Mother / [From] Their loving Son, Joe." [With:] A proof impression of the same card, printed in sepia on card stock, inscribed some years later (1865) by Henry Cole to Mr. and Mrs. Wallis. 12 x 16.5 cm. Greeting cards became popular and widely available in the early 19th century, and in 1843 Henry Cole (1808-1882), Joseph Cundall (1818-1895) and John Calcott Horsley (1817-1903) collaborated on a project to make a greeting card specifically for the Christmas season. Horsley created the festive image and Cundall put his imprint on the card and sold them at his Summerly Home Treasury Office. Summerly was a pseudonym invented by Henry Cole and used in many of his collaborations with Cundall. Above and below the image of the family celebrating Christmas, flanked by images of Christmas charity (feeding and clothing the poor), are lines with blank spaces for the sender to write in the recipient's and sender's name, as has been done on this example. 1,000 copies were printed, and sold for one shilling per card. According to the census by Kenneth Rowe (1977) only 21 examples are known to have survived, including this one. This example is accompanied by a rare proof of the card, inscribed by Henry Cole, who was said to have kept examples of the proof as souvenirs of his inventiveness. Only five such examples are recorded. This one was inscribed by Cole to Mr. and Mrs. George Wallis. George Wallis (1811-1891) was a museum curator and actively involved in artistic circles. ¶ In spite of the originality and ingenuity of the card, it was not a success, and another card designed specifically for Christmas would not appear for another five years. When color printing became less expensive in the 1860s, Christmas cards became commonplace. Provenance: from the collection of Jock Elliott. Sotheby's, December 12, 2006, lot 110. In fine condition; both cards are housed together in a linen folding chemise, within a linen clamshell box, with a red morocco label on the upper cover.

      [Bookseller: Brick Row Book Shop]
 24.   Check availability:     Direct From Seller     Link/Print  


        Instructions for the Practice of Fresco Painting; As given in the reports of the commissioners on the fine arts, compiled and arranged by artists' colour-makers to the Queen, and to H. R. H. Prince Albert.

      London: Winsor & Newton, 1843 - Octavo (185 x 123 mm). Bound for presentation by Westleys & Clark in pale brown calf titles to front cover gilt, elaborate gilt frames to covers, spine fully gilt, edges gilt, yellow moiré endpapers. Binder's ticket to foot of rear pastedown. Slight bumps and rubbing to extremities, rubbing to joints, boards lightly soiled with a couple small scratches, very light foxing to prelims and endmatter; a very good copy. Black and white illustrations to text. First edition. Presentation copy, inscribed by the authors on the front free endpaper, "To C. Stanfield Esq. R. A., respectfully presented by his obedient humble servants, W. Winsor & H. Newton." The recipient was Clarkson Stanfield, elected as a Royal Academician in February 1835, who "between 1820 and his last submission in 1867 showed 135 paintings at the Royal Academy, his only absences being from 1822 to 1826, in 1828, and (owing to a tour) in 1839" (ODNB). He played an active role in the Royal Academy, repeatedly serving on their council, and in 1852 became a member of the hanging committee. Originally a theatre painter, Stanfield was described by Ruskin as, "the leader of the British Realists, and, next to Turner, the noblest master of cloud forms of all our artists" (ODNB). Winsor and Newton were the first developers of the commonly used glycerine based watercolours, and have been important producers of art materials since they were established in 1832. An uncommon work, traced in seven institutions world-wide. [Attributes: First Edition; Signed Copy]

      [Bookseller: Peter Harrington. ABA member]
 25.   Check availability:     ZVAB     Link/Print  


        Mammalia. Dogs

      Lizars, Edinburgh. 1843 - 2 Vols, Frontis, Titles, 68 hand coloured plates. Original Red cloth, respined in matching colour oasis morocco. A thorough work mentioning many dog species. In "the naturalist's library" series. An extremely attractive set complete with all plates [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Anah Dunsheath RareBooks ABA ANZAAB ILAB]
 26.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  


        Galerie Microscopique, (traduction du Microscopic Cabinet de M. Pritchard), augmentée de notes.

      Paris:: N.-P. Lerebours, 1843.. 8vo. VIII, 224 pp. Half-title, numerous figs., 12 plates drawn by C.R. Goring (1792–1840) and engraved by W. Kelsall (10 of which are colored, 2 folding), numerous figures; spotted and/or foxed, with marginal damp-stains. Handsome modern quarter gilt-stamped crimson morocco, marbled boards. Ownership signature of title obscured; old rubber-stamp “Bibliothèque Populaire” (preface, p.85). Very good. First French edition of a classic of microscopic literature. Martin 163 (for the first English edition of 1832). Microscopic studies of the larvae of crocodiles, dragonflies, notonectidae or boatfly, animalcules, infusoria, gnat, green & brown polyps, satyrid butterfly, freshwater Cyclops, shrimp. Added to this are microscopic terminology, applying microscopes to precious stones, etc. One of the folding plates shows Andrew Prichard's Jewel & Doublet Microscope. Dr C.R. Goring, who made the drawings for the plates, was a medical practitioner and amateur microscopist. ¶ “During the 1830s Goring and Pritchard published several works that presaged and helped instigate the intense publishing activity that accompanied the heightened popularity of mircroscopy later in the 19th century. Pritchard and Goring's illustrated books are important for their pioneering exploration of natural history and for their espousal of an ultimately fruitless innovation in microscope development: the diamond lens microscope.” – Whipple Library. “Creating the original drawings of insects was not easy. Goring railed at the insects' ‘incorruptible restlessness' which 'so balks and baffles the artist, that he is frequently compelled to lay down his pencil to regain his lost temper, and fresh courage to proceed'.” ¶ “Nineteenth-century England's fascination for the study of microorganisms had made optical development of the microscope an English preserve. Against this background Pritchard and Goring devoted much time to the development of lenses made of diamond and other precious stones. They sought to realize Brewster's notion of the jewel microscope as a means of counteracting two defects that had hampered the use of the existing compound microscope (i.e. a microscope containing two or more lenses). The first defect, known as chromatic aberration, resulted in a rainbow-effect caused by imperfections in the eyepiece lens and object glass. The second defect, known as 'spherical aberration', resulted from a tendency of the object glass to confuse rays of light projected through the slide by the mirror light source beyond it. This made the edges of any object under observation appear indistinct. Goring and Pritchard became convinced that these defects could be rectified through the use of a 'single microscope', comprising one lens made of diamond or some other precious stone. It was believed that the higher refractive index of precious stones would allow for a shallower curved lens, thereby reducing aberration. Unfortunately, despite Pritchard's hyperbole the innovation proved impractical as natural diamonds are too hard to work and most have flaws. Moreover, the jewel lens microscope was made obsolete by the invention of the doublet lens in 1828 by W.H. Wollaston (1766–1828) and work on the design of objective lenses for the compound microscope by Joseph Jackson Lister (1786–1869).” – Whipple Library.

