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Displayed below are some selected recent viaLibri matches for books published in 1794

        Minutes of the Proceedings of the ... Convention of Delegates from the Abolition Societies Established in Different Parts of the United States, Assembled at Philadelphia [First, Second, Third, Fourth, Fifth, and Seventh Conventions]

      Philadelphia: Printed by Zachariah Poulson, Junr.. (1794-1801). First. Six sewn pamphlets in plain paper wrappers: 30, [2]; 32; 32; 59; 20; 55pp. Three (1794, 1797, 1801) are untrimmed in original plain paper wrappers; the other three (1795, 1796, 1798) are trimmed in early plain paper wrappers. The first pamphlet from 1794 has a contemporary signature of Samuel Rodman on the top of the title page; the fourth pamphlet from 1797 has a contemporary signature of Isaac Hicks on the front wrap. The front wrap of the fourth pamphlet is detached, a very good set.These pamphlets record the proceedings of the first American effort at national organization around the anti-slavery cause. Held in January 1794, the first meeting drew delegates from the abolition societies of Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, and Maryland. Later meetings added attendees from Rhode Island and Virginia, and each pamphlet lists the names of those present -- among them Benjamin Rush, Jonathan Edwards, and many important early abolitionists. The first gathering "voted to petition Congress to prohibit the slave trade and also to appeal to the legislatures of the various states to abolish slavery. The petitions pointed out the inconsistency of a country that had recently rejected the tyranny of kings engaging in "domestic despotism." Despite limited funds or authority and infrequent meetings, these conventions harnessed considerable public support for reform and imbued their ideological successor, the American Anti-Slavery Society, with cornerstone goals designed to "bring the whole nation to a speedy repentance." Evans 26533, 28146, 29947, 31686, 33264 (Conventions 1-5). .

      [Bookseller: Between the Covers- Rare Books, Inc. ABA]
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        An original watercolour, titled 'Calycanthus' of a cream-red-flowered shrub with two butterflies and a dragon-fly

      1794. Folio. (17 1/2 x 13 3/4 inches). Original water-colour on Whatman wove paper (sheet size: 17 1/2 x 13 3/4 inches), titled in both English, and Chinese characters. A Chinese drawing of a flowering shrub with butterflies produced for the Western market by a highly-talented Chinese artist. This watercolour derives from a well-established tradition of Chinese artists, working in and around the coastal trading ports, producing work for Western patrons, particularly the members of the East India and Dutch East India Companies. While meeting Western demands for botanical accuracy, the drawing has that fine Chinese feeling and tradition for design and delicacy which almost brings the plant to life. The insects (and particularly the butterflies) are used to heighten what is already a pleasing composition.

      [Bookseller: Donald Heald Rare Books]
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        ASSEMBL?E COLONIALE DE L'ISLE DE FRANCE. S?ANCE Du 17 BRUMAIRE AU MATIN, 3me. ANN?E DE LA REPUBLIQUE...RAPPORT FAIR A L'ASSEMBL?E COLONIALE DE L'ISLE DE FRANCE, AU SUJET DE ST. F?LIX, DUPLESSIS, TYROL, TESSAN, FAYOL, MARCENAY, GRANGIER, TOUS ARRET?S A L'ISLE DE LA R?UNION, PAR LES COMMISSAIRES DE LA CHAUMI»RE, & D?TENUS ?S PRISONS DE LA PLACE [caption title]

      Port de la Montagne [i.e. Port Louis]: Chez F.N. Bolle, 1794. Small quarto. Stitched as issued. Contemporary notation on first page, some contemporary underlining in text. Minor soiling. Very good. A remarkable early imprint from the colonial press at the French colony of Mauritius, also known as the Ile de France, in the south Indian Ocean. The text contains a report of the French Revolutionary Committee of Public Safety regarding prisoners arrested on the island of RÈunion being held as enemies of the Revolution. The document was printed in the capital, Port Louis, which was called Port de la Montagne from 1792 to 1795. The Dutch were the first Europeans to become interested in the island, taking possession in 1598. After exploiting the island's dense forests for a century and introducing the cultivation of sugar cane and cotton, in 1710 the Dutch abandoned the colony. The French soon claimed it as "Ile de France," and the island remained under the control of the French East India Company until 1767. During the long war between France and England at the beginning of the 19th century, Mauritius proved to be an important strategic naval base. The British took charge of the island in 1810, and the Treaty of Paris confirmed official British possession in 1814. It remained an important sugar producing colony, and in the 20th century agricultural production was expanded to include tea, rice, and other produce. Printing began on Mauritius in 1768. During the French period, until 1810, only about 400 imprints were produced, mostly in the form of official documents and newspapers, though there are also almanacs and a few other items. All are quite rare. No copies located in OCLC; Toussaint locates a copy at the Archives Nationales in Paris.

      [Bookseller: William Reese Company - Americana]
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        A Collection of the Private Acts of the General Assembly of the State of North-Carolina, from the Year 1715, to the Year 1790, inclusive, now in Force and Use

      Francois-Xavier Martin, Newbern 1794 - [5],249,[3]pp. Antique three-quarter calf and marbled boards, spine gilt with leather label. Minor toning, light foxing. Lacks the list of subscribers leaf, as usual. A rare collection of private acts published to supplement the Iredell edition of the laws of North Carolina. The publication starts with a 1715 act to incorporate a town in Bath County and to secure a public library at St. Thomas's Parish in Pamplico, and ends with a 1788 act to allow a debtor named John Colson back into North Carolina to settle his affairs. Rare. ESTC records only fifteen copies worldwide. ESTC w239; Evans 27419; McMurtrie 199; Sabin 55602; Weeks 99. [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Donald A. Heald Rare Books (ABAA)]
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        Gedanken über einige dem Officier der leichten Reutery nothwendige Kenntnisse.

      Riga, Müller, 1794. 4to. 246 + (1) s. 14 kobberstukne plansjer. Samt. helskinnbd. Papiretikett på ryggen

      [Bookseller: Ruuds Antikvariat]
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        Spanische Novellen. Von Grosse, Verfasser des Genius.

      bei Friedrich Maurer, Berlin 1794 - Erster (- Vierter) Theil. In zwei Bänden. Mit vier Titelkupfern. Berlin, bei Friedrich Maurer 1794 – 1796. I: Front., Titel, 192 S.; II: Front., Titel, 128 S.; III: Front., Titel, 104 S.; IV: Front., Titel, 222 S. Marmorierte Halblederbände d.Zt. mit Rückenschild. Ein Schild mit Fehlstelle, etwas berieben. Erste Ausgabe (Goedeke V,493,10). – Exemplar auf Schreibpapier. Gelegentlich etwas (stock-) fleckig. Starke marmorierte Vorsätze. C.GROSSE (Magdeburg 1768 - 1847 Kopenhagen) gilt als eine "der abenteuerlichsten Gestalten der deutschen Literaturgeschichte" (NDB VII,15). Der Sohn eines Arztes kam 1788 zum Studium nach Halle, wo er im Umfeld BAHRDTs in Verbindung zu Geheimgesellschaften geriet. In diesem Umfeld, wo Phantasienamen und -titel anzunehmen gängige klandestine Praxis war, wurde er MARQUIS VON GROSSE und GRAF VON VARGAS. 1791 ging er nach Spanien, 1792 nach Italien, "wo der Hauptteil seines schriftstellerischen Werks entstand. Danach [1809] lebte GROSSE unter dem Namen Graf VON VARGAS-BEDEMAR in Kopenhagen, von der dän. Regierung mit hohen Ämtern betraut. Mit dem König verband ihn enge Freundschaft, und als geachteter Geologe wurde er Mitglied mehrerer naturwissenschaftlicher Gesellschaften. GROSSE war der 'Romantiker der Trivialliteratur' [Thalmann]. Nicht nur sein Lebenslauf verkörperte eine romantische Existenzform, in der Schein und Sein nicht mehr deutlich zu unterscheiden sind. Auch seine schöngeistige Schriftstellerei nahm Motive und Visionen voraus, die erst von den Romantikern voll ausgeformt wurden." (Killy 4,371). „Er hebt die Kontinuität eines Lebens wie die eines flauen Romans, der nicht mehr unterhält, auf. (.) GROSSE ist als romantischer Graf eine Kometenfigur (.). Er (.) gehört wie CAGLIOSTRO und Konsorten zu den Figuren, die auf dem Index der bürgerlichen Moral stehen." (M.Thalmann. Die Romantik des Trivialen, S.54f.). Besonders sein Bundesroman Der Genius übte starke Wirkung auf TIECK (William Lovell) und WACKENRODER aus und noch E.T.A.HOFFMANN bekannte nach dessen Lektüre: "Meine Phantasie hatte einen Festtag." Sie erkannten in ihm "den Weltmann ihrer eigenen Generation" (Thalmann S.55). Bedeutend ist der Einfluss seiner „horrid mysteries“ auch auf die englische Romantik, von JANE AUSTEN in Northanger Abbey empfohlen. Noch vor Veröffentlichung des letzten Bandes des Genius (1795) erschienen die ersten beiden Bände der vorliegenden Spanischen Novellen, die heute ebenso selten, aber weit weniger bekannt sind. GROSSE behauptet, die Vorlagen zu denen in den ersten beiden Bänden teils bei CERVANTES gefunden, teils nach mündlicher Überlieferung niedergeschrieben zu haben, während die in den folgenden eigene Erfindung in spanischer, d.h. romantischer Manier seien, der er sich offensichtlich wesensverwandt fühlt: „Es ist gewiß, daß zu Feenmährchen und Gespenstergeschichten kein Charakter tauglicher ist, als der Spanische. Nicht sowohl wegen seines natürlichen Hanges zum Romantischen und Abentheuerlichen, sondern wegen seiner stillen und gefaßten Haltung, die das Wunderbarste als ganz natürlich behandelt. (.). Zuletzt ist das Umherschweifende, das Glücksritterwesen in Spanien ganz national.“ (Vorrede, 3.Bd.). „Keinen anderen Zweck, als den zu gefallen“ (Vorrede, 1.Bd.) hatte er bei den Gespenstergeschichten und Märchen im Sinn, die den Inhalt der Novellen ausmachen, die sich dennoch deutlich von der damals gängigen Ware unterscheiden. [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Günther Trauzettel]
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        Mémoire sur les eaux minérales et les établissements thermaux des Pyrénées. [Relié à la suite] : Mémoire sur les eaux minérales de Naples et sur les bains de vapeurs., par Attumoneli.

      A Paris, chez Vatar, an III [1794] ; Impr. de la Société de Médecine, an XII [1804]. - Deux ouvrages en un vol. in-8 reliure de l'époque demi-veau havane, dos lisse, pièce de titre grenat, roulettes et fleurons dorés, tranches mouchetées, XXVII-153 pp., 4 planches dépliantes gravées sur cuivre, [1] f. d'errata, [1] ff., 168 pp. Mouillure claire angulaire en marge des planches, petit cachet, bel ex. Envoi signé de l'auteur Lomet au premier faux-titre : "Pour le citoyen Schilmank chef de bataillon de génie, de la part de l'auteur". Les planches montrent des projets d'établissements thermaux, dont un à Barèges. Réf. bibliographiques : Labarere, 936. [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Librairie Le Trait d'Union sarl.]
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        Früher eigenhändiger Brief ohne Unterschrift an einen Grafen.

