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Displayed below are some selected recent viaLibri matches for books published in 1842

        Großherzogthum Baden Zunft-District Kleinlaufenburg . Meister-Brief, ausgestellt am 18. Oktober 1856, mit Siegel, im oberen Teil grosse Gesamtansicht von Laufenburg am Rhein ( D + CH )

      Blatt Gr. H 35 x B 40 cm - (guter Zustand, unter Glas gerahmt mit Passepartout) 1 Bl. S. mit 1 Lithographie gezeichnet von C. Gerspacher, Säckingen 1842 (Grösse der Text lautet: Der Vorstand der 2. Vereinszunft in Kleinlaufenburg bezeugt hiermit das Baptiste Meier von K.burg am heutigen Tage in unseren Zunftverband als Meister auf- und angenommen sei, und zwar in Folge dernach vorgelegten Wanderbuche und Professionszeugnisse gesezlich zurü(c)k gelegten Wanderjahre, und des zur vollkommenen Zufriedenheit der Zunftvorsteher gefertigten Meisterstückes, sowie der hinzu ertheilten Ermächtigung des Grossh. Bad. des. Amtes No 24, 9. 5. 9 vom 5ten Nov. d. J. diese Meisterurkunde . zur ungehinderten Ausübung seines Gewerbes hiermit ausgestellt. ( Schiffsleute und Flösser , Flößer, Flösserei / Fischer, Fischerzunft )

      [Bookseller: Johann Peter Hebel Antiquariat]
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        Die Natur in Bildern. Ein belehrendes und unterhaltendes Bilderbuch zum Behufe einer naturgemäßen Entwicklung und Bildung des Verstandes und Gemüthes der Kinder. 2 Tle. in 1 Bd. Stuttgart, Hallberger, 1842. VIII, 52 S.; 2 Bll., 92 S. Mit 28 kolor. lithogr. Tafeln. 4°. Neuer Hlwd. mit goldgepr. RSch.

       1842 Doderer/Müller, 60-62; Pressler 56; Wegehaupt I, 1688.- Seltene erste Ausgabe.- In der Tradition des Orbis Pictus gestaltetes Anschauungswerk, das für die Auffassung von Anschauungswerken in der Romantik und im Biedermeier als stellvertretend gilt.- Mit insgesamt 355 liebevoll kolorierten Abbildungen.- Stellenweise etwas fingerfleckig, etwa 15 Blätter mit Feuchtrand in oberer Außenecke. Versand D: 5,00 EUR

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Schramm]
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        Alcorani textus universus ex correctioribus Arabum exemplaribus summa fide, ... Eadem fide, ... in Latinum translatus; appositis unicuique capiti notis, atque refutatione: ...[vol. 2 title:] Refutatio Alcorani, in qua ad Mahumetanicae superstitionis radicem securis apponitur; ...Padova, Typographia Seminaria, 1698. 2 volumes bound as 1. Folio (35.5 x 25 cm). Blind-tooled vellum (ca. 1800?), reusing and retooling vellum from a slightly earlier blind-tooled binding.

      Cat. Bibl. A.-R. Courbonne, dont la vent ... 1er février 1842, 30 (this copy); 34; Schnurrer 377; Sheikh Al-Shabab, "The place of Marracci's Latin translation of the Holy Quran: ...", in: Journal of King Saud University: language & tanslation, 13 (2001), pp. 57-74. The first scholarly printed Quran, prepared by the anti-Islamic Catholic Ludovico Marracci, with a much more accurate Arabic text than any previously printed and the first accurate Latin translation, also including extensive notes based on the Islamic commentaries, as well as the editor's extensive "refutations" of each sutra. Each sura is given first in Arabic, then in Latin translation, followed by notes and then the refutation. The entire first volume of about 430 pages is taken up with preliminary matter, including a 24-page life of Muhammad (one of the first detailed biographies ever printed and again more accurate than its predecessors), an 8-page profession of faith with the Arabic and Latin in parallel columns, and additional commentaries and introductory matter. The fact that this edition was produced explicitly as an attempt to refute the views of Islam has naturally led Islamic scholars to dismiss it, but both the Arabic text and the Latin translation were far better than any previously printed and had no serious rival until the Leipzig edition of 1834. The commentaries also made a great deal of Islamic scholarship available to a European audience for the first time and both the Arabic and the Latin text influenced nearly every edition for the next 150 years.With two bookplates and an occasional early manuscript note and a few letters or numbers inscribed in the foot margin of one leaf. With a tear running into the text of one leaf, repaired, but otherwise in very good condition. With generous margins. The boards are slightly bowed and there is a small tear repaired at the foot of the spine. A ground-breaking work of Quranic scholarship, a valuable source for the study of the Quran and an essential source for European views of Islam.

      [Bookseller: Antiquariaat FORUM BV]
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        THE NATIVITY AND OTHER MUSIC [manuscript title]

      [Various places, including Antarctica, the Northwest Coast, and shipboard, 1842. 54pp. including four original color sketches. Oblong quarto. Contemporary black morocco, ornate gilt cover, stamped with the initials of James D. Dana and James C. Palmer, neatly rebacked with most of the original spine preserved. Corners slightly worn. Internally bright and clean. Later presentation inscription on front free endpaper. Overall in fine condition. A superlative album of music, lyrics, and artwork composed by officers of the United States Exploring Expedition (1838-42), originally composed during their landmark voyage. Included are several of the earliest views of Antarctica, as well as a superb watercolor of Oregon. The work is the collaboration of expedition scientist James D. Dana and expedition Acting Surgeon James C. Palmer, shipmates aboard the U.S.S. Peacock and evidently close friends. Dana, a young officer of twenty- five, was the only scientist of the expedition with previous naval experience. His work was shaped by his mentor, Prof. Benjamin Silliman of Yale, who became his father-in-law upon his return. Palmer served as a well respected medical officer. Together the two, with artistic contributions from colleagues, recorded the events of the expedition in this album in remarkable fashion. The musical scores were Dana's forte, while the lyrics fell to Palmer. The album consists of eight selections of music, four of which are adorned by original artwork, delineated as follows: 1) "The Nativity, A Dramatic Canticle." The first and longest piece in the album, likely written and performed in the interest of buoying morale. Stage directions and music were later printed in broadside format, located in only one copy, at the John Hay Library of Brown University. 2) "Veni Parvule." Dedicated to Palmer's wife, Juliet, occasioned by the death of his son during the expedition. An unattributed color portrait of the little boy precedes the music. 3) "The Stars May Aye Their Vigils Keep. Pacific Ocean - 1841." A melancholy tune, lamenting a father's absence upon the death of his newborn child, no doubt related to the previous title. 4) "A Breeze from the Unpopular Opera of The Iceberg!!" Below the ornate manuscript title of this piece appears a detailed watercolor of the Peacock locked in Antarctic ice, labeled in large block letters: "The Icebergs!" A small party of men in the foreground are engaged in what is likely repair of the damaged vessel. The sketch is captioned: "Accurately drawn by Dr. Guillou [a quarrelsome medical officer and Palmer's subordinate], January 24, 1840. Computed area, 32 miles." At the time the Wilkes expedition had travelled closer towards the pole than any previous American venture, making this image among the earliest evidence of the United States' "farthest south." This song was later published in Palmer's ANTARCTIC MARINER'S SONG... (New York: D. Van Nostrand, 1868), pp.75-76. Historian David B. Tyler cites Passed Midshipman Henry Eld's journal description of the Peacock at this moment as a "happy" ship, continuing that the crew could be heard "stamping about the decks the whole day in the most merry mood - dancing and singing most of the time." This merriment was likely the product of Dana and Palmer's song-writing efforts, though the mood changed dramatically in a moment. Tyler writes: "On the morning of the twenty-fourth this merry mood suddenly changed into one verging on panic. It was a clear day with light winds and smooth water as the ship worked her way into a bay searching, as always, for a means of reaching land. Space for maneuvering was limited...the first crash threw those having breakfast out of their seats, making them think the whole bow must be stove in, but actually the most serious damage was at the stern where the starboard wheelrope was carried and the neck of the rudder wrenched so that it became inoperable." The next twenty-four hours saw the condition of the Peacock deteriorate substantially, and it was only through the competent labors of the ship's carpenters that catastrophic disaster was avoided. The resulting "Breeze," also titled "The Old Peacock," was written in Honolulu, to entice shipmates to re-enlist by reminding them in song of the hardships that had brought the crew so close together. A selection referring to the loss of the ship's rudder reads: "Our pluck did not fail, till we lost our tail / And then 't was high time to belay; / But we stuck here clean through, and it came out anew, / And if any man says this yarn is not true, / Let him go there himself, some day." 5) "One Gentle Word...Oregon - 1841." A romantic love song addressed to an unnamed lover, likely Palmer's wife. 6) "My Tent Beside the Oregon." A light ditty, with an introduction based on the Chinook language. Above the title of this piece is a detailed watercolor of the expedition's camp beside the Columbia River drawn by Joseph Drayton, the primary artist of the expedition. The sketch is among the first views of Army exploration in the Pacific Northwest. It shows two tents surrounded by evergreens, with an American flag mounted on a makeshift pole to the right. An officer is shown seated upon a captain's chair outside the nearest tent. A pencil note, evidently added later, reads: "Sketched with camera lucida. The flag is the one referred to by Dr. Kane, vol. I, p.298." In that narrative, Elisha Kane's ARCTIC EXPLORATIONS... (Philadelphia: Childs & Peterson, 1856), the author writes that the flag was later flown high into the Arctic near Cape Constitution. The camp, affectionately dubbed "Peacockville," was built along the Columbia following the wreck of the Peacock at the river's mouth. The ship had struck the bar upon approaching what was thought to be the channel to the Columbia River. Over the next forty-eight hours the ship was wrecked entirely as a rising sea repeatedly smashed the vessel against the shore. Through the heroics of Capt. William Hudson no lives were lost, and enough supplies were salvaged to allow for the construction of the camp a short distance from Astoria where, for a time, Palmer was assigned command of a shore party. The accompanying music and lyrics, later published in the aforementioned ANTARCTIC MARINER'S SONG (pp.44-45), describe the loss: "My tent beside the Oregon o'er looks the sullen wave, Whose turbid waters darkly frown, Above the Peacock's grave; Where surges weave the shifting sands Around her for a pall; And like a spectral sentry, The toppling over. Mourn not her fate that, round the world, Thrice circled with the sea. And thrice to every land unfurled, The banner of the Free: She came to plant her standard fast, Where it had drooped before; Content to lay her bones at last, Beside it on the shore...." Despite their unlucky landing, the time spent at Peacockville was singularly productive. Under Wilkes' immediate direction the entire Columbia River region was systematically surveyed for the first time, thus elevating the Northwest's commercial potential. 7) "Young Shepards' Canzonet. China Sea. 1842." An introduction to "The Nativity," composed at a later date. 8) "Antarctic Mariner's Song. From 'Thulia' unpublished poem. Sooloo Sea - 1842." At the head of this score appears the last watercolor, of a schooner tacking hard amidst a sea of small icebergs and floes. Like "The Iceberg!!" before it, this sketch also ranks among the earliest views of America's southward progress and records the highest southern latitude of any exploring expedition vessel. The short ink caption reads: "Wm. May, USN. (on the spot)." William May served as a Passed Midshipman on the expedition and was later tried for insubordination. The polar ambitions of the Wilkes expedition are summed in a simple phrase repeated throughout the short tune: "Ease the sheet and keep away; Glory guides us South today." At the time of writing, this song was unpublished as stated, though it later appeared as THULIA. A TALE OF THE ANTARCTIC... (New York: Samuel Coleman, 1843), pp.27,42-46, and again as part of ANTARCTIC MARINER'S SONG (pp.65-72). Given its lavish binding, stamped with the authors' initials, and superlatively neat interior, it is most likely the present album was assembled immediately after the expedition's return, though the songs and watercolors were undoubtedly composed en route. The illustrations are probably fine copies of rougher sketches done "on the spot" by the original artists. That Dana, Palmer, Guillou, May, and Drayton would have collaborated on the album is not unlikely; all were simultaneously engaged in the production of the official expedition report and remained in close contact. The penciled captions were added later, as the 1856 Kane reference attests. While the extant narrative journals of the Wilkes expedition are invaluable research sources, the present album offers a unique sentimental view of morale and good spirits under repeated extreme duress. Dana and Palmer have provided in song a description of the mood of the endeavor in a way that would be impossible in a traditional narrative account. Further, the artwork supplied by Guillou, May, and Drayton offers wholly original and early views of two of the expedition's most important stops: the Northwest Coast and Antarctica. The juxtaposition of scenes from these diverse locations is testament to the broad range and scope of the expedition. Palmer himself writes in his introduction to THULIA that his journals and notes were lost with the wreck of the Peacock, making this volume, reconstructed from memory, the best record of his experiences. That this voyage was the defining event in the careers of both Dana and Palmer is certain, and it is evident both took great pride in their participation. Dana's scientific contributions, especially his work with crustaceans, elevated him to the forefront of American scientists. Palmer, for his part, was later offered the direction of naval hospitals in Washington and Brooklyn. Though Wilkes' expedition was riddled with strife and discord, the efforts and character of these two men, appropriately displayed here, offers an early hint to their future successes. In all, a tremendous and singular memoir of the expedition that vaulted the scientific efforts of the United States to new and unparalleled heights. David B. Tyler, THE WILKES EXPEDITION... (Philadelphia: American Philosophical Society, 1968), passim. DAB XIV, p.185; V, pp.55-56.