      [Bookseller: Jeff Weber Rare Books]
 27.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  


        An Inaugural Discourse on Arabic and Sanskrit Literature, delivered in New Haven, Wednesday, August 16, 1843

      New Haven: Printed by B.L. Hamlen, 1843. Printed for Private Circulation. 51 pp. 1 vols. 8vo. Cream printed wrappers. Minor chipping, spine split, some foxing, else Very Good. Printed for Private Circulation. 51 pp. 1 vols. 8vo. Presentation from America's 'First Arabist of Note'. Inscribed on front cover "Rev. Dr. Bacon with the respects of the author."Edward Elbridge Salisbury (1814-1901), "America's first Arabist of note", studied theology and Hebrew, and graduated from Yale in the class of 1832. He travelled to Europe in 1837 to study Arabic with the great French orientalist Sylvestre de Sacy, and then studied Sanskrit and philology under Franz Bopp in Berlin. "In 1841 Salisbury was appointed Professor of Arabic and Sanskrit at Yale. This was the first Orientalist teaching post in the United States" (Irwin). He studied further in Bonn and Paris before returning to take up the professorship in 1843, upon which occasion this Discourse was presented. It is a brisk and wide ranging survey of "the subject of oriental learning, particularly those two great departments of it of which the Sanskrit and the Arabic languages are the key". "Without a knowledge of Arabic how little can that transitory period of history be understood, when upon the fall of the Byzantine empire the Arabs succeeded, as not only the preservers, but the enlargers of science, the only nation which could be called really civilized, for several centuries." In addition to sketching the outlines of Arabic poetical and religious literature, Salisbury touches upon the roots and flowering of Sanskrit literature, as well as the importance of the language in understanding Hindu and Buddhist philosophy. Salisbury notes how in the preceding decades, European scholars had opened the doors of learning about the East, and suggests that America must not ne left behind by the further advance of learning.In 1842, Salisbury was one of the founders of the American Oriental Society. He served as editor of its Journal from 1846 to 1863 and assumed the costs of acquiring Oriental type fonts and the Journal's production. One of his contributions for 1847 was the first scholarly article on Buddhism published in the U.S., and his many essays also included the first American publication on cuneiform.In the decade during which he taught Sanskrit, Salisbury had only two students. One of them was William Dwight Whitney, "who became one of the ablest Sanskritists of his time. … With characteristic generosity and self-effacement, Salisbury resigned his professorship in Sanskrit in Whitney's favor, endowing the chair from his own resources (1853-1854). He increased the endowment in 1869 when Harvard attempted to draw Whitney to its own faculty" (ANB).The inscription on this copy of the Inaugural Discourse is to Leonard Bacon, Sr. (1802-1881) who from 1825 until his death was pastor of the First Church (Congregational) in New Haven. In 1843, Bacon was one of the founders of the New Englander (later the Yale Review) to which Salisbury was a regular contributor.A cornerstone of American engagement with the languages and ideas of the Arab and Indian cultures, with a fine association. See Robert Irwin, Dangerous Knowledge pp. 213-4

      [Bookseller: James Cummins Bookseller ]
 28.   Check availability:     ABAA     Link/Print  


        MANUAL OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF NEW YORK FOR THE YEARS 1843 & 4

      Wm. C. Bryant, Printer, New York 1843 - One of the very earliest of the Valentine's manuals for New York (the first was the 1841-2). With the two folding maps of New York, as called for. Also, the folding chart of "Real and Personal Estate in the City and County of New York". The binding has been discreetly repaired (the textblock had broken where the map is stubbed in) and the middle third of the book has a tideline near the bottom of the textblock. In the publisher's brown cloth which is stamped in blind, and with the arms of the city in gold; titling in gold to the spine. There is a previous owner bookplate on the pastedown. The two maps are splendid. Very Good binding. [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: BLACK SWAN BOOKS, INC., ABAA, ILAB]
 29.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  


        Kathedrale ('Cathédrale De Strasbourg. - Gustave Simoneau del. et lith. - Imprimé par Simonau, Lithographe-Editeur rue aux Choux, 68, à Bruxelles.').

      - Lithographie v. Gustave Simonau b. P. Simonau in Brüssel, dat. 1843, 73 x 51

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Norbert Haas]
 30.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  


        Opisanie Bukharskogo Khanstva [Description of the Khanate of Bukhara].

