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Displayed below are some selected recent viaLibri matches for books published in 1475


         Text begins: ‘[M]urus civitatis habet trece[n]tas turres Sexaginta et una.’

      [Sant’Orso, Johannes de Reno, c 1475]. - 4to. (230 x 150mm) [8] leaves; printed in roman type; 28 lines to a full page; first 10 chapter headings in capital letters, the remainder in lower case; postscript ‘Deo Gratias’ in capitals; 3 blank capital spaces on first page hand-painted in red. Preserved in a Spanish ‘cortina’ binding (c1820) of brown goatskin decorated with inlaid green and gilt rhombic design in centres of covers surrounded by floral gilt borders back-strip gilt; blue silk guards at beginning and end. One of the earliest editions recorded of the first guide to the city of Rome, generally known as Mirabilia Romae (the Marvels of Rome), and considered the first printed western town guide. Originally compiled in the early 12th century by one Benedict, a canon of St Peter’s, for the use of pilgrims and tourists, it locates and describes the ancient monuments and mediaeval churches. The text was revised and enlarged during the 14th century and exists in different manuscript versions. In the present edition contents are divided into sections including: ‘De portis infra urbem’ (the gates below the City), ‘De portis transtiberim’ (the gates beyond the Tiber), ‘De montibus infra urbem’ (the hills), ‘De pontibus ’ (the bridges), ‘Palacia imperatorum’ (the imperial palaces), ‘De arcubus triumphalibus’ (triumphal arches), ‘De arcubus non triumphalibus’ (commemorative arches), ‘De terminis’ (baths), ‘De theatris’ theatres), ‘De agulea sancti Petri’ (St Peter’s sarcophagus). ‘De cimiteriis’ (cemeteries), ‘De templis’ (temples), ‘De equis marmoreis’ (the marble horses), ‘De femina circundata serpe[n]tibus’ (statue of a woman surrounded by snakes), ‘De rustico sede[n]te super ereu[m] equu[m]’ (the origins of the horse called Constantine), ‘De coliseo’ (the Coliseum}, ‘De sancta maria rotunda’ (St Mary’s Round Church or the Pantheon), ‘De Octaviano imperatore’ (an incident in the life of the Emperor Augustus commemorated at the Church of the Minorites), ‘Totila exasperatio in servos dei’ (an angry King Totila’s destruction of churches). These small pilgrims’ guides were literally read to pieces and very few have survived which explains their extreme rarity. This is also one of the earliest imprints from Sant’Orso, north of Vicenza. The present copy has large margins and is in good condition. Sergio Rossetti: a bibliography, I, g 019 (records 1 copy in America); BMC VII, 1027; GW M23540;Goff, Suppl.M591a; Hain 11174; Proctor 7148. For the binding cf: M. López Serrano, Le décor de “cortina”, pp22-34 [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Hünersdorff Rare Books ABA ILAB]
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         Bible, Latin, the New and Old Testaments

      A fine copy of the first Bible printed by Koberger, containing the complete text of the Bible, the first of several editions that he would publish in his lifetime; it follows the text of the Gutenberg Bible. Koberger could be said to be the first Bible-printer, having printed over 20 editions before 1513, no other printer can claim that in the incunabular period. Koberger (c. 1440 - 1513) started his printing career in 1470, the same year the printing press was introduced in Nuremberg; he rose to become arguably the most important printer of Nuremberg, and almost unrivalled by his contemporaries in other cities. Koberger was one of the most successful printing entrepreneurs of the first period of the printing history, known mostly for his Bibles -both in Latin and German- and Schedel's Liber Chronicarum or Nuremberg Chronicle. His business employed printers, typesetters, illuminators, and on occasions illustrators such as Durer. Later editions of the Bible published by Koberger contained preliminary or supplementary material, this, being his first edition in Latin, contains the text of the Bible in its entirety and pure form. Provenance: armorial bookplate on front pastedown of rJohn Cottrell Powell (1798-1834); Ampleforth Abbey Library, armorial bookplate on front pastedown. HC 3056. GW 4218. BMC ii 413. Goff B543. Hase, Koberger 15.

      [Bookseller: HS Rare Books]
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         Vocabularius perutilis vtriusq [ue] iuris tam ciuilis q [uam] canonici. [Anhang] 'Tractatus de modo studendi in utroque jure... editus ... Johane baptistam de gazalupis'.

      8 (17x11), 1wBl., [210] Bl., 1 wBl., 1. Blatt mit Titel und großer dekorative Druckermarke des Jean Petit, zweispaltiger Druck mit zahlr. Initialen, Halblederband mit Einzelstempeln Holzdeckeln auf 5 starken Bünden, Messingschliesse mit gotischer Minuskel-Prägung an Pergamentstreifen (intakt), gestochenes Wappenexlibris des 18. Jh. auf Innenspiegel, die ersten 4 Blatt sowie gelegentliche zeitgenössische Marginalie, sehr schönes und wohlerhaltenes Exemplar, (Vocabularius perutilis utriusque iuris tam civilis quam canonici) colophon: Parisius impressum: per Johanne barbier: impensis Johanis parui ... Anno d[omi]ni millesimo quingetesimo septimo di vero vij mensis Septembris.-- Sehr geschätztes Rechtslexikon erstmals 1475 erschienen und bis zu Beginn des 17. Jahrhunderts mehrfach aufgelegt, hier in einer frühen Ausgabe des 16. Jahrhunderts.- Die Autorenschaft wird gewöhnlich Jodocus aus Erfurt zugeschrieben.-

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat an der Stiftskirche : Bad Wa]
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         Tabulae de motibus planetarum.

      [Ferrara, ca 1475]. - Folio (242 x 340 mm). Latin manuscript on paper. 160 leaves (complete including four blank leaves at the beginning and six at the end). Written in brown ink in a neat humanistic hand, double columns, 37 lines to each page, numerous two and three line initials supplied in red or blue. With one large illuminated initial and coat of arms of the Scalamonte family flanked by floral decoration on first leaf, painted in shades of blue, green and lilac and heightened in burnished gold. With altogether 231 full-page tables in red and brown, some marginal or inter-columnar annotations, and one extended annotation on final leaf. Fifteenth century blind stamped goat skin over wooden boards, remains of clasps. The so-called Toledan Tables are astronomical tables used to predict the movements of the Sun, Moon and planets relative to the fixed stars. They were completed around the year 1080 at Toledo by a group of Arab astronomers, led by the mathematician and astronomer Al-Zarqali (known to the Western World as Arzachel), and were first updated in the 1270s, afterwards to be referred to as the "Alfonsine Tables of Toledo". Named after their sponsor King Alfonso X, it "is not surprising that" these tables "originated in Castile because Christians in the 13th century had easiest access there to the Arabic scientific material that had reached its highest scientific level in Muslim Spain or al-Andalus in the 11th century" (Goldstein 2003, 1). The Toledan Tables were undoubtedly the most widely used astronomical tables in medieval Latin astronomy, but it was Giovanni Bianchini whose rigorous mathematical approach made them available in a form that they could finally be used by early modern astronomy. - Bianchini was in fact "the first mathematician in the West to use purely decimal tables" and decimal fractions (Feingold, 20) by applying with precision the tenth-century discoveries of the Arab mathematician Abu'l-Hasan al-Uqilidisi, which had been further developed in the Islamic world through the writings of Al-Kashi and others (cf. Rashed, 88 and 128ff.). Despite the fact that they had been widely discussed and applied in the Arab world throughout a period of five centuries, decimal fractions had never been used in the West until Bianchini availed himself of them for his trigonometric tables in the "Tabulae de motis planetarum". It is this very work in which he set out to achieve a correction of the Alfonsine Tables by those of Ptolemy. "Thorndike observes that historically, many have erred by neglecting, because of their difficulty, the Alfonsine Tables for longitude and the Ptolemaic for finding the latitude of the planets. Accordingly, in his Tables Bianchini has combined the conclusions, roots and movements of the planets by longitude of the Alfonsine Tables with the Ptolemaic for latitude" (Tomash, 141). - The importance of the present work, today regarded as representative of the scientific revolutions in practical mathematics and astronomy on the eve of the Age of Discovery, is underlined by the fact that it was not merely dedicated but also physically presented by the author to the Holy Roman Emperor Frederick II in person on the occasion of Frederick's visit to Ferrara. In return for his "Tabulae", a "book of practical astronomy, containing numbers representing predicted times and positions to be used by the emperor's [ ] astrologers in managing the future" (Westman, 10ff.), Bianchini was granted a title of nobility by the sovereign. - For Regiomontanus, who studied under Bianchi together with Peurbach, the author of the "Tabulae" counted as the greatest astronomer of all time, and to this day Bianchini's work is considered "the largest set of astronomical tables produced in the West before modern times" (Chabbas 2009, VIII). Even Copernicus, a century later, still depended on the "Tabulae" for planetary latitude (cf. Goldstein 2003, 573), which led to Al-Zarquali's Tables - transmitted in Bianchini's adaption - ultimately playing a p

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat INLIBRIS Gilhofer Nfg. GmbH]
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         RARE VERNACULAR BOOK OF HOURS LEAF CIRCA1475

      HORAE,[Book of Hours] , leaf from a Book of Hours on vellum in the Belgian language, probably written in a Belgian Scriptorium around 1475. Size of the leaves approx 15.0 cm x 100 cm [ 6" x 4"] .17 lines of text in a medium brown ink.Large initials in red,blue and white and gold with smaller initials in the same colours. Decorations of leaves and flowers to the top and bottom margins. Unusual and beautiful leaves in near Fine condition. We have more than one of these leaves, please ask for further images if required.

      [Bookseller: John Underwood Antiquarian Books]
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         De triplici via (Bound with:) Revelationes (Bound with:) De praeparatione ad missam.

      Köln: Ulrich Zell, 1475. 4to (15,5 x 22 cm). 47 leaves (without last blank). 19th-century cardboard binding. Printed in 1 column, 26 lines. Gothic Type. Broad margined. Partly rubricated; 3 larger initials in red (2 simply decorated). No foliation, no signatures nor catchwords, no colophon (as usual with Zell). Early and rare incunable from the 1st Cologne printing office with 3 treatises, nos 1 & 3 by S. Bonaventura, no 2 by S. Methodius. The 2nd printing of this work. De triplici via is the shortest, and most complete summary of Bonaventura's mystical philosophy. Revelationes (Apocalypse) by Pseudo-Methodius influenced the eschatological thinking of the Middle Ages. De praeparatione ad missam was conceived as an aid for priests in the discharge of their sacred office. Condition: Leaf 17 bit loose; leaves 41-v & 42-r with red inkstain; upper quarter of leaves with unobtrusive waterstaining. Altogether a very good, non-washed copy. For a full description and more images please visit our website: www.zaalbooks.nl .

      [Bookseller: Zaal Books]
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         Quadragesimale.

      Ulm: Johann Zainer (the Elder), 1475. Folio (leaf size 33,7 x 25,1 cm). 269 leaves (text complete, first & last blank missing). 2 col., 45-50 lines, rubricated. Contemporary half roan, blind-tooled spine, boards covered with old vellum antiphonary. Text decorated with a beautiful "scholar border" woodcut with floral branches and a human figure of a doctor & 51 large woodcut initials. Collation: a10, bc8, d-g10, h12, ik10, l8, m10, no8, pq10, r8, s10, t8, v7, xy10, z8, A10, B8, C-F10 (except for the missing first and last blank; text complete). First Zainer-edition of a collection of Lent sermons by the popular Franciscan preacher Konrad Gritsch [1409 - 1475]. A few contemporary marginal annotations in ink, (some in red ink), including two manicules (leaves 193 and 264). Condition: A bit worming of the spine, the boards and the inner margin of some leaves, mainly of the last ones (but outside of text); a few small defects of the spine-leather; a few leaves bit loose. But altogether a very fresh copy of a nicely printed, very rare and early edition. For a full description and more images please visit our website: www.zaalbooks.nl .