      [Bookseller: William Reese Company - Americana]
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        Palazzo Publico, Sienna

      Londra 1842 - "Bella veduta tratta dall'opera "The Ecclesiastical Architecture of Italy: From the Time of Constantine to the Fifteenth Century ", di Henry Gally Knight, stampata da Day & Haghe e pubblicata a Londra, in 2 volumi, nel 1843. L'opera è illustrata da 81 tavole di esterni ed interni di architetture ecclesiastiche di città italiane, i cui disegni furono realizzati da G. Moore, D. Quaglio, J. Aliusetti, J. M. Knapp, Hallman, and Edw. Lear, mentre le litografie da Owen Jones, G. Moore, T. T. Bury, and R. K. Thomas. La presente litografia è opera di G. B. Moore, da un disegno di Domenico Quaglio. Litografia tinta, timbro di appartenenza nell'angolo destro, in ottimo stato di conservazione. Dimensioni del foglio: 370x555 mm" "View taken from "The ecclesiastical architecture of Italy. From the time of Constantine to the fifteenth century, with an introduction and text by Henry Gally Knight " 2 vv illustrated with 81 plates, illustrative of the ecclesiastical architecture of Italy, published by Henry Bohn, London 1843, printed by Day & Haghe. Plates by Owen Jones, G. Moore, T. T. Bury, and R. K. Thomas; after G. Moore, D. Quaglio, J. Aliusetti, J. M. Knapp, Hallman, and Edw. Lear. Coloured lithograph with tint stones and chromolithograph, in very good condition." Dimensioni 357 290mm

      [Bookseller: Libreria Antiquarius]
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        Bibliotheca Grenvilliana; or Bibliographical Notices of Rare and Curious Books, Forming Part of the Library of the Right Hon. Thomas Grenville: by John Thomas Payne and Henry Foss

      London: Printed by William Nicol, Shakspeare Press [and] Chiswick Press, 1842-72. 3 Parts in 4 vols., 4to, one of only 30 large paper copies, [iv],6,[2],xxxiii,[i],388; [iv],[389]-846; [ii],4,[2],472,xlii[2]; 6,[2],219,[1]pp., with half-titles, photographic frontispiece in part three, all four volumes are from the library at Woburn Abbey, vols. 1-3 have the bookplate or label of the Duke of Bedford, some light foxing, as usual, uniformly bound by Clarke and Bedford in cont. quarter green goatskin, purple boards (lightly rubbed), small nick to head on vol. one, the fourth vol. has been expertly bound to match the others, smooth spines lettered in gilt, purpose made felt-lined marbled slip-cases. A fine set of the extremely rare large paper edition of this important catalogue. "The Hon. Thomas Grenville (1755-1846), after a brilliant parliamentary career, retired from public life in 1818 and devoted himself entirely to his books. He was a true bibliophile, in the highest sense of the word... When he died he left his books to the British Museum... His 20,000 volumes form the greatest gift of books that any private individual has ever made to the Museum. He had fine books of every description, but he seems to have specialised in early Americana (he was the first collector to buy Columbus and Vespucci letters), Aldines, early Spanish and Italian books (Dante, Petrarch and Ariosto), classics (especially Aesop and Homer), books on Ireland and lastly incunables on vellum, including the Mazarin Bible, the 1457 Psalter and the 1469 Livy, this catalogue, by Payne and Foss, is a lasting monument to his enlightened efforts as a collector." - De Ricci, p.114.

      [Bookseller: Forest Books]
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        Histoire de Joseph, accompagnée de dix figures, rélatives aux principaux evenemens de la fils de ce fils du patriarche Jacob, et gravées sur les modèles du fameux Reimbrandt.Amsterdam, Jean Neaulme, 1757. Folio. With title-page printed in red and black, and 10 full-page etched plates. Contemporary boards.

      Cohen-de Ricci 210; STCN (4 copies); for Caylus: Lugt, Marques des Collections 2919. First and only edition of a children's book beautifully illustrating the biblical story of Joseph and intended "as much for the improvement of morals as for the principles of drawing", as the title-page notes. Anne-Claude-Philippe comte de Caylus aimed to inspire his readers with a love of virtue and an appreciation of Rembrandt's masterly and evocative drawings. The original drawings have been in the Louvre since 1842, but they have lost their attribution to Rembrandt and are now sometimes ascribed to Rembrandt's pupil Gerbrand van den Eeckhout. The first recorded owner of the drawings was the painter Charles-Antoine Joseph Coypel, an acquaintance of the author.Owner's inscription on paste-down, binding chafed, spine damaged. Otherwise in good condition. A fine series of 10 etchings.

      [Bookseller: Antiquariaat FORUM BV]
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        Palazzo Publico. Sienna

      1842. Decorativa veduta del palazzo e della bella piazza, animata da personaggi. Stampata su fondo seppia

      [Bookseller: Libreria Trippini Sergio]
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        POKHOZHDENIYA CHICHIKOVA, ILI MERTVYYA DUSHI: POEMA [THE ADVENTURES OF CHICHIKOV, OR DEAD SOULS A POEM]

      Moscow: University Press, 1842. First edition. Gogol's masterpiece, a classic of nineteenth-century Russian literature, and one of his works satirising the Russian character, as he also did with Revizor [The Government Inspector]. Volume one only (as issued), 8vo (233 x 150mm.), half-title, later calf-backed brown buckram, lettered in gilt on spine, without wrappers, occasional light staining, pp.251-254 bound upside down, but generally an excellent copy. There was a second volume, published after Gogol's death by his heirs in 1855; although he had burned the second volume, there were sufficient drafts remaining for the volume to be recomposed, and the planned third volume had never been written. Gogol's "Dead Souls" sits high within the pantheon of Russian literature. It was written as a social satire, a modern "Inferno" in prose. The novel is complex, yet highly amusing as it follows the gregarious and immoral Tchitchikoff on his quest throughout the Russian countryside in attempts to purchase title to thousands of dead serfs.

      [Bookseller: Whitmore Rare Books]
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        [Two issues of the newspaper "Te Waka Maori"].Grisborne, James Grindell, 1878. 2 loose issues. Folio. With a wood engraving of a Maori war-canoe incorporating the name of the newspaper, on top of issue no. 13. No. 2 in loose folded sheets, no. 13 glued in the gutter.

      Hocken, p. 544; Williams 554; cf. Curnow e.a., “Rere Atu, Taku Manu! Discovering history, language, and politics in the Maori-language newspapers” (1842-1933). Two issues of the Maori newspaper Te Waka Maori ("the Maori canoe") from 4 September 1878 (no. 2) and 21 December 1878 (no. 13). This bilingual publication was an intent to revive the old Waka Maori which had ceased to exist in July 1877. After the fifth number "o Niu Tirani" ("of New Zealand") was removed from the title and replaced with an image of a Maori war-canoe and the caption "Hoea te Waka, ha!" ("paddle the canoe"). Only 42 issues were published of this short lived newspaper and in 1884 a further attempt was made to revive the paper.Included in no. 2 is an article on the final words of George Selwyn (1809-1878), who as bishop of Auckland was very active in converting the Maori and who is supposed to have said "E marama ana (It is light), an expression which he had often heard from the lips of dying Maories" (p. 23). A political article in no. 13, advocates the right of "Native women" owning land, to keep their possessions even after their marriage. This to avoid them losing their inheritance "through being married to spendthrift or drunken husband[s]" (p. 192).From the library of the New Zealand ornithologist Arthur Thomas Pycroft (1875-1911). Both issues in fair condition, with a horizontal fold in the middle; paper browned, spotted and with small tears near the edges. No. 2 with some tears in the inner folds, notably on the outside sheet; no. 13 with a strip of woven paper glued as an outer binding and with some holes in the pages, leading to slight loss of text.