      St. Petersburg: Imperial Academy of Sciences, 1843 - Octavo (222 × 148 mm). Later nineteenth-century Russian brown quarter sheep, marbled boards with cloth tips, title gilt directly to the spine, edges sprinkled blue, linen hinges, pre-1917 paper label of the library of the Orenburg military district to the front pastedown. A little rubbed at the extremities, pale toning to the text-block, some neat professional repairs verso to minor splits to the folds of the maps, but overall a very good clean copy. Lithographic portrait and 2 folding lithographic maps at rear, a regional map and a city plan of Bukhara. First and only edition, uncommon just 9 locations recorded on OCLC. A classic of the literature of the Great Game, probably the first attempt at a scientific description of the Khanate of Bukhara. The author was the noted Russian orientalist, historian and diplomat Nikolay Khanykov (1819-1878) and is based on his experience during Colonel Konstantin Butenev's 1841-2 embassy to Bukhara. The mission was organised as a response to a request of the Bukhara's Khan, Nasrullah, for the dispatch of a geological officer "for the investigation of local ores and location of metals and precious stones". While the embassy was in Bukhara Butenev negotiated for the release of British intelligence officers Arthur Conolly and Charles Stoddart who had been detained there. Despite making contact with Stoddart, and obtaining some detail from him of both his reconnaissance of the region and the conditions of the prisoners' captivity, Butenev failed to obtain the British officers's freedom, and they were murdered soon after the Russian delegation left Bukhara. The book offers a detailed survey of the khanate; the last chapter giving a biographical overview of the life and struggle for power of Nasrullah Khan, the fifth Emir of Bukhara (r. 1827-1860), including his portrait by Lev Alexandrovich Belousov (1806-1864), artist and lithographer, a graduate of the Imperial Academy of Arts who became noted his lithographs to Alexander Viskovatov's "Collection of uniforms of the Russian Army" (1830); "Historical Description of Uniforms and Arms of the Russian Troops" (1841-1862), and others; the volume concludes with a supplementary alphabetical index of place names in Russian and Arabic. The lithographed map shows the borders of the Khanate of Bukhara and its immediate neighbours, and the plan of Bukhara locates over 80 specific buildings and other sights. Widely considered to be "the most valuable achievement in pre-Revolutionary Central Asian studies before the annexation of the region by Russia Khanykov, who stayed in Bukhara for eight months in 1841-2 as a member of a Russian mission, observed the city of Bukhara for the purpose of "systematic description". He left valuable records, which are brief and to the point, of Bukhara's city gates, its area, graveyards, fountains, ark (citadel), jails, mosques, madrasas (including the number of rooms and students and the value of scholarships), caravanserais (including charges), public baths, tim (arcades of shops), the structure of houses, the permanent bazaar, suburban weekly fairs, feasts (festivals), mausolea, population (estimated as 60,000-70,000), trade with neighbouring countries and cities (Russia, Khiva, Mashhad, Kabul, Khokand, Kashgar, Yarkand), prices of goods, the machinery of governments, the ulama, the isan (Sufi spiritual masters), and the academic situation Though the descriptions of Samarkand and Karshi are superficial, Khanykov's record of nineteenth-century Bukhara is meticulous and well deserves the praise accorded it by later scholars such as V.V. Bartol'd and O.A. Sukhareva" (Henda & Miura (eds.), Islamic Urban Studies: Historical Review and Perspectives, p. 282). Nikolay Khanykov (1819-78) graduated as an interpreter in oriental languages from the Imperial Lycée at Tsarkoye Selo in 1836, and in this capacity took part in Perovsky's ill-fated military expedition to Khiva of 1839-1840. Following his participation in the present exped [Attributes: First Edition]

      [Bookseller: Peter Harrington. ABA member]
 31.   Check availability:     ZVAB     Link/Print  


        DAYS AND NIGHTS OF SALMON FISHING IN THE TWEED. By William Scrope, Esqre., F.L.S.

      John Murray. London. - 1843 1st edition. Large 8vo (157 x 247mm). Ppxx,298. Illustrated with 12 coloured lithographs, a tinted engraved title-page & 9 wood engravings in the text by L. Laghe, T. Landseer and S. Williams, from paintings by Sir David Wilkie, Edwin Landseer, R.A., Charles Landseer, William Simpson and Edward Cooke. Bound in half green morocco over green buckram, five raised bands, gilt titles and decorations to spine, top edge gilt, marbled end-papers. Slight soiling of edges of preliminary pages but a very good first edition copy in a very nice half-morocco binding. Bookplate of E.G. Poole. "With a short account of the natural history and habits of the salmon, instructions to sportsmen, anecdotes, etc." The first edition of one of the most important and readable early salmon fishing books. [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Coch-y-Bonddu Books Ltd]
 32.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  


        A REPORT ON AN EXPLORATION OF THE COUNTRY LYING BETWEEN THE MISSOURI RIVER AND THE ROCKY MOUNTAINS ON THE LINE OF THE KANSAS AND GREAT PLATTE RIVERS. [bound with] HOUSE REP. NO. 31, MILITARY POSTS--COUNCIL BLUFFS TO THE PACIFIC OCEAN