      Mannheim, 30.1.1794. 23 x 19 cm. 4 S. auf Doppelbogen Hadernbütten mit Wasserzeichen. gute Erhaltung. Montgelas war von 1799 bis 1817 Minister unter dem Kurfürsten und späteren König von Bayern Maximilian I. 1786 trat M. in den Dienst des Herzogs Karl II. August von Pfalz-Zweibrücken. Als die Franzosen 1793 Zweibrücken besetzten, blieb M. nach der Flucht Karls als herzoglicher Beamter zurück, um zwischen den fremden Truppen und der Bevölkerung zu vermitteln. Bei Karl II. fiel er in Ungnade, nachdem er sich unter Rettung des herzoglichen Archivs nach Mannheim durchgeschlagen hatte. Nach Karls Tod stellte dessen Bruder und Nachfolger Max Joseph 1796 M. als politischen Berater ein und nahm ihn 1799 mit nach München. Übersetzung: ... Die Franzosen haben das Schloss von Worms angezündet, haben einen großen Teil der Kontribution, die sie den Einwohner auferlegt hatten, erhoben, und haben danach diesen Ort am 24. dieses Monats verlassen. Briefe des Generals Graf von Isenburg, der in Ihrem Hauptquartier Mainz ist, kündigen die Räumung von Frankenthal für heute an. Die Dörfer jenseits des Rheins, die zu uns am nächsten sind, sind immer noch vom Feind besetzt. Ihre Exzellenz kennen die Geschichte von Fort Louis. Man weiß nicht genau, wo die Hauptmacht der französischen Truppen ist, und ihr Hauptquartier. Uns ist gestern ein Bataillon Bayern angekommen, wir erwarten für heute ein zweites, so sehr wie es gestattet ist, nach dem Anschein zu urteilen. Denn Sie wissen, Monsieur le Comte, dass derartig außergewöhnliche Dinge geschehen, dass es unmöglich wird, etwas vorherzusehen. Der Feldzug scheint auf unseren Seiten beendet zu sein. Man hat Unruhen in Italien und den Niederlanden. Die Landung der Engländer in C... war erneut in einem Brief aus London angekündigt worden, der dem General Prinz von Waldeck zugekommen ist, aber ich bezweifle noch, dass dies Erfolg hat. Wir wurden darüber so oft getäuscht, dass es sehr wohl erlaubt ist, nicht mehr leicht daran zu glauben. Dies wäre jedoch das einzige und wahre Mittel, uns das Ende zu verschaffen, dass wir alle so sehr wünschen müssen, und so wie wir Grund haben, es zu wünschen. Eine Versammlung so nahe der Hauptstadt und unterstützt von den Unzufriedenen des Inlandes hätte mehr Wirkung als der notwendigerweise blutige, lange und kostspielige Angriff der Grenzen. Die zwei Generale sind noch nicht eingetroffen. Es tut mir leid, es zu schreiben, aber von den Kommandanten bis zum letzten Soldat ist nur ein Schrei nach Frieden. Sie rufen nach ihm mit all ihrer Kraft und sind der Feindseligkeiten sehr müde. Ich bitte Ihre Exzellenz diese Einzelheit für sich zu behalten, aber die Beobachtung ist genau, und ich weiß, dass Sie ein getreues Bild mögen. Viele beginnen daran zu zweifeln, dass der König zur Armee kommt. Man spricht von Verhandlungen und ... zwischen Ihrem Hof und jenem von Wien zugunsten des ersteren. Was hat es mit den russischen Bewaffnungen am Schwarzen Meer auf sich? Möchte die große Katharina den Besonderheiten dieses schrecklichen Jahrhundertendes die Krone aufsetzen, indem sie den günstigen Augenblick nutzt, um ihr berühmtes orientalischen System zu verwirklichen? Der liebe Onkel war zwei Tage lang krank ... Unser Meister ist wegen einer starken Erkältung unpäßlich, die, ohne dass sie gefährlich wäre, ihn gezwungen hat, seine Reise nach München zu verschieben. Die bittersten Gedanken drängen sich über die elende Lage auf, in der wir uns befinden, und die sehr realen Gefahren, in denen sich die bürgerliche Gesellschaft befindet. Mein Herz ist schwer wegen dem was ich verliere, wegen dem, was ich erleide, mehr noch wegen dem, was ich fürchte. Es wird mir letztendlich ein großer Trost sein ... zu erfahren, Monsieur le Comte, dass Sie ruhig und zufrieden sind, und Sie mich beständig mit einer Freundschaft beehren, die mein Glück und mein Trost sein wird...\" Versand D: 6,00 EUR

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Bebuquin]
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        Recherches sur les causes des principaux faits physiques. 2 vols.

      Maradan, Paris 1794 - Lamarck, Jean Baptiste (1744-1829). Recherches sur les causes des principaux faits physiques. . . . 2 vols., 8vo. xvi, 375; [4], 412pp. Engraved plate in Vol. I, folding chart in Vol. II. B1 in Vol. I is a cancel, signed "B*". Paris: Maradan, seconde année de la République [1794]. 211 x 136 mm. Original paste paper wrappers, hand-lettered paper spine labels, spines worn and chipped with some loss, wrappers partly detached. Edges a bit frayed, some toning, but very good. First Edition of Lamarck’s first major scientific work. "With the publication of the Recherches, Larmarck brought together the various strands of his work in physics and chemistry, and his views on the differences between organic and inorganic beings" (Corsi, pp. 47-48). Lamarck’s chemical theories played an important part in the development of his ideas about the origin of species, as they provided a materialistic definition of life, reproduction and evolution. In opposition to the "new chemistry" established by Lavoisier, Lamarck held that there were only four true elements: Earth, air, fire and water. Fire was the most important of these four elements, and its three states—natural, "fixed," and a state of expansion (caloric fire)—were central to a great number of chemical and physical phenomena. Lamarck believed that only living beings could produce chemical compounds, with the most complex compounds being produced by those animals with the most highly organized physiological structure; in the absence of life, these compounds would naturally decompose over time into their constituent elements, producing in the process all known inorganic substances. This mineral "chain of being," with continuous degradation from the most complex to the simplest, is similar to Lamarck’s later theory of the evolution of species: Each stressed the gradual and successive production of forms, while denying the relevance of defined species. Corsi, The Age of Lamarck, pp. 47-53. Duveen, Bibliotheca alchemica et chemica, p. 334. Norman 1260. [Attributes: First Edition; Signed Copy; Soft Cover]

      [Bookseller: Jeremy Norman's historyofscience]
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        A DEFENCE OF THE CONSTITUTIONS OF GOVERNMENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, AGAINST THE ATTACK ON M TURGOT IN HIS LETTER TO DR PRICE

      London, 1794. Portrait in first volume. Contemporary gilt tree calf, rebacked, leather labels. Bookplate on front pastedown of each volume. Minor scattered foxing, but generally quite clean and fresh internally. Very good. The definitive final edition, after its first appearance in London in 1787. One of the most important and widely read of the many writings of the important Revolutionary figure and second president of the United States. The second and third volumes, originally issued later than the first, contain descriptions of the Italian republics of the Middle Ages as well as a lengthy analysis of "the Right Constitution of a Commonwealth." At the time Adams wrote this work he was serving as the first United States ambassador in England, an uncomfortable position for a recent rebel, but he was ever ready to argue the American point of view. Here he forcibly states the principles on which he perceived the United States to be founded. The book was popular and went through numerous editions. Its issuance as the Federal Constitutional Convention was assembling added to its popularity and resulted in several American reprintings, and according to the DAB, "its timeliness gave it vogue." Later Adams' detractors sought to find in it a hidden desire for a monarchy. This edition is sometimes known under its half title, HISTORY OF THE PRINCIPAL REPUBLICS IN THE WORLD.

      [Bookseller: William Reese Company - Americana]
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        Rules for the government of the charity school, for sixty poor girls at Bamburgh Castle, established on the appointment of a new mistress, assistant, and usher, to the said school, Decr. 1st. 1794.

      Alnwick: printed by J. Catnach. 1794. 8vo., 11 + (1)pp., light waterstaining throughout, attractively bound in late 19th / early 20th century chocolate morocco by Hatchards, with title in gilt on upper cover. With a mid-19th century ownership inscription in ink on title margin. A good, well-bound, copy. First edition. Apparently very rare, ESTC & COPAC locating copies only at BL + Durham Un. In the latter part of the 18th century, and, more specifically, from 1772 to 1792, the Rev. John Sharp (1723-1792), Archdeacon of Northumberland and a prebend of Durham Cathedral, was in personal charge of Bamburgh Castle and Bamburgh parish church as senior trustee on behalf of the Lord Crewe's trust. 'It is probably the task for which he is best remembered in the area. For twenty years he devoted himself to ?'improving?' Bamburgh Castle, and practised the charity that he preached. Using the surplus revenues of the trust's Bamburgh and Blanchland estates he devised a plan of practical benevolence. Part of the castle was converted to a residence for the senior trustee, and with seemingly indefatigable energy, he set up several philanthropic establishments, including an asylum providing accommodation for shipwrecked mariners.' [Françoise Deconinck-Brossard in ODNB]. Founder of the Bamburgh Charities, Dr. Sharp created a 'welfare state' which lasted at Bamburgh for almost 100 years. As well as setting up a pharmacy, an out patients' surgery and a hospital for the poor, using his own money he paid for the services of a midwife for the village. Over 300 underprivileged children were given an education at the school. And Sharp arranged for meat, milk, and coal to be distributed to the poor. The girls' school itself taught knitting, plain work, dress-making, mending their own clothes, and spinning wool and jersey. School hours were to be eight in the morning to four in the afternoon with an hour break at twelve noon. The girls were divided into classes, for reading, writing and accounts. During the last school hour they were to be taught psalmody to a competent standard. A system of rewards for good work in the form of tickets awarded daily by the mistress was instituted. Work done by pupils may be sold at half the current price and paid into the school-box. At the end of the year, the money in the box, and all other money arising from the work of the school, to be brought to account and the mistress granted one penny from every shilling as an incentive to her to make sure the system worked.

      [Bookseller: John Drury Rare Books]
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        Observations on the Disease of the Hip Joint; to which are added, some Remarks on White Swellings of the Knee, The Caries of the Joint of the Wrist and other similar complaints; The whole Illustrated by Cases, and engravings taken from the diseased parts.