      [Bookseller: ASHER Rare Books (Since 1830)]
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        CARTA DELL'ITALIA IN QUINDICI FOGLI, RICAVATA DALLE MIGLIORI MAPPE FINORA PUBBLICATE. Nella proporzione di 1 a 600.000 per servire di corredo alla corografia dei diversi Stati della Penisola.

      Firenze,, 1842.. Grande carta geografica dell'Italia di cm. 180x230, incorniciata. La carta, suddivisa in 15 grandi tavole inc. in rame, ciascuna di cm. 60x45 circa, comprende anche le isole di Corsica, Sardegna, Sicilia, Malta e le coste dell'Istria della Dalmazia. Incisa da V. Stanghi e G. Maina, titolo ornato in alto a destra (tav. n. 3) e il "Quadrato d'insieme" in basso a sinistra (tav. n. 13); una ricca bordura perimetrale racchiude l'intera carta ai quattro lati. Molto ben conservata.

      [Bookseller: Libreria Malavasi sas]
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        Les Ressources de Quinola EDITION ORIGINALE ENVOI AUTOGRAPHE

      Paris: Hippolyte Souverain, 1842. Fine. Hippolyte Souverain, Paris 1842, 13,5x22cm, relié. - The rare first edition.   Half caramel morocco, spine in five compartments, marbled pastedowns and endpapers, restored wrappers preserved, marbled edges. Foxed.   With an important autograph inscription signed by Honoré de Balzac to his friend Laurent-Jan, to whom Vautrin was dedicated, and the model for Bixiou, Léon de Lora and several other characters in The Human Comedy. He was at the same time Balzac's best friend, trusted secretary, ghost writer and perhaps even... "beloved." "...the singular phenomenon of the inventor who moved, in 16th century Barcelona, a vessel by steam past three hundred thousand spectators; that today we have no idea what became of him, denies this rage. But I've guessed the why, and that is [the basis of] my Comedy" (letter to Mme Hanska).   The Resources of Quinola is at the same time Scapin's Deceits and The Marriage of Figaro. Balzac's ambition from the 1840s up to his death was in essence to make a name for himself comparable to that of his illustrious predecessors. A hope as futile as it was abiding, he nonetheless never doubted his imminent success despite every setback. The author of The Human Comedy may well have thought that the principal source of humor in the work was the hero and his scathing repartee. For Balzac in fact knew this character, this fierce and eloquent harlequin, well - his name was Laurent-Jan and he was Balzac's most faithful friend in the last years of his life. Though most of their correspondence seems to have disappeared, it is thought that they met before 1835 (Albéric Second mentions a dinner in the rue Casini, where Balzac lived from 1829 to 1835). An eccentric and provocative character, Laurent-Jan had pride of place in the Bohemian life that Balzac led during these years, most notably with Léon Gozlan, Charles Lassailly, Paul Gavarni and Albéric Second, according to whom the writer "was slumming it both pleasurably and profitably" (Maurice Regard, Balzac et Laurent-Jan). All of them remained silent on the "excesses" of these tumultuous years, of which some eloquent traces have nonetheless come down to us in their correspondence; like the letter in which Balzac invites Gavarni to a soirée at Laurent-Jan's to "stretch a very well dressed chotepis a tad," signed "TicTac dit vit d'ours [TicTac, quick say bear]". Laurent-Jan was the principal organizer of these Balzacian orgies in his house at 23 rue des Martyrs, which inspired some scenes in The Human Comedy: "The seraglio, like the salon of a brothel, offered temptations for every eye and voluptuaries for every taste. There was a dancer naked under veils of silk, pretend-virgins who breathing sacral innocence, aristocratic beauties - proud and indolent, a pale and chaste Englishwoman, and young ladies starting conversations by establishing certain basic truths, such as: "Virtue we'll leave to the ugly and hunchbacked!" (cf. Hervé Manéglier, Les artistes au bordel, 1997). These crazy years coincided in Balzac's work with characters who were sexually ambivalent or clearly homosexual, like the androgynous Zambinella and Séraphita, Raphaël de Valentin, who had "a sort of effeminate grace," Louis Lambert "always gracious, like a woman in love," Lucien de Rubempré, and above all the character now considered the first homosexual in French literature: Vautrin. Seeing this particular interest for different sexualities evidenced in The Human Comedy between 1830 and 1836 (but not before or after, if Maurice Regard is to be believed), a number of commentators have been interested in Balzac's sexuality during this period, in which the author was 'with' almost all his young collaborators. Thus, S. J. Bérard and P. Citron raise the question of the surprising witticisms that run through Balzac's correspondence with his young "protégés." "You, who tell me to fuck myself...you've summed up my feelings about you perfectly - so come here, then, and get yourself fucked; and be quick about it!" he writes to Latouche. Even stranger are the formulas with which he signs off his correspondence with Eugène Sue, which are a little surprising to say the least: "Yours, in the Pineal Gland," "Yours perineally," "I admire your foreskin and I remain yours," etc. We've not found any correspondence with Laurent-Jan before 1840, at which time he writes Balzac letters commencing "Beloved," or "My darling," and ending with an explicit "I press myself against your great big chest." According to allusions by some of his contemporaries, this dual sexuality of Balzac's seems to have been well known. Albéric Second compared his male relationships to those of Nisus and Euryale, while Roger de Beauvoir gave him the nickname "Seraphinus" and Edward Allet captioned his caricature of Balzac: "the Reverend Father don Seraphitus culus mysticus Goriot...conceives...a mass of inconceivable things and ephialtesticulary incubuses," [a reference to Ephialtes, who 'took King Leonidas from behind' at Thermopylae].   For contemporary critics, however, the question of what Pierre Citron terms Balzac's "ambisexuality" remains open. Among the theories advanced by Citron, S. J. Bérard, and P. Berthier is that Balzac's relationship with Laurent-Jan (for whom we are not aware of any escapades with women) fits with a hypothesis of active or imagined homosexuality on Balzac's part. If we add that the play Vautrin is dedicated to Laurent-Jan, to thank him - Gautier writes - for having "really rolled up his sleeves", Laurent-Jan appears as one of the principal figures tied to the "shadowy areas of Balzac's psychology," (the title of Pierre Citron's study of the subject).   From 1841 on, the correspondence between Balzac and Laurent-Jan is distinctly less ambiguous and their extravagant language gives way to professions of friendship and mutual admiration right up to the Master's death on the 18th August 1850; Laurent-Jan signed his death certificate. During these final ten years, the man whom Gozlan considers "Balzac's best friend" and Philibert Audebrant "the right hand of the author of The Human Comedy," was more specifically Balzac's principal partner in his great theatrical adventure, a passion that was to consume the debt-stricken novelist in search of recognition and financial success.   Théophile Gautier tells us that in 1840, when Balzac urged Laurent-Jan, Ourliac and de Belloy to write the play Vautrin, which he had already sold to the Porte-Saint-Martin Theatre but not as yet written, only Laurent-Jan was willing: "Balzac started out by saying, when referring to Vautrin, your piece, then little by little, our piece and eventually...my piece."   Laurent-Jan nonetheless got a prestigious dedication in print, an honor he shares with a handful of illustrious contemporaries like Victor Hugo, George Sand and Eveline Hanska, to whom Balzac also dedicated works. The banning of the piece did not discourage Balzac, who persisted in his dream of making his fortune in theatre with the active and enthusiastic co-operation of Laurent-Jan, to whom the Master entrusted the writing, correction or re-writing of numerous plays and works: Lecamus, Monographie de la presse parisienne [A Monograph of the Parisian Press], Le Roi des mendiants [The Beggar King] ("a superb basis for a two-man play"), etc. "Also, you'll be getting several scripts to fill your spare time, because I want your help," Balzac wrote him from Wierzchownia in 1849. One year earlier, before leaving for Poland, Balzac made this collaboration official by means of a power of attorney for literary affairs to Lauren-Jan, dated the 19th September 1848. "I declare that I have invested Monsieur Laurent-Jan with all my powers in everything relating to literary matters...he can make additions or cuts, and any necessary changes;...in fact, he shall represent me entirely." Laurent-Jan took his task very seriously, as his many exchanges with the unhappy demiurge show. Balzac would never live to see the success he craved, as opposed to his friends Dumas and Hugo, to whom he compared himself, even during his failures. Thus, after the Resources of Quinola flopped, he wrote to Mme Hanska: "Quinola was the subject of a memorable battle, comparable to Hernani." Duly noted! On the 10th December 1849, more or less at death's door, Balzac still ties Laurent-Jan to all his projects in a letter that is admirable for its courage and hope: "Come, my friend, a little courage, and we shall board the ship of drama, good subjects in hand, to sail to the lands of Marivaux, New-Beaumarchais and New Comedy."   It is more than likely that the character of Quinola was partly inspired by this faithful friend, admired by Balzac, who signed his letters "a thousand times your friend," or "my heart is all yours," or "your respectful master, all proud of his pretend valet," (reflecting on the title Laurent-Jan gave himself). Laurent Jan, as brilliant as he was vain, never produced any work worthy of this title, but was nonetheless undoubtedly a significant source of inspiration for Balzac, who owed him a number of 'bon mots' peppering his works. In The Human Comedy, it is Bixiou and Léon de Lora above all who are directly inspired by this eccentric bohemian, but beyond these two characters (writes Maurice Regard) "many of Balzac's shadows accompany this ancient, hunched and wrinkled form: Schinner, Steinbock, Gendrin" owe him "a little bit of themselves [and] much of their spirit."     Balzac never stopped telling those who were close to him of the indefatigable affection he cherished for his "unrepentant misanthrope," who did not always enjoy a good reputation. "He's better than he seems. I, for one, love him seriously and well," (letter to Laure de Surville).   A few days before the death of her husband, Eve de Balzac recounted to his niece Sophie de Surville the transformative effects of the visits from his beloved.  "Your uncle is really much better, he's very cheerful and animated all day, and I attribute this to a good visit from our friend Laurent-Jan, who was more dazzling than ever yesterday evening - he was really fascinating and my dear patient kept repeating both yesterday and today: 'admit that no one is more spirited than that boy.'" - [FRENCH VERSION FOLLOWS] Edition originale rare.   Reliure en demi maroquin caramel, dos à cinq nerfs, contreplats et gardes de papier peigné, couvertures restaurées conservées, toutes tranches peignées. Rousseurs.   Important envoi autographe signé d'Honoré de Balzac sur la page de faux-titre à son ami Laurent-Jan, dédicataire de Vautrin, modèle de Bixiou, de Léon de Lora et de nombreux autres personnages de La Comédie humaine. Il fut pour Balzac à la fois son meilleur ami, son secrétaire fondé de pouvoir, son nègre littéraire et peut-être même... son « dilectus ».   « ... le singulier fait de l'inventeur qui fit manœuvrer à Barcelone, au XVIème siècle un vaisseau par la vapeur, et qui le coula devant trois cent mille spectateurs sans qu'on sache ce qu'il est devenu, ni le pourquoi de cette rage. Mais j'ai deviné le pourquoi et c'est ma comédie. » (lettre à Mme Hanska)   Les Ressources de Quinola, c'est tout à la fois Les Fourberies de Scapin et Les Noces de Figaro. L'ambition de Balzac à partir des années 1840 et jusqu'à sa mort fut en effet de conquérir une renommée semblable à celle de ses illustres prédécesseurs. Espoir aussi vain que tenace, il ne douta pourtant jamais, échec après échec, de l'imminence de son succès. Peut-être l'auteur de La Comédie humaine pensait-il que le principal ressort comique tient au personnage principal et à ses réparties cinglantes. Or justement, ce personnage, cet arlequin féroce et éloquent, Balzac le connaissait bien, il se nommait Laurent-Jan et ce fut le plus proche et le plus fidèle ami des dernières années de sa vie.  Bien que la majeure partie de leur correspondance semble avoir disparu, on estime que leur rencontre est antérieure à 1835. (Albéric Second fait mention d'un diner rue Cassini où Balzac demeura de 1829 à 1835).   Personnage excentrique et provocateur, Laurent-Jan occupe une place de choix dans la vie de bohème que Balzac mène durant ces années avec notamment Léon Gozlan, Charles Lassailly, Paul Gavarni et Albéric Second, auprès desquels l'écrivain « s'encanaille avec plaisir et profit » (Maurice Regard, Balzac et Laurent-Jan). Tous sont restés discrets sur les « excès » de ces années tumultueuses dont on conserve pourtant d'éloquentes traces dans leurs correspondances, comme cette missive dans laquelle Balzac invite Gavarni à une soirée chez Laurent-Jan pour « [s]'élonger un brin une chotepis très bien habillée » signée « TicTac dit vit d'ours ». Laurent-Jan fut le principal organisateur de ces orgies balzaciennes, dans sa demeure du 23 rue des Martyrs,  qui ont inspirées quelques scènes de la Comédie Humaine : « Le sérail offrait comme le salon d'un bordel des séductions pour tous les yeux et des voluptés pour tous les caprices. Il y avait une danseuse nue sous des voiles de soie, des vierges factices, mais qui respiraient une religieuse innocence, des beautés aristocratiques, fières mais indolentes, une anglaise blanche et chaste des jeunes filles engageant la conversation en assénant quelques vérités premières comme : - La vertu, nous la laissons aux laides et aux bossues ! » (cf. Hervé Manéglier, Les artistes au bordel, 1997) Ces années folles coïncident dans l'œuvre de Balzac avec la création de personnages sexuellement ambivalents ou clairement homosexuels comme Zambinella et Séraphita les androgynes, Raphaël de Valentin qui a « une sorte de grâce efféminée », Louis Lambert, « toujours gracieux comme une femme qui aime », Lucien de Rubempré, et surtout celui que l'on considère aujourd'hui comme le premier homosexuel de la littérature française : Vautrin. Au regard de cet intérêt particulier pour les différentes formes de sexualité dont témoigne La Comédie humaine durant les années 1830 à 1836 (ni avant, ni après si l'on en croit Maurice Regard), de nombreux critiques se sont intéressés à la sexualité de Balzac durant cette période lors de laquelle l'écrivain connut la presque totalité de ses jeunes collaborateurs. Ainsi S. J. Bérard et P. Citron s'interrogent-ils sur les surprenantes saillies qui parsèment la correspondance de Balzac avec ses jeunes « protégés ». « Vous qui m'envoyez faire foutre [...], vous me prenez [...] par le sentiment que j'ai pour vous, venez donc vous faire foutre ici ; et au plus vite » écrit-il à Latouche. Plus étranges encore, ses correspondances avec Eugène Sue se concluent par des formules pour le moins étonnantes : « à vous de glande pinéale » ; « à vous de périnée » ; « j'admire votre prépuce et je suis le vôtre » ...   On n'a retrouvé aucune correspondance avec Laurent-Jan avant 1840, mais à cette date, celui-ci lui adresse des lettres s'ouvrant sur un « très aimé » ou « mon chéri » et s'achevant par un explicite « je me presse sur ton gros sein ». D'après les allusions de certains de ses contemporains, la double sexualité de Balzac semble avérée. Albéric Second compare ses relations masculines à celles de Nisus et Euryale,  Roger de Beauvoir le surnomme « Seraphitus », et Edward Allet légende sa caricature de Balzac : « le R.P. dom Seraphitus culus mysticus Goriot (...) conçoit (...)  une foule de choses inconcevables et d'incubes éphialtesticulaires. » [Référence à Ephialte qui prit à Revers Léonidas aux Thermopyles].   Pour les critiques actuels en revanche, la question de ce que Pierre Citron nomme « l'ambisexualité » de Balzac, reste posée. Parmi les hypothèses avancées par P. Citron, S. J. Bérard ou P. Berthier, les relations de Balzac avec Laurent-Jan, auquel on ne connaîtra pas d'aventures féminines, concordent avec l'hypothèse d'une homosexualité active ou fantasmée de Balzac. Si l'on ajoute que la pièce Vautrin est dédiée à Laurent-Jan - pour le remercier, écrira Gautier, d'avoir « sérieusement mis la main à la pâte » - Laurent-Jan apparaît comme une des principales figures liées aux « zones obscures de la psychologie de Balzac » (titre de l'étude que Pierre Citron consacre à ce sujet). à partir de 1841, la correspondance entre Balzac et Laurent-Jan s'avère moins ambiguë, et les excès de langage font place aux déclarations d'amitié et d'admiration réciproques jusqu'à la mort du Maître dont Laurent-Jan signe le 18 août 1850 l'acte de décès. Durant ces dix dernières années, celui que Gozlan considérait comme le « meilleur ami de Balzac » et Philibert Audebrant comme  « le bras droit de l'auteur de La Comédie humaine » fut plus particulièrement le principal partenaire de Balzac dans sa grande aventure théâtrale, passion qui allait consumer le romancier endetté en quête de reconnaissance et de succès financier.   Théophile Gautier relate qu'en 1840, lorsque Balzac le convie avec Laurent-Jan, Ourliac et de Belloy à lui écrire la pièce Vautrin qu'il a déjà vendue au théâtre de la Porte-Saint-Martin mais pas encore composée, seul Laurent-Jan se prête au jeu : « Balzac a commencé par me dire, en parlant de Vautrin, votre pièce puis, peu à peu, notre pièce et enfin... ma pièce. »   Laurent-Jan héritera toutefois d'une prestigieuse dédicace imprimée, un honneur qu'il partage avec quelques illustres contemporains dont Victor Hugo, George Sand ou Eveline Hanska, auxquels Balzac dédia également certaines de ses œuvres. L'interdiction de la pièce ne décourage pas Balzac qui persiste dans son rêve de fortune théâtrale, avec la collaboration active et enthousiaste de Laurent-Jan auquel le Maître confie l'écriture, la correction ou la réécriture de nombreuses pièces et ouvrages : Lecamus, Monographie de la presse parisienne, Le Roi des mendiants (« un scénario superbe pour une pièce à deux »), etc. « Aussi recevras-tu plusieurs scénarios qui pourront occuper tes loisirs, car je veux ta collaboration » lui écrit Balzac de Wierzchownia en 1849. L'année précédente, avant son départ en Pologne, Balzac avait officialisé cette collaboration par une procuration littéraire à Laurent-Jan établie le 19 septembre 1848 : « Je déclare avoir investi Monsieur Laurent-Jan de tous mes pouvoirs, en tout ce qui concerne la littérature. [...] Il pourra faire les coupures ou les ajouts, enfin tous les changements nécessaires ; [...] Enfin il me représentera entièrement. » Laurent-Jan accomplira sa mission avec le plus grand sérieux comme en témoignent ses multiples échanges avec le malheureux démiurge. Balzac ne connaîtra jamais le succès espéré, contrairement à ses amis Dumas et Hugo auxquels il se compare pourtant, même dans l'échec. Ainsi, après le four des Ressources de Quinola, écrit-il à Mme Hanska : « Quinola a été l'objet d'une bataille mémorable, semblable à celle d'Hernani. » Dont acte ! Le 10 décembre 1849, c'est un Balzac presque mourant qui associe encore Laurent-Jan à tous ses projets dans une lettre admirable de courage et d'espoir : « Allons mon ami, encore un peu de courage, et nous nous embarquerons sur la galère dramatique avec de bons sujets, pour aller vers les terres de Marivaux, de New-Beaumarchais, et de la nouvelle Comédie ».   Il est très probable que le personnage de Quinola soit en partie inspiré de cet ami fidèle et admiré de Balzac qui concluait ses lettres de « mille amitiés » ; « tout à toi de cœur » ou « ton maître respectueux et fier de son prétendu valet » (en réponse au titre que s'attribuait Laurent-Jan).  Cet homme d'un esprit aussi brillant que vain ne produisit aucune œuvre digne de ce nom mais fut sans doute une source d'inspiration considérable pour Balzac qui lui doit nombre de « bons mots » ponctuant ses œuvres. Dans La Comédie humaine en particulier, Bixiou et Léon de Lora, sont directement inspirés de ce bohème excentrique, mais au-delà de ces deux personnages, écrit Maurice Regard : « Bien des ombres balzaciennes accompagnent ce vieux corps bossu et sec : Schinner, Steinbock, Gendrin » lui doivent « un peu d'eux même [et] beaucoup de leur esprit ».   Balzac n'aura de cesse de communiquer à ses proches l'indéfectible affection qu'il éprouve pour son « misanthrope sans repentir » qui n'eut pas toujours bonne presse. « Il vaut mieux que ses apparences. Moi je l'aime beaucoup et sérieusement » (lettre à Laure de Surville).   Quelques jours avant la mort de son mari, Eve de Balzac rapportait encore à sa nièce Sophie de Surville, l'effet salvateur des visites de son dilectus.  « Votre oncle va beaucoup mieux, il a été fort gai, fort animé, toute la journée, et je l'attribue à une bonne visite de notre ami Laurent-Jan, qui a été plus éblouissant que jamais hier soir - il nous a fasciné véritablement, et mon cher malade a répété plusieurs fois hier et aujourd'hui : « avouez qu'on n'a pas plus d'esprit que ce garçon ».  