      [Bookseller: Zaal Books]
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         SPECULUM SAPIENTIAE

      Michael Wenssler ca. 1475], [Basel - 282 x 198 mm. (11 x 7 3/4"). [61] leaves (complete). Single column, 34 lines, gothic type. Modern retrospective stiff vellum, flat spine with ink titling, two vellum tab closures. In a brown cloth dropfront box. With attractive eight-line puzzlework initial in green and red. Front pastedown with engraved bookplate of Victor de Guinzbourg; signed postcard from Frederick Goff to de Guinzbourg dated March 14, 1958, thanking him for reporting this copy to the Census of "Incunabula in American Libraries," laid in at front. Goff C-1017 (including this copy); BMC III, 721. Boards tending to splay slightly, a touch of soil to edges, last quire with dampstain to upper fore-edge corner (darker on final two leaves), occasional mild marginal foxing or small stains, otherwise clean, crisp, and rather bright, with ample margins and an unworn binding. This is a rare copy of one of the earliest printings of a fable collection, a book that predates the first appearance of Aesop by some three years. The work is divided into four books: an overview with fables promoting virtues, followed by three sections with tales warning, in turn, against arrogance, greed, and love of luxury. As in Aesop, various animals--lions, monkeys, roosters, crows, foxes--are used to embody human traits. Long attributed to the fourth century bishop Cyril of Jerusalem, it was determined by Thomas Kaeppeli to be the work of 13th century writer Boniohannes de Messana. "The Mirror of Wisdom" was apparently first printed in Strassburg no later than 1474; ISTC notes that the Bamberg copy was rubricated in that year. Our edition emanated "about 1475" from the workshop of Michael Wenssler, a Strassburg-born printer who was active in Basel for nearly 20 years. Wenssler entered the University of Basel in 1462, and started his press in that city 10 years later, with Friedrich Biel. According to Haebler, "Wenssler introduces in his type a series of new and quite peculiar forms. . . . He seems in his earliest types to have had a great affection for ornamented" letters. Wenssler flourished for many years, but his business ran into difficulties in the 1480s and he was forced to flee his debtors in 1491. Still, he did not abandon his trade, and there are records of him working as a printer in the South of France and in Lyon until about 1496. Former owner Victor de Guinzbourg (ca. 1906-76) was an Allied intelligence agent during World War II, and later worked on the Military Staff Committee at the United Nations. As the laid-in postcard attests, he reported his ownership of this volume to Frederick Goff, Curator of Rare Books at the Library of Congress, and it is recorded in Goff's entry C-1017 as "VdG." We were able to trace just two other copies of this imprint in the marketplace since 1931. This is a rare copy of one of the earliest printings of a fable collection, a book that predates the first appearance of Aesop by some three years. The work is divided into four books: an overview with fables promoting virtues, followed by three sections with tales warning, in turn, against arrogance, greed, and love of luxury. As in Aesop, various animals--lions, monkeys, roosters, crows, foxes--are used to embody human traits. Long attributed to the fourth century bishop Cyril of Jerusalem, it was determined by Thomas Kaeppeli to be the work of 13th century writer Boniohannes de Messana. "The Mirror of Wisdom" was apparently first printed in Strassburg no later than 1474; ISTC notes that the Bamberg copy was rubricated in that year. Our edition emanated "about 1475" from the workshop of Michael Wenssler, a Strassburg-born printer who was active in Basel for nearly 20 years. Wenssler entered the University of Basel in 1462, and started his press in that city 10 years later, with Friedrich Biel. According to Haebler, "Wenssler introduces in his type a series of new and quite peculiar forms. . . . He seems in his earliest types to have had a great affection for ornamented" letters. Wenssler flouris

      [Bookseller: Phillip J. Pirages Rare Books (ABAA)]
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         Illuminated Manuscript: Leaf with Text from the Office for the Dead

      np, France 1475 - Beautiful 15th century leaf on vellum with striking gold borders. 15 lines of text on each side written in Latin with brown-black ink in gothic script on vellum. The text is from the Ninth and Tenth Lessons. On recto: 1 double-line illuminated initial in burnished gold and blue. Border along right margin with beautiful red flowers on a bright gold background. On verso: Border along left margin with red-pink flowers on a stunning gold background. France: c. 1475. Size: 136 x 92 mm (approx. 5.4 x 3.6 inches). Light soiling around edges. Fine leaf with large, impressive margins. The text in Latin: On recto: Amplius lava me Domine ab iniustitia mea: et a delicto meo munda me. Ut tu Deus deleas iniquitatem meam. Quare de vulva eduxisti me? Qui utinam consumptus essem, ne oculus me videret. Fuissem quasi non essem, de utero translatus ad tumulum. Numquid non paucitas dierum meorum finietur brevi? On verso: Dimitte me ergo, ut plangam paululum dolorem meum, antequam vadam, et non revertar ad terram tenebrosam, et opertam mortis caligine, terram miseriae, et tenebrarum, ubi umbra mortis, et nullus ordo, sed sempiternus horror inhabitat. Libera me Domine de viis inferni, qui portas aereas confregisti, et visitasti infernum, et dedisti eis lumen? English translation: Recto: Wash me O Lord yet more, from my injustice: and from my sin cleanse me. That thou O God blot out my iniquity. Why didst thou bring me forth out of the matrix? Who, would God, I had been consumed, that eye might not see me, I had been as if I were not, transported from the womb to the grave. Shall not the fewness of my days be ended shortly? Verso: Suffer me therefore, that I may a little lament my sorrow, before I go, and return not unto the dark land, and that is covered with the mist of death, a land of misery, and darkness, where the shadow of death, and no order, but everlasting horror inhabiteth. Deliver me, O Lord, from the ways of hell, which hast broken the brazen gates, and hast visited hell, and hast given light to them. [Attributes: First Edition]

      [Bookseller: Manhattan Rare Book Company, ABAA, ILAB]
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         [Summa de virtutibus] [On the Virtues ; The Summation of Virtues] [Quintæ Partis Principalis, Tractatus de Beatitudinibus]

      [Basle, Switzerland : Michael Wenßler (Wenssler), 1475], 1475. Very Good. 169 Folio leaves ; 31 cm. ; 2° ; bound in quarter suede with three raised bands, hand-written titles on spine ; an incunable from the early and important press of Michael Wenssler of Basel, Switzerland ; this partial copy without title page or colophon ; Hain 12383, Proctor 7464, British Museum 15th century III, 722 (IB.37053), Polain 3034, Goff P-83, Walsh 1114 ; single column 36 line Gothic type, with conventional 15th century printing ligatures, and with rubricized initials throughout; some generally minor edge staining and tears ; a few worm holes in the margins ; a few pages with larger stains ; this copy with no chapter headings or signature marks ; begins at Quintæ Partis Principalis, Tractatus de Beatitudinibus, with the section on Patience and the temptations of demons and ends the Beatitudes with the discourse on Peace; rubics in the same hand that executed those for the 1474 Quennell edition at the University of Darmstadt ; Michael Wenssler, floruit 1472-1497 [name variations: Wensler, Wensel, Vrenssler, Wenkler or Wenßler] was originally from Strasbourg, but became a citizen of Basel in 1473 and was active from 1475 to 1488, when he had to sell his press to pay off his debts. He then leaves Basel for Cluny, while his family remained behind in penury, and he does not return until 1499, when he retires ; this publication, amongst the earliest for Basle, is of the celebrated work of William of Auvergne, ca. 1180-1271 : the Summa de Virtutibus, or The Summation of Virtues, the first of the famous two-part tract (whose second part, published separately, treats of the vices). William was born in the former Province of Auvergne about 1180, and by 1223 he was master of theology at the University of Paris and a canon at Notre Dame. He was consecrated Bishop and given the See of Paris in 1228 by Pope Gregory IX, and he remained there until his death in 1249. The Summa de Virtutibus et Viitis, On the Virtues and Vices, a massive work, is itself part of a much larger work, the Magisterium Divinale et Sapientiale (The Teaching on God in the Mode of Wisdom). The style of the work is somewhat rambling, moving off into many tangents as it explores related concepts and makes the work appear as an extemporaneous discourse, often making a point and then immediately raising objections to that point, which William then proceeds to refute. It was reprinted many times and was a monumental Dominican theological work. [name variants for William of Auvergne: Guilelmus Peraldus, Guillermus Parisiensis, Guilielmus Peraldus, Guilelmus Peraldus, Guillaume Perrault, Guilelmus Peraldus, Willelmi de Peraldo, Wilhelm Peraldus, Guilelmus de Petra Alda, Guillaume de Peyraud (Ardeche), G. Lugdunensis, G. de Peyrauta, G. de Peraudus, G. Parisiensis, Guil. de Lugduno, Guillelmus Peraltus, Fr. Guil. a Peira, Fr. Guillermo Peraldo, Wilhelmus Ep. Lugdun., and Willelmus Arch. Lug.] ; extremely rare edition ; VG

      [Bookseller: Joseph Valles - Books]
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         Confessiones

      Milan: Johannes Bonus, 1475. Chancery 4to in half-sheets (213 x 151 mm). Collation: [a-v8 x4].164 leaves, unfoliated. 26 lines. Type 1:105R. 4- and 5-line capital spaces, some with printed guide letters. Roman capitals supplied in red. Worming in first four and last two quires, marginal dampstaining to last dozen leaves. 18th-century parchment over pasteboards, goatskin gilt lettering piece on spine (slightly frayed), imprint and date added in ink; plain edges, green silk ribbon marker. Lower edges untrimmed, revealing contemporary manuscript and stamped quire signatures. Provenance: deleted but still visible contemporary inscription on title, S[an]ct[ae] Mariae mre [i.e., martyre?] Rumani ad Vsu[m] fr[atr]is Siri [or Sixi] d[e] b[er]gamo [flourish] fr. B[o?]tho de Pallo [pallatio?] Vig. [Vigevano?] co. manu p[ro]pria; Herculis de Silva, bookplate; (with Lardanchet, catalogue 2004/1).*** Second Edition of the Confessions of Saint Augustine, printed five years after the first (Strassburg: Mentelin, [not after 1470]). Only four fifteenth-century editions of Augustine's spiritual autobiography are recorded, each printed in a different city. Praised by Luther, the Confessions regained popularity with the Reformation. This was the first and only dated edition of three produced on the second press of Johannes Bonus, who identified himself as a German Augustinian in his verse colophons. He had worked previously for the Augustinians in Savona, near Genoa, where he printed at least two editions in 1474. Victor Scholderer commented on this edition in the introduction to BMC VI: "This is a most attractive little book, well printed with a roman fount differing from that used at Savona, and apparently influenced by the type-styles of Rome as much as those of Venice, which deserves the epithet `very beautiful' bestowed upon it by Proctor where its effect is not ruined by swarms of peculiar `double-decker' contractions." As noted by Scholderer in BMC, an extra (27th) line was added at the end of [b]6r after printing off. The wide margins of this large copy have preserved most of the manuscript and stamped quire signatures: the first seven quires are numbered in manuscript, while the rest, from quire h on, bear small stamped signatures. Signatures are found on the in the lower outer corners of the rectos of the first four leaves of each quire; the manuscript signatures are signed with arabic numerals (c1, c2, c3, c4), while the stamped signatures use the letter followed by the requisite number of tiny crosses (e.g., k+, k++, etc.). This may imply a two-press production, a possibility noted by Scholderer, who remarked that the watermarks of the BMC copy change after quire [l]. Our copy also contains different paper stocks, but a closer analysis would be necessary to determine the distribution, as several gatherings are without visible watermarks. The contemporary inscription of a Brother Sixi(?) points to a Bergamesque monastic provenance, but I have not succeeded in identifying the house. A manuscript in Ravenna from 1477 has a similar inscription, transcribed as "ad usum Fraris Sixi de Pergamo," in Giuseppe Mazzatinti, ed., Inventari dei manoscritti delle biblioteche d'Italia: Ravenna, vol. 5 (1895), p. 164. Goff A-1251; GW 2894; BMC VI xxiii and 728; CIBN A-693; Walsh 3082; Bod-inc A-536.

