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Displayed below are some selected recent viaLibri matches for books published in 1804

        Black Kite, milvus ater

      This splendid hand-colored, folio-size lithograph, "Black Kite, milvus ater", from John Gould?s (1804-1881) monumental book "Birds Europe" (1832-1837) is in very good condition with light foxing around the edges. Measuring 21.5" x 14.75", this lithograph magnificently displays the author?s scientific skill and attention to detail.Black Kite's are medium sized birds of prey also called raptors. As expertly illustrated, Black Kites have a forked tail and angled wings, allowing them to glide and soar while searching for food. This Black Kite is expertly colored with feathers in rich shades of brown from head to tail. Also detailed is its talons that hold strongly to the branch and its golden eye and yellow and black bill.John Gould was an English ornithologist, self-taught artist and naturalist. Gould first worked as a gardener under his father in the Royal Gardens of Windsor from 1818-1824, where he began his illustrations. He became an expert taxidermist, opening his own practice in London in 1824 and in 1827 he became the first Curator and Preserver at the museum of the Zoological Society of London. Through his work he was able to meet with the country?s leading naturalists and view new collections of birds given to the Zoological Society.His interest in birds was continually developing and in 1830 he published his first volume on birds, ?A Century of Birds From the Himalaya Mountains.? For the next fifty years, Gould, his wife and artists working with them traveled around Asia, the East Indies and Australia. His wife Elizabeth and other artists were able to transfer his sketches to stone; hand print and hand-color them.One of the most accomplished and engaging natural history works of the 19th century, ?The Birds of Europe? was also the first of Gould's works to feature plates by Edward Lear. A total of sixty-eight images bear Lear's name, and they are among the most remarkable bird drawings ever made. Lear endowed his illustrations with some measure of his own whimsy and intelligence, and his style is at once fluidly spontaneous and realistically precise. In this way, the images of ?The Birds of Europe? are amazingly distinctive, while also highly realistic. Gould undertook this work partly in an effort to redress the imbalance between the study of local and foreign ornithology. Gould portrayed birds native to Europe in a manner that had only been thought appropriate for the colorful species of distant places. In this way he managed to draw much popular interest back to native birds, which were suddenly considered equally beautiful to exotic species.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries]
 1.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  


        Oxypogon Lindenii, Plate 183 (Linden?s Helmet-crest)

      John Gould (1804-1881) was an English ornithologist, self-taught artist and naturalist. Gould first worked as a gardener under his father in the Royal Gardens of Windsor from 1818-1824, where he began his illustrations. He became an expert taxidermist, opening his own practice in London in 1824 and in 1827 he became the first Curator and Preserver at the museum of the Zoological Society of London.Through his work he was able to meet with the country?s leading naturalists and view new collections of birds given to the Zoological Society. His interest in birds was continually developing and in 1830 he published his first volume on birds, ?A Century of Birds From the Himalaya Mountains.? For the next fifty years, Gould, his wife and artists working with them traveled around Asia, the East Indies and Australia. His wife Elizabeth and other artists were able to transfer his sketches to stone; hand print and hand-color them. Of all his works, many of Gould?s best-known images come from this beautiful and comprehensive ?Monograph of the Trochilidae, or Family of Hummingbirds?.One of his largest productions, the Hummingbirds was also the most painstaking, meticulously detailed project that the ornithologist attempted. In order to create accurate representations of the tiny, delicately beautiful birds, Gould invented a new method of coloring, using metallic pigments to reproduce the iridescence of their plumage. Most images also show at least one subject in flight to further accentuate the coloring of their feathers. All of the hummingbirds are drawn to scale and are anatomically correct to the smallest detail, their brilliant coloring highlighted with gold and transparent luster. Most of the subjects in the book were taken from Gould?s personal collection of hummingbird specimens.This magnificently hand-colored lithograph, "Oxypogon Lindenii", measures 21.75" x 15" and is in very good condition with light foxing marks throughout. This lithograph shows the three hummingbirds, commonly called Linden's Helmet-crests, interacting with each other while resting on some branches. These dynamic hummingbirds are expertly hand-colored with rich green bodies, large, white-striped tail feathers, and purple-grey wings. The juvenile has a white spotted underside, while the adults have while necks, chins and black and white crests rising above their heads. The hummingbirds are illustrated resting on a finely colored branch with rich green leaves and delicate pink flowers.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries]
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        Phaethornis Hispidus, Gould, Plate 22 (Hairy Hermit)

