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Displayed below are some selected recent viaLibri matches for books published in 1842

        Almira's Curse; Or, The Black Tower Of Bransdorf. A Romance

      London: Edward Lloyd and G. Purkess. Very Good; Edges rubbed. Lacks original wrappers. Foxing.. 1842. First Edition; First Printing. Hardcover. 8vo 8" - 9" tall. Penny Dreadful bound from parts, 25 in total. Half-bound in calf with marbled paper sides. Gilt titles and rules to spine. Red speckled edges. Summers 229p. Kirkpatrick 20p. ; 198 pages .

      [Bookseller: Gothica Books Ltd.]
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        Chart of Part of the N.W. Coast of Australia by Phillip P. King , Commander, R.N. 1818.19.20.21.22, Sheet V. With additions by Commanders Wickham and Stokes 1838 & 1842

      London: Admiralty Hydrographic Office, after, 1842. Engraved map measuring 589 x 880 mm., a fine copy backed on linen. Striking Admiralty chart prepared by Captain Phillip Parker King from his survey voyages of 1818-22 and revised with information from the Beagle survey of northern Australian waters during 1837-42. This map covers the vast coastline from Cape Ford to the Lacepédè Islands and is from a series of eight charts mapping the northern and west coasts of Australia. It is a lasting testament King's commitment to completing the mapping of the Australian continent, and so completing the work of Cook and Flinders. First published in June 1825, this chart was prepared by King from the results of his four expeditions to chart to northernmost coast of Australia between 1818 and 1822 as commander of the Mermaid and Bathurst. The first expedition sailed in December 1817 carrying the botanist Allan Cunningham and surveyor John Septimus Roe. Two further voyages in the Mermaid ensued in the following years, culminating in that of the Bathurst during 1821-22. In addition to the invaluable mapping of these remote and treacherous waters, King's expedition yielded a bounty of information on the natural history and Aboriginal tribes of the region. This edition of King's chart is revised with additions from the Beagle surveys of northern Australian waters during 1837-42, commanded first by John Clements Wickham and later by John Lort Stokes. Both men served under King aboard the Beagle during the South American surveys of 1827 to 1830, and later accompanied Robert FitzRoy and Charles Darwin on their famous voyage of discovery 1833-36. Detailed and finely engraved, the chart is the work of John Walker and his likewise named son, engravers to the Admiralty (John Walker senior was long favoured by Dalrymple on account of the finesse of his work). It bears the stamp of "D. Wald Admiralty Agent Port Adelaide.

      [Bookseller: Hordern House Rare Books]
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        Autograph letter signed to the music publisher [Carl] Friedr[ich] Kistner in Leipzig

      . 1 page. Quarto. Dated January 29, 1842. With integral address panel. In German (with transcription and translation). Relative to the composer's urgent need to receive the vocal and instrumental parts for Handel's Israel in Egypt, op. 51, and his Lobgesang symphony-cantata, op. 52. "Please send me everything that remains at the Abonnements-Concert [series at the Leipzig Gewandhaus] "quam citissime" [Latin for "as fast as possible"] by rail. Slight foxing, primarily to upper margin; reinforced with paper tape to left edge and with transparent tape to upper edge; creased at folds and slightly overall to blank area of address panel; remnants of red sealing wax. . Mendelssohn may have been requesting these parts from Kistner in preparation for a concert in which he co-directed (with Julius Rietz) the Niederrheinisches Musikfest in Düsseldorf (May 1842), where he conducted both his ‘Lobgesang’ and Handel's Israel in Egypt.Mendelssohn's ‘Lobgesang’ symphony-cantata received its première in June 1840 at a festival commemorating the quadricentenary of the invention of movable type. "... a broad historical review that realtes the German past to the present and summons various musical icons - symphony, cantata, oratorio elementsk responsorial psalmody, and chorale - into the service of praising God. If the Lobgesang faied, it did so not by emulating the Ninth [Beethoven's Ninth Symphony] but by aspiring toward an unattainable comprehensiveness - a symphony-cum-cantata with the trappings of a sacred service, a concert piece created for a specific occaion but reaching toward musical universality." Todd: Mendelssohn, p. 400. Mendelssohn cultivated a life-long devotion to Handel and did much to promote his music in Germany, much as he had done for Bach in England, conducting Act II of Israel in Egypt in Düsseldorf in 1833 and the complete work three years later in Leipzig; he also prepared a new edition of the work in 1844 at the request of the Handel Society. "Op. 51 owes much to Handel, especially Joshua... But in conception and design... the composition is a product of nineteenth-century sensibilities and aesthetics." ibid, p. 382Kistner was Mendelssohn's publisher in Liepzig. Mendelssohn lived in Berlin at the time but retained close ties to Leipzig and continued conducting at the Gewandhaus. Interestingly, the railroad from Berlin to Leipzig had just been completed on September 10, 1841; Mendelssohn apparently took advantage of this for the urgent delivery of the material requested from Kistner mentioned in the present letter.

