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Displayed below are some selected recent viaLibri matches for books published in 1804

        The British Classics

      London - John Sharpe, 1804 Book. Very Good. Hardcover. A wonderful complete collection of these classic works containing articles from great British newspapers of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, compiled by John Sharpe, renowned publisher of the early 1800s. Fourteen volumes of the original thirty-four within The British Classics collection. All works are complete within themselves, The Tatler infour volumes; The Spectator in eight volumes; andThe Guardian intwo volumes. Illustrated throughout with frontispiece engravings of the newspaper editors, and contributorsin each volume, and engraved title pages. Each volume also benefits from a further five beautifully engraved plate in each. The original Tatler was founded in 1709 by Richard Steele, who used the nom de plume Isaac Bickerstaff, Esquire, the first such consistently adopted journalistic persona. Steele's idea was to publish the news and gossip heard in London coffeehouses, hence the title, and seemingly, from the opening paragraph, to leave the subject of politics to the newspapers, while presenting Whiggish views and correcting middle-class manners, while instructing these Gentlemen, for the most part being Persons of strong Zeal, and weak Intellects. . . what to think. To assure complete coverage of local gossip, a reporter was placed in each of the city's popular coffeehouses, or at least such were the datelines: accounts of manners and mores were datelined from White's; literary notes from Will's; notes of antiquarian interest were dated from the Grecian Coffee House; and news items from St. Jamess Coffee House. The Spectator was a daily publication founded by Joseph Addison and Richard Steele in England after they met at Charterhouse School; it lasted from 1711 to 1712. The paperappeared thrice weekly for sixmonths, and these papers when collected toformeight volumes. The stated goal of The Spectator was to enliven morality with wit, and to temper wit with morality. . . to bring philosophy out of the closets and libraries, schools and colleges, to dwell in clubs and assemblies, at tea-tables and coffeehouses (No. 10). It recommended that its readers consider it part of the tea-equipage (No. 10) and not leave the house without reading it in the morning. One of its functions was to provide readers with educated, topical talking points, and advice in how to carry on conversations and social interactions in a polite manner. In keeping with the values of Enlightenment philosophies of their time, the authors of The Spectator promoted family, marriage, and courtesy. The Guardian was a newspaper published in London from 12 March to 1 October 1713. It was also founded by Richard Steele, and featured contributions from Joseph Addison, Thomas Tickell, Alexander Pope and Ambrose Philips. Sir Richard Steele was an Irish writer and politician, remembered as the founder of these three influential British newspapers. Condition: In original diced calf bindings with gilt designs to the spines. Externally, rubbing to the boards and spines, with wear to extremities. Calf is cracking slightly to all joints, and several hinges are slightly strained. Internally, all volumes are firmly bound and bright throughout, instances of spotting throughout each volume, which is heavier to the first and last pages. Armorial bookplate to the front pastedown of each volume. Overall: GOOD..

      [Bookseller: Rooke Books]
 1.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  


        The Works of Plato, viz. his fifty-five Dialogues and twelve Epistles, translated from the Greek; nine of the dialogues by the late F. Sydenham, and the remainder by Thomas Taylor: with occasional annotations on the nine dialogues translated by Sydenham,

      Printed for T. Taylor: London. Hardcover. 5 volumes. Rebound in library red cloth. Wide margins, errata slip, one page tip tape repaired. Some pages professionally cleaned. Scarce. A very good set. First edition of The Works of Plato in English. * Rare books make Fine Gifts. Shipped in new box. Free tracking USA. Quality, Value, Experience. . Very Good. 1804.

      [Bookseller: Robinson Street Books, IOBA]
 2.   Check availability:     IOBABooks     Link/Print  


        A Topographical Map of the County of Essex. Constructed from the Trigonometrical Survey Made by Order of the Board of Ordnance

      London: W. Faden, July 6th, 1804. . Map dimensions 63 x 87 cm, overall dimensions 64.5 x 88 cm. An attractive folding map of the county with original colour in block and outline. Scale: ½ inch to one mile. Dissected into 21 sections and mounted on linen, both folded end sections with marbled paper tabs, one side with a publisher’s label, folds into original marbled paper slipcase with printed label to upper cover. Some wear to the case with the upper edge of one joint cracked, the map slightly browned overall, otherwise a very good copy. Essex was the second Ordnance Survey map to be published, preceded by Kent in 1801. This is the true first edition of their map of the county, the full four sheet version being published the following year. Rare, the only institutional copies found are in the British Library, Cambridge and Oxford. The only auction record is the Wardington copy, sold at Sotheby's in 2006.