      [Bookseller: Musinsky Rare Books, Inc.]
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         Anatomia

      [22] leaves, Gothic type, 43 lines. Folio (301 x 213 mm.), disbound (some worming towards end). [Padua (not Pavia): Pierre Maufer, about 1475]. First edition, a remarkable discovery of the third known copy of the true first edition of the first modern book devoted solely to anatomy. The other two surviving copies are in the Biblioteca Corsiniana (Rome) and the Biblioteca Comunale (Viterbo). The rarity of this book is well-known: it is revealing that Castiglioni, Choulant, and Garrison all cite the 1478 edition as the first printing. Its influence was great: "The first outstanding anatomist worthy of the name…the Anathomia of Mondino was the most used anatomical text up to the end of the sixteenth century, probably because it contained the most important technical indications in brief and concise form."-Castiglioni, A History of Medicine, pp. 341-43. Mondino (ca. 1275-1326), a native of Bologna, was the son of an apothecary and the nephew of a professor of medicine. He attended the University of Bologna where he studied under Alderotti (Thaddeus of Florence), an early dissector, and took his medical degree in 1300. Mondino soon became a professor of medicine at the university. "Mondino's chief work is his compendium of anatomy, Anatomia Mundini, completed in 1316, which made him, in Castiglione's [sic] words, 'the first outstanding anatomist worthy of the name.' Mondino's book dominated anatomy for over two hundred years. The major reason for Mondino's great popularity was the simplicity, conciseness, and systematic arrangement of his book, which is divided into six parts: (1) an introduction to the whole body and a discussion of authorities; (2) the natural members including the liver, spleen, and other organs in the abdominal cavity; (3) the generative members; (4) the spiritual members, the heart, lungs, trachea, esophagus, and other organs of the thoracic cavity up to the mouth; (5) the animal members of the skull, brain, eyes, ears; and (6) the peripheral parts, bones, spinal column, extremities. This organization was not the result of any philosophical approach to the subject but rather derived from the necessity of dissecting the most perishable organs first… "Mondino should be regarded as the restorer of anatomy if only because his popular textbook and his experimental teaching were instrumental in preparing the revival of the subject. His text was the first book written on anatomy during the Middle Ages that was based on the dissection of the human cadaver; his efforts consolidated anatomy as a part of the medical program at Bologna and encouraged further study. His book also dominated the teaching of anatomy, and no real improvements were made upon it until 1521, when Berengario da Carpi wrote his famous commentary on Mondino."-D.S.B., IX, pp. 468-69. "Mondino's book soon became a classic text; he was venerated soon after his death as a divine master and anyone who was found differing from his book was regarded as monstrous. For three centuries the lecturers on anatomy were required to use his book in their teaching, as may be seen in the statutes of many medical schools."-Castiglioni, op. cit., pp. 344-45-(& see the detailed account of the contents of this book and methods of dissection which it reveals on pp. 341-45). A very fine copy with all edges uncut and preserved in a slipcase. Two contemporary annotators have made a number of neat comments in the wide margins. This copy was clearly removed from a sammelband. The final four leaves have some worming, becoming increasingly more pronounced (but not at all offensive) touching the text of the final three leaves. ❧ Choulant-Frank, pp. 88-96. Garrison-Morton 361-(describing the 2nd edition of 1478)-"The first modern book devoted solely to anatomy, written for his students in 1316. Mundinus re-introduced human dissection, which had been neglected for 1500 years before him; he was the most noted dissector of his period." Garrison, History of Medicine, pp. 160-61. GKW M25666-(citing Pavia in error). ISTC im00871200. Klebs 688.1. Sarton, III, Pt. I, p. 843-"In spite of his personal observations, Mondino was almost entirely dependent upon Galen and Theophilos and upon Arabic authorities.".

      [Bookseller: Jonathan A. Hill, Bookseller, Inc.]
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         Duplex grammatice artis isagoge ab eodem multis nuper locupletata schematibus, ...[Paris], Ambrosius Girault (colophon: Paris, printed by Nicolai Savetier for Ambrosius Girault, 25 July 1525). Small 4to (20 x 13.5 cm). With a large woodcut device on title-page, about 25 woodcut "Lombardic" initials plus about 10 repeats, and about 20 line fillers. With the device, all initials and line fillers richly coloured by hand with extensive use of gold, four lines of text on title-page, nearly all paragraph marks and some capitals gilt. Black sheepskin (ca. 1900).

      Bibl. Belg. P317 (IV, p. 714: 1 copy); Moreau III, 887 (2 copies). Richly and beautifully hand-decorated copy of a very rare edition of a Latin school grammar by Pierre de Ponte (1475-1539). The decoration goes beyond mere colouring and the application of gold. Some of the initials have flowers or figures painted in that do not seem to be present in the printed initial, so that two initials that were probably printed from the same block sometimes appear different in details of form. Born at Bruges, De Ponte was blinded at age three but became a school teacher at Paris. The title-page calls him caecus Brugensis (the blind man of Bruges). His Latin grammar distinguished itself by its methods and scholarly qualities, teaching children by questions and answers in prose, with examples taken from classical authors. The first part treats Latin grammar and the second part Latin syntax. Only two other copies of the present edition are known.Title-page with a faint early owner's inscription. Some restorations and water stains in the title-page and it and the following leaf somewhat browned, but the rest of the leaves are in very good condition. The binding has cracks in the hinges and scuff marks mostly at the corners, but is still good. Very rare edition of a classic Latin school grammar, beautifully coloured and decorated with extensive use of gold.

      [Bookseller: Antiquariaat FORUM BV]
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         Illuminated Manuscript: Leaf with Text from the Office for the Dead

      France: np. 1st Edition. No Binding. Fine. Beautiful 15th century leaf on vellum with striking gold borders. 15 lines of text on each side written in Latin with brown-black ink in gothic script on vellum. The text is from the Ninth and Tenth Lessons. On recto: 1 double-line illuminated initial in burnished gold and blue. Border along right margin with beautiful red flowers on a bright gold background. On verso: Border along left margin with red-pink flowers on a stunning gold background. France: c. 1475. Size: 136 x 92 mm (approx. 5.4 x 3.6 inches). Light soiling around edges. Fine leaf with large, impressive margins. The text in Latin: On recto: Amplius lava me Domine ab iniustitia mea: et a delicto meo munda me. Ut tu Deus deleas iniquitatem meam. Quare de vulva eduxisti me? Qui utinam consumptus essem, ne oculus me videret. Fuissem quasi non essem, de utero translatus ad tumulum. Numquid non paucitas dierum meorum finietur brevi? On verso: Dimitte me ergo, ut plangam paululum dolorem meum, antequam vadam, et non revertar ad terram tenebrosam, et opertam mortis caligine, terram miseriae, et tenebrarum, ubi umbra mortis, et nullus ordo, sed sempiternus horror inhabitat. Libera me Domine de viis inferni, qui portas aereas confregisti, et visitasti infernum, et dedisti eis lumen… English translation: Recto: Wash me O Lord yet more, from my injustice: and from my sin cleanse me. That thou O God blot out my iniquity. Why didst thou bring me forth out of the matrix? Who, would God, I had been consumed, that eye might not see me, I had been as if I were not, transported from the womb to the grave. Shall not the fewness of my days be ended shortly? Verso: Suffer me therefore, that I may a little lament my sorrow, before I go, and return not unto the dark land, and that is covered with the mist of death, a land of misery, and darkness, where the shadow of death, and no order, but everlasting horror inhabiteth. Deliver me, O Lord, from the ways of hell, which hast broken the brazen gates, and hast visited hell, and hast given light to them.

      [Bookseller: The Manhattan Rare Book Company]
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         La Messa di S. Gregorio

      1475 - Bulino, 1475-1500 circa, privo di data e di iscrizioni. Bellissima prova, impressa su carta vergata coeva, con sottili margini, in perfetto sttao di conservazione. Rarissima incisione anonima è ascrivibile alla scuola tedesca dell’ultimo quarto del XV secolo La scena raffigura la cosiddetta Messa di S. Gregorio, in cui il Cristo, con gli strumenti della passione, appare sull’altare al papa celebrante. L’immagine divenne molto popolare nel corso del XVI secolo, anche perché spesso associata alle indulgenze. In effetti, agli inizi del secolo, nel Nord Europa, la Messa di S. Gregorio, anzi le 30 messe gregoriane, ricorrono di frequente nei manoscritti tra le pratiche per ottenere l’indulgenza; a partire dal 1425 circa, le indulgenze sono spesso incorporate in stampe o altre opere che raffigurano la Messa di S. Gregorio. Esemplare dalla collezione del British Museum, due timbri al verso, compreso quello di dismissione. (Lugt 302 & 305). Engraving, 1475-1500 circa, unlettered. A very good example, printed on contemporary lad paper, with small margins, perfect condition. The scene depicts the Mass of Saint Gregory. This subject became widespread in medieval art. Such visual manifestations have a variety of precise forms, but they almost always show Gregory and his entourage, usually consisting of clerics, in a church before an altar, often with the saint saying mass. Christ as a Man of Sorrows appears on the altar. Because the St. Gregory Mass shows a bleeding Christ and the celebration of the mass, the image has been used as support for the idea of transubstantiation. Another reason for the popularity of the image of the Mass of St. Gregory may be that such images often carried an indulgence, or a promise of the partial remission of sins of the viewer. In the early fifteenth century the Mass began to appear on Northern European indulgence charts. By the second quarter of the fifteenth century these indulgences were often incorporated in text form in prints and other works which showed the Mass of St. Gregory This little engraving can be attributed to the German school of the last quarter of the fifteenth century. A magnific example of this rare work, a duplicate copy from the British Museum collection; 2 marks on verso (Lugt 302 & 305). W. H. Willshire, A descriptive catalogue of early prints in the British Museum. German and Flemish Schools, II, G.93 Dimensioni 72 98mm

      [Bookseller: Libreria Antiquarius]
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         Summa de casibus conscientiae.