      Washington: Printed by order of the United States' Senate, 1843. FIRST EDITION, ONE OF 1,000 COPIES. This is the first issue of explorer John Fremont's report to the Senate on his exploration along the route that became known as the Oregon Trail. With Kit Carson as guide and German cartographer Carl Preuss along to create maps, Fremont set out to survey the territory and to recommend the best route for settlers heading west to take. Fremont (1813-90) joined the U.S. Army Corps of Topographical Engineers in 1838, and took part in two wilderness expeditions with explorer Joseph Nicollet, before being appointed to lead the present expedition through the influence of his father-in-law, Missouri senator Thomas Hart Benton, a fervent advocate of western expansion. According to Streeter, "The expedition was designed by Senator Benton and the expansionist group in Congress to publicize the first main division of the route to Oregon, for though this was well known to the fur traders, the region west of the Missouri was still terra incognita to the general public." The Grolier American 100 notes that this report "made clear the first half of the route to Oregon through the South Pass and cast doubts on the prevailing myth of a great American desert between the Missouri and the Rockies." Fremont's acccount of the journey is followed here by a Catalogue of Plants he collected and records of astronomical and meteorological observations. The success of this journey made Fremont's reputation, and he went on to lead three more western expeditions before settling in California, where he became one of the state's first U.S. senators. In 1856, he was the newly-formed Republican Party's first nominee for the presidency. ANB concludes that "He was at his best as the daring and resourceful leader of his early expeditions. The knowledge of the West and impetus to the westward movement that these journeys inspired remain a remarkable and enduring achievement." The second work in the volume is a report by the U.S. Representative from Ohio, Mr. Pendleton, on the establishment of a chain of military posts between Council Bluffs in Iowa and the Pacific Coast in Oregon.. 228 x 145 mm. (9 x 5 3/4"). 207, 78 pp. FIRST EDITION, ONE OF 1,000 COPIES. Modern brown buckram backed with matching morocco, gilt titling on spine. Original brown cloth backstrip laid in. With six plates and a large folding map. Graff 1437; Howes F-371; Wagner-Camp 95; Wheat, Transmississippi West 464; Streeter Sale 3130; Grolier American 100 #49. Second work: Howes P-199; Graff 3243, Wagner-Camp 100. First page a bit foxed, one page (207) with one-inch ink stain affecting a couple of words in a table and a couple of small ink spots, one of them affecting a number, minor foxing throughout (due to paper quality), otherwise an excellent copy in an unworn binding, the folding map especially clean and crisp. This is the first issue of explorer John Fremont's report to the Senate on his exploration along the route that became known as the Oregon Trail. With Kit Carson as guide and German cartographer Carl Preuss along to create maps, Fremont set out to survey the territory and to recommend the best route for settlers heading west to take. Fremont (1813-90) joined the U.S. Army Corps of Topographical Engineers in 1838, and took part in two wilderness expeditions with explorer Joseph Nicollet, before being appointed to lead the present expedition through the influence of his father-in-law, Missouri senator Thomas Hart Benton, a fervent advocate of western expansion. According to Streeter, "The expedition was designed by Senator Benton and the expansionist group in Congress to publicize the first main division of the route to Oregon, for though this was well known to the fur traders, the region west of the Missouri was still terra incognita to the general public." The Grolier American 100 notes that this report "made clear the first half of the route to Oregon through the South Pass and cast doubts on the prevailing myth of a great American desert between the Missouri and the Rockies." Fremont's acccount of the journey is followed here by a Catalogue of Plants he collected and records of astronomical and meteorological observations. The success of this journey made Fremont's reputation, and he went on to lead three more western expeditions before settling in California, where he became one of the state's first U.S. senators. In 1856, he was the newly-formed Republican Party's first nominee for the presidency. ANB concludes that "He was at his best as the daring and resourceful leader of his early expeditions. The knowledge of the West and impetus to the westward movement that these journeys inspired remain a remarkable and enduring achievement." The second work in the volume is a report by the U.S. Representative from Ohio, Mr. Pendleton, on the establishment of a chain of military posts between Council Bluffs in Iowa and the Pacific Coast in Oregon.

      [Bookseller: Phillip J. Pirages Fine Books and Mediev]
 33.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  


        INCIDENTS OF TRAVEL IN YUCATAN

      Harper & Brothers, New York 1843 - 230 x 140 mm. (9 x 5 1/2"). Two volumes. FIRST EDITION. Publisher's brown gilt-stamped cloth. Both volumes housed in a fine modern half calf dropback box. With 120 engravings after Frederick Catherwood, including 76 full-page plates with original tissue guards, two folding frontispieces, and a folding map. Titles with red ink stamp of W. J. Beck. Sabin 91299. Heads of spines chipped, extremities a little worn, boards lightly chafed, but the original bindings entirely solid. Plates and adjacent leaves a little foxed from contact with acidic tissue guards, two plates in volume II loose, occasional minor foxing to text, especially towards the end of each volume, but a very good copy with nothing approaching a fatal defect. After the great success of "Incidents of Travel in Central America," which introduced the public to the Mayan ruins hidden in the jungles, John Lloyd Stephens and his collaborator Frederick Catherwood returned to Yucatan with physician and paleontologist Samuel Cabot and continued their explorations. On this journey, they reached the great Mayan ruins in Chichen Itza and Tulum, and documented 44 Mayan sites in all. To aid them in their efforts, DNB reports, they took with them "a daguerreotype machine, one of the first brought to Mexico. They began by taking daguerreotypes of the local people, whom they invited to sit for portraits. These pictures, shot by Catherwood, constitute the first use of the daguerreotype for anthropological research. He later tried to use the machine for limning the ruins, but found it unsuited to bringing out their carved reliefs, which he presciently understood were not simply decorative, but connected to a linguistic system, as were the hieroglyphs he had depicted in Egypt. In June 1842 Catherwood and Stephens returned to New York, taking the daguerreotypes with them, among the first archaeological photographs produced in Spanish America." Tragically, all the daguerreotypes were destroyed in a fire, but Catherwood's sketches based on the images appear here. Like their earlier work on Mesoamerica, "Incidents of Travel in Yucatan" was a great success, with Sabin reporting that it was reissued "at least six times between 1847 and 1860," and it was still in print in 1876. It is difficult to overstate Stephens' contribution to the study of the Mayan civilization; his works provided the foundation for all the archaeologists who followed. Catherwood's meticulous illustrations set the standard for archaeological drawings. According to ANB, these books "remained important into the twenty-first century because they established the field of Mayan archaeology. Stephens provided accurate, detailed descriptions of the ruins, and he was the first to establish that the many Mayan sites were part of a single civilization that existed up to the time of the Spanish conquest and that the Indians were the direct descendants of that civilization." After the great success of "Incidents of Travel in Central America," which introduced the public to the Mayan ruins hidden in the jungles, John Lloyd Stephens and his collaborator Frederick Catherwood returned to Yucatan with physician and paleontologist Samuel Cabot and continued their explorations. On this journey, they reached the great Mayan ruins in Chichen Itza and Tulum, and documented 44 Mayan sites in all. To aid them in their efforts, DNB reports, they took with them "a daguerreotype machine, one of the first brought to Mexico. They began by taking daguerreotypes of the local people, whom they invited to sit for portraits. These pictures, shot by Catherwood, constitute the first use of the daguerreotype for anthropological research. He later tried to use the machine for limning the ruins, but found it unsuited to bringing out their carved reliefs, which he presciently understood were not simply decorative, but connected to a linguistic system, as were the hieroglyphs he had depicted in Egypt. In June 1842 Catherwood and Stephens returned to New York, [Attributes: First Edition]