      C Dilly, London 1794 - A fair copy of the 1st edition of this extremely scarce work. Edward Ford (1746 -1809) was a London surgeon. He became a Member of the Court Assistants of the Royal College of Surgeons and was Surgeon to the Westminster General Dispensary from 1780 - 1801. This work, based on his experience, was extremely popular and 2 further printings were organised by his nephew. This copy came from the Library of the Richmond Physical Society, Dublin, which was founded in 1812 at the Richmond Surgical Hospital, House of Industry. It has their bookplate on the front pastedown and House of Industry (or workhouse) stamps to the title page, p 229 and the reverse of one plate. It has been bound in a new plain buckram binding, with gilt titles and new endpapers. The binding is in very good condition. Internally: title page, dedication, preface pp vii-xvi, contents, errata, text pp 1 - 258 (including plate descriptions) and 6 of 8 plates (lacking plates 6 and 7, one of which is folding). The contents have some browning to pages, the occasional mark (sometimes of ink) and some scholarly annotation and lining - mostly pencil (probably from those consulting it at the hospital) The plates are not bound in order and plates 4 and 5 have some repair. [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: ecbooks]
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        Dominica from An Actual Survey, Completed in the Year 1773 . 1794

      London,, 1794 - Große Kupferstichkarte von Dominica, einer Insel der Kleinen Antillen in der östlichen Karibik. Aus The West Indian Atlas von Thomas Jeffrey. - Rückseitig etwas gebräunt. Sehr gute Erhaltung. Altes Kolorit. - Large copper engraved map of Dominica, an island of the Lesser Antilles in the eastern Caribbean. From The West Indian Atlas by Thomas Jeffrey. - Some browning on back side. Very good condition. Old colour.

      [Bookseller: Götzfried Antique Maps]
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        Göttinger Taschen-Calender Für das Jahr 1795.

      (Göttingen), Ioh. Chr. Dieterich (1794). 10,5 x 6 cm. Gest. Titel, 8 (v. 12) Modekupfer, 12 Monatskupfer, 5 Kupfer zur \"Erklärung Hogarthischer Kupferstiche\". 5 Bl., 24 Bl. (Kalendarium), 218 S., 1 Bl., lithogr. ill. OPappband, umlaufender Goldschnitt. Aussen stärker berieben, Spiegel mit Leimschatten. Innen recht sauber u. kaum gebräunt. Goedeke IV/1,639,10; Lanckoronska-Rümann S. 15; Köhring S. 154. - Seltener Jahrgang des von 1778 bis 1799 unter der Redaktion u. mit Texten v. Georg Christoph Lichtenberg herausgegebenen Kalenders, inkl. \"Geneaolgisches Verzeichniß der vornehmsten jetzt lebenden hohen Personen in Europa\". Enthält einige Textbeiträge von Lichtenbergs Hand: \"Geologische Phantasien\", \"Auch ein Paar Worte von Polen\", \"Das Luftbad\", \"Ueber Gewitterfurcht und Blitzableitung\", \"Ueber das Eselslehn\", \"Erklärung Hogarthischer Kupferstiche\". - \"Der Göttinger Taschenkalender ist inhaltlich der beste unter seinen `Brüdern`, eben weil Lichtenberg gar manchen Beitrag selbst geliefert hat.\" (Lanck.-R.)Versand D: 15,00 EUR

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Löcker]
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        (St. Peter),

       1794. Gesamtansicht mit dem Vatikan über den Petersplatz aus der Vogelschau. Kupferstich von G.G. Endner nach G.B. Piranesi, aus F.L. zu Stolberg: Reisen in Deutschland, der Schweiz, Italien und Sizilien, Königsberg und Leipzig 1794. 22,2 x 35,2 cm. - Leicht gebräunt und in den Rändern wenig knittrig (dort auch wenig angestaubt). Dekorative Ansicht nach dem berühmten Blatt von Piranesi. Versand D: 5,50 EUR Graphik, Europa, Italien, Rom, Petersdom

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Tobias Müller]
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        Curaçao antieke kaart.

      CURAÇAO, W.I.C. UITVALSBASIS VOOR HANDEL EN KAAPVAART"Curaçao, from the originals of Gerard van Keulen"'. Kopergravure vervaardigd door Thomas Jefferys uitgegeven door Laurie & Whittle te Londen 1794. Later met de hand gekleurd. Afm. 46,2 x 61,5 cm.Kaart van Curaço, met rechts een inzet van een plattegrond van Fort Amsterdam gelegen aan de Sint Annabaai. Rechtsboven een viertal kustprofielen van het eiland gezien vanuit verschillende richtingen. Linksonder schaalstokken in Sea Leagues en Dutch miles. Aangegeven zijn ook de plantages, zoutpannen, bronnen en vegetatie.Deze kaart verscheen in "The West-India Atlas"' met 41 kaarten en 27 pagina"s tekst.Jefferys was een van de belangrijkste Engelse uitgevers van kaarten in de 18de eeuw. Hij vervaardigde kaarten van de gehele wereld, maar zijn beste werk is van Noord-Amerika en West-Indië. Hij begon zijn carrière in de kaarten handel in de vroege jaren 1730, hij was werkzaam als graveur voor verschillende Londense uitgevers en begon uiteindelijk zijn eigen winkel. In 1746 werd hij benoemd tot geograaf van de Prince of Wales en werd in 1760 geograaf aan de Koning. Daarmee kreeg hij toegang tot de manuscripten en cartografische informatie in het bezit van de Engelse marine. Begin jaren 1760 begon hij aan een ambitieus project om op basis van nieuw onderzoek van een reeks Engelse graafschappen kaarten te produceren, maar het geld raakte op en zijn faillissement volgde in 1766. Hij werkte vervolgens samen met de Londense uitgever Robert Sayer, die veel van Jefferys' platen tot na zijn dood in 1771 opnieuw uitgaven. Dit exemplaar komt uit een atlas weer iets later uitgegeven door Laurie & Whittle.Jefferys maakte deze kaart naar voorbeeld van Gerard van Keulen, die in 1728 zijn "Nieuwe Afteekening van het Eyland Curacao"' had gemaakt.Prijs: € 4.350,- (incl. lijst).

      [Bookseller: Inter-Antiquariaat MEFFERDT & DE JONGE]
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        Bowles's New One-Sheet Map of Asia, Divided into its Empires, Kingdoms, States, and other Subdivisions; laid down from Observations of the most Celebrated Geographers

      London: Bowles and Carver, 1794. Engraved with period colour. Wove paper, watermarked twice: "J. Whatman 1794" A large, 18th century English map of Asia This interesting map of Asia published by Bowles & Carver, successors to Carington Bowles, shows the last eastward conquests of the Russian Asian Empire, Chukchi and Kamchatka at the Bering Strait, as well as many other refinements and improvements. There is a "Methodical Division of Asia" in the lower left, a chart that lays out the constituent parts of the major political entities: Russia, Tartary, Turkey, Arabia, Persia, India and China. It also lists the major island groups.

      [Bookseller: Donald Heald Rare Books]
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        A TREATISE ON THE PRACTICE OF THE SUPREME COURT OF JUDICATURE OF THE STATE OF NEW-YORK IN CIVIL ACTIONS.

      New York: T. and J. Swords, 1794.. xvi,355,[1]p. Lacks half title and prospectuses (pp.[358- 359]). Thick octavo. Half calf and marbled boards in antique style, stamped in gilt, leather label. Interleaved throughout, with extensive manuscript annotations in a contemporary hand. Contemporary ownership inscription on titlepage, trimmed a bit at top edge. Light scattered soiling. Very good. The first American practice manual for the legal profession, based in part on manuscript works by Alexander Hamilton. The present copy, interleaved throughout, contains massive annotations compiled by an attorney who was evidently in active practice before the New York Supreme Court at least until 1813. This is the self-styled second edition, published the same year as the first. It may have been the intention of the annotator to publish a new edition, but no such every appeared. Not much is known about William Wyche, a British emigré to America. On the titlepage of his treatise he styles himself as being "Of the honorable law society of Grey's Inn, London; and citizen of the United States of America." Wyche entered Grey's Inn at the end of 1788, but did not stay long enough to be registered as a proper barrister (a term of five years), and citizenship took two years' residence, meaning he must have emigrated around or before 1792. His TREATISE... quite practically translates, in a well-organized fashion, the practices of the New York court system in civil cases. This would have been eminently helpful for lawyers just starting out and learning to navigate the state's legal system. In the preface Wyche discusses the sources he consulted in the compilation of his work, noting: "Some practical sketches in manuscript, one passing under the name of a personage of high respectability, have been consulted; and whatever appeared of importance has been incorporated." The manuscript work referred to is undoubtedly one prepared by Alexander Hamilton in the 1780s. His treatise on practice circulated in manuscript copies (only one of which survives today) but was never published in the Federal period. It has been published in modern times by both the Hamilton Papers project and the New York Bar Association as PRACTICAL PROCEEDINGS IN THE SUPREME COURT OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK. A comparison of the texts reveals that Wyche did indeed draw heavily on Hamilton's pioneering work. Wyche himself was only briefly part of the New York legal scene. He was not admitted to practice before the New York Supreme Court until May of 1795. Prior to this he published several books and married in 1794. He appeared in the 1795 and 1796 New York directories, and last appeared in a legal action in January 1796. After that he disappears. The present copy is of extraordinary interest for the extensive contemporary annotations throughout the text. The volume is interleaved, doubling its size, and bears significant and detailed notes throughout by an unidentified contemporary author. The annotator was clearly an active practitioner before the Court. The earliest date we note is 1796, shortly after publication, and the latest is 1813, providing a detailed picture of the evolution of the Court in its early years. A fertile basis for future research, the notes are quite evocative of the training of American lawyers in the Federal period. A highly important book and manuscript, providing a key to the basis of legal practice in New York. ESTC W2533. EVANS 28140. COHEN 9188. Robert Emery, LAW LIBRARY JOURNAL 93:3, pp.469-77.

      [Bookseller: William Reese Company - Americana]
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        Compilation of 8 middle-period string quartets in first edition. [Parts].