      [Augsburg, Günther Zainer, 1475]. Fol. Mit zahlr. tlw. größeren, durchg. in Rot kolor. Holzschn.-Initialen sowie durchg. in Rot rubriziert. 190 (statt 192) num. Bll. (Rom. Typ., 2 Kol., 56-60 Zeilen), Späterer HLdr.-Bd. (wohl des 18. Jhds.) a. 4 Bünden m. dreiseitig gespränkeltem Rotschnitt. Vermutlich dritte Ausgabe, hier in der Variante ohne das 15-zeilige Kolophon am Ende der letzten Spalte. - Es fehlen die beiden nn. Registerbll. am Anfang (liegen in Kopie bei). Das vorliegende Exemplar beginnt somit mit dem nn. Bl. I („Modus legendi abbreviatorum“), gefolgt von den num. Bll. II-CLXXXX. - „Das Werk weicht von der systematischen Ordnung ab, indem es alphabetisch gegliedert ist. Sie ist sehr eingehend, entwickelt eine reiche juristische Casuistik und war, wie die Masse der Handschriften zeigt, im 14. und 15. Jahrhundert eines der beliebtesten Bücher“ (Schulte II, 429). - Einband (bes. Deckeln) beschabt u. an den Rändern stärker bestoßen (Bezug hier tlw. m. Fehlstellen). Rücken u. Vorderdeckel m. Bibl.-Nummernschildchen. Innendeckel gestempelt. Vereinzelt alte Marginalien. Schwach fleckig (nur wenige Bll. etw. stärker braunfleckig). - Insgesamt schönes Exemplar auf starkem Papier; am Ende mit einer eigenh. Anmerkung des Rubrikators. - GW 3453; Hain 2528; Pell 1893; BSB-Ink B-115; Proctor 1546; Günther 164; BMC II, 322; Goff B-172. Versand D: 12,00 EUR Bartholomaeus de Sancto Concordio (Pisanus), Summa de casibus conscientiae, Inkunabel, Inkunabeln, Frühdrucke

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Wolfgang Friebes]
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         Illuminated Manuscript: Leaf with Text from the Office for the Dead

      France: np, 1475. Beautiful 15th century leaf on vellum with striking gold borders. 15 lines of text on each side written in Latin with brown-black ink in gothic script on vellum. The text is from the Ninth and Tenth Lessons.On recto: 1 double-line illuminated initial in burnished gold and blue. Border along right margin with beautiful red flowers on a bright gold background.On verso: Border along left margin with red-pink flowers on a stunning gold background.France: c. 1475. Size: 136 x 92 mm (approx. 5.4 x 3.6 inches). Light soiling around edges. Fine leaf with large, impressive margins.The text in Latin:On recto: Amplius lava me Domine ab iniustitia mea: et a delicto meo munda me. Ut tu Deus deleas iniquitatem meam. Quare de vulva eduxisti me? Qui utinam consumptus essem, ne oculus me videret. Fuissem quasi non essem, de utero translatus ad tumulum. Numquid non paucitas dierum meorum finietur brevi?On verso: Dimitte me ergo, ut plangam paululum dolorem meum, antequam vadam, et non revertar ad terram tenebrosam, et opertam mortis caligine, terram miseriae, et tenebrarum, ubi umbra mortis, et nullus ordo, sed sempiternus horror inhabitat. Libera me Domine de viis inferni, qui portas aereas confregisti, et visitasti infernum, et dedisti eis lumen...English translation:Recto: Wash me O Lord yet more, from my injustice: and from my sin cleanse me. That thou O God blot out my iniquity. Why didst thou bring me forth out of the matrix? Who, would God, I had been consumed, that eye might not see me, I had been as if I were not, transported from the womb to the grave. Shall not the fewness of my days be ended shortly?Verso: Suffer me therefore, that I may a little lament my sorrow, before I go, and return not unto the dark land, and that is covered with the mist of death, a land of misery, and darkness, where the shadow of death, and no order, but everlasting horror inhabiteth. Deliver me, O Lord, from the ways of hell, which hast broken the brazen gates, and hast visited hell, and hast given light to them. Fine.

      [Bookseller: The Manhattan Rare Book Company]
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         Pragmatische Geschichte Der Cron Böhmen, Worinnen dasjenige, Was unter jedwedem Hertzoge und Könige von Böhmen von Zeiten zu Zeiten merckwürdiges vorgegangen, Und So wohl in die ehemalige als jetzige Grund-Verfassung dieses Königreichs Und dessen besondern Nexum mit dem Römischen Reiche einschlägt, Historisch erörtert wird.

      4. Mit gest. Frontispiz (Gelehrter in einer Bibliothek). 3 Bll., 912 S., 36 Bll., Pgmt. d. Zt. m. durchzogenen Bünden, handschriftl. Rückentitel u. dreiseitigem Farbschnitt. Erstausgabe. - Geschichtlicher Abriß Böhmens von den Karolingern bis Karl VI. - Einband min. berieben u. etw. fleckig. Vorderes Vorsatzbl. zur Hälfte entfernt. Etw. gebräunt, sonst schönes Exemplar. - Jöcher, Suppl. II, 1475.

      [Bookseller: Antiquariat Wolfgang Friebes]
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         Illuminated Manuscript: The Stoning of Saint Stephen from a 15th Century Book of Hours

      Paris, France: np, 1475. The Stoning of Saint Stephen from a late 15th century Book of Hours (likely Paris) on vellum. Verso: Leaf features St. Stephen in the center of two tormentors preparing to throw stones at him. St. Stephen is depicted kneeling in prayer. The artist sets the figures before a landscape background. Surrounding the miniature on three sides is an ornate foliate border of red & blue flowers, green & blue leaves, blue & gold acanthus leaves. A large bear appears on the lower border. All figures (including the bear) are somewhat illuminated with gold. Below the miniature is a grand 4-line initial "S" for "Stephanus" opening the text painted in gold on a blue background. Recto: 15 lines of text written with black ink and red rubrics in a gothic script. Lovely 2-line initial "B" painted in gold on a red background. Foliate border on one side features red & blue flowers, green leaves, and gold & blue acanthus leaves. The text is from Acts 6:8. The text in Latin reads: Stephanus autem plenus gratia et fortitudine faciebat prodigia et signa magna in populo The English translation is: And Stephen, full of faith and power, performed great wonders and miracles among the people. Slight toning to outer margins.Size: 122 x 86 mm (approx. 4.8 x 3.4 inches). Very Good.

      [Bookseller: The Manhattan Rare Book Company]
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         King David in Prayer.

      Southern France: circa, 1475. Arched miniature depicting King David kneeling in prayer, 91 x 65mm., set in elaborate illuminated border on three sides; 4-line illuminated initial D (of "Domine" - O Lord), eight lines of gothic text on the other side;Mounted. A superb late fifteenth-century miniature of King David from a French Book of Hours. The image of David, with his harp, kneeling in prayer, introduces the opening of the Seven Penitential Psalms, of which King David was traditionally identified as the author. The quality of the miniature is very fine; the king's face, drapery and the naturalistic landscape in which he kneels are all delicately rendered. The intense colours, differentiated landscape, and the elaborate border decoration of acanthus and gold leaves and flowers on swirling hairline stems all point to an artist in southern France.The group of Seven Penitential Psalms (6, 32, 38, 51, 102, 130, and 143) is particularly expressive of sorrow and repentance for sin, and was first given the name by Saint Augustine of Hippo: the title was originally only associated with the fifty-first psalm, 'Miserere', the psalm which was conventionally used to close daily morning service.King David also appears here as a model of penitence: after his commission of the dual crimes of adultery, with Bathsheba, and the murder of her husband Uriah, by sending him to be killed in battle, David was rebuked by the prophet Nathan and reprimanded by God. He repented and withdrew to live in exile, devoting himself to prayer.The miniature dates from the end of the fifteenth century, and is a reminder that even after the invention of moveable print and the Gutenberg revolution, the older tradition of manuscript transmission was still the dominant medium of the period, and that the traditions of artistry associated with the illumination of manuscripts were still of the highest quality. A minor sealed marginal tear at upper right, otherwise fine.

      [Bookseller: Hordern House]
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         Large historiated initial I 70 x 70mm of two unidentified martyr saints N E Italy c 1470

      

      [Bookseller: Maggs Bros. Ltd. ]
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         [Relatio de Simone puero tridentino.]

      [Nuremberg], Friedrich Creussner, [1475]. ____ Célèbre récit d'un "crime rituel" commis par des juifs. Le jour de Paques 1475, à Trente, dans le Tyrol, le corps sans vie d'un enfant, Simon, est trouvé dans la cave d'un prêteur juif. Très vite, l'évêque de Trente, Johannes Hinderbach, déclare coupable la communauté juive de la ville. 17 juifs sont arrêtés et avouent sous la torture le meurtre de cet enfant. Ils seront exécutés. Hinderbach tentera par la suite de faire canoniser Simon, sans succès. La présente relation de Giovanni Mattia Tiberino, un des deux médecins qui examinèrent le corps, a été à l'origine de la diffusion de cette calomnie. C'est un des écrits anti-sémites les plus influents de l'époque. 13 éditions ont été publiées la même année en Italie et en Allemagne, sans qu'on en connaisse la chronologie. Toutes sont rares. Grande capitale peinte en rouge au premier feuillet. Exemplaire complet. La gravure signalée par Hain est en fait un feuillet volant imprimé à Nuremberg à la même époque, dont on ne connaît que deux exemplaires. Goff T485. BMC II 447. GW M47700. ISTC it00485000. Aucun exemplaire dans les bibliothèques publiques en France.***** Famous blood libel of Simon of Trent. On Easter Sunday, 1475, in Trent, the dead body of a Christian young boy, named Simon, was discovered in the cellar of a house owned by a Jewish moneylender. The bishop of Trent, Johannes Hinderbach declared immediately the entire Jewish population of the city guilty of ritual murder. 17 Jews were tortured and forced to confess and were eventually condemned to death. This inflammatory account by Giovanni Mattia Tiberino, one of the two physicians who examined the child's body, was the principal vehicle of dissemination of the libel. Tiberino's vivid depiction of the supposed abduction and murder of Simon by bloodthirsty Jews "became the most influential piece of anti-Semitic propaganda surrounding the Trent ritual murder trial, not only because Tiberino was a physician, but because his letter... an impressive display of rhetoric, constructed a story of pathos and verisimilitude" (R. Po-chia Hsia, Trent 1475: stories of a ritual murder, p. 56). One of 13 editions printed in 1475, (without known priority) in Rome, Venice, Treviso, Vicenza, Mantua, Augsburg, Nuremberg, Cologne, and Trent. All are rare. Complete copy. The woodcut mentionned by Hain is a separate Nuremberg broadside, known in two copies. Large initial painted in red on first leaf. The first known dated book of Friedrich Creussner is of the year 1472 and his last one of 1499. Goff T485. 2 copies in USA : Beinecke Library and New York Public Library. In-folio. [280 x 197 mm] Collation : (8) pp. Cartonnage noir du XIXe siècle.

      [Bookseller: Hugues de Latude]
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         THE MONTH OF APRIL

      ca. 1475, France - 165 x 112 mm. (6 1/2 x 4 3/8"). Single column, 16 lines in a gothic book hand. Kalends comprised of gray and white acanthus leaves accented with flowers on a background of brushed gold, saints' names in blue, red, or gold, month and Golden Numbers in burnished gold, days in alternating blue and burnished gold, five Dominical letters in burnished gold on a blue or red ground with white tracery, each side with a panel border featuring a brushed gold triangle with a spray of pink flowers, and WITH A ROUNDEL DEPICTING THE LABOR OF THE MONTH (RECTO) AND ASTROLOGICAL SIGN (VERSO), the background filled with blue and gold acanthus leaves and swirling hairline stems bearing leaves and gold berries. Panel border with three small burn holes, four brown spots to the text, minor soiling to fore and head margins. Not as pretty as it could be, but an inexpensive example of a Book of Hours calendar leaf with miniatures.

      [Bookseller: Phillip J. Pirages Rare Books (ABAA)]
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         Heiliges Bayer-Land, Auß dem Lateinischen Vor Hundert Jahren Von Mattheo Radero Verfertigten Werck Anjezo In die Teutsche Sprach übersetzt ... Von M. Rassler.