      [Bookseller: J & J Lubrano Music Antiquarians LLC ]
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        New Government House, Sydney

      Sydney: J.S. Prout, 1842. Lithographic view, 185 x 295 mm; lacking margins, mounted. An idyllic view of Government House and its castellated bathing house seen across Farm Cove, from the Botanical Gardens. The signal station on Fort Phillip Hill is in the background to the left and Macquarie Fort to the right. The view was one of the suite of lithographs which Prout published in four parts as Sydney Illustrated. John Skinner Prout arrived in Sydney in 1841 and spent three years lecturing on art, working as a scene painter and art teacher. He made extensive sketching tours of New South Wales, before travelling to Van Diemen's Land in January 1844 where he worked for four years before returning to England.

      [Bookseller: Hordern House Rare Books]
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        Autograph letter signed to the music publisher [Carl] Friedr[ich] Kistner in Leipzig

      1 page. Quarto. Dated January 29, 1842. With integral address panel. In German (with transcription and translation). Relative to the composer's urgent need to receive the vocal and instrumental parts for Handel's Israel in Egypt, op. 51, and his Lobgesang symphony-cantata, op. 52. "Please send me everything that remains at the Abonnements-Concert [series at the Leipzig Gewandhaus] "quam citissime" [Latin for "as fast as possible"] by rail. Slight foxing, primarily to upper margin; reinforced with paper tape to left edge and with transparent tape to upper edge; creased at folds and slightly overall to blank area of address panel; remnants of red sealing wax. . Mendelssohn may have been requesting these parts from Kistner in preparation for a concert in which he co-directed (with Julius Rietz) the Niederrheinisches Musikfest in Düsseldorf (May 1842), where he conducted both his ‘Lobgesang’ and Handel's Israel in Egypt.Mendelssohn's ‘Lobgesang’ symphony-cantata received its première in June 1840 at a festival commemorating the quadricentenary of the invention of movable type. "... a broad historical review that realtes the German past to the present and summons various musical icons - symphony, cantata, oratorio elementsk responsorial psalmody, and chorale - into the service of praising God. If the Lobgesang faied, it did so not by emulating the Ninth [Beethoven's Ninth Symphony] but by aspiring toward an unattainable comprehensiveness - a symphony-cum-cantata with the trappings of a sacred service, a concert piece created for a specific occaion but reaching toward musical universality." Todd: Mendelssohn, p. 400. Mendelssohn cultivated a life-long devotion to Handel and did much to promote his music in Germany, much as he had done for Bach in England, conducting Act II of Israel in Egypt in Düsseldorf in 1833 and the complete work three years later in Leipzig; he also prepared a new edition of the work in 1844 at the request of the Handel Society. "Op. 51 owes much to Handel, especially Joshua... But in conception and design... the composition is a product of nineteenth-century sensibilities and aesthetics." ibid, p. 382Kistner was Mendelssohn's publisher in Liepzig. Mendelssohn lived in Berlin at the time but retained close ties to Leipzig and continued conducting at the Gewandhaus. Interestingly, the railroad from Berlin to Leipzig had just been completed on September 10, 1841; Mendelssohn apparently took advantage of this for the urgent delivery of the material requested from Kistner mentioned in the present letter.

      [Bookseller: J & J Lubrano Music Antiquarians LLC]
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        Catalogue des Tableaux des Écoles Hollandaise, Flamande et Française. Dessins-Aquarelles des artistes célèbres de l'école moderne, dont la vente aura lieu pour cause de départ de M. Georges P..., rue des jeuneurs, N. 16... Les Mardi 29 et Mercredi 30 Novembre 1842

      1842. Paris, imprimerie et lithographie de Maulde et Renou, rue Bailleul, n. 9-11, 1842. 14pp. 93 items described. Half dark blue morocco, marbled boards (paper damaged on front cover). Contains painting by Jan Steen, Isaac van Ostade, J. Ruisdael, Wouvermans, Fragonard, Boucher, Canaletti and many others. Each item with a detailed description.

      [Bookseller: Knuf Rare Books]
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        Encampment of the Piekann Indians