      - The Forsboom family was a dynasty of merchants in Frankfurt. "A. Forsboom" most probably refers to Anton Forsboom-Goldner (1794-1839), who was also a politician, noted for his interest in the arts. "The largest portion of Spohr's chamber music was for strings alone, ranging from 19 unsurpassed duos for two violins to four masterly, and largely unemulated, double string quartets. These, together with the 36 string quartets (and several other works for the same combination), seven string quintets and the String Sextet of 1848, display a number of common features. Spohr's own mastery of the violin is evident in all of them, and their technical difficulties, together with the particular style of performance necessary to secure their full effect, may partly explain their infrequent performance. The quartets, especially, fall into two distinct categories: solo quartets in the tradition of Rode (often entitled Quatuor brillant), which are essentially violin concertos with string trio accompaniment, and true quartets where the interest is more evenly divided between the instruments." Clive Brown in Grove Music Online. [Op. 30]Xtes Quartett für 2 Violinen, Viola und Violoncello. 30tes Werk. Preis ["f. 3" in pencil, erased]. [Parts]. Wien: S.A. Steiner und Comp. [PN S:u:C: 3017], [?after 1819]. Violino primo: [1] (title), 2-13, [i] (blank) pp.; Violino secondo: [1] (blank), 2-9, [i] (blank) pp.; Viola: [1] (blank), 2-9, [i] (blank) pp.; Violoncello: [1] (blank), 2-9, [i] (blank) pp. Engraved.First Edition, issue unclear. WorldCat (5 copies in North America, at the University of Victoria, the Eastman School of Music, Harvard, Indiana, and the Free Library of Philadelphia. According to Weinmann: Senefelder-Steiner-Haslinger 1, p. 167, the first issue (November 1819) has a printed price of "2 fl. 30 x" to the title. Göthel, p. 51, reverses the chronology: "The price was omitted [from the first issue] and re-engraved in a later issue as '2 fl. 30x'." Since the (erased) manuscript price to the present copy exceeds the printed price, Weinmann's hypothesis of a later deletion of the printed price seems more likely. Copies with a printed price other than "2 fl. 30 x." have not been located. Op. 30, in A major, is now counted as Spohr's 8th string quartet (see MGG2). The confusing numbering results from the fact that two of the three op. 29 quartets are actually later than op. 30.[Op. 43]Quatuor brillant [in E major] pour deux Violons, Alto et Violoncelle. Oeuv. 43. Pr. 1 Rthlr. 8 gr. [Parts]. Leipzig: Bureau de Musique de C.F. Peters [PN 1361], [February 1818]. Violino primo: [1] (title), 2-11, [i] (blank) pp.; Violino secondo: [1] (blank), 2-8 pp.; Viola: [1] (blank), 2-8 pp.; Basso: [1] (blank), 2-7, [i] (blank) pp. Engraved. With overpaste of B. Schott's Söhne, Mainz. Remnants of overpaste of manuscript music (?ossia) to p. 11 of Violino primo part. First Edition. Göthel p. 77 (with "[!]Oeuv 13." WorldCat (10 copies in North America). Spohr's 11th quartet, in E major, also counted as "Quatuor brillant no. 2."[Op. 45]Trois Quatuors pour deux Violons, Viola et Violoncelle. Oe. 45. No. I.II.III. Pr. 1 Rth. 20 gr. [Parts]. Leipzig: Bureau de Musique de C.F. Peters [PNs 1487, 1489, 1490], [October 1819]. No. 1: Violino primo: [1] (title), 2-12 pp.; Violino secondo: [1] (blank), 2-9, [i] (blank) pp.; Viola: [1] (blank), 2- 9, [i] (blank) pp.; Violoncello: [1] (blank), 2-9, [i] (blank) pp. No. 2: Violino primo: [1] (title), 2-13, [i] (blank) pp.; Violino secondo: [1] (blank), 2-11, [i] (blank) pp.; Viola: [1] (blank), 2-11, [i] (blank) pp.; Violoncello: 8 pp. No. 3: Violino primo: [1] (title), 2-14 pp.; Violino Secondo: [1] (blank), 2-10 pp.; Viola: [1] (blank), 2-10 pp.; Violoncello: [1] (blank), 2-10, [ii] (blank) pp. Engraved. All three title pages with overpaste of B. Schott's Söhne, Mainz. First Edition, probable first issue. Göthel p. 82. WorldCat (3 complete copies only in the U.S., at the Eastman School of Music, Harvard, and the University [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: J & J LUBRANO MUSIC ANTIQUARIANS LLC]
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        The History of the Origin, Progress, and Termination of the American war

      London: printed for the Author, sold by J. Murray, J. Debrett and J. Kerby, 1794. 2 volumes, quarto. (10 1/4 x 8 1/4 inches). Half-title to vol.II. 15 engraved maps and plans (11 folding, one of these with an over-flap). (Lacking half title to vol.I, minor scattered foxing to text). Expertly bound to style in 18th-century tree calf, gilt-tooled border to covers, the flat spines divided into six compartments with gilt fillets and a roll tool, red morocco lettering-piece in the second compartment, black morocco label with onlaid red morocco roundel with volume number in gilt in the fourth compartment A fine copy of the first edition of a fundamental work to any collection relating to the American Revolution This work is "generally considered the best contemporary account of the Revolution written from the British side" (Sabin). The beautifully engraved maps (the largest of which is approximately 20 x 30 inches) are the finest collection of plans assembled by an eyewitness. They depict the sieges of Savannah and Charlestown, plus the battles of Saratoga, Camden, Guilford, Hobkirk's Hill, and Yorktown. Stedman was a native of Philadelphia, a Loyalist who served as an officer under Howe, Clinton, and Cornwallis, and later became an examiner of Loyalist claims for the British government. He had first hand knowledge of many of the campaigns and persons involved in the effort. He is critical of Howe, and describes all the major theatres of war, as well as individual battles from Bunker Hill to Yorktown. Howes S914; JCB II:372; Lowndes V, p.2504; Sabin 91057; Winsor VI, p.518.

      [Bookseller: Donald Heald Rare Books]
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        Landschaft mit Burg, auf einem Weg ein Fuhrwerk mit einem Planwagen.

      - Feder in Dunkelbraun, braun laviert, auf Bütten mit Wasserzeichen: J. Whatman 1794. 16,4:20,6 cm. Verso mit Sammlervermerk „Philipp". Nicht bei Fröhlich. Nach einer Buchbinderlehre als Zwölfjähriger in Dresden absolvierte Klengel, Sohn eines aus Grüneberg bei Radeberg stammenden Mälzers und Bierbrauers, mit Unterstützung Chr.L. von Hagedorns (1712-1789) eine Zeichenausbildung an der Dresdener Kunstakademie bei Chr.G. Mietzsch (1742-1799) und Ch.F. Hutin (1715-1776) sowie bei J.F.A. Thiele (1747-1803) und B. Bellotto (1720-1780). 1768-1774 folgte eine Lehre bei Chr.W.E. Dietrich (1712-1774), der zu den wichtigsten Künstlern des sächsischen Hofes gehörte. 1772, Klengel zählte zu diesem Zeitpunkt erst 21 Jahre, erhielt er eine kurfürstliche Unterstützung von 50 Talern – er wurde als Nachfolger von J. Roos (1726-1805) an der Akademie ins Auge gefaßt –, die im darauffolgenden Jahr und erneut 1774 erhöht wurde, ohne daß er besondere Leistungen dafür erbringen mußte. 1777 wurde Klengel Mitglied und Lehrer der Dresdener Akademie, jedoch erfolgte erst 1799 die Ernennung zum außerordentlichen, 1816 zum ordentlichen Professor. Die Ehrenmitgliedschaft der Berliner Akademie erhielt er bereits 1786. In den Jahren 1790-1792 unternahm er die langersehnte Studienreise nach Rom. Seit spätestens 1808 litt er zunehmend unter gesundheitlichen Beschwerden, Gicht und Asthma, wiederholte Kuraufenthalte in Teplitz folgten 1814 und 1822. Klengel war als Landschafts- und Tiermaler, als Zeichner, Radierer und Lithograph tätig und bildete eine große Anzahl auch bedeutender Schüler aus. Er gab mehrere Radierungsfolgen mit eigenen Landschaftsbildern und nach Zeichnungen von Dietrich sowie eine Anleitung für Landschaftszeichner heraus.

      [Bookseller: Galerie Joseph Fach GmbH]
 21.   Check availability:     IberLibro     Link/Print  


        Resumo do systema de medicina, e traducção da materia medica do Doutor Erasmo Darwin, com varias notas por Henrique Xavier Baeta. Lisbon, João Rodrigues Neves (sold by Pedro & Jorge Rei), 1806. Narrow 4to (20.5 x 14 cm). With 1 engraved plate. Contemporary half tanned sheepskin, gold-tooled spine with title label, marbled sides.

      Innocêncio III, 190; Lisbon, Faculdade de Medicina, Catálogo da coleção portuguesa I, 39; Ferreira de Mira, História da medicina portuguesa, pp. 326 & 295; Gonçalves Rodrigues, A tradução em Portugal 2720 (not mentioning the engraved plate); WorldCat (5 or 6 copies); not in Wellcome Lib. First and only Portuguese edition of parts II and III of Erasmus Darwin's Zoonomia, or the laws of organic life (London, 1794-96). In Zoonomia, Darwin covered nearly all aspects of animal biology and proposed revolutionary ideas that in many ways anticipated the evolutionary theory of his grandson Charles Darwin. Baeta, who annotated this edition, was a proselytizer for Erasmus Darwin's theories. He had to flee Portugal for fear of persecution due to his sympathies with the French Revolution. He studied medicine at Edinburgh and returned to Lisbon, where he entered politics. His works were printed in England and Lisbon. Manuscript ownership entry in ink on title "Jorge Gaspar de Oliveira Rollão". In very good condition. The binding is rubbed and the spine damaged, primarily near the foot. The only Portuguese translation of one of Erasmus Darwin's main works.

      [Bookseller: ASHER Rare Books (Since 1830)]
 22.   Check availability:     NVvA     Link/Print  


        Beschreibung des hochfürstlich-erzbischöflichen Haupt- und Residenzstadt Salzburg und ihren Gegenden vorzüglich für Ausländer und Reisende. Aus dessen größerer Beschreibung von ihm selbst zusammengezogen. Nebst dem Grundrisse der Stadt und ihres Bezirks.

      Salzburg, Im Verlage der Mayrischen Buchhandlung, 1794 - Kleine Fehlstelle an oberem Kapital, 1 Außengelenk unten auf ca 2 cm aufgeplatzt, Ecken bestoßen, 2 Wurmfraßspuren auf den Deckeln, 4 an Innendeckeln, Titelblatt im weißen Rand mit alt hinterlegtem Ausriss, Papier leicht bis mäßig stock-/braunfleckig, der Faltplan ist gut bis sehr gut erhalten. Insgesamt ist dieses recht seltene Werk sauber und noch gut erhalten. XXIV, 442 S., 5 Bll. Register, 1 gefalteter Plan (Bildmaß 46 x 33 cm), Deutsch 455g 8° Ledereinband der Zeit mit 2 verschiedenfarbigen goldgeprägten Rückenschildchen

      [Bookseller: Versandantiquariat Kerstin Daras]
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        The History of the Origin, Progress, and Termination of the American war

      London: printed for the Author, sold by J. Murray, J. Debrett and J. Kerby, 1794. 2 volumes, quarto. (11 1/4 x 8 1/2 inches). Half-titles. 15 engraved maps and plans (11 folding). (Pp.53/54 in vol.II holed with some paper loss). Contemporary blue/grey paper-covered boards, rebacked to style with cream paper backstrips and paper labels, uncut (some rubbing to board edges), blue half morocco clamshell boxes Provenance: G. Rushout (ownership inscription dated 1798) First edition of a fundamental work to any collection relating to the American Revolution. This copy uncut in original boards. This work is "generally considered the best contemporary account of the Revolution written from the British side" (Sabin). The beautifully engraved maps (the largest of which is approximately 20 x 30 inches) are the finest collection of plans assembled by an eyewitness. They depict the sieges of Savannah and Charlestown, plus the battles of Saratoga, Camden, Guilford, Hobkirk's Hill, and Yorktown. Stedman was a native of Philadelphia, a Loyalist who served as an officer under Howe, Clinton, and Cornwallis, and later became an examiner of Loyalist claims for the British government. He had first hand knowledge of many of the campaigns and persons involved in the effort. He is critical of Howe, and describes all the major theatres of war, as well as individual battles from Bunker Hill to Yorktown. Howes S914; JCB II:372; Lowndes V, p.2504; Sabin 91057; Winsor VI, p.518.