      3 in 1 Bd. 32,5 x 22 cm. 9 Bl., 412 (recte 420) S., 3 Bl., 355 (recte 353) S., 3 Bl., 412 (recte 414) S. Mit 3 gestoch. Titeln, 136 Kupfertafeln, meist von R. Sadeler und mehr. Holzschnitt-Vignetten. Ldr. d. Zt. mit Rsch., reicher Goldpräg. und Goldschnitt. Vgl. Pfister I, 4303 (nennt nur 129 Kupfer) Lentner 4097 Vgl. De Backer/Sommervogel VI, 1475, 19 Brunet IV, 1085. - Titelauflage der ersten deutschen Ausgabe. - Etwa hundert Jahre nach der lateinischen Ausgabe (1615 - 1627) bringt Rassler hier die Lebensbeschreibungen der Heiligen und Seligen Bayerns in deutscher Sprache. Die prachtvollen Tafeln von R. Sadeler, J. Kilian u.a. zeigen die Heiligen meist in figurenreicher, dramatischer Szene vor landschaftlichem oder klösterlichem Hintergrund. "Wie stets" (Lentner) fehlt im zweiten Teil das Kupfer auf S. 201 St. Adalbertus (offenbar zensiert oder nicht fertig geworden). - Vordergelenk angebrochen, stellenweise wenig fleckig. Die Ritualmord-Darstellung auf der S. 323 des zweiten Teils aus einem anderen Exemplar ergänzt und alt montiert. - Dekoratives, prachtvoll gebundenes Exemplar des gesuchten Werkes in sehr gutem Zustand! Kulturgeschichte, Bayern, Heiligenbilder

      [Bookseller: Buch- und Kunstantiquariat]
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         C. Valerii Flacci Argonautica. Io. Baptistae Pij carmen ex quarto Argonauticon Apollonij. [Text Lateinisch]. Mit zahlreichen handschriftlichen Marginalien von Philipp Melanchthon.

      (Einband etwas bestoßen und fleckig, kleine Fehlstellen im Leder am Rücken und oberen Kapital, Rücken geweißt und mit roter Tinte beschriftet, innen etwas braunfleckig, Titelblatt fehlt, zahlreiche Marginalien und Anstreichungen) Im Ganzen ein schönes Exemplar. - Die "Argonautica" des Valerius Flaccus (gestorben vor 90 n. Chr.) erzählt die Geschichte von Jason und den Argonauten, die mit dem Schiff Argo nach Kolchis aufbrechen um dort das Goldene Vlies zu stehlen, was ihnen mit der Hilfe von Medea gelingt. Die Erzählung des Valerius orientiert sich an der Vorlage des Apollonios von Rhodos (295 -215 v. Chr.), ist aber unvollständig und bricht nach dem 8. Buch ab. Der italienische Humanist Giovanni Battista Pio (um 1475 - um 1546) hat den Text des Valerius um ein Supplement ergänzt, das sich eng an die Darstellung des Apollonius anlehnt. Gedruckt wurde das Buch von Andreas Asulanus, der nach dem Tod seines Schwiegersohnes Aldus Manutius (1515) dessen Druckerei in Venedig fortführte. Das vorliegende Exemplar ist "umgebaut": Der Titel fehlt und wurde durch das Blatt mit der Druckermarke vom Schluss des Buches ersetzt. Auf dieses Blatt wurden Textteile montiert, die offenbar vom originalen Titelblatt stammen: Über der Druckermarke: "C. Valerii Flac- / ci Argonau- / tica." und darunter: "Io. Baptistae Pij carmen ex quarto Argonauti- /con Apollonij." Es fehlt offenbar die Zeile "Orphei Argonautica innominato interprete." und eine auch auf dem Original-Titel vorhandene Druckermarke. Am Schuss fehlt das zum Titel umgebaute Blatt, sonst ist das Buch vollständig. Da kein Digitalisat dieses Buches zu finden war, folgen wir in der Kollation dem unter Nummer 221 beschriebenen Exemplar in "The Aldine Press. Catalogue of Ahmanson-Murphy Collection..." UCLA, Los Angeles 2001. Das Buch hat einen prominenten Vorbesitzer. Der Humanist und Reformator Philipp Melanchthon (1497 - 1560) hat das Buch mit zahlreichen Unterstreichungen und Randnotizen in brauner Tinte versehen! Die Echtheit der Handschrift Melanchtons wurde von der Handschriftenabteilung der Staatsbibliothek Berlin bestätigt.- Weitere Bilder auf Anfrage oder auf unserer Homepage.

      [Bookseller: Versandantiquariat Bürck]
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         Opus Restitutionum, Usurarum, Excommunicationum

      - Woodcut printer's device on recto of final printed leaf. 216 unnumbered leaves (two leaves are blank). 38 lines, Gothic type, initial spaces of various sizes. Chancery folio (252 x 183 mm.), cont. Polish blind-tooled calf over bevelled wooden boards (carefully rebacked with a few discrete repairs, light dampstain to inner margins and occasionally to upper & lower margins, careful and discrete repairs to inner margins of first 30 leaves & outer margins of first two leaves), the covers divided by triple fillets forming rectangular panels, creating a Latin cross on upper cover, the compartment edges with a semi-circular arcade tool & filled with impressions of an open leafy stamp & an arrangement of leafy foliage in a lozenge, one chaste brass clasp with strap of white tawed leather. [Cracow: Printer of Turrecremata, Expositio (Kaspar Staubel)], 1475. [bound with]:GERSON, Johannes. De Examinatione Doctrinarum [and other texts, see below]. Lombard initials supplied in blue flourished with red or red flourished with green, red & blue paragraph signs. 22 unnumbered leaves. 35 lines, Gothic type, initial spaces of various sizes. Chancery folio (252 x 183 mm.) (occasional minor dampstain to margins, one or two leaves with initial flourishing with minor cropping). [Nuremberg: Johann Sensenschmidt and Andreas Frisner, between 1474 and 1476]. A fine sammelband in a contemporary Polish blind-stamped calf binding over bevelled wooden boards, containing what is very probably the first substantial book printed in Poland. I. One of only four works printed at the first press in Poland and the only dated book of the press. The other works from this press include a broadside almanac for 1474, which is considered to have been printed in late 1473 or early 1474. The other two books from the press, St. Augustine's Opuscula and the Expositio Psalmorum of Johannes de Turrecremata are dated ca. 1475 or ca. 1475-1476 based on the printed date of the present edition and a rubrication date of 1476 in one copy of the Turrecremata. Books from this Cracow printing house are of the greatest rarity on the market. Cracow, a cosmopolitan city with a university founded in 1364, was the only Polish town to have printing in the 15th century. While many Polish printers were at work in Italy, Spain, and elsewhere, the first printers in Poland were all foreigners. Discoveries of archival references from 1477 to the presence in Cracow of Kaspar Straube, from Dresden or Leipzig, also called in the documents "Casper Drucker," have led to the currently accepted designation of Straube as Poland's first printer. Apart from the works of this press, no other Latin printing survives from 15th-century Cracow. This work on restitution, usury, and excommunication is one of the earliest texts printed to be concerned with economic problems. The author, Franciscus de Platea (d. 1460), was an Italian Franciscan. The text was quite popular in the 15th century with nine editions. There are apparently three variants of the final printed leaf; our copy corresponds to variant B with the printer's mark and the date printed below it. This book is of considerable rarity: ISTC locates only four copies outside of Poland, two in German libraries (Berlin and Munich) and two in the U.S. (Morgan and Huntington). II. First and only 15th-century edition of this collection of texts by Johannes Gerson (1363-1429), chancellor of the University of Paris, produced by Nuremberg's first printer, Johann Sensenschmidt in partnership with Andreas Frisner. The other texts include: De duplici statu in Dei ecclesia; Admonitio brevis quo modo caute legendi sunt quorundam libri; De appellatione peccatoris a divina justitia ad divinam misericordiam; De unione ecclesiae; and Dubium de delectatione in servitio Dei. Binding: Our binding is related to a Cracow binding by Valentinus de Pilzno in the Biblioteka Jagiellonska (on: MS Bullae et Constitutiones Ord. FF Min., 1453-1483). The two bindings share in common a ver [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: Jonathan A. Hill, Bookseller Inc.]
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         Anatomia

      - [22] leaves, Gothic type, 43 lines. Folio (301 x 213 mm.), disbound (some worming towards end). [Padua (not Pavia): Pierre Maufer, about 1475]. First edition, a remarkable discovery of the third known copy of the true first edition of the first modern book devoted solely to anatomy. The other two surviving copies are in the Biblioteca Corsiniana (Rome) and the Biblioteca Comunale (Viterbo). The rarity of this book is well-known: it is revealing that Castiglioni, Choulant, and Garrison all cite the 1478 edition as the first printing. Its influence was great: "The first outstanding anatomist worthy of the name?the Anathomia of Mondino was the most used anatomical text up to the end of the sixteenth century, probably because it contained the most important technical indications in brief and concise form."-Castiglioni, A History of Medicine, pp. 341-43. Mondino (ca. 1275-1326), a native of Bologna, was the son of an apothecary and the nephew of a professor of medicine. He attended the University of Bologna where he studied under Alderotti (Thaddeus of Florence), an early dissector, and took his medical degree in 1300. Mondino soon became a professor of medicine at the university. "Mondino's chief work is his compendium of anatomy, Anatomia Mundini, completed in 1316, which made him, in Castiglione's [sic] words, 'the first outstanding anatomist worthy of the name.' Mondino's book dominated anatomy for over two hundred years. The major reason for Mondino's great popularity was the simplicity, conciseness, and systematic arrangement of his book, which is divided into six parts: (1) an introduction to the whole body and a discussion of authorities; (2) the natural members including the liver, spleen, and other organs in the abdominal cavity; (3) the generative members; (4) the spiritual members, the heart, lungs, trachea, esophagus, and other organs of the thoracic cavity up to the mouth; (5) the animal members of the skull, brain, eyes, ears; and (6) the peripheral parts, bones, spinal column, extremities. This organization was not the result of any philosophical approach to the subject but rather derived from the necessity of dissecting the most perishable organs first? "Mondino should be regarded as the restorer of anatomy if only because his popular textbook and his experimental teaching were instrumental in preparing the revival of the subject. His text was the first book written on anatomy during the Middle Ages that was based on the dissection of the human cadaver; his efforts consolidated anatomy as a part of the medical program at Bologna and encouraged further study. His book also dominated the teaching of anatomy, and no real improvements were made upon it until 1521, when Berengario da Carpi wrote his famous commentary on Mondino."-D.S.B., IX, pp. 468-69. "Mondino's book soon became a classic text; he was venerated soon after his death as a divine master and anyone who was found differing from his book was regarded as monstrous. For three centuries the lecturers on anatomy were required to use his book in their teaching, as may be seen in the statutes of many medical schools."-Castiglioni, op. cit., pp. 344-45-(& see the detailed account of the contents of this book and methods of dissection which it reveals on pp. 341-45). A very fine copy with all edges uncut and preserved in a slipcase. Two contemporary annotators have made a number of neat comments in the wide margins. This copy was clearly removed from a sammelband. The final four leaves have some worming, becoming increasingly more pronounced (but not at all offensive) touching the text of the final three leaves. ? Choulant-Frank, pp. 88-96. Garrison-Morton 361-(describing the 2nd edition of 1478)-"The first modern book devoted solely to anatomy, written for his students in 1316. Mundinus re-introduced human dissection, which had been neglected for 1500 years before him; he was the most noted dissector of his period." Garrison, History of Medicine, pp. 160-61. GKW M [Attributes: First Edition]

      [Bookseller: Jonathan A. Hill, Bookseller Inc.]
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         Epistola de morte Hieronymi. (Bound with:) Epistola de vita Hieronymi. (Bound with:) Epistola de miraculis Hieronymi.