      Paris, Coblentz and London 1842 - Prince Maximilian and his party arrived at Fort McKenzie on 9 August 1833. The present plate illustrates the Piegan Blackfoot camp near to Fort McKenzie with dozens of Indians, dogs and horses in the foreground giving an impression of the noisy bustle of camp life. A typical feature of Bodmer's work is the careful attention to detail, and this can be seen here in the varying sizes of the tipis, a fact that many artists would have missed: the size of tipi was a reflection of variation in family sizes and their wealth. The Piegan Blackfoot, a subgroup of the Blackfoot tribe, were the archetypal Plains Indians, for whom the buffalo provided nearly all their needs, from clothing to food to leather for their tipis. Because of this dependence on the buffalo, the Blackfoot were swift to adapt to the use of horses and soon had large herds and a well-deserved reputation for horsemanship. When they obtained firearms they became particularly potent raiders and were in effect masters of the North Plains. They are shown here at the height of their power. Karl Bodmer's images show great versatility and technical virtuosity and give us a uniquely accomplished and detailed picture of a previously little understood (and soon to vanish) way of life. Swiss-born Bodmer was engaged by Prince Maximilian zu Wied-Neuwied (1782-1867) specifically to provide a record of his travels in North America, principally among the Plains Indians. In the company of David Dreidoppel (Prince Maximilian's servant and hunting companion), their travels in North America were to last from 1832 to 1834. Well-armed with information and advice, the party finally left St.Louis, on the most important stage of their travels, aboard the steamer Yellow Stone on April 10 1833. They proceeded up the treacherous Missouri River along the line of forts established by the American Fur Company. At Bellevue they encountered their first Indians, then went on to make contact with the Sioux tribe, learning of and recording their little known ceremonial dances and powerful pride and dignity. Transferring from the Yellow Stone to another steamer, the Assiniboin, they continued to Fort Clark, visiting there the Mandan, Mintari and Crow tribes, then the Assiniboins at Fort Union, the main base of the American Fur Company. On a necessarily much smaller vessel they journeyed through the extraordinary geological scenery of that section of the Missouri to Fort Mackenzie in Montana, establishing a cautious friendship with the fearsome Blackfeet. From this, the westernmost point reached, it was considered too dangerous to continue and the return journey downstream began. The winter brought its own difficulties and discomforts, but Bodmer was still able to execute numerous studies of villages, dances and especially the people, who were often both intrigued and delighted by his work. The portraits are particularly notable for their capturing of individual personalities, as well as forming a primary account of what was to become virtually lost cultures. Graff 4648; Howes M443a; Pilling 2521; Sabin 47014; Wagner-Camp 76:1. Hand-coloured aquatint engraving by Beyer and H?rlimann after Bodmer, blindstamp. Expert repairs to margins, not affecting image area. [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Donald A. Heald Rare Books (ABAA)]
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        Ruine der St. Nicolai-Kirche in Hamburg. Nach dem grossen Brande vom 5. - bis 8. Mai 1842. Von der Bohnenstrasse. Altkolorierte Lithographie gedruckt von Peter Suhr nach C. A. Lill

      Hamburg, Kunst-Verlag Lill, 1842.. Bildgröße: 24,5 x 38 cm / Blattgröße: 35 x 46,5 cm. Detailreiche Ansicht des Kirchenschiffes und Turms der Nicolaikirche mit einigen Passanten, Arbeitern etc..Das Blatt gering fleckig, am weißen Außenrand etwas stärker fingerfleckig, hier auch gering angeknickt sowie mit 2 kleineren hinterlegten Einrissen. ( Pic erhältlich // webimage available ).

      [Bookseller: Buchhandlung & Antiquariat Friederichsen]
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        Ruine der St. Nicolai-Kirche in Hamburg ( December 1842 ). Altkolorierte Lithographie gedruckt von Peter Suhr nach C. A. Lill

      Hamburg, Kunst-Verlag Lill, 1842.. Bildgröße: 24 x 34,5 cm / Blattgröße: 37,5 x 49,5 cm. Das Blatt gering fleckig, im weißen Außenrand stärker finger- und leicht stockfleckig mit kleineren Randläsionen sowie einem kleinen hinterlegten Einriß am Oberrand. ( Pic erhältlich // webimage available ).

      [Bookseller: Buchhandlung & Antiquariat Friederichsen]
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        A Descriptive Vocabulary of The Language in Common Use amongst the Aborigines of Western Australia

      London: Wm. S. Orr, 1842. Octavo; crude repair to title-page, some wear to extremities, else a good mostly unopened copy in original green cloth, with 4-pp. advertisements bound in. Moore, a lawyer, landed proprietor and diarist, arrived at the Swan River Settlement on the brig Cleopatra in 1830; over the following decades he became a large land-holder at his property Millendon and was appointed advocate-general. Less than a month after arriving in the settlement, Moore accompanied the colonial secretary on a search-party to find Aborigines implicated in a robbery. From this period on he would express sympathetic concern for the local tribes, and made a sustained effort to learn their language and understand their stories. This work is based on the preliminary studies of the explorer George Grey. Moore greatly expanded and enhanced the material, producing a genuinely descriptive vocabulary of the language in common use amongst the Aborigines of Western Australia. As with all good works of this sort, Moore's work makes fascinating reading, as it includes detailed observations regarding the habits, manners and customs of the natives and the natural history of the country. Throughout, Moore's work gives a real insight into the lives of the settlers themselves; thus 'Janjin… the native pear tree. It bears a thing which looks provokingly like a good fruit'.

      [Bookseller: Hordern House Rare Books]
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        A Journey in the Northern Island of New Zealand

      Hobart Town: George Rolwegan, 1842. Duodecimo, 206 pp. including appendices; a little modest foxing yet a very good uncut copy in attractive recent green polished half calf. Dedicated to Lady Franklin. Scarce Hobart printed account of New Zealand travels. This copy has an interesting presentation inscription to the publisher's wife 'Mrs. Rolwegan, with the author's kind regards.' Hocken recommends the quality of Wade's descriptive account while the NZNB applauds it as 'a work of present day rarity and textual value'. Reverend Wade came to New Zealand with William Colenso as a superintendent of the press. He served for six years as a missionary in New Zealand before being installed as the minister of Harrington Street Chapel in Hobart. While serving in Hobart Wade evidently became acquainted with the Franklins, as his account is dedicated, with permission, to Lady Franklin (who also personally subscribed for 6 copies). The 'Appendix gives list of New Zealand plants furnished by Allan Cunningham, with excellent list of their native names' (Hocken).