      John Gould (1804-1881) was an English ornithologist, self-taught artist and naturalist. Gould first worked as a gardener under his father in the Royal Gardens of Windsor from 1818-1824, where he began his illustrations. He became an expert taxidermist, opening his own practice in London in 1824 and in 1827 he became the first Curator and Preserver at the museum of the Zoological Society of London.Through his work he was able to meet with the country?s leading naturalists and view new collections of birds given to the Zoological Society. His interest in birds was continually developing and in 1830 he published his first volume on birds, ?A Century of Birds From the Himalaya Mountains.? For the next fifty years, Gould, his wife and artists working with them traveled around Asia, the East Indies and Australia. His wife Elizabeth and other artists were able to transfer his sketches to stone; hand print and hand-color them.Of all his works, many of Gould?s best-known images come from this beautiful and comprehensive ?Monograph of the Trochilidae, or Family of Hummingbirds?. One of his largest productions, the Hummingbirds was also the most painstaking, meticulously detailed project that the ornithologist attempted. In order to create accurate representations of the tiny, delicately beautiful birds, Gould invented a new method of coloring, using metallic pigments to reproduce the iridescence of their plumage. Most images also show at least one subject in flight to further accentuate the coloring of their feathers. All of the hummingbirds are drawn to scale and are anatomically correct to the smallest detail, their brilliant coloring highlighted with gold and transparent luster. Most of the subjects in the book were taken from Gould?s personal collection of hummingbird specimens.This magnificently hand-colored lithograph, "Phaethornis Hispidus, Gould", measures 21" x 14" and is in excellent condition. This lithograph shows the two hummingbirds, commonly called Hairy Hermits, in search of nectar to feed on. These large hummingbirds are expertly hand-colored with rich green backs, pale blue undersides and wingtips and a blend of green and blue patterned tail feathers with white tips. The are illustrated with their long, thin breaks reaching for nectar from delicate white flowers. The positioning of the bodies of the hummingbirds allows for their dynamic coloring and patterns to be appreciated.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries]
 3.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  


        Klais Guimeti, Plate 7 (Guimet?s Flutterer)

      John Gould (1804-1881) was an English ornithologist, self-taught artist and naturalist. Gould first worked as a gardener under his father in the Royal Gardens of Windsor from 1818-1824, where he began his illustrations. He became an expert taxidermist, opening his own practice in London in 1824 and in 1827 he became the first Curator and Preserver at the museum of the Zoological Society of London.Through his work he was able to meet with the country?s leading naturalists and view new collections of birds given to the Zoological Society. His interest in birds was continually developing and in 1830 he published his first volume on birds, ?A Century of Birds From the Himalaya Mountains.? For the next fifty years, Gould, his wife and artists working with them traveled around Asia, the East Indies and Australia. His wife Elizabeth and other artists were able to transfer his sketches to stone; hand print and hand-color them.Of all his works, many of Gould?s best-known images come from this beautiful and comprehensive ?Monograph of the Trochilidae, or Family of Hummingbirds?. One of his largest productions, the Hummingbirds was also the most painstaking, meticulously detailed project that the ornithologist attempted. In order to create accurate representations of the tiny, delicately beautiful birds, Gould invented a new method of coloring, using metallic pigments to reproduce the iridescence of their plumage. Most images also show at least one subject in flight to further accentuate the coloring of their feathers. All of the hummingbirds are drawn to scale and are anatomically correct to the smallest detail, their brilliant coloring highlighted with gold and transparent luster. Most of the subjects in the book were taken from Gould?s personal collection of hummingbird specimens.This magnificently hand-colored lithograph, "Klais Guimeti", measures 21.75" x 15" and is in excellent condition. This lithograph shows the two hummingbirds, commonly called Guimet's Flutterer's, resting on some branches. These dynamic hummingbirds are expertly hand-colored with rich green bodies and lighter undersides. The bird in the foreground has a more colorful body with deep indigo colored head. The smaller bird in the background has a lighter underside with a blue-green forehead and white win-tips on its tail feathers. The birds are perched on a finely colored and well detailed tree branch with green leaves.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries]
 4.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  


        Phaethornis Intermedius, Plate 30 (Middle Sized Hermit)

      John Gould (1804-1881) was an English ornithologist, self-taught artist and naturalist. Gould first worked as a gardener under his father in the Royal Gardens of Windsor from 1818-1824, where he began his illustrations. He became an expert taxidermist, opening his own practice in London in 1824 and in 1827 he became the first Curator and Preserver at the museum of the Zoological Society of London.Through his work he was able to meet with the country?s leading naturalists and view new collections of birds given to the Zoological Society. His interest in birds was continually developing and in 1830 he published his first volume on birds, ?A Century of Birds From the Himalaya Mountains.? For the next fifty years, Gould, his wife and artists working with them traveled around Asia, the East Indies and Australia. His wife Elizabeth and other artists were able to transfer his sketches to stone; hand print and hand-color them. Of all his works, many of Gould?s best-known images come from this beautiful and comprehensive ?Monograph of the Trochilidae, or Family of Hummingbirds?.One of his largest productions, the Hummingbirds was also the most painstaking, meticulously detailed project that the ornithologist attempted. In order to create accurate representations of the tiny, delicately beautiful birds, Gould invented a new method of coloring, using metallic pigments to reproduce the iridescence of their plumage. Most images also show at least one subject in flight to further accentuate the coloring of their feathers. All of the hummingbirds are drawn to scale and are anatomically correct to the smallest detail, their brilliant coloring highlighted with gold and transparent luster. Most of the subjects in the book were taken from Gould?s personal collection of hummingbird specimens.This magnificently hand-colored lithograph, "Phaethornis Intermedius", measures 21.75" x 15" and is in excellent condition. This lithograph shows two hummingbirds, commonly called Middle Sized Hermits, resting on delicate green plants. These hummingbirds are expertly hand-colored with rich green backs and brown undersides with white and black freckled necks and tails. they have white accented wingtips and long, orange accents on their beaks and eyebrows. Their dynamic positioning allows for their back and underside patterning to be appreciated.

      [Bookseller: Arader Galleries]
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