      Blaubeuren: Konrad Mancz, 1475. Folio (264 x 195 mm). 65 unn. lvs. Later vellum (old material). Gothic type; 31 lines; Hain- type 1:120G; throughout rubricated in red; 2-to-4-line penwork initials in red. Beautifully printed early incunable. First Blaubeuren printing. Second edition, one of a few scarce works by the only 15th-century printer of Blaubeurren in Württemberg. Printed for the first time by Ulrich Zell from Köln, ca 1470. A wide-spread collection of letters on life, death and miracles of Saint Jeremy, written in the 14th century in Italy or France and first printed by U. Zell in Cologne. Very good antiquarian condition. Text complete, without the last blank. Faint dampstaining to margins, marginal rust mark and small holes to last two leaves. Some tiny wormholes to outer margins. Few marginal tears of leaves 33 & 56 carefully restored. Paper washed and therefore rubricized/rubricated initials somewhat bleached. But a fine well-preserved and well-bound thick paper copy with broad margins of a scarce Blaubeuren incunable. For a full description and more images please visit: www.zaalbooks.nl .

      [Bookseller: Zaal Books]
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         Anatomia

      [22] leaves, Gothic type, 43 lines. Folio (301 x 213 mm.), disbound (some worming towards end). [Padua (not Pavia): Pierre Maufer, about 1475]. First edition, a remarkable discovery of the third known copy of the true first edition of the first modern book devoted solely to anatomy. The other two surviving copies are in the Biblioteca Corsiniana (Rome) and the Biblioteca Comunale (Viterbo). The rarity of this book is well-known: it is revealing that Castiglioni, Choulant, and Garrison all cite the 1478 edition as the first printing. Its influence was great: "The first outstanding anatomist worthy of the name…the Anathomia of Mondino was the most used anatomical text up to the end of the sixteenth century, probably because it contained the most important technical indications in brief and concise form."-Castiglioni, A History of Medicine, pp. 341-43. Mondino (ca. 1275-1326), a native of Bologna, was the son of an apothecary and the nephew of a professor of medicine. He attended the University of Bologna where he studied under Alderotti (Thaddeus of Florence), an early dissector, and took his medical degree in 1300. Mondino soon became a professor of medicine at the university. "Mondino's chief work is his compendium of anatomy, Anatomia Mundini, completed in 1316, which made him, in Castiglione's [sic] words, 'the first outstanding anatomist worthy of the name.' Mondino's book dominated anatomy for over two hundred years. The major reason for Mondino's great popularity was the simplicity, conciseness, and systematic arrangement of his book, which is divided into six parts: (1) an introduction to the whole body and a discussion of authorities; (2) the natural members including the liver, spleen, and other organs in the abdominal cavity; (3) the generative members; (4) the spiritual members, the heart, lungs, trachea, esophagus, and other organs of the thoracic cavity up to the mouth; (5) the animal members of the skull, brain, eyes, ears; and (6) the peripheral parts, bones, spinal column, extremities. This organization was not the result of any philosophical approach to the subject but rather derived from the necessity of dissecting the most perishable organs first… "Mondino should be regarded as the restorer of anatomy if only because his popular textbook and his experimental teaching were instrumental in preparing the revival of the subject. His text was the first book written on anatomy during the Middle Ages that was based on the dissection of the human cadaver; his efforts consolidated anatomy as a part of the medical program at Bologna and encouraged further study. His book also dominated the teaching of anatomy, and no real improvements were made upon it until 1521, when Berengario da Carpi wrote his famous commentary on Mondino."-D.S.B., IX, pp. 468-69. "Mondino's book soon became a classic text; he was venerated soon after his death as a divine master and anyone who was found differing from his book was regarded as monstrous. For three centuries the lecturers on anatomy were required to use his book in their teaching, as may be seen in the statutes of many medical schools."-Castiglioni, op. cit., pp. 344-45-(& see the detailed account of the contents of this book and methods of dissection which it reveals on pp. 341-45). A very fine copy with all edges uncut and preserved in a slipcase. Two contemporary annotators have made a number of neat comments in the wide margins. This copy was clearly removed from a sammelband. The final four leaves have some worming, becoming increasingly more pronounced (but not at all offensive) touching the text of the final three leaves. ? Choulant-Frank, pp. 88-96. Garrison-Morton 361-(describing the 2nd edition of 1478)-"The first modern book devoted solely to anatomy, written for his students in 1316. Mundinus re-introduced human dissection, which had been neglected for 1500 years before him; he was the most noted dissector of his period." Garrison, History of Medicine, pp. 160-61. GKW M25666-(citing Pavia in error). ISTC im00871200. Klebs 688.1.

      [Bookseller: Jonathan A. Hill, Bookseller, Inc.]
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         Opus Restitutionum, Usurarum, Excommunicationum

      Woodcut printer's device on recto of final printed leaf. 216 unnumbered leaves (two leaves are blank). 38 lines, Gothic type, initial spaces of various sizes. Chancery folio (252 x 183 mm.), cont. Polish blind-tooled calf over bevelled wooden boards (carefully rebacked with a few discrete repairs, light dampstain to inner margins and occasionally to upper & lower margins, careful and discrete repairs to inner margins of first 30 leaves & outer margins of first two leaves), the covers divided by triple fillets forming rectangular panels, creating a Latin cross on upper cover, the compartment edges with a semi-circular arcade tool & filled with impressions of an open leafy stamp & an arrangement of leafy foliage in a lozenge, one chaste brass clasp with strap of white tawed leather. [Cracow: Printer of Turrecremata, Expositio (Kaspar Staubel)], 1475. [bound with]:GERSON, Johannes. De Examinatione Doctrinarum [and other texts, see below]. Lombard initials supplied in blue flourished with red or red flourished with green, red & blue paragraph signs. 22 unnumbered leaves. 35 lines, Gothic type, initial spaces of various sizes. Chancery folio (252 x 183 mm.) (occasional minor dampstain to margins, one or two leaves with initial flourishing with minor cropping). [Nuremberg: Johann Sensenschmidt and Andreas Frisner, between 1474 and 1476]. A fine sammelband in a contemporary Polish blind-stamped calf binding over bevelled wooden boards, containing what is very probably the first substantial book printed in Poland. I. One of only four works printed at the first press in Poland and the only dated book of the press. The other works from this press include a broadside almanac for 1474, which is considered to have been printed in late 1473 or early 1474. The other two books from the press, St. Augustine's Opuscula and the Expositio Psalmorum of Johannes de Turrecremata are dated ca. 1475 or ca. 1475-1476 based on the printed date of the present edition and a rubrication date of 1476 in one copy of the Turrecremata. Books from this Cracow printing house are of the greatest rarity on the market. Cracow, a cosmopolitan city with a university founded in 1364, was the only Polish town to have printing in the 15th century. While many Polish printers were at work in Italy, Spain, and elsewhere, the first printers in Poland were all foreigners. Discoveries of archival references from 1477 to the presence in Cracow of Kaspar Straube, from Dresden or Leipzig, also called in the documents "Casper Drucker," have led to the currently accepted designation of Straube as Poland's first printer. Apart from the works of this press, no other Latin printing survives from 15th-century Cracow. This work on restitution, usury, and excommunication is one of the earliest texts printed to be concerned with economic problems. The author, Franciscus de Platea (d. 1460), was an Italian Franciscan. The text was quite popular in the 15th century with nine editions. There are apparently three variants of the final printed leaf; our copy corresponds to variant B with the printer's mark and the date printed below it. This book is of considerable rarity: ISTC locates only four copies outside of Poland, two in German libraries (Berlin and Munich) and two in the U.S. (Morgan and Huntington). II. First and only 15th-century edition of this collection of texts by Johannes Gerson (1363-1429), chancellor of the University of Paris, produced by Nuremberg's first printer, Johann Sensenschmidt in partnership with Andreas Frisner. The other texts include: De duplici statu in Dei ecclesia; Admonitio brevis quo modo caute legendi sunt quorundam libri; De appellatione peccatoris a divina justitia ad divinam misericordiam; De unione ecclesiae; and Dubium de delectatione in servitio Dei. Binding: Our binding is related to a Cracow binding by Valentinus de Pilzno in the Biblioteka Jagiellonska (on: MS Bullae et Constitutiones Ord. FF Min., 1453-1483). The two bindings share in common a very distinctive decorative scheme of a large Latin crucifix tooled in blind over the entire covers, and adorned with multiple impressions of a double-line semi-circle. This type of decoration is characteristic of the work of Valentinus de Pilzno (Valentine of Pilsen), who has been recently described as "one of the most interesting Polish binders of all times. He had an academic background as did several of his Cracow colleagues. He matriculated in 1474, became a bachelor in the liberal arts in 1477 and master in 1480. He died in March 1486" (van Leeuwen). Whereas Valentine was active in Cracow for only a decade, dozens of bindings by him are preserved in Poland and elsewhere, and more than 100 tools from his shop are known. It is very possible that our binding was executed by him. It is not without interest that the first work in our sammelband was indeed printed in Cracow. See Ewa Zwinogrodzka et al., "Poolse Boekbindkunst 1400-1800 uit de Jagiellonski Bibliotheek, Krakow," no. 18. Storm van Leeuwen, "The Golden Age of Bookbinding in Cracow 1400-1600," no. 14, with 2 reproductions. Provenance: From the library of Helmut N. Friedlaender with booklabel (sale 23 April 2001, lot 98). Very good copies. ? I. Goff P-756. II. Goff G-229.