      [Bookseller: Phillip J. Pirages Rare Books (ABAA)]
 34.   Check availability:     IberLibro     Link/Print  


        The Dabistan,

      Paris: Printed for the Oriental Translation Fund of Great Britain and Ireland,, 1843. or School of Manners, translated from the Original Persian, with Notes and Illustrations. 3 volumes, tall octavo. Original green cloth, paper-spine labels, edges untrimmed. From the library of British Arabist and colonial agent Col. S. B. Miles (1838–1914), with printed bookplates noting his widow's bequest of the collection to Bath Public Library in 1920, manuscript shelf-marks to spines and front-pastedowns, and blind-stamps to the text as usual. Spine-labels largely missing, vol. 1 spine chipped at foot, vols. 2 and 3 slightly nicked, skilful restoration to joints, sides lightly rubbed, tips bumped, endpapers browned, occasional light spotting, vol. 2 sigs. 21–2 foxed more heavily, occasional pale-tide marks to margins of vols. 2 and 3, only touching the text in vol. 3 contents. A good copy. First complete edition in English of this "important [Persian] text of the Azar Kayvani pseudo-Zorostrian sect. It was written anonymously between the years 1645 and 1658 and contains important information particularly about the prevalent religions of India in the 17th century" (Encyclopaedia Iranica). The author, erroneously identified by Sir William Jones as one Muhsin Fani, appears to to have composed most of the text during the reign of Shah Jahan, travelling to various parts of India to study different religious creeds; his attempt to keep his identity secret probably reflects the orthodox religious climate subsequently promulgated by Awrangzeb (r. 1658–1707). Each chapter is devoted to the beliefs of a different group, including Parsis, Hindus, Tibetans, Jews, Christians, Muslims, and (treated separately) Sufis, as well as smaller communities. The Persian text was printed in Calcutta in 1809; a partial translation by Francis Gladwin had previously appeared in the New Asiatic Miscellany (1789). This edition is scarce, with seven copies listed at auction since 1933.

      [Bookseller: Peter Harrington]
 35.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  


        The History of the Rebellion and Civil Wars in England, ... Also his life written by himself, in which is included a continuation of his History of the Grand Rebellion. A new edition, from the original manuscript, with copious indexes.

      Oxford:: University Press, 1843.. Thick sm. 4to. [iv], 1364 pp. Original full brown diced calf, gilt rules and corner pieces, gilt extra spine, all edges gilt, two modern maroon and green leather gilt-stamped labels added; joints just starting to show a crack at ends. Bookplate of Jac. Edv. C. Welldon, A.M. [1900]. Very good +. WITH A SPLIT-DOUBLE FORE-EDGE PAINTING, WITH TWO SCENES: (A) ON THE LEFT A PORTRAIT OF CHARLES I; (B) A PORTRAIT OF OLIVER CROMWELL. Painted ca. 1990s.

      [Bookseller: Jeff Weber Rare Books]
 36.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  


        THE HISTORY OF THE REBELLION AND CIVIL WARS IN ENGLAND.

      - Also his Life, written by himself, in which is included a continuation of his History of the Grand Rebellion. A new edition, from the original manuscript, with copious indexes. Pp. [iv]+1364, printed in double columns, indices; thick med. 8vo; contemporary full dark brown morocco, spine lettered and decorated in gilt, boards blind ruled, upper board with central gilt stamp of King's College, London, the boards very lightly marked; a.e.g.; yellow endpapers, school prize label laid on upper pastedown, some scattered light foxing, mainly to outer leaves and edges; Oxford University Press, Oxford, 1843. [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Kay Craddock - Antiquarian Bookseller]
 37.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  


        Opisanie Bukharskogo Khanstva [Description of the Khanate of Bukhara].