      [Bookseller: Librairie Le Feu Follet]
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        Scènes De La Vie Privée Et Publique Des Animaux…

      Paris: J.Hetzel Et Paulin, 1842., 1842. 2 Volumes. large 8vo. pp. 4 p.l., 386, [6]; 2 p.l., 390, [6]. with half-titles. 201 wood-engraved plates (incl 2 additional titles), numerous head & tailpieces, initials, & vignettes by Brévière & others after designs by Grandville. contemporary half chagrin (bit rubbed, spines faded, occasional light foxing – first few leaves in each vol. more heavily affected). First Edition. "The moving force behind this book was its publisher P.-J. Hetzel, who himself contributed many chapters under the pseudonym of P.-J. Stahl…Through Grandville’s animals, Hetzel and his colleagues offered a witty and telling commentary on contemporary politics and personalities. Bouchot described the result as the best satire on French manners during the middle of the century, recalling "the anger to which it gave rise, the outbursts of laughter it provoked and the lawsuits of which it ran the risk." These allusions pass largely unnoticed today, but Grandville’s animals remain as amusing as ever, thanks to the wit and verve of his compositions. The types and situations he depicts are indeed "of every period and every country." "The final plate shows the artist at the zoo of the Jardin des Plantes. He is sketching the visiting creatures who in turn are peering at cages containing Hetzel, Balzac, Jules Janin, and other authors of the Scènes de la vie privée et publique des animaux. It should be noted that the engravings for this book are by Brévière, the one craftsman whose renderings of his work Grandville refused to criticize." (Ray) Carteret III 553. Ray, The Art Of The French Illustrated Book 1700 to 1914, 194 (citing incorrect number of plates).. 1st Edition. Hardcover. Very Good.

      [Bookseller: D & E Lake Ltd. (ABAC, ILAB)]
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        Scènes de la vie privée et publique des animaux EDITION ORIGINALE

      à Paris: Chez Hetzel et Paulin, 1842. Fine. Chez Hetzel et Paulin, à Paris 1842, 18x26,5cm, 386pp. et 390pp., 2 volumes reliés. - first edition, illustrated with 201 figures inset and 120 vignettes by Grandville. Binders half red shagreen with corners ca 1860. Back to bands decorated. 3 rubbed corners. Sheet 123 of Volume 1 and detaching emerged. Top right corner of Volume 2 scuffed 2cm. Some very rare and pale foxing on a good white paper. Nice copy. No need to introduce this famous publication satire of contemporary society of the Second Empire, whose company is due to Hetzel, who under the pseudonym Stahl signed several texts and commissioned texts to famous feathers of the time Balzac, Musset, Sand, the BEDOLLIERE ... the last chapter recounts the imprisonment of various writers that one can see in different locations garden plants. One of the great works of imagination of Grandville, full of verve and imagination. - [FRENCH VERSION FOLLOWS] Edition originale, illustrée de 201 figures hors-texte et de 120 vignettes par Grandville.  Reliures en demi maroquin rouge à coins de chagrin ca 1860. Dos à nerfs ornés. Têtes dorées. 3 coins frottés. Des traces de frottements à un nerf et à certaines bordures. Feuillet 123 du tome 1 se détachant et ressorti. Coin droit haut du tome 2 éraflé sur 2cm. Quelques très rares et pâles rousseurs sur un papier bien blanc.  Bel exemplaire. On ne présente plus cette publication célèbre, satire de la société contemporaine parisienne du Second empire, dont l'entreprise est due à Hetzel, qui sous le pseudonyme de Stahl a signé plusieurs textes et a commandé des textes aux plumes les plus célèbres de l'époque : Balzac, Musset, Sand, La Bedollière... Le dernier chapitre raconte l'emprisonnement des différents écrivains que l'on peut voir dans différents emplacements au Jardin des plantes. Une des grandes oeuvres d'imagination de Grandville, pleine de verve et de fantaisie.  

      [Bookseller: Librairie Le Feu Follet]
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        VIE PRIVEE ET PUBLIQUE DES ANIMAUX

      1842 . (Grandville)illus. VIE PRIVEE ET PUBLIQUE DES ANIMAUX by Balzac et al. Paris, 1842 (1st ed). 2 vols, 4to., Original pictorial boards, 386 and 390pp., plus tables of contents, 210 illustrations on engraved plates hors texte and 120 vignettes, in-texte. One of the great illustrated books. Social satire in which animals play human roles. Grandville's mastery at presenting animals with convincing human expressions, poses, and costumes has been imitated, but never equalled. Very unusual in the pictorial boards. Light wear to the board edges and hinges, expert repair to inner hinges, else a very nice copy.

      [Bookseller: A FINE THING: Edward T. Pollack Fine Art]
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        Scenes de la Vie Privee et Publique des Animaux

      Paris: J. Hetzel et Paulin, 1842. First edition. Minor rubbing or scuffing to edges, scattered light foxing, but a very clean and tight copy, near fine. 2 volumes, contemporary full dark green morocco with richly gilt spines, morocco lettering pieces, marbled endpapers, all eges gilt; [8], 386, [6] pp. and [96] leaves of plates; [4], 390, [6] pp. and [108] leaves of plates, profusely. Originally published in 99 parts, this is the first book edition. Ray, The French Illustrated Book 194.

      [Bookseller: Chanticleer Books]
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        Scènes de la Vie Privée et Publique des Animaux. Études de Moeurs Contemporaines publiées sous la direction de M. P.-J. Stahl.

      Paris: J. Hetzel, 1842. 2 volumes. First edition. 201 engraved plates plus illustrations in text by Grandville, engreved by his preferred engraver Brévière. 4to., bound by Plow of Boston, Lincolnshire in half maroon morocco with marbled paper boards, edges and endpapers, spines decorated in gilt. Worn with repairs to upper joints, but still good strong copies. Booklabel of James Lloyd and Plow binder's tickets. Stahl was a pseudonym for the publisher Hetzel who edited texts by Balzac Jules Janin, George Sand and others to go with Grandville's superb engravings. It was seen as a great satire on French manners of the the middle nineteenth century

      [Bookseller: SOPHIE SCHNEIDEMAN RARE BOOKS]
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        Scènes de la vie privée et publique des animaux. Etudes des moeurs contemporaines publiées sous la direction de M. P.-L. Stahl.

      Paris, Hetzel 1842.. 2 vols. 4°. 6 Bll., 386 S., 4 Bll.; 4 Bll, 390 S., 3 Bll. Mit zahlr, tlw. ganaszeit. Holzst. v. J. J. Grandville. OLn. m. Rückengoldpräg. Leicht berieb. EA Sander 312; Rümann 312; Vicaire VII, 405 - Avec la collaboration de Balzac, Louis Baude, Émile de la Bédollière, P. Bernard, Gustave Droz, Benjamin Franklin, Jules Janin, Édouard Lemoine Alfred de Musset, Paul de Musset, Mme. Menessier-Nodier, Charles Nodier, George Sand, Louis Viardot.

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Burgverlag]
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        Alcorani textus universus ex correctioribus Arabum exemplaribus summa fide, . Eadem fide, . in Latinum translatus; appositis unicuique capiti notis, atque refutatione: .[vol. 2 title:] Refutatio Alcorani, in qua ad Mahumetanicae superstitionis radicem securis apponitur; .Padova, Typographia Seminaria, 1698. 2 volumes bound as 1. Folio (35.5 x 25 cm). Blind-tooled vellum (ca. 1800?), reusing and retooling vellum from a slightly earlier blind-tooled binding.

      - Cat. Bibl. A.-R. Courbonne, dont la vent . 1er février 1842, 30 (this copy); 34; Schnurrer 377; Sheikh Al-Shabab, "The place of Marracci’s Latin translation of the Holy Quran: .", in: Journal of King Saud University: language & tanslation, 13 (2001), pp. 57-74. The first scholarly printed Quran, prepared by the anti-Islamic Catholic Ludovico Marracci, with a much more accurate Arabic text than any previously printed and the first accurate Latin translation, also including extensive notes based on the Islamic commentaries, as well as the editor's extensive "refutations" of each sutra. Each sura is given first in Arabic, then in Latin translation, followed by notes and then the refutation. The entire first volume of about 430 pages is taken up with preliminary matter, including a 24-page life of Muhammad (one of the first detailed biographies ever printed and again more accurate than its predecessors), an 8-page profession of faith with the Arabic and Latin in parallel columns, and additional commentaries and introductory matter. The fact that this edition was produced explicitly as an attempt to refute the views of Islam has naturally led Islamic scholars to dismiss it, but both the Arabic text and the Latin translation were far better than any previously printed and had no serious rival until the Leipzig edition of 1834. The commentaries also made a great deal of Islamic scholarship available to a European audience for the first time and both the Arabic and the Latin text influenced nearly every edition for the next 150 years.With two bookplates and an occasional early manuscript note and a few letters or numbers inscribed in the foot margin of one leaf. With a tear running into the text of one leaf, repaired, but otherwise in very good condition. With generous margins. The boards are slightly bowed and there is a small tear repaired at the foot of the spine. A ground-breaking work of Quranic scholarship, a valuable source for the study of the Quran and an essential source for European views of Islam. [Attributes: Soft Cover]

      [Bookseller: Antiquariaat FORUM BV]
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        12 eigenh. Briefe m. Unterschrift.

      Zus. 36 S., 8 bis 4. Eugène Lachat trat mit 17 Jahren in den Orden der Missionare vom Kostbaren Blut ein und wurde am 24. September 1842 zum Priester geweiht. Nachdem er am 26. Februar 1863 zum Bischof von Basel gewählt worden war, bestätigte Papst Pius IX. die Wahl am 26. Oktober desselben Jahres. Die Bischofsweihe spendete ihm am 30. November 1863 der damalige Bischof von Strassburg, Andreas Räss, in der Kathedrale Solothurn. Lachat wurde im Zuge des Kulturkampfes am 29. Januar 1873 von den Diözesanständen Aargau, Solothurn, Bern, Basel-Landschaft und Thurgau von seinem Amt abgesetzt, während ihn Luzern und Zug weiterhin als rechtmässigen Bischof betrachteten (Wikipedia). 1863 erschien in Paris eine über 300 Seiten umfassende Monographie über Lachat von Edouard Hornstein (Biographie de Monseigneur Lachat eveque de Bale). - Der Empfänger der auf Französisch abgefassten Briefe ist Jacques (Jacob) Mislin (1807-1878). Der aus ärmlichen Verhältnissen stammende Mislin konnte dank seines Onkels an der berühmten Lehranstalt von Porrentruy im Schweizer Kanton Bern studieren, wo er nicht viel später auch selbst unterrichten sollte. Der 1830 zum Priester geweihte kath. Theologe wurde 1836 auf Vermittlung des Grafen von Bombelle an den Wiener Hof berufen, wo er einer der Lehrer der Söhne von Erzherzog Franz Karl und Erzherzogin Sophie wurde und damit sowohl den zukünftigen Kaiser Franz Joseph wie auch Erzherzog Ferdinand Maximilian (später Kaiser Max von Mexiko) unterrichtete (u.a. auch in Erdkunde). Vor der Revolution von 1848 unternahm Mislin eine Pilgerreise von Wien über Budapest und Konstantinopel nach Jersusalem. Der danach erschienene Reisebericht wurde in mehrere Sprachen übersetzt und mehrfach nachgedruckt. In den folgenden Jahren leitete er die Bibliothek am Hof der Herzogin von Parma, Erzherzogin Marie Louise, wurde zum Abt von St. Maria von Deg (Ungarn), geheimer Kämmerer u. Hausprälat Papst Pius' XI., Apostolischer Pronotar, Kanoniker der Kathedrale von Großwardein, Träger zahlr. Orden (u.a. von Spanien, Parma u. des Ritterordens vom Heiligen Grab zu Jerusalem) sowie Mitglied zahlr. Akademien. Der Verfasser zahlr. Publikationen und Vertraute des belgischen Königs und des Grafen von Chambord blieb nach der Rückkehr von seiner Pilgerreise in Wien, wo er weiterhin in persönlichem Kontakt mit dem Kaiserhaus stand. - In einem numerierten, von Mislin eigenh. beschrifteten Papierumschlag. -

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Wolfgang Friebes]
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        22 eigenh. Briefe m. Unterschrift.