      [Bookseller: Bow Windows Bookshop]
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        A Catalogue of all the Books Printed in the United States, With Their Prices, and Places Where Published Annexed

      Boston, Printed for the Booksellers, Jan. 1804. 79 p.; 17.5 cm. The earliest American booktrade bibliography and an early sales catalog. With the 1980 Houghton Library exhibition catalog which included this. Shaw/ Shoemaker, American Imprints 5987 records five copies. Stock#NS0118. Vg/ stitched, spine has marbled paper strip.

      [Bookseller: The Owl at the Bridge]
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        THE LIFE OF GEORGE WASHINGTON, COMMANDER IN CHIEF OF THE AMERICAN FORCES, DURING THE WAR WHICH ESTABLISHED THE INDEPENDENCE OF HIS COUNTRY, AND FIRST PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES

      Philadelphia: C.P. Wayne, 1804. Five volumes with the atlas. (Six volumes total). Red leather spine labels. All five text volumes show general wear. All covers are intact. 1" piece missing from top of spine of Volume 5. Front free endpaper missing from Volumes 1-2. The Washington portrait frontispiece in Volume 1 shows heavy foxing as does the title-page. Other volumes have varying degrees of foxing and browning, sometimes heavy . The atlas volume does not contain the list of subscribers, thus a second printing. It is bound in 1/2 brown cloth over green paper-covered boards with paper label on front cover. Covers show mild to moderate soiling. (See photos.)Title-page is foxed. All 10 hand-colored maps are in excellent condition. A monumental work by the fourth Chief Justice of the United States Supreme Court at an affordable price. See Howes M317. . First Edition. Full Contemporary Calf. General Cover Wear.. Octavo.

      [Bookseller: Glenn Books]
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        The Life of George Washington: Commander in Chief of the American Forces during the War which established the Independence of His Country, and first President of the United States, etc. (FIVE VOLUMES)

      Printed for Richard Phillips, 1804-01-01. Leather Bound. Good. 5 volume set. 22 cm. Full leather bindings. 2 volumes in original leather, 3 in modern leather. Excellent bindings and covers. Foxing/toning throughout. Vol. 1 is missing title page, good besides. Contemporary signature, William Kelly. No Atlas. Sabin 44788 Compiled under the inspection of Bushrod Washington, from original papers ; to which is prefixed an introduction containing a compendious view of the colonies planted by the English on the continent of North America, from their settlement to the commencement of that war which terminated in their independence ; by John Marshall.

      [Bookseller: SequiturBooks]
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        Travels of Anacharsis the younger in Greece. During the middle of the fourth century, before the Christian æra.... The first American edition

      Philadelphia: Pr. by Bartholomew Graves and William McLaughlin for Jacob Johnson & Co., 1804. 8vo signed in 4s (22 cm, 8.625"). Vol. I: xviii, 419, [1 (blank)] pp.; fold. map; II: [1] f., iii, [1 (blank)], 403, [1 (blank)] pp.; III: vii, [1 (blank)], 463, [1 (blank)] pp. (lacking half-title); IV: vii, [1 (blank)], 496 pp. (lacking half-title). Translated from the French by William Beaumont for the original English printing. Really a textbook on the daily life and culture of ancient Greece, primarily centered around Athens, this lengthy work is "so written, that the reader may frequently be induced to imagine he is perusing a work of mere amusement, invention, and fancy" (p. iii). Footnotes citing a multitude of classical sources back up Barthelemy's imagined journey, which is illustrated with an attractive engraved map by du Bocage. Shaw & Shoemaker 5809. Recently rebound in period-style tan cloth over light blue paper sides, spines with paper labels. Contemporary ownership inscription to front fly-leaf in each volume. Map with light offsetting and short tear just starting along one fold. First 20 leaves of vol. II waterstained and last 10 foxed; scattered incidences of spotting in all volumes, pages generally clean. => A nice-looking set, and still — as it always was! — a work offering a pleasant way to absorb ancient history.