      [Bookseller: Hordern House Rare Books]
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        The Bank, looking towards the Mansion House

      T. Boys, [London 1842 - A very fine image from Boys' 'London As It Is': a work 'of considerable importance' (Abbey) Abbey writes of the work London As It Is from which this beautiful image comes: apart "from the beauty of its plates, it records London at a period when good pictorial records were few. The London of the 1840's is probably more difficult to reconstruct than at any other period in the nineteenth century" (Abbey Life 239). High production costs and changing fashion caused aquatint to die out, photography was still in an experimental stage, and chromolithography did not appear until 1850. Boys' work was issued with the plates hand-coloured mounted in imitation of watercolours, with no imprint, or as here, with the plates tinted and hand-coloured, including Boys' name at the foot. Boys garnered enormous prestige from this work and from his earlier, Picturesque Views in Paris, Ghent. (1839). The "accuracy of his portraits of buildings and his skill in composition have seldom been bettered" (Mallalieu Dictionary of British Watercolour Artists p.38). Cf. Abbey Scenery 239. Hand-coloured lithograph by Thomas Shotter Boys, printed by Charles Hullmandel.

      [Bookseller: Donald A. Heald Rare Books (ABAA)]
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        To Richard Hill Esqr. of Thornton This Portrait of John Booth is respectfully Dedictated, By. Robert Sunter

      R. Sunter, [London] 1842 - A characterful portrait of the huntsman, John Booth, his horse and a number of his hounds. John Ferneley, with the encouragement of the Duke of Rutland studied under Benjamin Marshall for three years before travelling and painting in England and Ireland. He settled in Melton Mowbray in 1814. He "painted the Leicester hunting fraternity and their activities for nearly fifty years with great success and popularity. He also painted thoroughbreds, many of which were engraved by Edward Duncan. and published in Ackermann's short-lived series of racehorse portraits. In the hierarchy of horse painters Ferneley's work. [is] more consistently excellent than portraits by J.F. Herring Snr." (Lane) Siltzer p.121. Lithograph, coloured by hand, drawn on stone by Lowes Dickinson, printed by Charles Hullmandel.

      [Bookseller: Donald A. Heald Rare Books (ABAA)]
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        Czarina, The

      1842. first edition. Borscht and CaviarIn the Court of Catherine IHOFLAND, Mrs. [Barbara]. The Czarina; An Historical Romance of the Court of Russia. By Mrs. Hofland…In Three Volumes. London: Henry Colburn, 1842. First edition. Three twelvemo volumes (7 5/16 x 4 5/8 inches; 186 x 118 mm.). [2], 302; [2], 317, [1, blank]; [2], 325, [1, blank] pp. Bound without half-titles (possibly as issued?).Contemporary half plum calf, decoratively ruled in blind, over marbled boards. Spines decoratively ruled and numbered in gilt and ruled in blind with four raised bands and brown morocco gilt lettering labels, edges sprinkled red. Spines faded to brown, corners lightly rubbed, spine labels a tiny bit chipped. Some light foxing and browning. Volume I with a few ink smudges on the verso of the title and on the first page of text and a printing flaw (slight ink smear to a few words) on pp. 258 and 259. A very good copy. One of the last novels by Hofland, an extremely prolific - and moralistic - writer."The patient reader who has followed Mary [our princess] through her many trials, and, we trust, rejoiced in the development of her virtues as a daughter and sister, will not doubt that she became an exemplary as a wife, a mother, and a mistress " (p. 318).Mrs. Barbara Hofland (1770-1844) “was the daughter of Robert Wreaks, a Sheffield manufacturer, who died when she was an infant. She was brought up by an aunt and in 1796 married T. Bradshawe Hoole, a merchant, by whom she had a son. Hoole’s death from consumption two years later left her wealthy but the money was subsequently lost through a bad investment, and she turned to writing. A volume of Poems (1805) attracted 2,000 subscribers, mainly out of sympathy. She opened a boarding school at Harrogate on the proceeds, and when this failed she began to write fiction. The History of a Clergyman’s Widow (1812) sold 17,000 copies in various editions. In 1808 she married the landscape painter Thomas Cristopher Hofland (1777-1843). The precariousness of an artist’s life together with Hofland’s natural improvidence and subsequent illness meant that she had to work even harder at her fiction. By 1824 she had produced upwards of twenty titles, the most successful of which, and probably her best, was The Son of a Genius [1812], which drew on her experience of the artistic temperament and also on the emotional legacy of her son’s death from consumption. She followed it with The Daughter of a Genius (1823). She was a poplar as well as prolific writer although her fiction, which extended to nearly seventy works, was remorselessly didactic in tone. Towards the end of her career she turned out conventional Victorian three-deckers, including The Czarina (1842), The King’s Son (1843), The Unloved One (1844), and Daniel Dennison (1846). She was also an energetic journalist, having begun as early as 1795 with ‘Characteristics of Some Leading Inhabitants of Sheffield’, which she published in the Sheffield Courant. She expanded this vein later by contributing gossipy letters about London literary life to provincial newspapers. Her children’s books include both history and travel and, despite their moralizing, are attractive and readable. Hofland was a friend of Mary Russell Mitford” (The Oxford Companion to British Women Writers).“[Mrs. Hofland’s] work for children includes imaginative textbooks (she centres both histories and travels on invented young people). Some simplified moral judgements apart, it is intelligent and readable. Depth and variety is added in adult works like Iwanowa, or The Maid of Moscow, 1813 (Richardsonian letters; clash of armies and cultures), Katherine, 1828 (delicate psychological analysis of misunderstandings in love), The Captives in India, 1834 (effective use of Eliza Fay), and The King’s Son, 1843 (fictional vindication of Richard III)” (The Feminist Companion to Literature in English).Block, pp. 109-110. CBEL III, 734. CBEL (3) IV, 934. Not in Sadleir or in Wolff, who had only two of her works—The Captives in India, A Tale; and A Widow and a Will (1834) and A Season in Harrogate (1812).