      [Bookseller: Donald Heald Rare Books]
 24.   Check availability:     IOBABooks     Link/Print  


        [Op. 15]. Tre Quartetti per due violini, viola, e violoncello... Opera 15.[Parts]

      [Vienna]: [Artaria Comp. PN 479]. [1794]. Folio. 20th-centurybrown wrappers with typed titling. Violino I: 1f. (title), 19, [i] (blank) pp.; Violino II: [1] (blank), 2-18 pp.; Viola: [1] (blank), 2-13, [i] (blank) pp.; Violoncello: [1] (blank), 2-13, [i] (blank) pp. Engraved. Footer "Op. XV" to all pages of music. With several earlier ownership markings: signature "Johann Baptist Huber" in brown ink to foot of title and first pages of Violino II, Viola, and Violoncello parts, each crossed out and replaced with signature "Carl Kaltenbach"; circular handstamp, "Sammlung Dr. Fiala Wien" to title. Titling in ink in the hand of Johann Baptist Huber to blank first pages of Violino II, Viola, and Violoncello parts; bifolia numbesr ("Bögn" [!Bögen]) noted at lower right corner of blank first pages, possibly in the same hand. Occasional notational corrections and performance-related annotations in pencil and blue crayon. Somewhat worn and browned, with occasional stains, worming and dampstaining; repairs and reinforcement to spine of Violino I part; imprint erased. . First Edition. Weinmann, Artaria, p. 36. RISM H5953 (one copy only in the U.S., at the New York Public Library). World Cat (one copy only, at the British Library). "The frequently uttered judgement that Hoffmeister's music lacks depth and originality... may be correct in some cases, but it is unsuited to characterize his complete output, vast and manifold. One has to accept that Hoffmeister took the abilities and the taste of musical amateurs into account... Thus, comparison with the works of Mozart and Beethoven and, consequently, with standards that emerged only later is of little help... The extraordinary popularity of Hoffmeister's music in the composer's lifetime is mirrored in the large number of editions and issues and also in the reviews, not only in specialized journals but also elsewhere." Axel Beer in MGG2

      [Bookseller: J & J Lubrano Music Antiquarians LLC]
 25.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  


        Map] The State of New Hampshire. Compiled chiefly from Actual Surveys. By Samuel Lewis. 1794.

      1794 - The State of New Hampshire Compiled chiefly from Actual Surveys [Map] The State of New Hampshire. Compiled chiefly from Actual Surveys. By Samuel Lewis. 1794. Lewis, Samuel Publication Date: 1794 Hand-coloring. 1-1/2 inch closed tear in the upper right. Vintage tape repairs on the reverse side. Nice color. Maker: Samuel Lewis/Mathew Carey 1794 Lewis Map of New Hampshire Philadelphia: engraver: Smither, 1794. A note on the map states "The White Hills appear many leagues off at sea like white clouds just rising above the horizon." Carey's American Atlas Cobb (NH) #68; Wheat & Brun #185. Size: 18-1/4 x 11-1/2 Inches [Attributes: Soft Cover]

      [Bookseller: Hamilton's Rare Books]
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        A collection of 61 broadsides, chiefly announcements of degree defenses.

      Guatemala: Various publishers Folio (see below). [61] ff.. 1794?-1823 This is a great and eye-pleasing assemblage for the study of Guatemalan art, specifically that of engraving, etching, and typography. Announcements of university degree defenses are a => rare printing genre; for example, none of the 61 items in this collection are held in the John Carter Brown Library. Additionally, only 16 were discovered by Medina. Of the 61 items, 37 are in the smaller folio format (appx. 29.5 x 20 cm; 11.75" x 8.875") and 24 in the larger folio format (42 x 30.5 cm; 16.5" x 12"). Each has an engraving or etching in the top area: The very attractive images include saints and Madonnas, including three instances of the Virgin of Guadalupe, but also coats of arms and, very interestingly, portraits of living individuals. The typography is always center-justified above a final paragraph or two that is right justified; and the printers have used a variety of ornaments to create interesting borders. There is one case of an image being used twice: once on a small format broadside and also on a large one. The etched text has been eliminated on one of these; and when one looks carefully at the other images it is clear that engraved text has been masked or removed from some of them also — further evidence of recycling as having been a printshop practice. Remarkably, one of the broadsides is bilingual (Latin & Spanish) and is a publication => not of a university defense but a publication of that Enlightenment development, the social organization "La Sociedad Economica," in this case La Sociedad Economica de Guatemala. It announces that it has been reborn, and will not let the authorities "suffocate" it. Another is a => eulogy for a retired university professor. Among the defense announcements, some give the actual questions/topics that will be asked/defended. The date range of the items is 1794 to 1823 and the engravers include Juan Jose Rosales de Santa Cruz, Narcisco Rosal, Juan Pedro Larrabe, Garci-Aguirre, Francisco Cabrera, Valladolid, and Jose Casildo Espana. Notably one is by the Mexican engraver Villavicencio. Finally, the printers are the usual admirable suspects: Bracamonte, Beteta, and Arevalo. => It is interesting to see them represented by such UNusual ephemera! All items are in very good condition, in Mylar sleeves, the entire collection in a quarter morocco clamshell case.

      [Bookseller: Philadelphia Rare Books & Manuscripts Co]
 27.   Check availability:     Biblio     Link/Print  


        Africa, with All Its States, Kingdomes, Republics, Regions, Island &c. Improved and inlarged from D'Anville's map to which have been added a particular chart of the Gold Coast [on an inset larger scale map] wherein are distinguished all the european forts and factories by S. Boulton and also a summary description relative to the trade and natural produce, manners and customs of the African continent and islands

      London: Robert Laurie & James Whittle, 1794. Copper-engraved map, on four joined sheets, with original outline colour, some splits to old folds, small tears at margins, one with slight loss, overall in good condition. A fascinating late eighteenth-century wall map of Africa, after one of France's greatest cartographers Jean Baptiste Bourguignon d'Anville was the spiritual successor to Guillaume De L'Isle in the sense that he maintained the rigorous standard for accuracy that De L'Isle had established. D'Anville was the last French mapmaker to establish an international reputation superior to all his contemporaries, as witnessed by the respect shown by English cartographers and publishers during an era when the two countries were often at war and always hostile to one another. This excellent map of Africa, an English edition with revisions of D'Anville by Laurie & Whittle, was issued when the European appetite for exploration and colonization of the continent was just getting underway. By this time there were well over fifty fort/trading posts on the western and southeastern coasts representing various European nations, but there had been almost no penetration of the interior (these European `forts & factories' on the Gold Coast are shown in close up on Boulton's inset map). With the gradual outlawing of the slave trade by most civilized nations, interest in the vast interior regions greatly increased as whites sought other profitable resources, and Catholic and Protestant missionaries bravely evangelised. The peoples of Africa proved much more diverse and intriguing than ever imagined, and some of the discoveries in this regard are included in the extensive texts that are interspersed amongst the geographic features shown on the map.

      [Bookseller: Donald Heald Rare Books]
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        A View of the United States of America

      William Hall No. 51, Market Street, Philadelphia 1794 - First edition. Folding tables. [viii], 514 pp. 1 vols. 8vo. William Cushing's Copy. Signed by William Cushing (1723-1810) on front pastedown. Cushing was the Chief Justice of the Massachusetts Supreme Court, and one of the original Associate Justices of the United Supreme Court. He served 21 years as an Associate Judge (longer than any of the other original appointees), and refused to accept a promotion to Chief Justice. With the later signature of "Charles Cushing Paine Boston 1836," son of Cushing's niece, Elizabeth Sumner Cushing Paine.This is a culmination of Coxe's work as an early economist and treasury official, a distillation of information respecting the American economy in the eighteenth century. Howes C833; Sabin 17307; Evans 26829 Boards, chipped and soiled, untrimmed Folding tables. [viii], 514 pp. 1 vols. 8vo [Attributes: First Edition; Signed Copy]

      [Bookseller: James Cummins Bookseller, ABAA]
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        Sketches and Hints on Landscape Gardening. Collected from designs and observations now in the possession of the different noblemen and gentlemen, for whose use they were originally made. The whole tending to establish fixed principles in the art of laying out ground

      London: printed by W. Bulmer & Co., sold by J. & J. Boydell and G. Nicol, 1794. Oblong folio. (10 1/4 x 14 inches). 10 hand-coloured aquatints engravings (1 folding, 3 double-page), each with one or more overslips, and 6 aquatint plates printed in black with a single tint added (4 with one or more overslips), 2 wood-engraved illustrations, 1 wood-engraved tailpiece, bound without the half title. Expertly bound to style in 18th-century half russia over contemporary marbled paper-covered boards, the flat spine divided into six compartments by fillets and a Greek-key roll, red morocco lettering-piece in the second compartment, the others alternately decorated with a large centrally-placed vase and flower spray tool, with foliate cornerpieces and a large centrally-placed goblet and birds tool with foliate cornerpieces, gilt edges Provenance: early crowned 'C' monogram at foot of title The first of Repton's three great works on landscape gardening. Humphry Repton was the main successor to Lancelot "Capability" Brown as an improver of grounds for the English gentry in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth century. He was particularly noted for his Red Books. These were produced for each individual client and were made up from a manuscript description of his proposed improvements bound with Repton's own watercolour drawings of the grounds, with his proposed alterations displayed on an overlay. The present work is made up to a large degree of extracts from the Red Books of 57 houses which Repton had been called upon to improve. A list of these houses, their location and their owners is given in a valuable two-page list towards the front of this volume. The work is broken down into various chapters: Concerning Buildings, Concerning Water, Concerning Approaches, etc. In each chapter Repton selects the relevant section from each Red Book that is helpful to the point he is trying to make. In addition to the specific ideas that he is trying to convey, Repton also enters the fray on behalf of "Capability" Brown. The theoreticians, Payne Knight and Uvedale Price, had both written disparagingly of Brown's work and Repton here answers their arguments, a lengthy letter that Repton wrote to Price in July 1794 is quoted in full. The work ends with an intriguing list of sixteen "Sources of pleasure in Landscape Gardening" and William Wyndham's letter to Repton in support of his theories: "Places are not to be laid out with a view to their appearance in a picture, but to their uses, and the enjoyment of them in real life, and their conformity to those purposes is that which constitutes their true beauty: with this view gravel walks, and neat mown lawns ... are in perfect good taste, and infinitely more conformable to the principles which form the basis of our pleasure in these instances, than the docks and thistles, and litter and disorder, that may make a much better figure in a picture." The plates echo the watercolours with which Repton invariably illustrated the Red Books. He makes extensive use of movable flaps or slides - generally to explain the effect he is trying to create by showing the property before his improvements (with the flap down) and after, with the flaps lifted. The quality of the aquatints is exceptional, and the folding view of the Duke of Portland's house Welbeck Abbey in Nottinghamshire is particularly interesting as it apparently shows Repton and his assistants at work on a survey of the estate. Abbey Scenery 388; Archer 280.1; ESTC t073696; Henrey III, 1269; RIBA III, 405; Tooley 400.