      [Bookseller: SessaBks, A Division of the Philadelphia]
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        View of Sydney Cove, New South Wales

      London,: F. Jukes, 10 April, 1804.. Hand-coloured aquatint, 435 x 605 mm., a good example, complete with caption, in an old frame. A fine early view of Sydney, just the second view of Australia to have been separately published, and the earliest depiction of boat-building in the infant colony.The few large separately-issued early Australian views are all of great rarity, and this magnificent coloured aquatint engraving is a particularly good example of this famous image with excellent original colouring.Edward Dayes, the English artist of this fine aquatint, had earlier links with Australia. He had worked on sketches by the convict artist Thomas Watling which were published in David Collins's An Account of the English Colony in New South Wales, London, 1798, and on engravings published in John Hunter's An Historical Journal of the Transactions at Port Jackson and Norfolk Island, London, 1793.The caption to the engraving reads "From an Original Picture in the possession of Isaac Clementson Esq. Drawn by E. Dayes from a Picture painted at the Colony. Engraved by F. Jukes, London, Published April 10, 1804 by F. Jukes, No. 10 Howland St.". The original picture referred to here, now lost, was presumably a painting done in the colony by Thomas Watling.The Government Dock Yard, established by John Hunter, shows the frame of Governor Hunter's brig 'Portland' partly finished; her frame had been laid down in 1797, but as Governor King noted in 'Return of Government Shipping', 9th November 1802, five years later she was still "in Frame, no shipwrights to work on her".First Views of Australia, plates 54 and 55.

      [Bookseller: Hordern House Rare Books]
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        THE LIFE OF GEORGE WASHINGTON

      Premium quality bindings, 1804-7 1st edition, with 1st edition Atlas and Subscriber's list, 1/2 leather complete set in six volumes, THE LIFE OF GEORGE WASHINGTON by John Marshall, printed and published by C P Wayne, Philadelphia Pa., approximately 4,500 pages and complete with colonial history.  Excellent premium crimson moroccan leather bound volumes adorned with much gilt. Overall very clean, minor to moderate foxing, no stains, all have very tight bindings, ruff cut page edging, gold gilt  top edging, all near fine, a real solid set.  1807 first edition Atlas has original leather binding, minimal light foxing, all double and single page maps, complete with subscribers names listed, all pages present, none loose.  Volumes cover the entire life of Washington, along with the Revolutionary War from Bunker Hill and the death of Joseph Warren, Lexington, Tarrytown, Bennington, Yorktown,  Cowpens, King's Mountain, Brandywine, battlefield at Trenton, Princeton, Millstone, Waxhaws, capture of New York, Crown Point, Lake Champlain, White Plains retreat, occupation of Boston, the harsh winter at Valley Forge, defense of Charleston South Carolina, attack on Quebec, Arnold's journey through the wilderness of Maine, many letters and writings, officers, Generals Putnam, Benedict Arnold, Gates, Schuyler, St. Clair, Stark, Lee, Greene, Sullivan, the Marquis de LaFayette, Indian enemies, and many other facts exhaustively covered from Washingtons' actual notes and letters.  A wonderful read and a must for any quality US history library, the buyer will be very pleased.  These have been beautifully rebound long ago, volumes are over 208 years old, atlas is original. See the many photos provided, ask any questions.  Thank you for viewing, see our other fine books for sale, many fine leather.