      [Bookseller: David Brass Rare Books, Inc.]
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        Die teutschen Schaumweine. Für teutsche Weinzucht und teutsche Weintrinker.

      Heidelberg, Winter, 1842.. (18 x 11 cm). 71 S. Moderner Pappband im Stil der Zeit.. Erste Ausgabe. - Der aus Neckargemünd stammende Apotheker und Weinbaupionier Bronner (1792-1864) errichtet in Wiesloch eine Muster-Rebschule mit 100000 Weinstöcken aus 400 verschiedenen Rebsorten. Für seine Verdienste um den Weinbau wird ihm der Titel eines Ökonomierats verliehen. In vorliegendem fasst er seine auf einer Reise durch die Champagne gesammelten Erkenntnisse zusammen und will dazu beitragen, die Qualität des deutschen Schaumweins zu verbessern. - Titel gestempelt Durchgehend etwas stockfleckig, sonst gut erhalten. - Schoene 5222

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Gerhard Gruber]
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        Das frische Wasser als vorzügliches Beförderungsmittel der Gesundheit und ausgezeichnetes Heilmittel in Krankheiten. Ein Wort zu seiner Zeit für alle Menschen, die wünschen, gesund zu werden, es zu bleiben und ein frohes Alter zu erreichen. Von einem Menschenfreunde.

      München, Georg Franz 1842.. 4. Auflage. 8°. 371 S., 1 Frontisp. Marmorierter Original-Halbleder d. Zt. mit goldgepr. Rückentitel "Das kalte Wasser Hugo Bischoff." (Rücken mit Klebemarke, Einband etw. berieben und best., angerändert, Besitzervermerk a. Vors. u. Titel, Buchbl. insges. etwas wellig, ansonsten gut). Auflage:4.

      [Bookseller: AEGIS Buch - und Kunstantiquariat Einzel]
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        The Meet.; The Return from the Hunt. from a Painting by W.J. Shayer

      William Spooner, London 1842 - A marvellously atmospheric pair of images after paintings by the Sussex-born artist, William Shayer. The first plate ably captures slightly nervous bonhomie with which the members of the hunt greet each other. One rider blows his horn as the pack with the hunt servants make their way through a small hamlet and up the hill towards the meeting place. On the skyline of the hill on the left a further group of riders can be seen making their way towards the meeting point. The hounds in the right foreground are alert, their flags in the air and keen to go off. The second plate presents a bucolic scene: at the end of a successful day in the field, members of the hunt gather outside a local pub, the landlord serves stirrup cup whilst the riders smoke and discuss the day's sport. In the mid-ground the pack is led back to the kennels by the huntsman, followed by a couple of riders and a gentleman lucky enough to have his carriage ready to convey him homewards. Sold as a pair. A pair of lithographs, coloured by hand, 'drawn by J.H. Lynch'. (Expert marginal repairs, margin of first plate with imprint shaved. Both prints re-backed).

      [Bookseller: Donald A. Heald Rare Books (ABAA)]
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        A Critical Inquiry into Antient Armor as it existed in Europe Volumes two and three

      John Dowding. Very Good. 1842. Very Good. (Binding: Hardcover, Jacket: No Jacket) Two volumes of three. Large half leather over boards. 39cm. . .

      [Bookseller: Moe's Books]
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        Mouth of the Fox River (Indiana)