      Zus. 64 S., 8 bis 4. Bourquenoud entre dans la Compagnie, le 1er octobre 1842. Aprés la révolution de 1847, il enseigna les humanités á Namur, acheva ses études théologiques à Rome et se rendit en Syrie pour étudier les langues orientales. De retour en Europe, il enseigna lEcriture sainte à Paderborn, et repartit en 1863 pour Ghazir, ou il mourut le 25 octobre 1868 (De Backer/S. II, 41). - Bourquenoud ist Verfasser der Schriften Mémoire sur les monuments du culte d'Adonis dans le territoire de Palaebiblos (1861), Mémoire sur les ruines de Séleucie de Piérie ou Séleucie de Syrie (1860), Les distractions de M. Renan (1863), Études archéologiques de Ghazir voyage dans le Liban et dans l'Anti-Liban (1864) u.a. - Der Empfänger der auf Französisch abgefassten Briefe ist Jacques (Jacob) Mislin (1807-1878). Der aus ärmlichen Verhältnissen stammende Mislin konnte dank seines Onkels an der berühmten Lehranstalt von Porrentruy im Schweizer Kanton Bern studieren, wo er nicht viel später auch selbst unterrichten sollte. Der 1830 zum Priester geweihte kath. Theologe wurde 1836 auf Vermittlung des Grafen von Bombelle an den Wiener Hof berufen, wo er einer der Lehrer der Söhne von Erzherzog Franz Karl und Erzherzogin Sophie wurde und damit sowohl den zukünftigen Kaiser Franz Joseph wie auch Erzherzog Ferdinand Maximilian (später Kaiser Max von Mexiko) unterrichtete (u.a. auch in Erdkunde). Vor der Revolution von 1848 unternahm Mislin eine Pilgerreise von Wien über Budapest und Konstantinopel nach Jersusalem. Der danach erschienene Reisebericht wurde in mehrere Sprachen übersetzt und mehrfach nachgedruckt. In den folgenden Jahren leitete er die Bibliothek am Hof der Herzogin von Parma, Erzherzogin Marie Louise, wurde zum Abt von St. Maria von Deg (Ungarn), geheimer Kämmerer u. Hausprälat Papst Pius' XI., Apostolischer Pronotar, Kanoniker der Kathedrale von Großwardein, Träger zahlr. Orden (u.a. von Spanien, Parma u. des Ritterordens vom Heiligen Grab zu Jerusalem) sowie Mitglied zahlr. Akademien. Der Verfasser zahlr. Publikationen und Vertraute des belgischen Königs und des Grafen von Chambord blieb nach der Rückkehr von seiner Pilgerreise in Wien, wo er weiterhin in persönlichem Kontakt mit dem Kaiserhaus stand. - In einem numerierten, von Mislin eigenh. beschrifteten Papierumschlag. - Vereinzelt m. Randläsuren bzw. -einrissen. - Beiliegend 3 Briefe von fremder Hand. -

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Wolfgang Friebes]
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        Martin's Civil Costume of England from the Conquest to the Present Time and Hope's Costume of the Ancients

      London: Henry G. Bohn, 1842, London - Decorative Cloth. Good-fair. First Edition. History. all plates loose, but undamaged, needs rebinding, 61 etchings by Leopold Martin plus 25 etchings of Hopes Costumes of the Ancients, library marks from Maine Genealogical Society # 381, spine bumped, scarce copy [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Open Door Books]
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        Natural History of the Insects of India, containing upwards of two hundred and twenty figures and descriptions .

      Henry G. Bohn, London 1842 - A New Edition. 58 hand-coloured plates. 102pp. Printed by J. Davy Queen Street (now Shorts Gardens), Seven Dials. 4to. Nissen ZBI 1143 Publisher's orange cloth, spine neatly laid down 58 hand-coloured plates. 102pp. Printed by J. Davy Queen Street (now Shorts Gardens), Seven Dials. 4to

      [Bookseller: James Cummins Bookseller, ABAA]
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        POKHOZHDENIYA CHICHIKOVA, ILI MERTVYYA DUSHI: POEMA [THE ADVENTURES OF CHICHIKOV, OR DEAD SOULS. A POEM]

      Moscow: University Press, 1842. First edition. Gogol's masterpiece, a classic of nineteenth-century Russian literature, and one of his works satirising the Russian character, as he also did with Revizor [The Government Inspector]. Volume one only (as issued), 8vo (233 x 150mm.), half-title, later calf-backed brown buckram, lettered in gilt on spine, without wrappers, occasional light staining, pp.251-254 bound upside down, but generally an excellent copy. There was a second volume, published after Gogol's death by his heirs in 1855; although he had burned the second volume, there were sufficient drafts remaining for the volume to be recomposed, and the planned third volume had never been written. Gogol's "Dead Souls" sits high within the pantheon of Russian literature. It was written as a social satire, a modern "Inferno" in prose. The novel is complex, yet highly amusing as it follows the gregarious and immoral Tchitchikoff on his quest throughout the Russian countryside in attempts to purchase title to thousands of dead serfs.

      [Bookseller: Whitmore Rare Books]
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        Polled Angus Breed

      London: [Wilson & Ogilvie for] Longman, Orme, Brown, Green, and Longmans, 1842. Hand-coloured lithograph by Fairland from a drawing by William Nicholson, after a painting by William Shiels. Very good condition. A beautiful and carefully observed portrait of one of the most historically important breeds of cow, from David Low's "The Breeds of the Domestic Animals of the British Islands," a famous pioneering work illustrating the forerunners of all of today's most important breeds of horses, cows, sheep and pigs. David Low, professor of Agriculture at Edinburgh University, produced these beautiful lithographs as a reference for those interested in the infant science of selective breeding. He was concerned that the majority of farmers or breeders did not understand the relatively simple concept of matching a breed to its environment to improve its productivity. With the help of a government grant from Earl Spencer, Low set up the agricultural museum in Edinburgh. The artist William Shiels of the Royal Scottish Academy was commissioned to produce a series of paintings of all the significant breeds of economic significance in Great Britain at the time. These paintings were then used as the basis for Low's important work. Cf. BM(NH) III, p.1184; cf. Mellon, Books on the Horse and Horsemanship, 168; cf. Nissen, ZBI, 2564; cf. Wood, p.442.

      [Bookseller: Donald Heald Rare Books]
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        The ports, harbours, watering-places, and coast scenery of Great Britain (2 Bände, komplett). Illustrated by views taken on the spot, by W.H. Bartlett; with descriptions by William Beattie, M.D.

      London, G. Virtue, 1842. 4°. 28 cm. 190, 155 Seiten. Halblederbände mit goldgeprägtem Rückentitel und marmorierten Deckelbezügen. 1. Auflage. Englischsprachige Ausgabe. Mit zahlreichen Abbildungen. Einbände stärker berieben, Kanten bestoßen. Seiten stockfleckig. Innenfalzen gerissen. Privater Namenseintrag auf Vorsatz. Gute Exemplare. First edition. English language edition. With many illustrations. Cover rubbed, Cut edges bumped. Pages spotted. Private inscription on flying endpaper. Good copies. Versand D: 4,90 EUR Geografie / Geographie / geography

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Lenzen GbR]
 26.   Check availability:     buchfreund.de     Link/Print  


        Fauna Japonica sive descriptio animalium, quae in itinere per Japoniam, jussu et auspiciis superiorum, qui summum in India Batava imperium tenent, suscepto, annis 1825 - 1830 collegit, notis, observationibus et adumbrationibus illustravit Ph. Fr. de Siebold. Conjunctis studiis C. J. Temminck et H. Schlegel pro vertebratis atque W. de Haan pro invertebratis elaborata. Pisces.

      - Leiden, A. Arnz, [1842]-1850 [REPRINT Tokyo, after 1945]. Folio (37.0 x 29.2 cm; box size: 45 x 32.5 x 10 cm). Decorated title page, 2, 345 pp.; 161 mostly coloured plates. Original half calf over red cloth boards. Spine with six raised bands, rich gilt compartments and gilt title. Top edge gilt. Preserved in a burgundy cloth clamshell box with printed title (in Japanese) on marbled paper, pasted on the top board, and a second label tipped in inside on the bottom.l A fine fascimile reprint of the original edition (Lugduni Batavorum, 1842-1850) which was written by Von Siebold in collaboration with Schlegel and Temminck. The latter two authors are usually regarded as authors of the new species described herein. This edition was edited by S. Tanaka. It is not the Matsumura, 1934 edition, but a second reprint. The plates are of great quality and the entire volume is in near fine condition. This publication was limited to 350 copies and sold out fast; it is very hard to find now. The colour plates, a fine example of Japanese multicolour printing, have been checked against the originals and found to be identical. Cordier, p. 480; Dean II, p. 448; Nissen ZBI, 3848. [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Antiquariaat Schierenberg]
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        The life of a sportsman. By Nimrod. With thirty-six coloured illustrations by Henry Alken.