      [Bookseller: Smith House Books & Antiques]
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        [Pears] King Catherine Pear (Catherine Royal); Lemon Pear; Late Petite Muscat; Oignon La Reine; Long stalked Blanquet [Pl. LXXVII]

      [London]: G. Brookshaw, [1804-1812]. Aquatint engraving, with some stipple, printed in colours and finished by hand. Very good condition. 17 3/4 x 13 3/4 inches. 21 3/4 x 18 1/8 inches. A fine image from Brookshaw's masterpiece: 'Pomona Britannica; or, A Collection of the Most Esteemed Fruits'. George Brookshaw's 'Pomona Britannica' is the finest work on fruit and flowers ever produced. Its breathtaking images display a level of technical virtuosity and beauty that distinguish this magnificent book as a true work of art. As a retired cabinetmaker, Brookshaw produced his seminal botanical study late in his career, at first publishing it in parts and then as a complete edition in 1812. The fact that this outstanding work took ten years to complete is evident in the quality of its images and the care with which Brookshaw executed each individual picture. 'Pomona Britannica' was produced as a visual record of the best available varieties of fruit in an attempt to encourage gardeners to experiment with growing fruit, and illustrates examples found in the Royal gardens at Hampton Court, Kensington Gardens, and the private gardens of the Prince of Wales in Blackheath. 'Pomona Britannica' differs from other botanical books in its dark aquatinted backgrounds and its stylized compositions. By using aquatint to create a contrasting background, Brookshaw manages to produce a truly dramatic effect. His use of stylized composition distinguishes his pictures from the dry scientific illustrations found in other botanical studies and creates an exceptionally beautiful visual experience. 'Pomona Britannica' is not only a didactic study, it is a masterpiece of illustration in which every picture is a testament to the artist's talent and ingenuity. Cf. Dunthorne 50; cf. Great Flower Books (1990) p. 81; cf. Nissen BBI 244; cf. Sandra Raphael An Oak Spring Pomona 40a.

      [Bookseller: Donald Heald Rare Books]
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        An Inquiry Into the Nature and Origin of Public Wealth : and Into the Means and Causes of its Increase / by the Earl of Lauderdale

      Edinburgh : Printed For Arch. Constable & Co. ; London : T. N. Longman & O. Rees, 1804. 1st Edition. Physical desc. : [1-8] 1-482 [483-488] p. ; 22 cm; folding table. Subject: Economics. Wealth. Early Political Economy. Notes: Signatures: 4 p. [? ]. , A-Ggp8s, Hhp4s (first four leaves of each signature signed; 2Hh folds out to c. A. 32 x 27 cm. ) . Referenced by: OCLC 15814475. Goldsmiths'-Kress library of economic literature, no. 18801. Finely bound in modern aniline calf over marble boards. Raised bands with the title blocked direct in gilt. An exceptional copy - scans and additional bibliographic detail on request.

      [Bookseller: MW Books Ltd.]
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        KALENDARIO MANUAL Y GUIA DE FORASTEROS EN MADRID, para el año de 1804.

      - Madrid; Imprenta Real, 1804. 16º (11 cm.) Retrato de Carlos III y Maria Luisa., 216 p. = 234 p. (Estado militar). Encuadernación en pasta española con orla dorada en el lomo. Buen estado, leves rozes en la encuadernación. Revisado completo. Año: 1804

      [Bookseller: LIBRERIA MARGARITA DE DIOS]
 12.   Check availability:     IberLibro     Link/Print  


        Catalogue des Livres rares et précieux, et des Manuscrits, composant la Bibliothèque de M***,

      dont la Vente se fera le Jeudi 22 Germinal (12 Avril 1804) et jours suivans... xii, 320, [4] pp. 8vo, cont. speckled calf (rather nicely rebacked with the orig. red morocco label laid-down), double gilt fillet round sides, spine gilt. Paris: G. De Bure père et fils, 1804. An important sale, containing a large portion of books from the famous De Boze collection. De Boze's library was acquired in 1753 before the scheduled auction jointly by Cotte (1721-1804), Président au Parlement de Paris, and Charles Robert Boutin, Maître des Requêtes, for the sum of 83,000 livres. They, in turn, sold most of the fifteenth-century books, reputedly for 80,000 livres, to Louis-Jean Gaignat, except for the Gutenberg Bible, of which he probably already owned a copy. Cotte and Boutin then divided up among themselves the books they wished to keep, and sold the remainder by auction through Martin in 1754. This was one of the great and most highly anticipated sales of the period which dispersed a very large portion of the legendary De Boze collection formed more than fifty years before. The sale was an enormous success and Didot was a major buyer. Cotte made his first important purchases at Count d'Hoym's sale in 1738. Fine copy with the four-page schedule of sale at end. 2422 lots plus two further numbered lots and one lot of three dozen skins of red morocco. Pages [308]-320 list another ca. 180 lots of manuscripts. Priced throughout in a contemporary hand. This catalogue is rare; I have not had a copy before. ❧ Gustave Brunet, Dictionnaire de Bibliologie Catholique, col. 439-"Les classiques grecs et et latins y dominent. Belles éditions et exemplaires de choix payés alors à des prix qu'on ne retrouverait plus aujourd-hui." Guigard, II, pp. 162-63. Peignot, p. 91-"Catalogue intéressant; beaucoup d'articles se sont vendu exorbitamment cher." .