      Paris, Coblenz and London 1842 - A highly evocative view of the confluence of the Fox and Wabash Rivers: the almost pre-Columbian scene is shown at sunset, the final red light of the sun adding an ochre wash to the entire scene. Cattle drink from their watering-place on the opposite bank, a flock of Carolina Parrakeets settles down noisily at the roost for the night, beneath a Bald Eagle perches watchfully: all this is allied with the untamed nature of the landscape and gives us a view of America as it was before the arrival of the white man. Prince Maximilian's health had suffered on the journey out to New Harmony, and during November and December 1832, whilst he recovered, Bodmer and Dreidoppel made many excursions along the rivers in search of zoological specimens. On 6 December 1832 Maximilian was sufficiently recovered to accompany them and as he recorded in his journal `Mr. Bodmer made a drawing from an interesting landscape, the estuary of the Fox River into the Wabash', he goes on, the water was `clear and dark green' and the surrounding forest of `colossal Plantanus trees were shining white in the densely tangled thicket'. Karl Bodmer's images show great versatility and technical virtuosity and give us a uniquely accomplished and detailed picture of a previously little understood (and soon to vanish) way of life. Swiss-born Bodmer was engaged by Prince Maximilian zu Wied-Neuwied (1782-1867) specifically to provide a record of his travels in North America, principally among the Plains Indians. In the company of David Dreidoppel (Prince Maximilian's servant and hunting companion), their travels in North America were to last from 1832 to 1834. They arrived in Boston in July 1832, traveled on to Philadelphia, where they stayed with Napoleon Bonaparte's elder brother Joseph. From here they headed west across Pennsylvania across the Alleghenies to Pittsburgh and the Ohio country, visiting all the important German settlements en route. Their most important stop on their route west was at the utopian colony of New Harmony in Indiana. The Prince spent five months there in the company of some of the country's leading scientific men, and studying all the relevant literature on backcountry America. On 24 March 1833 the party reached St. Louis, Missouri, and the start of the journey into Indian country. Graff 4648; Howes M443a; Pilling 2521; Sabin 47014; Wagner-Camp 76:1. Hand-coloured aquatint engraving by Himely after Bodmer, issue with no imprint line and with no English title, blindstamp. [Attributes: Soft Cover]

      [Bookseller: Donald A. Heald Rare Books (ABAA)]
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        Warrant. In the Colony of the Cape of Good Hope

      Cape Town, South Africa: 20 August, 1842. Printed warrant form, large folio sheet 550 by 430 mm., completed in manuscript, old folds with some slight damage, signed by Sir John Wylde; framed. Very rare printed warrant form, for use in the Colony of the Cape of Good Hope for transportation to New South Wales. This example has been completed in detailed manuscript regarding the transportation of Private Booy Piet, court-martialled for desertion and the theft of his equipment. Piet's sentence was seven years, and it is particularly interesting to note that the printed form has been amended in manuscript to specify that he be sent to Van Diemen's Land rather than New South Wales (transportation to New South Wales was suspended in 1840, although not formally abolished for another decade). Piet came out to Van Diemen's Land on board the Cape Packet, sailing on 10 October 1842 from Cape Town and arriving in Hobart on 24 November. The Cape Packet is linked with the ill-fated Waterloo, a convict transport that was wrecked at Table Bay, Cape Town in late August of the same year (see Bateson, The Convict Ships, pp. 283-90). Of the 220 male convicts that had boarded the Waterloo at Sheerness, an estimated 72 survived. Bateson notes that the Cape Packet took these survivors to Australia, as well as three prisoners sentenced at the Cape to transportation; it can be assumed that Booy Piet would have been one of these. Booy Piet's convict record held in the Archives Office of Tasmania records him as being a laborer who could not read or write, of dark complexion, curly black hair, high cheekbones, broad nose and black eyes and eyebrows. There are two offences with sentences noted before he was released from the first stage probation on 24 January 1845. Also noted is that he died in hospital in Hobart Town, 28 August 1845. The warrant is signed by Sir John Wylde, former deputy judge advocate in Sydney (1816-25), and chief justice of the Cape of Good Hope from 1827 to 1855. Wylde had a controversial career in Australia, criticised by Bigge, avoided by Macquarie, and finally removed by Brisbane, but he was heavily involved in the Australian judicial system at an important period of its history.

      [Bookseller: Hordern House Rare Books]
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        England's Exiles; or, a View of a System of Instruction and Discipline, as carried into effect during the voyage to the Penal Colonies of Australia

      London: Darton and Clark, 1842. Small octavo, 238 pp., the first few leaves with very minor dampstaining to bottom margin; generally very good in the original printer's green cloth, rather scuffed. The health of convicts on convict transports. Important book by Browning building on his experience as a Surgeon on board convict transports, most notably the Elphinstone which arrived in Hobart in 1836. Colin Arrott Browning (1791-1856) was appointed an assistant surgeon in the navy in 1813, and surgeon less than four years later. Well educated - he took his degree from Edinburgh University Medical College in 1825 - he first visited Australia in the convict ship Surry (arrived Sydney, 1831) and later served in a similar capacity in the Arab (Hobart, 1834), Elphinstone (Hobart, 1836), Margaret (Sydney, 1840), Tortoise (Hobart, 1842), Earl Grey (Hobart, 1843), Mount Stewart Elphinstone (Hobart, 1845) and Hashemy (Sydney, 1849). 'A kindly and religious man but restricted and narrow in outlook, [he] protested against sick prisoners being embarked and complained of the quantity and quality of the medicines and medical comforts placed in convict ships. He was attentive in the medical care of the prisoners and sought to further their education' (ADB). It was in this work that Browning really explained the nature of the reforms he was proposing, with a view to future surgeon-superintendents having a much more coherent and sensible plan to follow, rather than the very modest instructions with which he had been favoured. In his preface Browning does suggest that he has seen evidence that some reforms of the nature explained here had recently been adopted in some ships conveying female convicts. Browning could not be accused of lacking piety, but the present work does provide a well-considered and argued account of overdue reforms to the practice of transportation, and was published in time to be of some impact on the last twenty years or so of ships being sent to Australia. Throughout there are glimpses of life on board based on his own experiences. An appendix deals with preventative medicine: hygiene, clothing, diet, exercise.