      St. Petersburg: Imperial Academy of Sciences,, 1843. Octavo (222 × 148 mm). Later nineteenth-century Russian brown quarter sheep, marbled boards with cloth tips, title gilt directly to the spine, edges sprinkled blue, linen hinges, pre-1917 paper label of the library of the Orenburg military district to the front pastedown. Lithographic portrait and 2 folding lithographic maps at rear, a regional map and a city plan of Bukhara. A little rubbed at the extremities, pale toning to the text-block, some neat professional repairs verso to minor splits to the folds of the maps, but overall a very good clean copy. First and only edition, uncommon just 9 locations recorded on OCLC. A classic of the literature of the Great Game, probably the first attempt at a scientific description of the Khanate of Bukhara. The author was the noted Russian orientalist, historian and diplomat Nikolay Khanykov (1819-1878) and is based on his experience during Colonel Konstantin Butenev's 1841-2 embassy to Bukhara. The mission was organised as a response to a request of the Bukhara's Khan, Nasrullah, for the dispatch of a geological officer "for the investigation of local ores and location of metals and precious stones". While the embassy was in Bukhara Butenev negotiated for the release of British intelligence officers Arthur Conolly and Charles Stoddart who had been detained there. Despite making contact with Stoddart, and obtaining some detail from him of both his reconnaissance of the region and the conditions of the prisoners' captivity, Butenev failed to obtain the British officers's freedom, and they were murdered soon after the Russian delegation left Bukhara. The book offers a detailed survey of the khanate; the last chapter giving a biographical overview of the life and struggle for power of Nasrullah Khan, the fifth Emir of Bukhara (r. 1827-1860), including his portrait by Lev Alexandrovich Belousov (1806-1864), artist and lithographer, a graduate of the Imperial Academy of Arts who became noted his lithographs to Alexander Viskovatov's "Collection of uniforms of the Russian Army" (1830); "Historical Description of Uniforms and Arms of the Russian Troops" (1841-1862), and others; the volume concludes with a supplementary alphabetical index of place names in Russian and Arabic. The lithographed map shows the borders of the Khanate of Bukhara and its immediate neighbours, and the plan of Bukhara locates over 80 specific buildings and other sights. Widely considered to be "the most valuable achievement in pre-Revolutionary Central Asian studies before the annexation of the region by Russia … Khanykov, who stayed in Bukhara for eight months in 1841-2 as a member of a Russian mission, observed the city of Bukhara for the purpose of "systematic description". He left valuable records, which are brief and to the point, of Bukhara's city gates, its area, graveyards, fountains, ark (citadel), jails, mosques, madrasas (including the number of rooms and students and the value of scholarships), caravanserais (including charges), public baths, tim (arcades of shops), the structure of houses, the permanent bazaar, suburban weekly fairs, feasts (festivals), mausolea, population (estimated as 60,000-70,000), trade with neighbouring countries and cities (Russia, Khiva, Mashhad, Kabul, Khokand, Kashgar, Yarkand), prices of goods, the machinery of governments, the ulama, the isan (Sufi spiritual masters), and the academic situation … Though the descriptions of Samarkand and Karshi are superficial, Khanykov's record of nineteenth-century Bukhara is meticulous and well deserves the praise accorded it by later scholars such as V.V. Bartol'd and O.A. Sukhareva" (Henda & Miura (eds.), Islamic Urban Studies: Historical Review and Perspectives, p. 282). Nikolay Khanykov (1819-78) graduated as an interpreter in oriental languages from the Imperial Lycée at Tsarkoye Selo in 1836, and in this capacity took part in Perovsky's ill-fated military expedition to Khiva of 1839-1840. Following his participation in the present expedition he joined the diplomatic office of the Main Administration of the Transcaucasian Krai and continued his ethnographic researches; his writings included On Muridism and the Murids, A Translation of Muslim Decrees on War, and On the Alternating Changes in the Level of the Caspian Sea. Between 1850 and 1855, Khanykov served as one of the directors of the newly organised Caucasus section of the Russian Geographic Society; from 1854 to 1857 he was consul general in Tabriz; and in 1858–9 he led a scientific expedition to Khorasan. From 1860, Khanykov lived mainly in Paris where he was close to Ivan Turgenev, moving in the circles of Russian revolutionary émigrés surrounding Alexander Herzen, whose papers and letters he helped preserve. Khanykov wrote two books about his exploration of Khorasan; one of these, Mémoire sur la partie méridionale de l'Asie centrale (first published in French in 1861, and not in Russian until 1973), was awarded the Grande Médaille d'Or of the Société de géographie. The present work was Khanykov's first published book, it was subsequently translated in English - as Bokhara: its Amir and its People, 1845 - French and German.

      [Bookseller: Peter Harrington]
 38.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  


        HISTORY OF THE CONQUEST OF MEXICO, WITH A PRELIMINARY VIEW OF THE ANCIENT MEXICAN CIVILIZATION, AND THE LIFE OF THE CONQUEROR, HERNANDO CORTES

      New York: Harper and Brothers, 1843. First American Edition. Published a few months after the first edition appeared in London, this is the first American appearance of an enduringly popular work on Cortes' subjugation of the Aztec civilization, the masterpiece of a man Britannica considers "the greatest Anglo-American historian of the Hispanic world." The Harvard-educated Prescott (1796-1859) was known for seeking out primary material and contemporary sources to craft his very readable and engaging histories, and has been called America's first scientific historiographer. Partially blinded by an accident in college, and unable to travel to Mexico himself to see the Aztec ruins and to examine documents in person, he enlisted the assistance of his friends, Spanish diplomat Ángel Calderón de la Barca and his Scottish wife Frances (Fanny) Inglis. Ángel procured manuscripts and other scholarly materials, while Fanny used a daguerreotype machine sent by Prescott to provide him with images of the sites discussed in the book and wrote lively letters that were valuable sources of anthropological and ethnographic information. Prescott was so impressed that he got Fanny's collected letters published under the title "Life in Mexico," the earliest account of Central America by a female traveller. Prescott's biographer Harry Thurston Peck calls this work "one of the most brilliant examples which the English language possesses of literary art applied to historical narration," further observing, "Here, as nowhere else, has Prescott succeeded in delineating character. All the chief actors of his great historic drama not only live and breathe, but they are as distinctly differentiated as they must have been in life. Cortés and his lieutenants are persons whom we actually come to know in the pages of Prescott. . . . Over against these brilliant figures stands the melancholy form of Montezuma, around whom, even from the first, one feels gathering the darkness of his coming fate. He reminds one of some hero of Greek tragedy, doomed to destruction and intensely conscious of it, yet striving in vain against the decree of an inexorable destiny. . . . [Prescott] transmuted the acquisitions of laborious research into an enduring monument of pure literature.". 240 x 150 mm. (9 1/2 x 5 7/8"). Complete with two half titles (volume III issued without). Three volumes. First American Edition. Publisher's embossed black cloth, smooth spines with gilt titling. With three engraved frontispieces, two engraved double-page maps, and an engraved facsimile of Cortes' signature. Two pencilled signatures on front flyleaf. BAL 16340; Grolier American 100 #51; Hill 1383. Boards a bit chafed, extremities a little rubbed, tiny tear to head of one spine, but the bindings solid. A couple of quires a little browned, isolated marginal smudges or other insignificant imperfections, otherwise a fine, clean set. Published a few months after the first edition appeared in London, this is the first American appearance of an enduringly popular work on Cortes' subjugation of the Aztec civilization, the masterpiece of a man Britannica considers "the greatest Anglo-American historian of the Hispanic world." The Harvard-educated Prescott (1796-1859) was known for seeking out primary material and contemporary sources to craft his very readable and engaging histories, and has been called America's first scientific historiographer. Partially blinded by an accident in college, and unable to travel to Mexico himself to see the Aztec ruins and to examine documents in person, he enlisted the assistance of his friends, Spanish diplomat Ángel Calderón de la Barca and his Scottish wife Frances (Fanny) Inglis. Ángel procured manuscripts and other scholarly materials, while Fanny used a daguerreotype machine sent by Prescott to provide him with images of the sites discussed in the book and wrote lively letters that were valuable sources of anthropological and ethnographic information. Prescott was so impressed that he got Fanny's collected letters published under the title "Life in Mexico," the earliest account of Central America by a female traveller. Prescott's biographer Harry Thurston Peck calls this work "one of the most brilliant examples which the English language possesses of literary art applied to historical narration," further observing, "Here, as nowhere else, has Prescott succeeded in delineating character. All the chief actors of his great historic drama not only live and breathe, but they are as distinctly differentiated as they must have been in life. Cortés and his lieutenants are persons whom we actually come to know in the pages of Prescott. . . . Over against these brilliant figures stands the melancholy form of Montezuma, around whom, even from the first, one feels gathering the darkness of his coming fate. He reminds one of some hero of Greek tragedy, doomed to destruction and intensely conscious of it, yet striving in vain against the decree of an inexorable destiny. . . . [Prescott] transmuted the acquisitions of laborious research into an enduring monument of pure literature."