      [Bookseller: Jonathan A. Hill, Bookseller, Inc.]
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         Collectanea Rerum Memorabilium

      In Latin. Illuminated manuscript on vellum. Italy, Naples, ca.1475. 243 x 165mm., 188 leaves, vellum, complete, catchwords and illuminator's instructions survive, ruled page: 145 x 75mm. 51 white vine initials, 180 small decorated initials, two foliate borders, one full-page interlaced with peacocks and rabbits with putti holding the coat-of-arms of Ferdinand I of Aragon, King of Naples (some trivial oxidization to putti in full-page border, otherwise in pristine condition). Binding of 19th-century red velvet over boards by Charles Lewis (spine lightly rubbed). Red slipcase. PROVENANCE:1. Illuminated by Cola Rapicano and likely written by Giovanni Marco Cinico for Ferdinand I of Aragon, King of Naples (1423-94); his coat of arms and emblems in the margins. Two copies of this Solinus text are listed in De Marinis: one, "Solinus de mirabilibus mundi, cubierto de pergamino" is no. 510 in a list of codices left in 1550 to the convent of San Miguel de los Reyes in Valencia by Ferdinand of Aragon, Prince of Taranto, eldest son of the last Aragonese king of Naples Ferdinand III; in all likelihood this is Valencia, Biblioteca Històrica BH Ms. 614 (T. De Marinis, La Biblioteca Napoletana dei rRe d'Aragona, Milan, 1952, II, p.207). The second and most probable match with the present manuscript - "Solinus de mirabilibus mundi" - is no. 198 in an inventory from ca.1508-13 by Fabio Vigile of Spoleto found in codex Vaticanus lat. 7134, ff.255-259v, itself a copy of the lost original inventory of Aragonese codices sent to Lorenzo de' Medici from Naples (T. De Marinis, II, p.197).2. Henry Gee Barnard (1789-1858) of South Cave, with his bookplate. 3. Allan Haywood Bright, letter addressed to him. It may be that Bright was given the present manuscript by Henry Yates Thompson (1838-1928); a Book of Hours now at the British Library and illuminated by Cola Rapicano (Yates Thompson 6) also belonged to Henry Gee Barnard before passing to Yates Thompson. The previous documented owner of Yates Thompson 6 was Gioacchino Guasconi (1438-1521), a Florentine representative of Lorenzo de' Medici in the Kingdom of Naples. It seems possible, therefore, that the present manuscript may also have followed the same line of provenance from the Aragonese court to Florence and perhaps Guasconi and Lorenzo de' Medici, and then, several centuries later, to Henry Gee Barnard and Yates Thompson.TEXT:Solinus, Collectanea rerum memorabilium: dedication to Aventinus and list of chapters ff. 1-6v, Chapters I-L, ff. 7-188. The text of the manuscript is the Collectanea rerum memorabilium (also known as the De mirabilibus mundi or Polyhistor) of Caius Iulius Solinus. It is a geographical catalogue of curiosities in the form of a history of the ancient world, borrowing from Pliny's Naturalis Historia and Pomponius Mela's De Situ Orbis, the work proved extremely popular throughout the Middle Ages and the Renaissance.ILLUMINATION: The illumination of this striking manuscript of the 3rd-century Latin grammarian and compiler Solinus's Collectanea rerum memorabilium is attributable to Cola Rapicano, the official illuminator to the Aragon court in Naples from 1451 to 1488. His earliest securely identified and documented work is the copy of Andrea Contario's Obiurgatio in Platonis calumniatorum of 1471 (Paris, BnF, Ms lat.12947), written by Giovanni Marco Cinico, with whom he collaborated on more than one occasion. Each chapter of the present manuscript is preceded by intricate white-vine initials of Florentine inspiration but Neapolitan execution so characteristic of Cola's style, and the hooded-eyed, angular-buttocked little putti in the borders of the opening leaf of the text are clearly related to the lively protagonists in the BnF manuscript (or indeed to those in a Breviary in Valencia, Biblioteca Universitaria Ms. 890-726). From the mid-15th century, Cola led a thriving workshop that produced numerous manuscripts for the Aragonese court, and his engaging and modernizing blend of Catalan, Franco-Flemish and Florentine styles was cemented by his sons and followers: he laid the foundations of a distinctive and coherent Neapolitan style that dominated book illustration in the city for the remainder of the century (see G. Toscano, La Biblioteca Reale di Napoli al tempo della dinastia Aragonese, Naples, 1998, pp. 385-416).LITERATURE:Christie's London, 16 July 2014, lot 20.

      [Bookseller: Jonathan A. Hill, Bookseller, Inc.]
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         Aggregator sive De Medicinis simplicibus

      286 leaves (complete) with a duplicate of quire [g]6 giving a total of 292 leaves. Royal folio (403 x 282mm.), 55 lines, Gothic type, 2- to 7-line initials supplied in red (some with marginal extensions), red initial-strokes, paraphs & underlinings, cont. German blind-stamped pigskin over thick wooden boards (binding slightly rubbed, a couple of leaves a little foxed or stained), small stamps of eagles, flowers and dragons (with less stamping on lower cover), two catches & remains of clasps, paper label on upper cover "Aggrega. Paduano." [Strasbourg: The R-Printer (Adolf Rusch), ca. 1475-80]. First edition of this important herbal and pharmacological work, one of the earliest printed books with an exclusively medical content; the recipes are largely based on Greek and Arabic sources. This is a magnificent copy - crisp, large, and rubricated - in its first binding from the Episcopal Court Library at Eichstätt. Dondis (1295-1359), a native of Padua, was the municipal physician of Chioggia, a coastal town near Venice and later became professor of medicine at Padua. Dondis was also a mechanician who designed a complicated automatic clock for his native town; it was certainly one of the earliest tower clocks. Astronomy was another area in which Dondis worked; he wrote a work entitled Planetarium, a set of astronomical tables based on the Alphonsine ones but simpler and computed for the meridian of Padua. Dondis' "most extensive work was the Aggregatio medicamentorum, or Promptuarium medicinae, a work which contains a large collection of medical recipes based largely on Greek and Arabic sources. It is divided into four main sections: (1) impostumes (37 chapters), (2) contusions and fractures (8 chapters), (3) wounds (12 chapters), (4) ulcers and abscesses (20 chapters). The work was completed after 1358."-Sarton, III, p. 1670. This was a most successful work with a number of later editions. The Italian translation appeared under the title Herbolario volgare (eds. of 1536 and 1540). Binding & Provenance: This combination of binding stamps is also recorded on a Venice imprint of 1477 now in Augsburg (Ink 226). Seventeenth-century inscription at head of first leaf: "Ad Bibl. Aul. Eystettensem" (the Episcopal Court Library of Eichstätt). A really fine copy and rare; the only other copy to have come to auction in recent years is the Norman copy in 1998. ? Garrison-Morton 6789-"an encyclopaedic dictionary of medicine, containing a large number of medical recipes based upon Greek and Arabic sources." Goff D-358-(dating the book "1470"). Stillwell The Awakening Interest in Science during the First Century of Printing, 355.

      [Bookseller: Jonathan A. Hill, Bookseller, Inc.]
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         Historia Ecclesiastica Gentis Anglorum

      97 (of 98, without final blank) leaves. 40 lines, gothic type, paragraph & capital strokes in red, cont. MS. guide-letters. Small folio (275 x 198 mm.), 18th-cent. English calf (very expertly rebacked with orig. spine laid-down), double gilt fillet round sides with Spencer arms in center in gilt. [Strassburg: Heinrich Eggestein, not after 1475]. First edition. The Venerable Bede (673-735), "was the greatest English historian and one of the greatest European historians of the Middle Ages. It is therefore not surprising that his most important work - and certainly the one with the strongest appeal to laymen - should have been one of the first historical books to be printed. The 'Ecclesiastical History of the English People', which is in fact a comprehensive history of the Anglo-Saxon tribes, was completed in 731 and its fame soon spread far and wide. The English scholars and missionaries who worked in the Frankish empire in the eighth and ninth centuries - men such as Boniface and Alcuin - were well acquainted with Bede's writings, and manuscripts of the Historia Ecclesiastica were in many monasteries of the Rhine and Moselle regions… "The appearance in Strasbourg of the editio princeps of the Historia Ecclesiastica is less puzzling than might appear at first sight. The publisher, Heinrich Eggesteyn, like all his Strasbourg fellow-printers, specialized in publications for the laity; and the fact that he produced the earliest surviving advertisement sheet (1466) shows that he had a shrewd eye for the market. Moreover, the Rhenish printers - besides those of Strasbourg, especially those of Cologne - were obviously interested in the English market…Thus Eggesteyn no doubt reckoned that Bede's masterpiece would sell among the educated public on the continent as well as in England. He was not mistaken: the Historia Ecclesiastica had to be reprinted in 1500 in Strasbourg, and, by Heinrich Gran of Hagenau in Alsace, in 1506 and 1514."-Printing & the Mind of Man 16. This work has considerable musical interest. Bede's writings "constitute some of the most important and informative evidence for musical practice in the 6th, 7th and 8th centuries…The richest of Bede's works, for the light it throws on the importance of music in the development of the English church, is the Ecclesiastical History…Bede clearly testified that the first missionaries to England, sent by Gregory in 597, took with them a Roman manner of singing, and that this manner, often mentioned in conjunction with Gregory, survived and was taught in England well into the 8th century… "Bede's descriptions of music are therefore most important as records of the central role played by the practical art of singing the daily liturgy in monastic life during the early Middle Ages."-New Grove, Vol. 2, p. 345. Provenance: Mainz, Jesuit College (17th-century inscription at end); George John, second Earl Spencer (1748-1834, binding, accession number '1073' on front pastedown); William Foyle (bookplate, sale Christie's, 11 July 2000, lot 117). Fine crisp copy. First few quires with a light dampstain. ? Goff B-293. GW 3756.

      [Bookseller: Jonathan A. Hill, Bookseller, Inc.]
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         THE MONTH OF APRIL

      France, ca. 1475. n. 165 x 112 mm. (6 1/2 x 4 3/8"). Single column, 16 lines in a gothic book hand. Kalends comprised of gray and white acanthus leaves accented with flowers on a background of brushed gold, saints' names in blue, red, or gold, month and Golden Numbers in burnished gold, days in alternating blue and burnished gold, five Dominical letters in burnished gold on a blue or red ground with white tracery, each side with a panel border featuring a brushed gold triangle with a spray of pink flowers, and WITH A ROUNDEL DEPICTING THE LABOR OF THE MONTH (RECTO) AND ASTROLOGICAL SIGN (VERSO), the background filled with blue and gold acanthus leaves and swirling hairline stems bearing leaves and gold berries. Panel border with three small burn holes, four brown spots to the text, minor soiling to fore and head margins. Not as pretty as it could be, but an inexpensive example of a Book of Hours calendar leaf with miniatures.

      [Bookseller: Phillip J. Pirages Fine Books and Mediev]
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         Dialogus qui vocatur Scrutinium Scripturarum...(Accedit:) Samuel Rabbi. Epistola ad Rabbi Isaac. (Colophon:)

      (Mantua, Johannes Schall germanus), 1475. Dialogus qui vocatur Scrutinium Scripturarum...(Accedit:) Samuel Rabbi. Epistola ad Rabbi Isaac. (Colophon:). Paolus de Sancta Maria. Hoc opus impressit rerum scrutinia Schallus Johannes doctor artis Apollinee anno domini 1475. (Mantua, Johannes Schall germanus). In - folio, pergamena moderna uso antico. (250 ff.) n.n. Car. gotico, tipo 539 (Burger), 38 - 39 linee. Esemplare ben conservato, a parte insignificanti forellini di tarlo negli ultimi ff. Uno dei primi libri stampati a mantova e la prima edizione dello Schall, secondo tipografo di questa città. Esemplare della prima tiratura non contenente l' Epistola ad Rabbi Isaac che fu aggiunta in seguito (cfr. Oates, 2586). Rarissimo. H. - C., 10765. Proctor, 6898. B.M.C., VII, 933. Polain, 3011. I.G.I., 7328. Oates, 2586.