      [Bookseller: Donald Heald Rare Books]
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        A Pair: "British Plenty" and "Scarcity in India"

      London, 1794. A pair of colour printed stipple engravings. [British Plenty]: Engraved by Bartolotti. Printed on laid paper. A lovely impression in good condition. Trimmed within platemark on all sides. A series of creases along upper margin and a water stain on the extreme edge of the right margin. Paper is time stained. Image size: 20 x 15 3/4 inches. Sheet size: 23 1/2 x 17 1/4 inches. [Scarcity in India]: Engraved and published by Charles Knight. Printed on watermarked 1794 wove Whatman paper. A lovely impression in good condition. Trimmed just within platemark on bottom margin. Some creasing in extreme edges. Water stain in bottom margin and small hole in bottom left corner of sheet. Mended hole in center of sheet. Image size: 20 1/4 x 15 7/8 inches. Sheet size: 24 1/8 x 19 1/8 inches. A stunning pair of "risqué" prints by the celebrated English genre painter Henry Singleton. Henry Singleton achieved early success painting literary and Biblical subjects, but he also produced many accomplished portraits and genre paintings. He spent the majority of his career in London where he was a regular exhibitor at the Royal Academy. He exhibited his first painting at the Academy while he was still a student there, and won a gold medal at the tender age of twenty-two. Singleton's beautiful paintings recall the pictures of George Morland, and depict, with insightful subtly, the tender side of English country life. His pretty genre paintings of rural and domestic life were a great source of inspiration for contemporary engravers who reproduced his work with industrious vigor. The popularity of these prints greatly enhanced Singleton's reputation, and made him one of the most celebrated painters of his day. This intriguing pair of stipples represents a deviation from Singleton's more conservative images. Typically a sentimental painter, Singleton became known for his sweet moralistic genre scenes. In comparison, this amusing pair is openly suggestive if not overtly sexual. If just examining the titles, one would assume that the subject matter was about commerce or perhaps a moralistic declaration regarding poverty in the colonies. When viewed in conjunction with the images, the pair assumes a more risqué connotation. In "British Plenty", a young man, sporting a delighted expression and eager demeanor, walks with two beautiful girls along the wharf. The fact that the women are most likely courtesans, an assumption supported by their flirtatious behavior and revealing clothing, immediately transforms the meaning of the image. In "Scarcity in India", two young Englishmen offer pretty trinkets to a young Indian girl outside a rural village. The girl responds to the familiar gestures and lascivious glances of the Englishmen with a meek expression and a demure pose. Singleton seems to be suggesting that Britain is wealthy in more ways than simple commerce, and that India's poverty extends to all levels of its society. Although, to a modern eye, Singleton's images are merely suggestive if not slightly amusing, to an eighteenth century audience these images would have been blatantly risqué. It is interesting that Singleton chose to place his scene in India, since he had never actually been there. Like many British artists, he produced paintings with an Indian theme in response to the great public demand for images of the colonies. This public fascination with India obviously extended to the erotic print trade, which sought to capture the latest fashions and most up to date trends.

      [Bookseller: Donald Heald Rare Books]
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        A Chart of the Gulf of Florida or New Bahama Channel, commonly called the Gulf Passage, between Florida, the Isle of Cuba, & the Bahama Islands: from the journals, observations and draughts of Mr. Chas. Roberts, master of the Rl. Navy, compared with the surveys of Mr. George Gauld &ca

      London: printed for W. Faden, 1794. Copper-engraved map, hand-coloured in outline. Good condition, with small neat repairs to fold and upper and lower margin, old light creasing. A spectacular and rare sea-chart of southern Florida, the Keys, the north coast of Cuba and the Bahamas. The British Admiralty assigned George Gauld, a Scots-born surveyor, the task of charting the difficult waters off the Gulf Coast of West Florida. Between 1764 and 1781 Gauld mapped an area that extended from New Orleans to the western coast of modern-day Florida. Recognizing the importance of his work to all those who travelled in the area, Gauld readily shared his work with scientific societies in America. During the Revolutionary War, Gauld was forced to suspend his work in the Dry Tortugas and Florida Keys due to attacks by American privateers, and in 1781, he was taken prisoner at the Siege of Pensacola. He was subsequently taken to Havana and then New York, before being repatriated to England, where he died shortly afterwards. Cf. Ware, John D. George Gauld, Surveyor and Cartographer of the Gulf Coast (Gainesville, Fla.: Univ. of Florida, 1982).

      [Bookseller: Donald Heald Rare Books]
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        Select Views in Mysore, the country of Tippoo Sultan; from drawings taken on the spot by Mr.Home; with historical descriptions

      London: published by Mr. Bowyer ... the letter-press by T. Bensley, 1794. Royal quarto. (13 3/8 x 10 3/4 inches). Text in English and Perso-Arabic script. 29 copper-engraved plates by Fittler, Byrne and others after Robert Home, 4 folding maps and plans (one hand-coloured). Contemporary red straight-grained morocco gilt, expertly rebacked to style, the flat spine divided into six compartments by single gilt fillets, lettered in the second, marbled endpapers, gilt turn-ins, marbled endpapers, gilt edges Provenance: Henry Malcolm (armorial bookplate) A very fine copy of the first edition of this early view book of India, recalling the power struggles which led to the British dominance of India in the 19th century. Home was instructed by Angelica Kauffmann when he attended the Royal Academy schools in 1769, and she encouraged his further studies in Rome between 1773-9. He subsequently worked as a portrait painter in Dublin, before returning to London in 1789. Home's career took on a spectacular new direction with his departure for India in 1790. Arriving in January 1791, he established a highly successful portrait practice and worked mainly in Madras, Calcutta and Lucknow. Home had arrived in India during what has become known as the Third Anglo-Mysore War (1789-92) and it is not unlikely that he left England with a commission from Bowyer to record the scenes of the action. The war took place in South India between the Kingdom of Mysore and the English East India Company. Tipu Sultan, the ruler of Mysore and an ally of France, invaded the nearby state of Travancore in 1789, which was a British ally. The resultant war lasted three years and ended in a resounding defeat for Mysore. France, embroiled in the French Revolution and thwarted by British Naval power, was unable to provide as much assistance as Tipu had expected. The war resulted in a sharp curtailment of Mysore's borders to the advantage of the Marathas, the Nizam of Hyderabad, and the Madras Presidency. The districts of Malabar, Salem, Bellary, and Anantapur were ceded to Madras Presidency. The war ended after the 1792 siege of Seringapatam and the signing of the Treaty of Seringapatnam according to which Tipu had to surrender half of his kingdom to the British company and send his two sons to them as the hostages of war. The present work is dedicated to the victorious commander in chief of the British forces in India, Marquess Cornwallis (1738-1805). Home was subsequently employed as official Lucknow court painter to both King Ghazi and his successor, the Crown Prince Nazir-Ud-Din. In the tradition of court artists, he was again encouraged to employ the full range of his artistic abilities, not only for painting pictures, but also for designing crowns and regalia, furniture for the palaces, richly ornamental howdahs, carriages and pleasure boats. Many of the drawings for these are now in the Victoria and Albert Museum, London. Home died in India in 1836. Brunet III, 268; Cox I, 304; P. Godrej & P. Rohatgi Scenic Splendours India through the printed image pp.112-114; Indian Life and Landscape pp.116-125; Lowndes II, p.1095.

      [Bookseller: Donald Heald Rare Books]
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        A Narrative of the Campaign in India which terminated in the war with Tippoo Sultan in 1792

      London: W. Bulmer for G. Nicol, 1794. 4to. (10 5/8 x 8 3/8 inches). 9 engraved maps and plates (some folding). Full contemporary tree calf, covers bordered in gilt, spine richly gilt in compartments, red morocco lettering piece in the second. Provenance: Edward Clive, 2nd Earl of Powis (1785-1848, grandson of Robert Clive of India. Inscription dated 'Eton College ... 1800') A fine copy in a lovely contemporary binding of an important account of British India and the third Anglo-Mysore war. Alexander Dirom here gives a largely first-hand account of the final campaign in the Third Anglo-Mysore War, including the siege of Seringapatam, and covering a period between the spring of 1791 and the beginning of March 1792 when Tipu Sultan sued for peace with General Cornwallis, and eventually surrendered his two sons as hostages. Alexander Dirom, who served as Deputy Adjutant-General during the war was well placed to provide an informed account of events, and apparently compiled this work, with the help of fellow officers, on the voyage home. The first edition was published in 1793; the present second edition appeared in the following year. The work was admired by Lowndes: "A very amusing and entertaining detail [sic.] of the operations which closed the late Indian war in 1792." This fine copy with provenance to the grandson of an important British figure in India, Major General Edward Robert Clive (1725-1774). Also known as "Clive of India," he is credited with helping to establish the military and political supremacy of the East India Company in Southern India and Bengal, securing India, and the wealth that followed, for the British crown. Lowndes I, p.620.

      [Bookseller: Donald Heald Rare Books]
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        Arte de Nadar

      Hardcover. Very Good. 8vo [14.3 x 10.3 cm]. (1) f. engraved title, 190 pp., XI full-page single-sided engravings interleaved in text. Quarter bound in contemporary brown calf, brown and green mottled boards, brown marbled endpapers, green silk ribbon bookmark, sprinkled edges. Minor spotting in places, marginal paper loss at p. 187, otherwise quite clean. Rare first Spanish edition (first Italian in 1794) of this attractive illustrated work propounding the "Bernardi Method" of swimming, which, both in terms of the history of swimming and illustrated books on the subject, had an influence in the late 18th and early 19th century equal to that of Melchisédech Thévenot (1620-92) in the 17th century. The work goes far beyond being an instructional manual touching on areas as diverse as comparative anatomy, iatro-mechanics, respiration, hydrostatics, and even the design and architecture of swimming pools. The engravings of this Spanish edition are reductions of eleven of the ambitiously artistic designs (rather more fanciful than one would expect in a didactic work of this nature) originally produced for the earlier Italian edition, after drawings by Francesco Antonio Lapegna (1769-1817). Although purportedly drawn from life, the subjects are embellished with considerable fantasia, not infrequently resembling ancient statuary, and here and there bordering on risqué. This combination of science, erudition and a slightly indulgent taste for decadent illustration - all devoted to an activity generally viewed at the time as eccentric - makes the work an interesting and representative document of the colorful milieu of late 18th-century Naples as received by readers in early 19th-century Madrid. Apart from this work, nothing is known of Oronzio de' Bernardi, a lawyer and holder of honorific ecclesiastical titles, although the first edition's warm dedication to the minister of the Neopolitan Navy, Sir John Acton, suggests that Bernardi held an "insider" position at Court. OCLC locates U.S. copies at the NYPL, UC San Diego, and Harvard; a further copy is held at the Hispanic Society of America. * Palau 28241; Hispanic Society of America, vol. 2, p. 1002; Piñal, vol. 9. p. 47, no. 287; Minerva, vol. VIII (1807), pp. 97-104; Ralph Thomas, Swimming, pp. 91-2 and 215-18; Bénezit VI.442; Riccardi 1.118; Villani 129/80 (the first edition); Poggendorf (the first).