      [Bookseller: Jonathan A. Hill, Bookseller, Inc.]
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        [GEOGRAPHIA ANTIQUA: BEING A COMPLETE SETT OF MAPS OF ANTIENT GEOGRAPHY]

      [London]: [Rivington], [1804]. Disbound. The maps are quite clean but with offsetting. One map has a small, dark stain toward the top. Very Good. Small quarto (8-1/4" x 10"), disbound, with one original board present. Lacking the title page but with the table of contents and all 33 double-page maps present. The first 20 were engraved by Richard William Seale; William Henry Toms engraved the remainder. None of the maps is colored, and most measure about 12" x 8-1/4" on 15" x 10" pages. Apparently Seale issued these beginning about 1731, and they continued in print until about 1819. The paper is watermarked 1804. Christoph Cellarius (1638-1707) was a German classicist and geographer who was an early advocate of using maps to illustrate his publications. His most notable publication was Geographia Antiqua... (1686), and it was reissued throughout the next century and a half in various forms. Apparently the combination of maps varied for different editions. Most of the maps in this edition are the classical ones: the Roman Empire, ancient Greece, Macedonia, Palestine, etc.

      [Bookseller: Charles Agvent]
 14.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  


        Phaethornis Pygmaeus, Pl. 42 (Swallow-tail)

      John Gould (1804-1881) was an English ornithologist, self-taught artist and naturalist. Gould first worked as a gardener under his father in the Royal Gardens of Windsor from 1818-1824, where he began his illustrations. He became an expert taxidermist, opening his own practice in London in 1824 and in 1827 he became the first Curator and Preserver at the museum of the Zoological Society of London.Through his work he was able to meet with the country?s leading naturalists and view new collections of birds given to the Zoological Society. His interest in birds was continually developing and in 1830 he published his first volume on birds, ?A Century of Birds From the Himalaya Mountains.? For the next fifty years, Gould, his wife and artists working with them traveled around Asia, the East Indies and Australia. His wife Elizabeth and other artists were able to transfer his sketches to stone; hand print and hand-color them.Of all his works, many of Gould?s best-known images come from this beautiful and comprehensive ?Monograph of the Trochilidae, or Family of Hummingbirds?. One of his largest productions, the Hummingbirds was also the most painstaking, meticulously detailed project that the ornithologist attempted. In order to create accurate representations of the tiny, delicately beautiful birds, Gould invented a new method of coloring, using metallic pigments to reproduce the iridescence of their plumage. Most images also show at least one subject in flight to further accentuate the coloring of their feathers. All of the hummingbirds are drawn to scale and are anatomically correct to the smallest detail, their brilliant coloring highlighted with gold and transparent luster. Most of the subjects in the book were taken from Gould?s personal collection of hummingbird specimens.This magnificently hand-colored lithograph, "Phaethornis Pygmaeus", measures 21.75" x 15" and is in excellent condition with a few light foxing marks. These hummingbirds, also known as Pygmy Hermits or Reddish Hermits, are colored with reddish undersides, green wings and patterned tail-feathers. Precise lines define and detail each feather, giving these hummingbirds dimension and their positioning, one in the nest and one outside, show their small size and add to this dynamic composition.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries]
 15.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  