      - London, Rudolph Ackermann, 1842. Large 8vo (23.6 x 15.1 cm). viii, 402, [ii] pp., 36 full colour plates. Full scarlet morocco; boards with triple gilt-lined border; broad, rich gilt inner dentelles with minute name of the bookbinder; spine with five raised gilt-stippled bands, compartments with rich gilt floral patterns, title and author. Marbled endpapers, all edges gilt. Original cloth covers and spine mounted and bound in the rear.l A superbly bound copy, bound by Riviere & Son, of the first edition. The English (Huguenot descent) Robert Riviere (1808-1882) was renowned for the fine quality of his bindings: "The excellent workmanship and good taste displayed in his bindings gradually won for them the appreciation of connoisseurs, and he was largely employed by the Duke of Devonshire, Samuel Christie-Miller, Captain Francis Capper Brooke and other great collectors. He also bound for the queen and the royal family. In the Great Exhibition of 1851 he exhibited several examples of his skill, and he obtained a medal." (Wikipedia). The work itself ranks among the best-illustrated sporting books of the early to mid-19th century. "Considered by many to be the premier coloured plate sporting book" (Tooley). Four plates printed on India paper and mounted on plate paper; something that has been recorded more often. Quite peculiar: the original linen spine and boards (front board with gilt vignette) are preserved and tipped in on extra blanks in the rear. A clean, near mint copy. Schwerdt, I, p. 37; Tooley, 65. [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Antiquariaat Schierenberg]
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        Wien 1818 - 1887). Die nähende Schönheit. Öl auf Leinwand. Um 1850. Unten rechts signiert. 46 x 38 cm. Im braunen Holzrahmen.

      Schweninger, Vater von Carl Schweninger d. J. und Rosa Schweninger, studierte an der Wiener Akademie der bildenden Künste. Seit 1842 zeigte er seine Werke in der Akademie am St. Annahof und zehn Jahre später nahm er regelmäßig an deren Monatsausstellungen des Wiener Kunstvereins teil. Für den Empfangssalon des k.k. Hofes am Wiener Nordbahnhof schuf er acht Fresken mit Darstellungen alpiner Landschaften. Neben großformatigen Ölgemälden von diesen Alpenlandschaften fertigte er auch Genre- und Aktbilder.- Auf der Terassenbrüstung sitzendes nähendes Mädchen im weißen Kleid, vor ihr ein schlafender Hund und ein Stuhl mit Korb darauf, im Hintergrund hinter grünen Wiesen ein Dorf vor Gebirgssilhouette.- Am rechten und linken Bildrand (jeweils ca. 1 cm breit) dunkler Firnis (?).- Dabei: Expertise mit Stempel vom Antiquitäten-Geschäft Martha Srna-Modlitby aus Wien.- Aus der Sammlung Häusler, Kiel.-

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Daniel Schramm e.K.]
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        Cribb

      [London: J. Moore, 1842.]. Hand colored engraving of the famous English bare knuckle boxer Tom Cribb, who became world champion in 1810 and retired with the title. Anonymous engraving with no place or date, but after 1811 (image is taken from a larger work, "The Second Contest between Cribb and Molineaux," which took place in September 1811). The engraving is mounted, and the mount is faded and tattered at the edges. There is a long stain on the front of the mount that continues about an inch into the image, but does not seriously deface it. Aside from this, the engraving itself is in Very Good condition.

      [Bookseller: Alan Wofsy Fine Arts]
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        AUTOGRAPH LETTER SIGNED FROM NEW YORK, 25 MARCH 1843, TO NEW YORK ATTORNEY GEORGE GRIFFIN, CONGRATULATING GRIFFIN ON HIS SUCCESSFUL DEFENSE OF ALEXANDER SLIDELL MACKENZIE, COMMANDER OF THE BRIG SOMERS.

      - Folded folio sheet, consisting of a single manuscript page, followed by two blanks and a final page addressed to Griffin at 65 Merchants Exchange, New York, with remnant of red wax seal. Old folds from mailing, Very Good. Chancellor Kent, the most influential American jurist of the 19th century after Chief Justice Marshall, wrote this letter to another 19th century legal giant, George Griffin. Kent congratulates Griffin on his brilliant defense of Commander Alexander Slidell Mackenzie, who had commanded the Brig Somers. In 1842 Mackenzie set out for the Africa Squadron. During the passage, plans for a mutiny were discovered, with the intention to kill the officers and convert the ship into a piratical vessel. Mackenzie ordered the summary execution of three crew members, one of whom, Philip Spencer, was the son of President Tyler's Secretary of War. The incident sparked an explosive controversy. A Court of Inquiry was convened. Kent writes that Griffin accomplished "one of the most admirable forensic arguments I ever read for its fervent, energetic & elegant style, its noble sentiments, its clear & skilful arrangement, & for its close & irresistible logic. It is a question of life or death to the future character & efficiency of the Navy." In a long and distinguished career, Griffin is best known for his successful defense of Mackenzie. Griffin's obituary in the New York Times [May 7, 1860] called him "an active member of the bar of this City, in the full height of practice for just half a century. Few lawyers of his day achieved greater triumphs at the bar; his fame as an advocate being coextensive with the legal history of the country. Some of his eloquent jury speeches have been enrolled among those specimens of American eloquence which are daily declaimed by students in our Academies and Colleges as specimens of impassioned eloquence. He practiced with a race of legal giants. His daily competitors were men of the highest legal attainments, and of the most commanding powers of eloquence."

      [Bookseller: David M. Lesser, ABAA]
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        Gesamtansicht.

      - Lithographie aus Borussia, 1842, 14 x 21

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Norbert Haas]
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        Gemalde von Nord-Amerika in allen Beziehungen von der Entdeckung au bis auf die neueste Zeit

      J. Scheible. Good. 1842. B0042PA7FC Good. (Binding: Hardcover, Jacket: No Jacket) Half-leather, 23 cm, vol. I, 800 pages. + engraved 38 plates; vol. II, 796 pages. + engraved 39 plates. First published in parts, 1837-41? (cf. Hinrichs) Also appeared under title: 'Des universums Neue welt: Nord-Amerika, in allen beziehungen geschldert,' 1838-42. (cf. Kayser; Hinrichs; Sabin) The first volume was also issued with title: 'Nordamerika's bewohner, sch_nheiten und naturschFtze im allgemeinen und die brittischen besitzungen insbesondere,' 1839. This latter title is here reissued in expanded form as vol. I, with the unique issue of vol. II. Sabin 8204. Full and correct reference is Thomas D. Clark's Travels in the Old South, volume 3, entry 16 (5) p. 25. Good copy with only only slight discoloration of paper and some light foxing. Attractive binding. . B0042PA7FC .

      [Bookseller: Moe's Books]
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        A Discourse on the Hope of Israel delivered on the seventeenth Anniversary of the dedication of the synagogue Mikveh Israel, on Sabbath, the 4th of Shebat, 5602

      published by request. Philadelphia: Printed by C. Sherman., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 1842 - OCLC: Libraries worldwide that own item: 1 [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Meir Turner]
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        THIS INDENTURE, Made the Second day of March in the year of our Lord one thousand eight Hundred and Forty Two atKemptville in the District of Johnstown in the Province of Canada: -Between: Bethiah White, widow of the late James White of Kemptville,Yeoman,

      Kemptville. 1842.. Large printed and manuscript paperdocument, 40x 50cm. (16" x 20"), printed with handwritten entries,folded in sixths, some slight text loss, expertly restored, fine. Fitzroy Township was first settled around 1824. A "Jno. McDermott" isnoted in the Belden Atlas of 1879 as having 200 acres east of the Villageof Fitzroy Harbor. On the verso of the document is a hand-written codicildated 1852: "County of Carleton Registry Office. I do hereby certify thata Memorial of the written deed of bargain and sale attested before me byJohn McDermott of the Township of Litchfield formerly of Fitzroy,Yeoman, was duly recorded in this office .". .

      [Bookseller: Patrick McGahern Books, Inc. (ABAC)]
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        Sketches Illustrating the Manners & Customs of the Indians & Anglo Indians. Drawn on Stone from the Original Drawings from Life by William Tayler, Esqr., Bengal Civil Service.

      London: Thomas McLean, 26, Haymarket, 1842. - Folio (21 1/2' x 14 3/4'), publisher's moirŽ fine-ribbed brown cloth boards, title in gilt on upper cover, recent brown morocco spine, contents loose as issued. Lithographed title, lithographed dedication, 6 six leaves of letterpress text, six hand colored lithographs heightened with gum arabic. A scarce, fascinating, and quite lovely British color-plate portfolio depicting the domestic life of an Anglo Indian couple, as well as native Bengalese genre scenes. The six plates are hand-colored lithographs by J. Bouvier of the General Lithographic Establishment, 70, Martin's Lane, after watercolors by Tayler. The plates are titled as follows: 1. The Young Civilian's Toilet, 2. The Young Lady's Toilet, 3. The Breakfast, 4. The Women Grinding at the Mill, 5. The Sunyasees, and 6. The Village Barber. In the first of these images a young Anglo man luxuriates in a tastefully appointed room after his bath. He is attended by no less than five servants: a young boy fans him with a hand-Punkah, the Sirdar-bearer brushes his hair, the Mate-bearer washes his feet, a Khansaman brings in a cup of coffee, and another servant holds up a mirror. Lying on the floor nearby is a bill with the name 'W. Tayler' at the top followed by 'Pittar and Lattey' and the word 'jeweller.' The text explains that 'Messrs. Pittar and Lattey's bill for jewellry, which is seen on the floor, affords some ground for speculation as to his matrimonial intentions.' It would appear that this and the subsequent two plates are autobiographical. William Tayler (1808-1892) arrived in India in October of 1829, employed by the East India Company. In June of 1830 he was appointed assistant to the commissioner of Cuttack, and subsequently held various posts in Bengal. Tayler married Charlotte Palmer, daughter of merchant John Palmer, in July of 1830. According to the DNB, Tayler's 'official career had been uneventful, though he made friends in high quarters by his skill as a portrait-painter, and some enemies by a turn for caricature.' The latter skill is particularly evident in the plates illustrating Bengalese village life, especially the last, which pictures a barber 'shaving a fat baboo.' The letterpress provides detailed explanations of the plates, including glossaries of Indian terms that would have been unfamiliar to his audience in Victorian England. Scarce. OCLC locates only six copies. REFERENCES: Abbey, Travel, 465 (Abbey's copy included the original watercolor for plate 3).CONDITION: Good, spotting and discoloration to covers; title, dedication and text leaves foxed, plates quite clean and bright; text and plates worn at edges with minor losses and a few short tears. [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: James Arsenault & Company, ABAA]
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        Manners and Customs of the Japanese in the Nineteenth Century. From Accounts of Recent Dutch Residents in Japan and from the German Work of Dr. Ph. Fr. von Siebold

      New York: Harper & Brothers, 1842. First American edition. Woodcut title page. xi, [i], [13]-298, [1] pp. 1 vols. 12mo. Original quarter black morocco and black cloth. Some rubbing, flyleaf missing, else a very handsome copy. First American edition. Woodcut title page. xi, [i], [13]-298, [1] pp. 1 vols. 12mo. First report on Japan, translated into English mostly by Von Siebold, the noted physician and botanist, based on his sojourn with the Dutch Embassy in Japan. With a one page introduction by Harper and Brothers explaining that this is the first work to introduce these secretive people to English and American audiences. Borton 285

      [Bookseller: James Cummins Bookseller]
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        Whaling Broadside - List of Shipping Owned in New-London October 1st, 1842. Employed in the Whale Fishery &ct.