      [Bookseller: Martayan Lan, Inc.]
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        THIRD CONGRESS OF THE UNITED STATES...AN ACT MAKING FURTHER PROVISION FOR SECURING AND COLLECTING THE DUTIES ON FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC DISTILLED SPIRITS, STILLS, WINES AND TEAS [caption title]

      Philadelphia, 1794. Folio. Soiling and foxing, particularly to the last page. Old fold lines. About very good. An Act passed by the Third Congress, just as the insurrection which later became known as the Whiskey Rebellion was fomenting; this law was the final straw which prompted the Rebellion. Among other things, this Act requires licensing of all stills and subjects any which are not licensed to forfeiture and confiscation. George Washington's presidential message of November 22, 1792 advocated a tax on distilled spirits, and Alexander Hamilton was a strong proponent of the whiskey excise tax, which was part of his overall plan for putting the federal government on a sound fiscal basis. As with many of his other proposals, it aroused bitter opposition in some quarters. Some objected that it laid federal taxes which properly belong to the states, while frontier representatives considered themselves singled out for an onerous tax. The impact of the whiskey revenue took several years to take full effect while the system of collectors was installed. Growing resistance to the tax continued to develop through the summer of 1794, when the Whiskey Rebellion began, finally set off by this licensing law. Congress repealed the excise tax on distilled spirits in March 1797, effectively ending the cause of the revolt. "Approved - June the fifth 1794," and signed in print by Speaker of the House Frederick Augustus Muhlenberg, Vice President John Adams, and President George Washington. Variant issues of the Acts of the Third Congress are known, and this is the issue which ends with the printed lines, "Deposited among the Rolls in the Office of the Secretary of State" and "Secretary of State," and is signed in manuscript by the second Secretary of State Edmund Randolph. NAIP notes five copies, including the one at the University of Michigan which is listed on OCLC. Edmund Randolph became the second Secretary of State on Jan. 2, 1794, succeeding Thomas Jefferson, who resigned at the end of 1793. He continued the practice begun in the First Congress of the Secretary of State signing a small number of "official" copies of Congressional acts for distribution to the States and important government officials. After the Third Congress, official acts were no longer signed in manuscript by the Secretary of State.

      [Bookseller: William Reese Company - Americana]
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        AN ENQUIRY INTO THE PRINCIPLES AND TENDENCY OF CERTAIN PUBLIC MEASURES

      Philadelphia, 1794. 20th-century polished calf, gilt. Boards lightly rubbed. Minor foxing. Very good. In a cloth slipcase. An important early essay by this staunch states' rights advocate and Jeffersonian Republican, touching on issues of government, political parties, and especially the first Bank of the United States. John Taylor of Caroline was the preeminent spokesman for southern states' rights and agrarian philosophy in the early national period. A fierce libertarian, he condemns Hamilton's funding and banking measures, which he views as "usurpations upon constitutional principles," capable of leading to "the dreadful remedy of civil war." This is Taylor's first major publication, quite rare, and a most important political work of the Federalist era.

      [Bookseller: William Reese Company - Americana]
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        ... Views in the Mysore Country

      [London: "published ... for Capt. Allen", 1794. Oblong folio. (18 1/4 x 25 1/4 inches). Engraved title/dedication to Charles Marquis Cornwallis K.G., Governor General of Bengal, 12pp. descriptive letterpress text at end. 20 uncoloured aquatint plates by J. Wells after Allan, mounted on guards throughout, edges uncut. Expertly bound to style in half eighteenth-century russia over contemporary marbled paper-covered boards, the flat spine in eight compartments divided by gilt fillets and roll tools, red morocco label in the second compartment, the other compartments with repeat decoration in gilt A complete copy of one of the rarest of all India view books. Allan served in the Madras Infantry from 1780 and took part in the third Mysore war. The present work resulted from images drawn by Allan at the conclusion of the campaign. As a military topographer, his overriding goal would have been to accurately portray what he saw: in the present beautiful and rare series he presents to a British public who were fascinated by the dealings surrounding Tipu Sultan. Allan went on to actively serve in the fourth Mysore War, as Deputy Quartermaster General. He spoke Persian fluently and was therefore appointed to carry the flag of truce into the Palace after the fall of Seringapatam and negotiate with Tipu. Subsequently, Allan was with Baird when Tipu's body was found. Allan resigned from the Army in 1804, and from 1814 was a Director of the East India Company. The rarity of this work can be judged from the fact that only one other complete copy is listed as having sold at auction in the past thirty five years. The only other records are for two partial copies: one with plates but no text, and a second with only 12 plates. Abbey Travel II, 418; Archer p.73; H. de Almeida & G.H. Gilpin Indian Renaissance pp.176-178; Prideaux p.326; P. Rohtagi and G. Parlett Indian Life and Landscape by Western Artists p.79.

      [Bookseller: Donald Heald Rare Books]
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        Recherches sur les causes des principaux faits physiques. 2 vols.

      Paris: Maradan, 1794. Lamarck, Jean Baptiste (1744-1829). Recherches sur les causes des principaux faits physiques. . . . 2 vols., 8vo. xvi, 375; [4], 412pp. Engraved plate in Vol. I, folding chart in Vol. II. B1 in Vol. I is a cancel, signed ?B*?. Paris: Maradan, seconde année de la République [1794]. 211 x 136 mm. Original paste paper wrappers, hand-lettered paper spine labels, spines worn and chipped with some loss, wrappers partly detached. Edges a bit frayed, some toning, but very good. First Edition of Lamarck?s first major scientific work. ?With the publication of the Recherches, Larmarck brought together the various strands of his work in physics and chemistry, and his views on the differences between organic and inorganic beings? (Corsi, pp. 47-48). Lamarck?s chemical theories played an important part in the development of his ideas about the origin of species, as they provided a materialistic definition of life, reproduction and evolution. In opposition to the ?new chemistry? established by Lavoisier, Lamarck held that there were only four true elements: Earth, air, fire and water. Fire was the most important of these four elements, and its three states?"natural, ?fixed,? and a state of expansion (caloric fire)?"were central to a great number of chemical and physical phenomena. Lamarck believed that only living beings could produce chemical compounds, with the most complex compounds being produced by those animals with the most highly organized physiological structure; in the absence of life, these compounds would naturally decompose over time into their constituent elements, producing in the process all known inorganic substances. This mineral ?chain of being,? with continuous degradation from the most complex to the simplest, is similar to Lamarck?s later theory of the evolution of species: Each stressed the gradual and successive production of forms, while denying the relevance of defined species. Corsi, The Age of Lamarck, pp. 47-53. Duveen, Bibliotheca alchemica et chemica, p. 334. Norman 1260.

      [Bookseller: Jeremy Norman's Historyofscience.com]
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        Chart of the Coast of America from Cape Hateras [sic] to Cape Roman from the actual surveys of Dl. Dunbibin Esq

      [Boston: John Norman, 1794. Copper-engraved sea chart, on two joined sheets. Overall sheet size: 21 1/4 x 33 inches. An early issue of the earliest American chart of the North Carolina coast. Wheat and Brun, and others, speculate that the original version of this map was separately published in 1761, citing an advertisement in the September 14, 1761 Boston Gazette: "The Navigation on the Coast of North and South Carolina being very dangerous on account of the many Bars, Shoals, Sandbanks, Rocks, etc. The late Daniel Dunbibin, Esq. of North Carolina, has, at very great Expence and Labour, draughted the Sea Coast of both the Provinces in a large whole Sheet Chart of 33 inches by 23; together with all the Rivers, Bays, Inlets, Islands, Brooks, Bars, Shoals, Rocks, Soundings, Currents, &c. with necessary Directions to render the Navigation both easy and safe, and are much esteemed by the most expert Pilots..." No copy of this 1761 map is known to exist. It is believed, however, that John Norman re-used the original printing plate for this map, or closely copied a surviving example, when he published the first edition of his The American Pilot in 1791. This example of Norman's chart of the North Carolina coastline is present here in its third state (i.e., preceded by the 1761 first issue, and second issue copies from the 1791 and 1792 editions of Norman's pilot). This state can be discerned by the addition of "New Inlet" just north of Cape Fear. Additional issues were published through 1803. The American Revolution brought to an end Britain's leading role in the mapping of America. The task now fell to the American publishing industry, still in its infancy, but with first-hand access to the new surveys that were documenting the rapid growth of the nation. In particular, there was a need for nautical charts for use by the expanding New England commercial fleets. The first American marine atlas, Mathew Clark's A Complete Set of Charts of the Coast of America, was published in Boston in 1790. Two of Clark's charts had been engraved by John Norman, who was inspired to launch his own enterprise. In January 1790, Norman published a notice in the Boston Gazette stating he was currently engraving charts of all the coast of America on a large scale. These were assembled and published as The American Pilot , Boston, 1791. Norman's Pilot , the second American marine atlas, indeed the second American atlas of any kind, marked an advance over the earlier work of Mathew Clark. New editions of the Pilot appeared in 1792 and 1794, and after John Norman's death, his son, William, brought out editions in 1794, 1798, 1801, and 1803. Despite the seemingly large number of editions, The American Pilot is one of the rarest of all American atlases, and one of the very few published during the eighteenth century. Wheat and Brun (pps. 198-199) locate just ten complete copies for the first five editions: 1791 (Huntington, Harvard); 1792 (LC, Clements); 1794(1) (LC, JCB, Boston Public); 1794(2) (Yale); 1798 (LC, Boston Public). Provenance: de-accessioned by the Museum of the City of New York. Wheat & Brun Maps & Charts Published in America before 1800 580 (third state); Phillips, p. 872 (1798 edition); Printed Maps of the Carolinas 24; cf. Wroth, Some Contributions to Navigation, pp. 32-33.

      [Bookseller: Donald Heald Rare Books]
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        A Chart of the Banks of Newfoundland, drawn from a great number of hydrographical surveys, chiefly from those of Chabert, Cook and Fleurieu

      [Boston: John Norman, 1794. Copper-engraved sea chart, on two joined sheets. Overall sheet size: 21 1/2 x 33 inches. A very rare and finely engraved sea chart from John Norman's American Pilot, one of the earliest American mappings of the Grand Banks. This map was originally published as part of the first edition of John Norman's The American Pilot, 1791. The map, depicts the entire Grand Banks as far west as the Bay of Fundy and as far east as the Flemish Cap. The present copy is an example of the second state (of three) with erasures below the title and scale and is from the 1794 edition of the Pilot. The map was of much importance to the New England fishing fleet, as the Treaty of Paris which ended the American Revolution gave the United States the right to fish these rich waters. The American Revolution brought to an end Britain's leading role in the mapping of America. The task now fell to the American publishing industry, still in its infancy, but with first-hand access to the new surveys that were documenting the rapid growth of the nation. In particular, there was a need for nautical charts for use by the expanding New England commercial fleets. The first American marine atlas, Mathew Clark's A Complete Set of Charts of the Coast of America , was published in Boston in 1790. Two of Clark's charts had been engraved by John Norman, who was inspired to launch his own enterprise. In January 1790, Norman published a notice in the Boston Gazette stating he was currently engraving charts of all the coast of America on a large scale. These were assembled and published as The American Pilot , Boston, 1791. Norman's Pilot , the second American marine atlas, indeed the second American atlas of any kind, marked an advance over the earlier work of Mathew Clark. New editions of the Pilot appeared in 1792 and 1794, and after John Norman's death, his son, William, brought out editions in 1794, 1798, 1801, and 1803. Despite the seemingly large number of editions, The American Pilot is one of the rarest of all American atlases, and one of the very few published during the eighteenth century. Wheat and Brun (pps. 198-199) locate just ten complete copies for the first five editions: 1791 (Huntington, Harvard); 1792 (LC, Clements); 1794(1) (LC, JCB, Boston Public); 1794(2) (Yale); 1798 (LC, Boston Public). Provenance: deaccessioned by the Museum of the City of New York. Wheat & Brun Maps & Charts Published in America before 1800 102; Suarez Shedding the Veil p. 164.