        MÈmoire sur le nouveau genre Pyrosoma

      Paris,: An XII, that is, 1804.. Quarto, hand-coloured plate and 10 pp.; some toning, but an excellent copy in modern marbled paper wrappers. Very rare indeed: the first printing of one of PÈron's earliest scientific articles based on his work during the Baudin voyage.In 1804, newly returned from the voyage, PÈron was living in Paris, where he and Lesueur began work on the official Baudin account. He had been resigned to the fact that by sending many of his specimens home, the scientific descriptions of a great number fell to important figures like Cuvier and Jussieu. On his return, however, he pressed on to publish several essays of his own, and one of the first was this essay on "Pyrosoma", bioluminescent organisms common to warm waters (from the Greek pyro "fire", soma "body"). His work on unheralded sea creatures like pyrosoma was the product of his tremendous collecting enthusiasm; he and Lesueur had been overwhelmed and delighted with the myriad different oceanic species they had discovered during the voyage, and later commented that 'their number and diversity afforded an inexhaustible fund of pleasure, and were the subject of philosophical enthusiasm' (quoted in Duyker, FranÁois PÈron, p. 87).'PÈron's work on jellyfish would ultimately include pioneering observations of their anatomy and physiology, and the collection of many previously undescribed species' (Duyker, p. 64). It was for this reason that the various mollusca and zoophytes he collected were so beautifully illustrated in the official account: the subject of the present article, the Pyrosoma atlanticum, was later figured at the upper left corner of plate 30 of the Atlas. The species is also, interestingly, one of only a handful to now be named after PÈron, as its official nomenclature has since been updated to Pyrosoma atlanticum PÈron, 1804.Any separate scientific publication relating to the voyage is a rarity: very few indeed survive, probably because of the limited audience to which they were distributed. Although not noted here, this article was published the same year in Annales du MusÈum national d'Histoire naturelle (pp. 437-46); this does confirm, however, that the present article, newly paginated, is a proper offprint rather than simply an extract from the museum journal. Such offprints, where they exist, are recognised as the original editions since they normally precede the journal printing and were typically done in very limited numbers for the author to distribute.

      [Bookseller: Hordern House Rare Books]
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        White-Fronted Goose, Anser albifrons; Steph

      This splendid hand-colored, folio-size lithograph, "White-Fronted Goose, Anser albifrons; Steph", from John Gould?s (1804-1881) monumental book "Birds Europe" (1832-1837) is in very good condition with light foxing and a small pencil mark on the lower right corner. Measuring 14" x 21", this lithograph magnificently displays the author?s scientific skill and attention to detail. These geese are expertly hand-colored and finely detailed. The goose in the goose in the foreground has a taupe colored body, with white and gray accenting on the back and wings and black spots on its belly. The goose in the background is colored in rich taupe with gray and white highlighting. Each geese has a white face and colored beak tip. Precise lines define and detail each feather, giving these birds great dimension and naturalistic qualities.John Gould was an English ornithologist, self-taught artist and naturalist. Gould first worked as a gardener under his father in the Royal Gardens of Windsor from 1818-1824, where he began his illustrations. He became an expert taxidermist, opening his own practice in London in 1824 and in 1827 he became the first Curator and Preserver at the museum of the Zoological Society of London. Through his work he was able to meet with the country?s leading naturalists and view new collections of birds given to the Zoological Society. His interest in birds was continually developing and in 1830 he published his first volume on birds, ?A Century of Birds From the Himalaya Mountains.? For the next fifty years, Gould, his wife and artists working with them traveled around Asia, the East Indies and Australia. His wife Elizabeth and other artists were able to transfer his sketches to stone; hand print and hand-color them.One of the most accomplished and engaging natural history works of the 19th century, ?The Birds of Europe? was also the first of Gould's works to feature plates by Edward Lear. A total of sixty-eight images bear Lear's name, and they are among the most remarkable bird drawings ever made. Lear endowed his illustrations with some measure of his own whimsy and intelligence, and his style is at once fluidly spontaneous and realistically precise.In this way, the images of ?The Birds of Europe? are amazingly distinctive, while also highly realistic. Gould undertook this work partly in an effort to redress the imbalance between the study of local and foreign ornithology. Gould portrayed birds native to Europe in a manner that had only been thought appropriate for the colorful species of distant places. In this way he managed to draw much popular interest back to native birds, which were suddenly considered equally beautiful to exotic species.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries]
 17.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  


        Oxypogon Lindenii, Plate 183 (Linden?s Helmet-crest)