      New London, CT: A.G. Seaman, 1842. Single sheet, 22 x 18 inches, with decorative type border enclosing a printed area of 17 1/2 x 11 1/2 inches "With an account of the oil and bone brought into New-London, from April 1, 1842 to October 1, 1842." Fifty vessels are named, with information on tonnage, owner and date of sailing. A smaller box in the lower right corner lists twenty vessels and the amounts of "sperm oil, whale oil, elephant oil and bone" landed in that port between April and October 1842. All the information conforms with that given in Starbuck except for the ship "Robert Bourne" spelled "Robert Bowne in this broadside, and the schooner "Pacific" listed in the broadside as having sailed in 1842, though it is not listed in Starbuck. This is a rare broadside. No copies appear in Worldcat, AAS, or any other collections that I have searched. Old fold marks, Three inch tear along right center fold with no loss.

      [Bookseller: Ten Pound Island Book Co.]
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        American Notes for General Circulation

      London: Chapman and Hall,, 1842. In two volumes. 2 volumes, octavo. Original dark reddish brown vertically-ribbed cloth, spines lettered in gilt, sides blocked in blind, pale yellow coated endpapers, edges untrimmed. 6 pp. publisher's ads at end of vol. II. Early bookseller's ticket of J. Smith & Son, Glasgow. Some marks to cloth, fore corners of front cover of vol. I a little worn and darkened at tips, otherwise generally clean and fresh, a very good copy. First edition, first issue, with "xvi" paginated in Volume I. "Not one of Dickens' books was the subject of so much adverse criticism as the book he wrote after his return from America in 1842" (Eckel). Although complimentary of the United States in many ways, Dickens antagonised a large portion of his readership by his criticisms of the penal system, the lack of copyright and subsequent pirating of English works, and the entire system of slavery.

      [Bookseller: Peter Harrington]
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        Poems

      London: Edward Moxon,, 1842. Two volumes, octavo (170 x 104 mm). Original boards, title label to spines. Half-title in both volumes, two pages of publisher's advertisements at rear of volume one, terminal blank in volume two. Tiny chips to the margins of title labels, spines somewhat darkened, loss to head of volume one with a small split, corners rubbed, some minor spotting to edges and endpapers, but on the whole an excellent and unsophisticated copy, sound and internally clean. First edition, an exceptional copy in the rare boards, of Tennyson's important and scarce early collection, containing the first appearance of "Ulysses". The publication was Tennyson's second with Edward Moxon (after Poems, 1833), containing original unpublished poetry written in the intervening decade, which was one of Tennyson's saddest and his most creative, following the sudden death of his dear friend Arthur Henry Hallam, in whose memory In Memoriam (1850) was written. "Ulysses" and "Morte d'Arthur", both appearing for the first time here, are "great poems prompted by the death of his Arthur . . . finding extraordinarily compelling correlatives, in ancient worlds, for his feelings personal and universal, ancient and modern" (ODNB). The first volume reprints selections from poems that had been previously published in Poems, Chiefly Lyrical (1830) and Poems (1833), many of them significantly revised. These include such classics as "The Lotos Eaters" and "The Lady of Shalott". Though the collection was much reprinted, the first edition is very scarce - to have a copy surviving in the original boards is rare indeed. Only two copies in boards are recorded at auction in the past 20 years, one of which was rebacked - the other, from the Litchfield library and in similar condition to the present copy, sold at Swann Galleries for $5,500 in 2013.

      [Bookseller: Peter Harrington]
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        Sessio Quarta Concilii Tridentini vindicata, seu Introductio in Scripturas Deutero-canonicas Veteris Testamenti, per Aloisium Vincenzi Sammaurensem, in Romano Archigymnasio Littera

      1844, Typis S.C. de Propaganda Fide 1842 - Opera in 3 parti divisa in 2 voll. in 8_, br., pp. 248, 167. In latino. Intonso, con barbe. Al primo vol.: mancanze al dorso, segni di tarlo alle prime carte che non interessano il testo, fior., leg. salda._ Al secondo vol.: fior., leg. salda._ Discrete condizioni._ [Attributes: Soft Cover]

      [Bookseller: Invito alla Lettura]
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        Kupfer-Atlas zu Johann Samuel Traugott Gehler's Physikalischem Wörterbuche neu bearbeitet von Brandes, Gmelin, Horner, Littrow, Muncke, Pfaff. / CCLXXIII Kupfertafeln

      Leipzig: E. B. Schwickert, 1842. First Edition. Boards. Very Good. First Edition. 11 1/4 x 9 inches. Oblong. 1/4 leather over marbled boards. Ex-libary "Deventer Bibliotheek", with blue ink-stamp on title page and a few labels on the spine. Otherwise unmarked. An atlas volume containing all copper plates, with most plates clean, and a few (particularly for Volume 3) browned and spotted. Boards. The ATLAS VOLUME ONLY for Gehler's "Physikalischem Wörterbuche," an early and still useful encyclopedia of the physical sciences. Contains the following plate counts (278 total plus 6 charts): Vol 1: 21, Vol 2: 20, Vol 3: 16, Vol 4: 18, Vol 5: 30, Vol 6: 43 plus 4 charts, Vol 7: 26, Vol 8: 23, Vol 9: 42 plus 2 charts, Vol 10: 34. Plus an additional grouping of 5 plates in the rear. Apparently complete. A separate title page dated 1842 precedes the plates.

      [Bookseller: Kuenzig Books, ABAA/ILAB]
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        Meklenburg [Mecklenburg] in Bildern. Redigirt und mit erlaeuterndem Texte begleitet. (1. und 2. Band) [von insg. 4].

      Rostock Verlag von J G Tiedemann (-) 1843 1842 - EA; 2 Bände in 1; ca 21x15 cm; 68, 64 Seiten mit 2 gest. Titelblätter mit Titelvignette und insgesamt 48 altkolorierte lith. Tafeln; Leinwandeinband d. Zt. mit Rückentitel (Einband leicht bestoßen und geringfügig fleckig, die Titelblätter leicht stockfleckig, 2 Tafeln mit geringer Randbräunung; sonst gutes, sauberes Exemplar) 0,000 gr. [Attributes: First Edition]

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Hilbert Kadgien]
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        Karte des Königreichs Illyrien und des Herzogthums Steyermark nebst dem Königlich Ungarischen Littorale astronomisch trigonometrisch vermessen, topographisch aufgenommen, reduzirt, gezeichnet und gestochen im topographischen Bureau des K. K. Generalquartiermeisterstabes. Vollendet im K. K. Militärischen Geographischen Institute in Wien.

      Wien, Militärisch Geographisches Institut, 1842. Auf Lwd. aufgezogene Kupferkarte. 22 Blätter in je 8 Segmenten sowie ein gefalt. Übersichtsblatt, zus. lose in Pp.-Schuber d. Zt. Die vorliegende „Spezialkarte“, Teil der sogenannten „zweiten Franziszeischen Landesaufnahme“ der Österreichisch-Ungarischen Monarchie im Maßstab 1:144.000, besteht insgesamt aus 36 Blättern (je ca. 27,5 x 40 cm) sowie der Übersichtskarte. Vorhanden sind die Blätter 1-19, 22, 23 u. 27, welche den nördlichen Teil des genannten Gebietes abdeckt (mit dem Großglockner bzw. Bad Aussee im Nordwesten, Mariazell, Mürzzuschlag u. Hartberg im Nordosten, Tarvis im Südwesten bzw. Cilli und Pettau im Südosten; also dem Gebiet der Steiermark. So auch von alter Hand auf der Übersichtskarte eingezeichnet). - Schuber stärker bestoßen u. mit Bezugsfehlstellen, sonst nur vereinzelt schwach fleckig. - Vgl. Austria Picta 121. Versand D: 12,00 EUR Steiermark, Karte des Königreichs Illyrien und des Herzogthums Steyermark nebst dem Königlich Ungarischen Littorale astronomisch trigonometrisch vermessen, topographisch aufgenommen, reduzirt, gezeichnet und gestochen im topographischen Bureau des K. K. Generalquartiermeisterstabes. Vollendet im K. K. Militärischen Geographischen Institute in Wien, 2. Franziszeischen Landesaufnahme, Zweite Franziszeische, Karte, Karten, Landkarte, Landkarten

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Wolfgang Friebes]
 44.   Check availability:     buchfreund.de     Link/Print  


        Boston, with Charlestown and Roxbury.

      London. 1842 - Size: 410 x 345 mm. Good condition. Some age toning. Steel engraving. An interesting town plan of the important and historic North American, Massachusetts city of Boston. As well as delineating downtown Boston, south and east Boston are also engraved. Published for the S.D.U.K. by Chapman and Hall.

      [Bookseller: Peter Harrington. ABA member]
 45.   Check availability:     ZVAB     Link/Print  


        Die Privilegien der kaiserl. königl. landesfürstlichen Stadt Radkersburg in Untersteyer, nebst einer kurzgefaßten Geschichte und Beschreibung dieser Stadt, ihrer Merkwürdigkeiten und Umgebungen.

      Radkersburg, Alois Weitzinger, 1842. - Erstausgabe; ohne die sechs Tafeln, die diesem Handexemplar nie beigebunden waren. - Der Holzschnitt mit einer Abbildung des ältesten Stadtsiegels von 1418. - Durchschossenes (interfoliiertes) Handexemplar des Verfassers mit zahlr., tlw. umfangreichen Ergänzungen u. Anmerkungen sowie einigen Korrekturen. Titel verso mit dem mont. lithogr. Namensschildchen Hofrichters. - Umschlag berieben u. bestoßen. Unteres Kapital m. Fehlstelle. Innendeckel m. altem Namensstempel. Ecken etw. bestoßen. Gebräunt u. stockfleckig. - Schlossar 212. ge Gewicht in Gramm: 500 8°. Mit einer Holzschn.-Abbildung (Titel verso) u. einem lithogr. Stadtplan. VIII, 168 S., OKart. [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Wolfgang Friebes]
 46.   Check availability:     ZVAB     Link/Print  

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