      [Bookseller: Brighenti libri esauriti e rari]
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         Confessiones

      Milan: Johannes Bonus, 1475. Chancery 4to in half-sheets (213 x 151 mm). Collation: [a-v8 x4].164 leaves, unfoliated. 26 lines. Type 1:105R. 4- and 5-line capital spaces, some with printed guide letters. Roman capitals supplied in red. Worming in first four and last two quires, marginal dampstaining to last dozen leaves. 18th-century parchment over pasteboards, goatskin gilt lettering piece on spine (slightly frayed), imprint and date added in ink; plain edges, green silk ribbon marker. Lower edges untrimmed, revealing contemporary manuscript and stamped quire signatures. Provenance: deleted but still visible contemporary inscription on title, S[an]ct[ae] Mariae mre [i.e., martyre?] Rumani ad Vsu[m] fr[atr]is Siri [or Sixi] d[e] b[er]gamo [flourish] fr. B[o?]tho de Pallo [pallatio?] Vig. [Vigevano?] co. manu p[ro]pria; Herculis de Silva, bookplate; (with Lardanchet, catalogue 2004/1).*** Second Edition of the Confessions of Saint Augustine, printed five years after the first (Strassburg: Mentelin, [not after 1470]). Only four fifteenth-century editions of Augustine's spiritual autobiography are recorded, each printed in a different city. Praised by Luther, the Confessions regained popularity with the Reformation. This was the first and only dated edition of three produced on the second press of Johannes Bonus, who identified himself as a German Augustinian in his verse colophons. He had worked previously for the Augustinians in Savona, near Genoa, where he printed at least two editions in 1474. Victor Scholderer commented on this edition in the introduction to BMC VI: "This is a most attractive little book, well printed with a roman fount differing from that used at Savona, and apparently influenced by the type-styles of Rome as much as those of Venice, which deserves the epithet `very beautiful' bestowed upon it by Proctor where its effect is not ruined by swarms of peculiar `double-decker' contractions." As noted by Scholderer in BMC, an extra (27th) line was added at the end of [b]6r after printing off. The wide margins of this large copy have preserved most of the manuscript and stamped quire signatures: the first seven quires are numbered in manuscript, while the rest, from quire h on, bear small stamped signatures. Signatures are found on the in the lower outer corners of the rectos of the first four leaves of each quire; the manuscript signatures are signed with arabic numerals (c1, c2, c3, c4), while the stamped signatures use the letter followed by the requisite number of tiny crosses (e.g., k+, k++, etc.). This may imply a two-press production, a possibility noted by Scholderer, who remarked that the watermarks of the BMC copy change after quire [l]. Our copy also contains different paper stocks, but a closer analysis would be necessary to determine the distribution, as several gatherings are without visible watermarks. The contemporary inscription of a Brother Sixi(?) points to a Bergamesque monastic provenance, but I have not succeeded in identifying the house. A manuscript in Ravenna from 1477 has a similar inscription, transcribed as "ad usum Fraris Sixi de Pergamo," in Giuseppe Mazzatinti, ed., Inventari dei manoscritti delle biblioteche d'Italia: Ravenna, vol. 5 (1895), p. 164. Goff A-1251; GW 2894; BMC VI xxiii and 728; CIBN A-693; Walsh 3082; Bod-inc A-536.

      [Bookseller: Musinsky Rare Books, Inc.]
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         La Messa di S. Gregorio

      1475. Bulino, 1475 - 1500 circa, privo di data e di iscrizioni. Bellissima prova, impressa su carta vergata coeva, con sottili margini, in perfetto sttao di conservazione. Rarissima incisione anonima è ascrivibile alla scuola tedesca dell'ultimo quarto del XV secolo La scena raffigura la cosiddetta Messa di S. Gregorio, in cui il Cristo, con gli strumenti della passione, appare sull'altare al papa celebrante. L'immagine divenne molto popolare nel corso del XVI secolo, anche perché spesso associata alle indulgenze. In effetti, agli inizi del secolo, nel Nord Europa, la Messa di S. Gregorio, anzi le 30 messe gregoriane, ricorrono di frequente nei manoscritti tra le pratiche per ottenere l'indulgenza; a partire dal 1425 circa, le indulgenze sono spesso incorporate in stampe o altre opere che raffigurano la Messa di S. Gregorio. Esemplare dalla collezione del British Museum, due timbri al verso, compreso quello di dismissione. (Lugt 302 & 305). Engraving, 1475 - 1500 circa, unlettered. A very good example, printed on contemporary lad paper, with small margins, perfect condition. The scene depicts the Mass of Saint Gregory. This subject became widespread in medieval art. Such visual manifestations have a variety of precise forms, but they almost always show Gregory and his entourage, usually consisting of clerics, in a church before an altar, often with the saint saying mass. Christ as a Man of Sorrows appears on the altar. Because the St. Gregory Mass shows a bleeding Christ and the celebration of the mass, the image has been used as support for the idea of transubstantiation. Another reason for the popularity of the image of the Mass of St. Gregory may be that such images often carried an indulgence, or a promise of the partial remission of sins of the viewer. In the early fifteenth century the Mass began to appear on Northern European indulgence charts. By the second quarter of the fifteenth century these indulgences were often incorporated in text form in prints and other works which showed the Mass of St. Gregory This little engraving can be attributed to the German school of the last quarter of the fifteenth century. A magnific example of this rare work, a duplicate copy from the British Museum collection; 2 marks on verso (Lugt 302 & 305). W. H. Willshire, A descriptive catalogue of early prints in the British Museum. German and Flemish Schools, II, G.93 72 98

      [Bookseller: Libreria Antiquarius]
 37.   Check availability:     maremagnum.com     Link/Print  


         Nebulo nebulonum hoc est: loco-seria vernaculae nequitiae censura, carmine iambico depicta.Leeuwarden, Joannes Coopmans, 1634. 8vo. With engraved title-page and 33 engraved emblems (ca. 80 x 68 mm) in text. 19th-century gold-tooled green morocco, richly gold-tooled spine.

      Landwehr, Emblem and fable books 235; STCN 038106752; cf. Praz, p. 337. Second edition of a satirical work by Johann Flitner, an adaptation in Latin of Thomas Murner's (1475-1537) great early 16th-century German satire Schelmen Zunft (1512). At the same time it is a curious emblem book, focusing on those who use words to deceive and seduce: jurists, councilors, clerics, debtors, preachers, hypocrites and flatterers. The arrangement is similar to that of an emblem book: 33 poems are symbolically illustrated with an engraving, accompanied by two mottoes, one for the poem and one for the plate, and an explanation in prose. The emblematic plates are also of interest for showing daily life at the beginning of the 17th century, depicting the costumes, home interiors and all sorts of indoor and outdoor activities. Censuring the corrupt manners of his time, Flitner's book presents a curious mixture of iambic verses in "macaronic" Latin and scholarly Latin notes, quoting classical authors on the subject, in Greek and Latin.Browned, title-page slightly soiled, ink stain in lower margin of first 50 pages, not affecting the text, and some minor thumbing. A good copy in attractive binding.

      [Bookseller: ASHER Rare Books (Since 1830)]
 38.   Check availability:     NVvA     Link/Print  


         Large historiated initial I 70 x 70mm of two unidentified martyr saints N E Italy c 1470

      

      [Bookseller: Maggs Bros. Ltd. ]
 39.   Check availability:     Direct From Bookseller     Link/Print  


         In Lucanum commentum

      Venice: Filippo di Pietro, 1475 21 July 1475. 372 unnumbered leaves, roman type, 34 lines, 10 large red ink initials, some greek letters, waterstain on the upper margin of 1 leaf, contemporary wooden boards binding, blind tool decorations, ink titles on the edge, restored. Acid-Free clamshell box. A clean copy in contemporary binding; FIRST EDITION of Leonicenus? commentary to Lucanus. This edition, first attributed to Vindelinus from Spira, seems to be the second to be printed by Philippus de Petri, the first typographer to use greek types. Brunet III, 985; Goff L172; IGI 6999; BMC V 219. PHOTOS AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST.

      [Bookseller: Louis Caron]
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        STATUTO DEL FOSSO DI PISA, 1475 / REPERTORIO GENERALE DI TUTTE LE MATERIE INTERESSANTI IL DIPARTIMENTO DELL'UFFIZIO DEI FOSSI DI PISA. Due documenti originali manoscritti, il primo cinquecentesco, il secondo settecentesco.

      - Si tratta di due importanti manoscritti inerenti la principale Magistratura delle Acque del territorio pisano. Il primo manoscritto, di chiara fattura cinquecentesca, in formato cm.28,4x21,2, è composto da una carta bianca; due carte compilate al recto e al verso; quattro carte bianche; 24 carte con numerazione consecutiva, compilate al recto e al verso, comprendenti lo statuto costitutivo dell'Ufficio del 1475; una carta datata 1517 compilata al recto e al verso; una ulteriore carta compilata solo al recto; 14 carte bianche. Legatura in mz.pergamena ottocentesca con piatti marmorizzati. Alla prima carta è apposta manoscritta una notazione ottocentesca "N.B.: L'originale di questo Statuto si trova nell'Archivio di Stato di Pisa". Il secondo manoscritto, in formato cm.30x21, è composto da 520 pagine, compilate in grafia leggibile in epoca settecentesca, e contiene l'elenco, in ordine alfabetico, di tutte le voci di interesse della Magistratura. Alcuni quaderni staccati. Legatura cartonata coeva, rivestita da carta marmorizzata che presenta fisiologiche abrasioni. Alla prima carta una notazione manoscritta ottocentesca: "N.B.: Questo libro fu comprato sotto le logge dette del Borgo a Pisa sopra di un banchetto per la somma di lire 268. Una copia uguale esiste (anzi l'originale) nellArchivio della Prefettura, oggi all'Archivio di Stato di Pisa". Nel 1475 Lorenzo de? Medici istituì l'"Opera della Reparazione del Contado e della Città di Pisa", ripristinando di fatto una struttura già esistente e nominandone Provveditori Tommaso Biliotti e Piero Giovanni Fiani. Cosimo I, nel 1547, riformò l?istituto creando il "Magistrato degli Uffiziali dei Fossi", a cui furono affidate la direzione delle operazioni connesse alla condotta delle acque e l?amministrazione delle masse d?imposizione (consorzi) per l?esazione dei tributi, oltre al governo delle strade, alla pulizia della città e tutto quello che riguardava la salubrità dell?aria. Nel 1775 Pietro Leopoldo ne trasferì le attribuzioni all?Auditore dell'Uffizio dei Fossi e Comunità; a seguito di questa riforma, nel 1777, l?ente assunse il carattere di "Ufficio di Soprintendenza Generale delle Comunità della Provincia di Pisa", diventando, di conseguenza, tramite tra le Comunità locali e il Governo fiorentino, e organo preposto al controllo dell?osservanza degli ordini e dei regolamenti dello Stato. Il Governo francese abolì l?ordinamento dato da Pietro Leopoldo, e ripartì le funzioni dell?Ufficio tra il Prefetto del Dipartimento del Mediterraneo e una commissione amministrativa. Con la Restaurazione, Ferdinando III, nel 1815, ripristinò l?antico ente e lo denominò "Deputazione Generale Amministrativa dei Fiumi, Fossi e Canali della Provincia Pisana". Nel 1828 Leopoldo II attuò ancora una riforma: i corsi d?acqua furono ripartiti in tre classi, e alla Deputazione generale fu data la competenza di quelli di prima classe, e cioè di maggiore entità. In virtù di questa riforma il Presidente della Deputazione assunse il ruolo di un moderno Prefetto. Con l?Unità d?Italia, la Legge n. 2248 del 20 marzo 1865 riformò il sistema della pubblica amministrazione. Con questa riforma all?Ufficio vennero tolte le competenze in materia di affari statali, e i suoi compiti furono limitati a quelli propri dei consorzi, dettati dalla legge stessa. Alterne vicende interne all?ente portarono ad una nuova riforma nel 1882: l?Ufficio fu costituito da un insieme di 141 consorzi idraulici di II e IV categoria, a loro volta raggruppati in tre compartimenti: "Compartimento settentrionale o del Fiume Morto", "Compartimento meridionale o del Calambrone", "Compartimento dei Fiumi Arno e Serchio". Si tratta di due straordinari documenti manoscritti di estrema rarità, copia originale di quelli conservati presso l'Archivio di Stato di Pisa, inerenti la Magistratura pisana delle Acque. Esemplari assai ben conservati, di notevole freschezza. 2050 gr. [Attributes: Hard Cover]

      [Bookseller: studio bibliografico pera s.a.s.]
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