      [Bookseller: Phillip J. Pirages Fine Books and Mediev]
 39.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  


        South Australia in 1842. By one who lived there nearly four years. Illustrated by drawings

      J.C. Hailes and S. Gilbert, London 1843 - Octavo, 32 pages plus a small folding map (205 x 156 mm), an engraving of Adelaide and 2 full-page lithographs: 'Farm of J. Barton Hack . . .Echiunga [sic] Springs, Mount Barker' and two portraits on the one plate of Kertamaroo (King John) and Mogata (his wife). Later (early twentieth century?) half calf and cloth, retaining the original pale yellow front wrapper (lettered 'South Australia in 1842') and with numerous binder's blanks at the rear to make a more substantial object; covers slightly rubbed at the extremities and high spots; wrapper lightly stained and creased, with the leading edge neatly reinforced (presumably when the binding was done); first and last leaves lightly foxed, with the last one lightly marked; trifling signs of handling; a very good copy. This copy contains the armorial bookplate of Henry Percival Moore (and his pencilled ownership initials on an early binder's blank). Moore was the Colonial Manager for the South Australian Company from 1901 to 1929. Interestingly, the lithographs are by George French Angas from the artwork of others - 'a sketch by Col. Gawler' in the first instance and from drawings 'Model'd from life by Mrs Walker [? - cropped to Walk]' in the second. Extracts from official reports and various statistics (up to August 1842), but predominantly first-hand accounts, often in the form of lengthy quotes from letters from settlers. The passage of time puts things into perspective. There is a PS to Alexander Lorimer's letter: 'I have neglected to mention, that vineyards are forming by many of the settlers'. The closely-printed two pages on Aborigines concludes with this paragraph: 'It is hoped, that a conviction of the deep responsibility which we have incurred, toward the aboriginal inhabitants of that beautiful country, of which we have taken possession, will render the minuteness of the preceding information not unacceptable'. Ferguson 3721 (not mentioning Angas). Please use the 'Ask Bookseller a Question' link below to confirm availability and postage charges. [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Michael Treloar Booksellers ANZAAB/ILAB]
 40.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  


        Les Hiéroglyphes français ou méthode figurative appliquée à l'instruction primaire, contenant en outre: 1° un essai sur la prononciation des langues étrangères, 2° la plus simple des sténographies, 3° un nouveau système du blason, 4° l'art d'écrire avec des points, et de transmettre la pensée par la seule indication de quelques hiéroglyphes.

      P., Roret, 1843, gd. in 8°, de XVIII-134pp.-2ff., ill. d'un front. et de 10 planches gravées h. t., d'un calque transparent et de très nbr. hiéroglyphes in t., cart. papier marbré moderne genre ancien, couv. ill. cons., cachet, restauration en marge des 8 derniers ff. Envoi de l'auteur au verso de la couv. "à Monsieur du Taya, hommage de l'auteur" Rarissime ouvrage dédié à Charles Nodier, et dont la méthode hiéroglyphique se rapproche beaucoup de ce que les spécialistes qualifieraient de "cabbale phonétique" par le procédé dit du "rébus à transfert". Son mystérieux auteur qui après une carrière militaire mourut à Lyon en 1851, a été fréquemment assimilé au nom moins mystérieux militaire dont il est question dans les ouvrages hermétiques de Fulcanelli, et qui enseignait un système mnémotechnique à base d'idéogrammes fonctionnants par cabbale phonétique. Ce procédé du rébus à transfert, à savoir que le même idéogramme peut servir à représenter un mot concret ou un autre mot ou partie de mot homophone, revêt un importance capitale dans de nombreuses écritures idéographiques dont l'égyptienne, l'aztèque, et la chinoise. Chesnier-Duchêne applique cette méthode à la construction d'un écriture hiéroglyphique française, qu'il dit pouvoir rénover nos moyens actuels d'expression... En dehors de son aspect ésotérique la démarche reste fascinante et l'ouvrage peut-être regardé comme une véritable curiosité bibliophilique dont la rareté est indéniable. ¶ Noël Arnaud consacre quelques longues pages à ce traité dans son article "Vers une Littérature illettrée" paru dans le N° spécial "Littérature illettrée" de la Revue Bizarre, 32/33 de 1964 - Caillet n°2326 "très curieux ouvrage.." - aussi Blavier Fous littéraires p.200.

      [Bookseller: L'intersigne Livres anciens]
 41.   Check availability:     Direct From Seller     Link/Print  


        The Christmas Books: A Christmas Carol; The Chimes; The Battle of Life; Cricket on the Hearth; The Haunted Man and The Ghost?s Bargain.