      [Bookseller: Hordern House Rare Books]
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        Going to a Fair [Plate I Hunters and hacks]; Going to a Fair [Plate II Cart horses]

      Messrs. Fores, London 1842 - A very fine pair of prints from "Fores's Road Scenes" series, here showing strings of finely observed horses on their way to a horse fair. Cooper Henderson "was educated at Brighton and then Winchester before studying rather idly for the Bar and enjoying a European tour with his father and elder brother, John. While his father and brother sketched panoramas.Cooper Henderson found, to him, more interesting subjects among the coaches, carriages and postillions 'on the road'. On Christmas Eve, 1829, he was married secretly to Charlotte By (then aged sixteen), the daughter of a Thames lighterman. Disapproving of the marriage, his father gave him a small allowance and told him to leave London. Thrown mainly onto his own resources, Cooper Henderson moved to Bracknell in Berkshire and started to paint for his living. He was quickly successful and his pictures of coaches and coaching are well known, being more accurate and lively than those of his near contemporary, James Pollard. He soon received sufficient commissions to afford to return to London where he was reconciled with his parents" (Charles Lane, British Racing Prints, p.119). Charles Lane, Cooper Henderson and the Open Road, p.101; Siltzer p.137. Aquatint engraving, coloured by hand, by J. Harris.

      [Bookseller: Donald A. Heald Rare Books (ABAA)]
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        Tyrol: Trente et Inspruck.

      Desenne, Paris. 1842 - L’opera contiene sei finissime incisioni tirate su carta giapponese applicate su tavola e quattro legni. Quattro incisioni e un legno riguardano Trento. Formato: 176 p., [10] c. di tav., 31 cm, m.p. mod. Buono, piccola gora alle ultime carte.

      [Bookseller: Studio Bibliografico Adige]
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        NARRATIVE OF THE LATE EXPEDITION TO SYRIA, UNDER THE COMMAND OF ADMIRAL THE HON. SIR ROBERT STOPFORD, ..... Comprising an account of the Capture of Gebail, Tripoli, and Tyre; Storming of Sidon; Battle of Calat-Meidan; Bombardment and Capture of St. Jean D'Acre,

      London: Henry Colburn , Publisher, Great Marlborough Street., 1842. First edition. 8vo. 2 volumes: viii, (4), 301, (8, publisher's catalogue); v, (3), 312 pp. Lithographed frontispiece portraits, map, plan, and five lithographed or wood-engraved plates. Blackmer sale 850: "Hunter was present on board H.M.S. Dido during various scenes of action in the Anglo-Egyptian war in Syria in 1840. A British-Turkish military force invaded Lebanon in September, 1840, in order to force Mehmet Ali to return Syria to Ottoman rule and to abandon his dangerous attempts to partition the Ottoman Empire." Some light foxing to portraits and ads, but a very good copy. Original blue cloth, stamped in blind, gilt spine titles. (#6312)

      [Bookseller: Bartlebys Books ]
 24.   Check availability:     ABAA     Link/Print  


        Mássika, Saki Indian. Wakusáee, Musquake Indian

      Paris, Coblenz and London 1842 - A fine double portrait of these warriors from the Sauk (or Sac) and Fox (Mesquaki, Muskake or Muskwaki) Tribes. Both men are shown half length and were apparently sketched by Bodmer on 27 and 28 March 1833 in St. Louis, Missouri, during the two week period when final arrangements were made for the travelers' journey up the Missouri River. Mássika (`Turtle') was one of a number of Sauk and Fox who came to St. Louis to try to arrange the release of Black Hawk, a Sauk chief, who had engaged in a series of running battles with the US Army before being defeated and captured on 3 August 1832. Karl Bodmer's images show great versatility and technical virtuosity and give us a uniquely accomplished and detailed picture of a previously little understood (and soon to vanish) way of life. Swiss-born Bodmer was engaged by Prince Maximilian zu Wied-Neuwied (1782-1867) specifically to provide a record of his travels in North America, principally among the Plains Indians. In the company of David Dreidoppel (Prince Maximilian's servant and hunting companion), their travels in North America were to last from 1832 to 1834. Well-armed with information and advice, the party finally left St.Louis, on the most important stage of their travels, aboard the steamer Yellow Stone on April 10 1833. They proceeded up the treacherous Missouri River along the line of forts established by the American Fur Company. At Bellevue they encountered their first Indians, then went on to make contact with the Sioux tribe, learning of and recording their little known ceremonial dances and powerful pride and dignity. Transferring from the Yellow Stone to another steamer, the Assiniboin, they continued to Fort Clark, visiting there the Mandan, Mintari and Crow tribes, then the Assiniboins at Fort Union, the main base of the American Fur Company. On a necessarily much smaller vessel they journeyed through the extraordinary geological scenery of that section of the Missouri to Fort Mackenzie in Montana, establishing a cautious friendship with the fearsome Blackfeet. From this, the westernmost point reached, it was considered too dangerous to continue and the return journey downstream began. The winter brought its own difficulties and discomforts, but Bodmer was still able to execute numerous studies of villages, dances and especially the people, who were often both intrigued and delighted by his work. The portraits are particularly notable for their capturing of individual personalities, as well as forming a primary account of what were to become virtually lost cultures. Graff 4648; Howes M443a; Pilling 2521; Sabin 47014; Wagner-Camp 76:1. Hand-coloured aquatint engraving by Hürlimann after Bodmer, blindstamp.