      [Bookseller: Donald Heald Rare Books]
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        A New and Accurate Chart of the Bay of Chesapeak including the Delaware Bay with all the Shoals, Channels, Islands, Entrances, Soundings & Sailing marks as far as the Navigable Part of the Rivers Patowmack Patapsco & N East. Drawn from several Draughts made by the most Experienced Navigators Chiefly those of Anthony Smith Pilot of St. Mapys and compared with the latest Surveys of Viriginia and Maryland

      Boston: Printed & Sold by W. Norman, 1794. Copper engraved sea chart, on four joined sheets. Overall sheet size: 42 3/8 x 34 1/4 inches. The first large-scale map of the Chesapeake region published in America. This map was first published as part of William Norman's 1794 edition of The American Pilot . This beautiful example is present here in the first state, with the "St. Mapys" for St. Marys reading in the title. This error was corrected for the 1798 and subsequent editions of the atlas. A magnificent undertaking early in the history of American mapmaking, this great chart is the centerpiece of the Normans' American pilot. While pre-eminently a work created for practical purposes, it is at the same time part of the process whereby American came into possession of itself and became acquainted with its new, extraordinary identity and possibilities. The American Revolution brought an end to Britain's leading role in the mapping of America. The task now fell to the American publishing industry still in its infancy, but with first-hand access to the new surveys that were documenting the rapid growth of the nation. In particular, there was a need for nautical charts for use by the expanding New England commercial fleets. The first American marine atlas, Mathew Clark's A Complete Set of Charts of the Coast of America , was published in Boston in 1790. Two of Clark's charts had been engraved by John Norman, who was inspired to launch his own enterprise. In January 1790, Norman published a notice in the Boston Gazette stating he was currently engraving charts of all the coast of America on a large scale. These were assembled and published as The American Pilot in Boston in 1791. Norman's Pilot, the second American marine atlas, indeed the second American atlas of any kind, marked an advance over the earlier work of Mathew Clark. New editions of Norman's Pilot appeared in 1792 and 1794, and after his death, his son, William Norman, brought out editions in 1794, 1798, 1801, and 1803. Despite the seemingly large number of editions, The American Pilot is one of the rarest of all American atlases. Wheat and Brun (pps. 198-199) locate just ten complete copies for the first five editions: 1791 (Huntington, Harvard); 1792 (Library of Congress, Clements); 1794(1) (Library of Congress, John Carter Brown Library, Boston Public Library); 1794(2) (Yale); 1798 (Library of Congress, Boston Public Library). Provenance: de-accessioned by the Museum of the City of New York. Wheat & Brun 310; Swem, Maps relating to Virginia 350 (1798 edition); Phillips, p. 723 (1798 edition); Phillips, Virginia Cartography, p. 65 (1798 edition); cf. Wroth, Some Contributions to Navigation, pp. 32-33.

      [Bookseller: Donald Heald Rare Books]
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        SPEECH OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES TO BOTH HOUSES OF CONGRESS [caption title].

      [Philadelphia: Printed by Francis Childs, 1794].. [4]pp. printed on a single folded sheet. Small tears at fold lines, not affecting text. Lightly toned. Very good. In a half morocco box. The very rare first printing of George Washington's sixth State of the Union Address, delivered on November 19, 1794. Most of the speech, nearly three- quarters of the printed text, is taken up by a discussion of the Whiskey Rebellion in western Pennsylvania, during which the authority of the federal government was severely tested. Washington's speech gives his account of the rebellion and his explanation of his military response to the insurrection, and offers important insights into his conceptions of the rule of law and the powers of the new federal government. Washington's description of the unfolding of events in western Pennsylvania, when residents protested an excise tax on liquor by resort to arms, is terse and to the point. He summarizes the course of the complaints from the frontier and describes the escalating violence. Washington recounts how Congress considered the complaints about the tax, but that this consideration only seemed to spur the rebels, writing that "the very forbearance to press prosecutions was misinterpreted into a fear of urging the execution of the laws." Washington castigates the rebellious American citizens as "the enemies of order" and malevolent "insurgents," gripped by a "treasonable fury" and a "spirit inimical to all order." His anger is palpable, as he accuses the insurgents of seeking to "withstand by force of arms the authority of the United States, and thereby to extort a repeal of the laws of excise, and an alteration in the conduct of government." Washington goes on to explain his actions in calling up a large militia force to march to western Pennsylvania and subdue the insurrection by force. What is very interesting in the text of the address is Washington's forceful interpretation of the powers and responsibilities of the federal government and the chief executive, and the ultimate rule of law. This address thereby becomes a forceful statement by Washington of his thoughts on the role and power of government. Washington describes the liquor tax as a constitutional exercising of the legislative power of the Congress, and expresses his dismay when he found that the courts and local authorities in western Pennsylvania were unable to control the rebels. He writes that "crimes, which reached the very existence of social order, were perpetrated without controul; - the friends of government were insulted, abused, and overawed into silence." Washington proclaims that to yield to those who were violently opposing the tax "would be to violate the fundamental principle of our constitution, which enjoins that the will of the majority shall prevail." Several times he expresses the need to obey the "authority of laws" and he reiterates his oath to "preserve, protect and defend the constitution of the United States." In the remainder of the address Washington discusses the need for a better organized militia and more adequate fortifications, issues which connect with the subject of the Whiskey Rebellion. He goes on to report on relations with Indian tribes on the frontier, the activities of General Anthony Wayne, and treaty negotiations. Washington also discusses the need to retire the national debt, the progress of the United States Mint, and his policy of equanimity in relations with European powers. Evans ascribes the printing of this speech to Francis Childs. Only five copies located in OCLC. Rare, and a very important expression of George Washington's philosophy of the role and power of the federal government when it faced the first serious domestic challenge to its authority. EVANS 27923.

      [Bookseller: William Reese Company - Americana]
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        Geschichte eines dicken Mannes worin drey Heurathen und drey Körbe nebst viel Liebe. 2 Bände.

      Berlin und Stettin Friedrich Nicolai 1794 - Kl.-8°. 1 Bl., 284 S. und 1 Bl., 239 S., 2 Bll. Mit 3 Kupfertafeln und 1 gest. Textvignette von und nach J. W. Meil. Pappbände d. Zt. mit Rückenschildchen und Rotschnitt. Goedeke IV/1, 503, 30. ? Hayn/Gotendorf II, 582f (»reizende Kupfer [?] u. A. eine fesselnde Schilderung des damaligen akademischen Lebens«). ? Dorn 560. ? Erste Ausgabe der zweiten Romanveröffentlichung des Verlegers Friedrich Nicolai. Sie liegt hier gleichsam in einer Vorzugsausgabe vor: Breitrandiger Druck »bey J. F. Unger, mit dessen neu abgeänderter deutschen Druckschrift« auf besserem Papier u. mit drei Kupfertafeln (wurde auch ohne diese Illustrationen ausgeliefert). Erzählt wird die Geschichte eines Mannes, Anselm Redlich, der auszog nach den Kantschen Lehren zu leben und - scheiterte. ? Aus der Bibliothek des Grafen Georg von Einsiedel (Geheimer Rat, 1767-1840, »höchst gebildet in den schönsten Künsten, zeichnete er sich auch durch scharfen Verstand, Witz, Belesenheit und Kunstsinn aus [?]« Neuer Nekrolog 1840); Titelbll. mit kleinen Stempeln »Bibl. Einsiedel. Reibersd[orf bei Dresden]« ? Gelenke etwas abgeplatzt. Vereinzelt gering fleckig. 800 g gr. [Attributes: First Edition; Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Halkyone]
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        A New Map of Hindoostan from the latest Authorities, Chiefly from the Actual Survey made by Major James Rennell, Surveyor General to the H.ble East India Company, of the Bengal Provinces, and of the Countries lying between them and Dehly: the whole exhibiting All the Military Roads and Passes as wall as the most accurate Division of the British Possessions in the East Indies.

      1794 - London, Laurie & Whittle, 1794. Original outline colour. Four sheets conjoined, total 1200 x 1440mm. Minor repairs to binding folds. A huge map of India incorporating Rennell's landmark mapping of Bengal. However of equal interest are the borders settled after the Treaty of Seringapatam ended the Third Anglo-Mysore in 1792, only two years before this map's publication. Areas of Mysore (which is marked as the 'Dominions of Tipu Saib' are coloured to denote their transferal to the control of the East India Company.

      [Bookseller: Altea Antique Maps]
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        The European Part of the Russian Empire, from Maps Published by the Imperial Academy at St. Petersburg, with the New Provinces on the Black Sea.

      Laurie & Whittle, London 1794 - This magnificent and rare map of the Russian Empire covers the European as well as the Asian portions of Russia. It extends from the Black Sea east to Kamchatka and the Bering Sea and includes Novaya Zemlya in the Arctic. Includes parts of neighboring Poland, Scandinavia and China. Shows beautifully rendered topography rendered in profile. The most interesting feature is the mapping of Kamchatka and vicinity. The exploration tracks to the Kuril Islands are noted and "Behring's Island" is identified, where the great Arctic explorer ultimately died in 1741. Sakhalin is speculatively mapped as to separate islands with the lower islands identified as "Ezzo". Published by Laurie and Whittle in Kitchin's "General Atlas", this is one of the finest maps of Russia from a 18th century atlas. In good condition with some offsetting. Minor foxing with minimal edge wear. Toning over folds. Thomas Kitchin (1719-1784) was an English engraver and map-maker. His maps and atlases of England earned him the position of hydrographer to the King. This large map of the Russian Empire is an impressive example of his work. Robert Laurie (c. 1755 - 1836) and James Whittle (1757-1818) were London-based map and atlas publishers active in the late 18th and early 19th century. Their firm combined Laurie's engraving skills with Whittle's social contacts and print sales experience. Together, they published numerous maps and atlases, often enlisting prominent cartographers such as Kitchin, Faden, Jefferys and others to update and modify their plates. Map. Engraving with hand coloring. Image measures 18 1/2" x 50".

      [Bookseller: Argosy Book Store, ABAA, ILAB]
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