      John Gould (1804-1881) was an English ornithologist, self-taught artist and naturalist. Gould first worked as a gardener under his father in the Royal Gardens of Windsor from 1818-1824, where he began his illustrations. He became an expert taxidermist, opening his own practice in London in 1824 and in 1827 he became the first Curator and Preserver at the museum of the Zoological Society of London.Through his work he was able to meet with the country?s leading naturalists and view new collections of birds given to the Zoological Society. His interest in birds was continually developing and in 1830 he published his first volume on birds, ?A Century of Birds From the Himalaya Mountains.? For the next fifty years, Gould, his wife and artists working with them traveled around Asia, the East Indies and Australia. His wife Elizabeth and other artists were able to transfer his sketches to stone; hand print and hand-color them. Of all his works, many of Gould?s best-known images come from this beautiful and comprehensive ?Monograph of the Trochilidae, or Family of Hummingbirds?.One of his largest productions, the Hummingbirds was also the most painstaking, meticulously detailed project that the ornithologist attempted. In order to create accurate representations of the tiny, delicately beautiful birds, Gould invented a new method of coloring, using metallic pigments to reproduce the iridescence of their plumage. Most images also show at least one subject in flight to further accentuate the coloring of their feathers. All of the hummingbirds are drawn to scale and are anatomically correct to the smallest detail, their brilliant coloring highlighted with gold and transparent luster. Most of the subjects in the book were taken from Gould?s personal collection of hummingbird specimens.This magnificently hand-colored lithograph, "Oxypogon Lindenii", measures 21.75" x 15" and is in very good condition with light foxing marks throughout. This lithograph shows the three hummingbirds, commonly called Linden's Helmet-crests, interacting with each other while resting on some branches. These dynamic hummingbirds are expertly hand-colored with rich green bodies, large, white-striped tail feathers, and purple-grey wings. The juvenile has a white spotted underside, while the adults have while necks, chins and black and white crests rising above their heads. The hummingbirds are illustrated resting on a finely colored branch with rich green leaves and delicate pink flowers.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries]
 18.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  


        Phaethornis Hispidus, Gould, Plate 22 (Hairy Hermit)

      John Gould (1804-1881) was an English ornithologist, self-taught artist and naturalist. Gould first worked as a gardener under his father in the Royal Gardens of Windsor from 1818-1824, where he began his illustrations. He became an expert taxidermist, opening his own practice in London in 1824 and in 1827 he became the first Curator and Preserver at the museum of the Zoological Society of London.Through his work he was able to meet with the country?s leading naturalists and view new collections of birds given to the Zoological Society. His interest in birds was continually developing and in 1830 he published his first volume on birds, ?A Century of Birds From the Himalaya Mountains.? For the next fifty years, Gould, his wife and artists working with them traveled around Asia, the East Indies and Australia. His wife Elizabeth and other artists were able to transfer his sketches to stone; hand print and hand-color them.Of all his works, many of Gould?s best-known images come from this beautiful and comprehensive ?Monograph of the Trochilidae, or Family of Hummingbirds?. One of his largest productions, the Hummingbirds was also the most painstaking, meticulously detailed project that the ornithologist attempted. In order to create accurate representations of the tiny, delicately beautiful birds, Gould invented a new method of coloring, using metallic pigments to reproduce the iridescence of their plumage. Most images also show at least one subject in flight to further accentuate the coloring of their feathers. All of the hummingbirds are drawn to scale and are anatomically correct to the smallest detail, their brilliant coloring highlighted with gold and transparent luster. Most of the subjects in the book were taken from Gould?s personal collection of hummingbird specimens.This magnificently hand-colored lithograph, "Phaethornis Hispidus, Gould", measures 21" x 14" and is in excellent condition. This lithograph shows the two hummingbirds, commonly called Hairy Hermits, in search of nectar to feed on. These large hummingbirds are expertly hand-colored with rich green backs, pale blue undersides and wingtips and a blend of green and blue patterned tail feathers with white tips. The are illustrated with their long, thin breaks reaching for nectar from delicate white flowers. The positioning of the bodies of the hummingbirds allows for their dynamic coloring and patterns to be appreciated.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries]
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