      London: Chapman and Hall, 1843-48. First editions, first issues of all five of Charles Dickens' Christmas Books. Octavo, original cloth, 5 volumes. A Christmas Carol, in Prose. Being a Ghost Story of Christmas is first state binding ("D" intact, 14mm margin), half-title printed in blue, title-page printed in red and blue, verso printed in blue, hand-colored etched frontispiece and three hand-colored etched plates by John Leech, four wood-engravings in-text by W.J. Linton after Leech, 2pp. publisher's advertisements at the end. First edition, second impression per Smith, first impression, first issue per Todd YB43c (yellow endpapers, blue and red title-page, 1843 date, Stave One, remainder of text unrevised per Todd, also all per Scott save p.21, ln. 22, see supplement Table I Scott), one of three combinations that per Todd do not recur in the later issue, order 2 per Todd (no priority, outer b1 inner a1), sewers' mark "12" and line to verso of ad leaf and recto rear endpaper, and with one of five points noted in VanderPoel (space between sentences p.127, ln. 22, is 4mm). Very light wear to the cloth, otherwise fine. The Chimes. A Goblin Story of Some Bells that Rang an Old Year Out and a New Year yellow endpapers, a.e.g., advertisement, half-title, engraved frontispiece and first state vignette title page. First edition, first issue, with internal flaws per Smith (save "h" p.166, some copies). In near fine condition. The Cricket on the Hearth. A Fairy Tale of Home yellow endpapers, a.e.g., half-title, frontispiece and vignette title page, first state ad leaf. First edition, first issue, with internal flaws (save p.iv and 79). Front inner hinge cracked; manuscript inscription to title page. The Battle of Life. A Love Story has yellow endpapers, a.e.g., half-title, advertisements, frontispiece and second state vignette title page [Todd C2, Eckel 2]. First edition, with four internal flaws per Smith. In near fine condition. The Haunted Man and The Ghost's Bargain. A Fancy for Christmas-Time. London: Bradbury & Evans, 1848. 12mo, original red cloth, yellow endpapers, a.e.g., advertisements, frontispiece and vignette title page. First edition, with internal flaws noted per Smith (save pp.iv and 122, some copies). In near fine condition. Housed in a custom clamshell box. An exceptional set, uncommon in this condition. A Christmas Carol "may readily be called the Bible of Christmas It was issued about ten days before Christmas, 1843, and 6000 copies were sold on the first day the number of reprintings have been so many that all attempts at the figures have been futile. Altogether 24 editions were issued in the original format" (Eckel, 110). "It was a work written at the height of Dickens’ great powers, which would add to his considerable fame, bring a new work to the English language, increase the festivities at Christmastime, and contain his most eloquent protest at the condition of the poor" (John Mortimer). "Suddenly conceived and written within a few weeks, [A Christmas Carol] was the first of Dickens’ Christmas books (a new literary genre thus created incidentally) it was an extraordinary achievement—the one great Christmas myth of modern literature."

      [Bookseller: Raptis Rare Books]
 42.   Check availability:     IOBABooks     Link/Print  


        An Inaugural Discourse on Arabic and Sanskrit Literature, delivered in New Haven, Wednesday, August 16, 1843

      Printed by B.L. Hamlen, New Haven 1843 - Printed for Private Circulation. 51 pp. 1 vols. 8vo. Presentation from America's 'First Arabist of Note'. Inscribed on front cover "Rev. Dr. Bacon with the respects of the author."Edward Elbridge Salisbury (1814-1901), "America's first Arabist of note", studied theology and Hebrew, and graduated from Yale in the class of 1832. He travelled to Europe in 1837 to study Arabic with the great French orientalist Sylvestre de Sacy, and then studied Sanskrit and philology under Franz Bopp in Berlin. "In 1841 Salisbury was appointed Professor of Arabic and Sanskrit at Yale. This was the first Orientalist teaching post in the United States" (Irwin). He studied further in Bonn and Paris before returning to take up the professorship in 1843, upon which occasion this Discourse was presented. It is a brisk and wide ranging survey of "the subject of oriental learning, particularly those two great departments of it of which the Sanskrit and the Arabic languages are the key". "Without a knowledge of Arabic how little can that transitory period of history be understood, when upon the fall of the Byzantine empire the Arabs succeeded, as not only the preservers, but the enlargers of science, the only nation which could be called really civilized, for several centuries." In addition to sketching the outlines of Arabic poetical and religious literature, Salisbury touches upon the roots and flowering of Sanskrit literature, as well as the importance of the language in understanding Hindu and Buddhist philosophy. Salisbury notes how in the preceding decades, European scholars had opened the doors of learning about the East, and suggests that America must not ne left behind by the further advance of learning.In 1842, Salisbury was one of the founders of the American Oriental Society. He served as editor of its Journal from 1846 to 1863 and assumed the costs of acquiring Oriental type fonts and the Journal's production. One of his contributions for 1847 was the first scholarly article on Buddhism published in the U.S., and his many essays also included the first American publication on cuneiform.In the decade during which he taught Sanskrit, Salisbury had only two students. One of them was William Dwight Whitney, "who became one of the ablest Sanskritists of his time. ? With characteristic generosity and self-effacement, Salisbury resigned his professorship in Sanskrit in Whitney's favor, endowing the chair from his own resources (1853-1854). He increased the endowment in 1869 when Harvard attempted to draw Whitney to its own faculty" (ANB).The inscription on this copy of the Inaugural Discourse is to Leonard Bacon, Sr. (1802-1881) who from 1825 until his death was pastor of the First Church (Congregational) in New Haven. In 1843, Bacon was one of the founders of the New Englander (later the Yale Review) to which Salisbury was a regular contributor.A cornerstone of American engagement with the languages and ideas of the Arab and Indian cultures, with a fine association. See Robert Irwin, Dangerous Knowledge pp. 213-4 Cream printed wrappers. Minor chipping, spine split, some foxing, else Very Good [Attributes: Signed Copy; Soft Cover]

      [Bookseller: James Cummins Bookseller, ABAA]
 43.   Check availability:     AbeBooks     Link/Print  

______________________________________________________________________________


      Home     Wants Manager     Library Search     562 Years   Links     Contact      Search Help      Terms of Service      Privacy     


Copyright © 2018 viaLibri™ Limited. All rights reserved.