      [Bookseller: Donald A. Heald Rare Books (ABAA)]
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        Norway, and Her Laplanders, in 1841: With a Few Hints to the Salmon Fisher

      London John Murray 1842. G : in Good condition. Cover rubbed. Upper joint carcked. Wear to spine head. Library stamp and blind stamp to title and several text leaves. Contents bright and firm First Edition Brown hardback embossed cloth cover 230mm x 140mm (9" x 6"). 318pp + 8pp catalogue.

      [Bookseller: Barter Books]
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        A Ramble in Malta and Sicily, in the Autumn of 1841

      London: Tyler & Reed for Smith, Elder & Co, 1842. Royal octavo, chromolithographic additional title by Angas, printed by M. and N. Hanhart, engraved dedication plate, 12 tinted lithographic plates by Angas, two wood-engraved illustrations; plates a little spotted else very good in original green cloth, all edges gilt. Angas' first illustrated work. First edition of Angas' first illustrated work, published the year before he sailed for Australia. This is a subscriber's copy, signed John Abraham on the front free endpaper: there are one hundred and seventy-nine names (including 'Abraham, J. Esq.') on the list of subscribers, and one hundred and ninety-seven copies subscribed for. Angas early showed an interest in natural history and art, but as a young man took a place in a London office. He studied under the natural history artist Benjamin Waterhouse Hawkins, thanking the latter's 'new and infallible system' of drawing in the introduction to this work. In August 1841 he left on a tour of the Mediterranean, returning in November, and publishing this account of the trip less than a year later. The work features a handsome series of twelve lithographic plates, taken from his own sketches from nature and drawn by him on the stone. The letterpress is taken from Angas' journal and shows his lively and inquisitive imagination, as well as giving many descriptive details of the pictures. Now surprisingly rare, the Ramble shows Angas coming to maturity as an artist, and makes an important addition to any collection of Australian illustrated books.

      [Bookseller: Hordern House Rare Books]
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        A Journey in the Northern Island of New Zealand?

      George Rolwegan, Hobart Town 1842 - Duodecimo, 206 pp. including appendices; a little modest foxing yet a very good uncut copy in attractive recent green polished half calf. Dedicated to Lady Franklin. Scarce Hobart printed account of New Zealand travels. This copy has an interesting presentation inscription to the publisher's wife 'Mrs. Rolwegan, with the author's kind regards.' Hocken recommends the quality of Wade's descriptive account while the NZNB applauds it as 'a work of present day rarity and textual value'. Reverend Wade came to New Zealand with William Colenso as a superintendent of the press. He served for six years as a missionary in New Zealand before being installed as the minister of Harrington Street Chapel in Hobart. While serving in Hobart Wade evidently became acquainted with the Franklins, as his account is dedicated, with permission, to Lady Franklin (who also personally subscribed for 6 copies). The 'Appendix gives list of New Zealand plants furnished by Allan Cunningham, with excellent list of their native names' (Hocken).

      [Bookseller: Hordern House Rare Books]
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        Observations on the Poetics of Aristotle , by Metastasio... with a biographical notice of the author

      Sydney: Kemp & Fairfax, 1842. Small quarto; original embossed cloth boards with dark green calf spine gilt, partially unopened, fine. Perhaps the earliest philosophical work printed in Sydney? Rare, and very fine: a presentation copy (inscribed on the front endpaper to Walter Wrottersley "from the translator") of an unusual publication for this period in Australia, a translation of an obscure commentary on Aristotle. Almost nothing of a philosophical bent was published in Australia before the 1850s and the creation of the Universities of Sydney and Melbourne. Elwin says that he translated part of the eighteenth-century writer Metastasio's critical observations on the Poetics in order to place "such portion as appeared to be likely to engage the attention, as well from the nature of the immediate topic, as from the spirited manner in which it is treated… within reach of the English reader". Metastasio, or Pietro Antonio Domenico Trapassi, is best known today because Mozart used his "La Clemenzo di Tito" as the basis for his libretto. Ferguson originally entered the translator as Elwin Hastings, but the Addenda notes that his identity as Hastings Elwin was established by an inscribed presentation copy offered by Henry Cork, London, Cat. 5 (1929) No. 294. Hastings Elwin was a rather grand figure, friend of the poet Thomas Moore, elected to the NSW Legislative Council in 1843.

      [Bookseller: Hordern House Rare Books]
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